Level 2 – Principal Learning
Specification (7352)
Assessment 2010 onwards




BUSINESS, ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE
Business, Administration
and Finance
Level 2 Principal Learning
Specification (7352)
Assessment 2010 onwards




This Prin...
This specification will be published annually on our website (www.diplomainfo.org.uk)
We will notify centres in writing of...
Contents

1     Introduction
1.1   Why choose AQA-City & Guilds?                                                      5
1....
4.3    Task marking                                                             115
       Guidance on applying the unit A...
1       Introduction

1.1 Why choose AQA-City & Guilds?
AQA is the UK’s main provider of GCSEs and A levels. Over 3.5 mill...
1.2 Why choose the Diploma in Business, Administration
        and Finance?
1
    The Diploma in Business, Administration ...
1.4 How do I find out more?
Use Ask AQA – our online information service                                                  ...
2           Specification at a glance

    2.1 Higher Diploma at a glance – 800 GLH
        (guided learning hours)

    •...
2.2 Level 2 Principal Learning in Business, Administration
    and Finance at a glance

•   all 7 units are compulsory

  ...
3       Principal Learning

    3.1 Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills
    The Framework of Personal, Learning and Thi...
Reflective learners
Focus:
Young people evaluate their strengths and limitations, setting themselves realistic goals with ...
Effective participators
    Focus:
    Young people actively engage with issues that affect them and those around them. Th...
3.2 Functional Skills signposting
The units may use and/or contribute towards the underpinning skills and knowledge of the...
Principal
                      Functional Skills
     Learning
                                                          ...
3.3 Level 2 Units

Level 2 Unit 1: Business enterprise

What is this unit about?
The purpose of this unit is to help learn...
Content details

     Learning outcomes             Assessment criteria
                                                  ...
Scope of content
This section gives details of the scope of content to be covered in the teaching of the unit, to ensure
t...
Learning outcome 3
    Learners must be supported in developing the skills needed to communicate the merits of a business
...
Assessment
This unit is assessed through a centre set and marked assessment. Internal assessments are subject to
moderatio...
If part of this assignment is taking place as group work, the learner must present their own evidence and
    be able to i...
Assessment grid
Please note that the descriptions in this marking grid relate to the top of each band. Further guidance on...
Assessment grid (continued)

     Learning outcomes                    Band 1                              Band 2         ...
Guidance for delivery
This unit has close links with the rest of the qualification and, as such, it is suggested that lear...
For this part of the unit, and in order to prepare a presentation to prospective investors, learners should
    be encoura...
Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills
The list below is indicative of the way this unit supports the development of PLTS,...
Opportunities for Functional Skills development
    This unit and its associated learning activities will provide the lear...
Suggested learning resources
Books
Marcouse, I. (2006). GCSE Business Studies: Introduction to Enterprise. Published: Hodd...
•    Social Enterprise Coalition                     www.socialenterprise.org.uk
    •    Social Enterprise Magazine      ...
Level 2 Unit 2: Business communication
and administration

What is this unit about?
The purpose of this unit is to develop...
Content details
     Learning outcomes              Assessment criteria
                                                  ...
Scope of content
This section gives details of the scope of content to be covered in the teaching of the unit, to ensure
t...
Learners must be supported in gaining the understanding needed to compare the use of the above
    methods for different p...
The tasks involved with administrative roles must be explained, including:
•   producing documents
•   maintaining spreads...
Learning outcome 5
    Learners must be prepared to carry out a range of administrative tasks, including:
    •    ensurin...
Assessment
This unit is assessed through a centre set and marked assessment. Internal assessments are subject to
moderatio...
Task taking
    Details of controls that should be applied during the taking of the assessment tasks are set out on
    pa...
Assessment grid
Please note that the descriptions in this marking grid relate to the top of each band. Further guidance on...
Assessment grid (continued)

     Learning outcomes                     Band 1                               Band 2       ...
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  1. 1. Level 2 – Principal Learning Specification (7352) Assessment 2010 onwards BUSINESS, ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE
  2. 2. Business, Administration and Finance Level 2 Principal Learning Specification (7352) Assessment 2010 onwards This Principal Learning specification should be read in conjunction with: • Business, Administration and Finance Companion Document (see www.baf-diploma.org.uk) • Specimen assessment materials and mark schemes for Principal Learning • Teacher guidance materials for Principal Learning • Examiners’ Reports for Principal Learning • Specifications for other components of Diplomas ie Functional Skills specifications, Project specifications and Additional and Specialist Learning specifications 1
  3. 3. This specification will be published annually on our website (www.diplomainfo.org.uk) We will notify centres in writing of any changes to this specification. We will also publish changes on our website. The version of the specification on our website will always be the most up-to-date version, although it may be different from printed versions. You can get further copies of this specification from: AQA Logistics Centre Unit 2, Wheel Forge Way, Ashburton Park, Trafford Park, Manchester M17 1EH or you can download it from our website (www.diplomainfo.org.uk) AQA and City & Guilds are working together to provide Diplomas. Copyright © 2009 The Assessment and Qualifications Alliance / The City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved. The Assessment and Qualifications Alliance (AQA) is a company limited by guarantee registered in England and Wales (company number 3644723) and a registered charity, number 1073334. Registered address: AQA, Devas Street, Manchester, M15 6EX. The City and Guilds of London Institute. Incorporated by Royal Charter. Founded 1878. Registered Charity in England & Wales number 312832 and in Scotland SC039576. Registered address: 1 Giltspur Street, London, EC1A 9DD. 2
  4. 4. Contents 1 Introduction 1.1 Why choose AQA-City & Guilds? 5 1.2 Why choose the Diploma in Business, Administration and Finance? 6 1.3 How do I start using this specification? 6 1.4 How do I find out more? 7 2 Specification at a glance 2.1 Higher Diploma at a glance 8 2.2 Level 2 Principal Learning in Business, Administration and Finance at a glance 9 3 Principal Learning 3.1 Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills 10 3.2 Functional Skills signposting 13 3.3 Level 2 Units 15 Level 2 Unit 1: Business enterprise 15 Level 2 Unit 2: Business communication and administration 29 Level 2 Unit 3: Business finance and accounting 45 Level 2 Unit 4: Marketing, sales and customer service for business 57 Level 2 Unit 5: Business administration and teams 68 Level 2 Unit 6: Understanding business in a changing world 83 Level 2 Unit 7: Success at work 96 4 Assessment guidance 4.1 Task setting 113 Guidance 113 Moderation 113 4.2 Task taking 113 Internal assessment 113 Supervision of learners’ work 115 Guidance by the teacher 115 External assessment 115 3
  5. 5. 4.3 Task marking 115 Guidance on applying the unit Assessment grid 115 Assessment of group work 116 Internal standardisation of marking 116 Claiming and moderation of internal assessment 116 Unfair practice 116 Authentication of learners’ work 116 Malpractice 117 Moderation 117 5 Administration 5.1 Availability of Principal Learning units 118 5.2 Centre registration 118 5.3 Centre requirements 118 Resources 118 Health and safety 118 Centre staff 118 Continuing Professional Development (CPD) 118 5.4 Entries 119 5.5 Quality assurance 119 Internal quality assurance 119 External quality assurance 120 5.6 Irregularities 120 5.7 Awarding grades and reporting results 120 5.8 Certification of the Diploma 121 5.9 CABs, DABs and the Diploma aggregation service 121 5.10 Enquiries about results 121 5.11 Re-sits and shelf-life of unit results 121 5.12 Access arrangements and special consideration 122 5.13 Language of examinations 122 5.14 Qualification titles 122 Appendices A Connections to other qualifications 123 B Additional and Specialist Learning for the Higher Diploma in Business, Administration and Finance 124 C Other issues 125 4
  6. 6. 1 Introduction 1.1 Why choose AQA-City & Guilds? AQA is the UK’s main provider of GCSEs and A levels. Over 3.5 million AQA examinations are taken every 1 year and AQA is recognised by schools and colleges as the number one choice for customer service and high quality products. City & Guilds is a household name for vocational qualifications. City & Guilds offers over 500 awards across a range of industries. With over 8500 centres in over 100 countries, City & Guilds is recognised by employers worldwide. It works closely with employers and industry bodies to ensure that its qualifications provide the benchmark standard for workplace skills and knowledge. Diplomas are a blend of academic and vocational learning and that is why AQA-City & Guilds is the ideal choice for any school, college or consortium looking to offer them. The collaboration brings together the leading providers of qualifications in both fields to provide all the support you need to deliver the Diploma at one point of contact. Why are AQA and City & Guilds so popular? • Specifications These are designed to the highest standards, so that teachers, learners and learners’ parents or guardians can be confident that an AQA-City & Guilds award provides an accurate measure of achievement. Assessment structures have been designed to achieve a balance between rigour, reliability and demands on learners and teachers. • Support AQA-City & Guilds runs the most extensive programme of Diploma support meetings available in the UK; these are free of charge in the first years of a new specification and are offered at a very reasonable cost thereafter. These meetings explain the specification and suggest practical teaching strategies and approaches that really work. Further support is available from Diploma Advisors. • Service AQA-City & Guilds Diplomas are administered from AQA’s offices in Manchester and Guildford. We are committed to providing an efficient and effective service and we are at the end of a phone when you need information, advice or guidance. We will try to resolve issues the first time you contact us and will work with you to find the solution. • Ethics AQA and City & Guilds are registered charities. We have no shareholders to pay. We exist solely for the good of education. Any surplus income is ploughed back into educational research and our service to you, our customers. We don’t profit from education, you do. If you are an existing customer with either AQA or City & Guilds, we thank you for your support. If you are thinking of adopting AQA-City & Guilds for Diplomas, we look forward to welcoming you. 5
  7. 7. 1.2 Why choose the Diploma in Business, Administration and Finance? 1 The Diploma in Business, Administration and Finance introduces learners to the wide range of career opportunities available in today’s business world and is suitable for those who may wish to work in business or to establish and run a business of their own. It develops technical business knowledge and understanding as well as the wider skills and attributes necessary to achieve success in a competitive, global environment. The Diploma will enable learners to progress into Further and Higher Education and future employment. Learners following a Business, Administration and Finance programme will also: • develop Functional Skills in English, mathematics and ICT • produce a project which complements the Principal Learning and/or supports their progression • have a wide choice of Additional and Specialist Learning from which they can choose other qualifications which reflect their interests and abilities. 1.3 How do I start using this specification? • Your school or college must pass through the Government Gateway process in order to receive approval to offer Diplomas in Business, Administration and Finance. Gateway 1 approved consortia started teaching Diplomas in 2008, Gateway 2 approved consortia start teaching Diplomas in 2009, and Gateway 3 is approving consortia to start teaching in 2010. More information is available on the DCSF website: www.dcsf.gov.uk • If you are a Gateway approved centre working as part of a consortium delivering Diplomas, you will also need to register your centre with us. (See Section 5.2.) This will enable AQA to ensure that you receive all the material you need to help you to deliver units and to enter your learners for examinations. This is particularly important where examination material is issued before the entry deadline. You can let us know by completing the appropriate registration forms. We will send copies to your exams officer and they are also available on the AQA website: www.aqa.org.uk/admin/p_entries.html • Almost all examination centres in England and Wales are approved by either AQA or City & Guilds or both. A small minority are not. If your centre is new to both AQA and City & Guilds, please contact our centre approval section at: centreapproval@aqa.org.uk 6
  8. 8. 1.4 How do I find out more? Use Ask AQA – our online information service 1 Centres offering AQA-City & Guilds Diplomas will have 24-hour access to answers to the most commonly-asked questions at: www.aqa.org.uk/rn/askaqa.php If the answer to your question is not available you can submit a query for our team. Our target response time is two days. Contact your Diploma Advisor You may also contact the Diploma Advisor for your region. Please check current details on: www.diplomainfo.org.uk Diploma Advisors have particular expertise in: • supporting centres and consortia on Gateway applications • curriculum development and delivery including consortium operation • assessment and quality assurance • dealing with work experience. Attend a Teacher Support meeting Details of the full range of current Teacher Support meetings are also available on our website. There is a link to our fast and convenient online booking system for Teacher Support meetings at: events.aqa.org.uk/ebooking/ If you need to contact the Teacher Support team you can call us on 01483 477860 or email us at: teachersupport@aqa.org.uk Contact the Exams Office Support department Our Exams Office Support department offers administrative support for the Diplomas. There is an office team to deal with your queries about: • general administration • general documents • results documents • timetable information • publication orders. You can contact us on 0870 410 1836 or email: eos@aqa.org.uk The department includes AQA’s five Regional Officers who can provide up-to-date information, advice, support and guidance at a local level in your region. To contact the Regional Officer for your area, see: www.aqa.org.uk/regional_officer.php 7
  9. 9. 2 Specification at a glance 2.1 Higher Diploma at a glance – 800 GLH (guided learning hours) • comparable to 7 GCSEs grade A*–C • 1 year full-time study or 2 years part-time with National Curriculum programmes of study 2 • all components are compulsory 1 Principal Learning includes 420 GLH Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills (PLTS) Minimum 210 GLH Applied Learning 2 Generic Learning Functional Functional Functional Skills Skills Skills English Maths ICT 27 GLH 27 GLH 27 GLH PLTS 60 GLH Project 60 GLH 3 Additional and Specialist Learning 180 GLH 4 Work Experience Minimum 10 days 8
  10. 10. 2.2 Level 2 Principal Learning in Business, Administration and Finance at a glance • all 7 units are compulsory 2 Unit 1 60 GLH Business enterprise Internally assessed Unit 2 60 GLH Business communication and administration Internally assessed Unit 3 60 GLH Business finance and accounting Externally assessed Unit 4 60 GLH Marketing, sales and customer service for business Internally assessed Unit 5 60 GLH Business administration and teams Internally assessed Unit 6 60 GLH Understanding business in a changing world Internally assessed Unit 7 60 GLH Success at work Internally assessed 9
  11. 11. 3 Principal Learning 3.1 Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills The Framework of Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills 11–19 comprises six groups of skills that, together with the Functional Skills of English, mathematics and ICT, are essential to success in learning, life and work. For each group there is a focus statement that identifies the main PLTS in that group. This is followed by a set of outcome statements that are indicative of behaviours and personal qualities associated with each group of skills. Each group of skills is distinctive and coherent. The groups are also inter-connected. Learners are likely to encounter skills from several groups in any one learning experience. Listed below are the PLTS that are integrated within the Assessment criteria in each unit. A copy of the PLTS framework should be given to each learner. Following these descriptors is a table showing the PLTS in the seven units of the Level 2 Principal Learning in Business, Administration and Finance. Independent enquirers Focus: 3 Young people process and evaluate information in their investigations, planning what to do and how to go about it. They take informed and well-reasoned decisions, recognising that others have different beliefs and attitudes. Young people: IE1 identify questions to answer and problems to resolve IE2 plan and carry out research, appreciating the consequences of decisions IE3 explore issues, events or problems from different perspectives IE4 analyse and evaluate information, judging its relevance and value IE5 consider the influence of circumstances, beliefs and feelings on decisions and events IE6 support conclusions, using reasoned arguments and evidence Creative thinkers Focus: Young people think creatively by generating and exploring ideas, making original connections. They try different ways to tackle a problem, working with others to find imaginative solutions and outcomes that are of value. Young people: CT1 generate ideas and explore possibilities CT2 ask questions to extend their thinking CT3 connect own and others’ ideas and experiences in inventive ways CT4 question own and others’ assumptions CT5 try out alternatives or new solutions and follow ideas through CT6 adapt ideas as circumstances change 10
  12. 12. Reflective learners Focus: Young people evaluate their strengths and limitations, setting themselves realistic goals with criteria for success. They monitor their own performance and progress, inviting feedback from others and making changes to further their learning. Young people: RL1 assess themselves and others, identifying opportunities and achievements RL2 set goals with success criteria for their development and work RL3 review progress, acting on the outcomes RL4 invite feedback and deal positively with praise, setbacks and criticism RL5 evaluate experiences and learning to inform future progress RL6 communicate their learning in relevant ways for different audiences 3 Team workers Focus: Young people work confidently with others, adapting to different contexts and taking responsibility for their own part. They listen to and take account of different views. They form trusting relationships, resolving issues to reach agreed outcomes. Young people: TW1 co-operate with others to work towards common goals TW2 reach agreements, managing discussions to achieve results TW3 adapt behaviour to suit different roles and situations TW4 show fairness and consideration to others TW5 take responsibility, showing confidence in themselves and their contribution TW6 provide constructive support and feedback to others Self-managers Focus: Young people organise themselves, showing personal responsibility, initiative, creativity and enterprise with a commitment to learning and self-improvement. They actively embrace change, responding positively to new priorities, coping with challenges and looking for opportunities. Young people: SM1 seek out challenges or new responsibilities and show flexibility when priorities change SM2 work towards goals, showing initiative, commitment and perseverance SM3 organise time and resources, prioritising actions SM4 anticipate, take and manage risks SM5 deal with competing pressures, including personal and work-related demands SM6 respond positively to change, seeking advice and support when needed SM7 manage their emotions, and build and maintain relationships 11
  13. 13. Effective participators Focus: Young people actively engage with issues that affect them and those around them. They play a full part in the life of their school, college, workplace or wider community by taking responsible action to bring improvements for others as well as themselves. Young people: EP1 discuss issues of concern, seeking resolution where needed EP2 present a persuasive case for action EP3 propose practical ways forward, breaking these down into manageable steps EP4 identify improvements that would benefit others as well as themselves EP5 try to influence others, negotiating and balancing diverse views to reach workable solutions EP6 act as an advocate for views and beliefs that may differ from their own 3 This table shows the coverage of PLTS in the Principal Learning units of the Higher Diploma in Business, Administration and Finance. Level 2 Principal Learning in Business, Administration and Finance PLTS IE CT RL TW SM EP Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Unit 4 Unit 5 Unit 6 Unit 7 12
  14. 14. 3.2 Functional Skills signposting The units may use and/or contribute towards the underpinning skills and knowledge of the Functional Skills in the following areas, depending on the precise nature of the work done in the Principal Learning. If work is generated by computer then the Functional Skill marked* will be used. Principal Functional Skills Learning Information and Unit English Mathematics communication technology Unit 1 • Speaking and • Representing situations • Use ICT systems Level 2 listening Level 2 using mathematics Business • Find and select information Level 2 enterprise • Reading Level 2 Level 2 • Analysing and • Writing Level 2 • Develop, present and processing using mathematics Level 2 communicate information 3 Level 2 • Interpreting and presenting results Level 2 Unit 2 • Speaking and • Representing situations • Use ICT systems Level 2 listening Level 2 using mathematics Business • Find and select information Level 2 communication • Reading Level 2 Level 2 and • Analysing and • Writing Level 2 • Develop, present and administration processing using communicate information mathematics Level 2 Level 2 • Interpreting and presenting results Level 2 Unit 3 • Speaking and • Representing situations • Use ICT systems Level 2 listening Level 2 using mathematics Business • Find and select information Level 2 finance and • Reading Level 2 Level 2 accounting • Analysing and • Writing Level 2 • Develop, present and processing using communicate information mathematics Level 2 Level 2 • Interpreting and presenting results Level 2 Unit 4 • Speaking and • Representing situations • Use ICT systems Level 2 listening Level 2 using mathematics Marketing, • Find and select information Level 2 sales and • Reading Level 2 Level 2 customer • Analysing and • Writing Level 2 • Develop, present and service for processing using communicate information business mathematics Level 2 Level 2 • Interpreting and presenting results Level 2 13
  15. 15. Principal Functional Skills Learning Information and Unit English Mathematics communication technology Unit 5 • Speaking and • Representing situations • Use ICT systems Level 2 listening Level 2 using mathematics Level 2 Business • Find and select information administration • Reading Level 2 • Analysing and Level 2 and teams processing using • Writing Level 2 • Develop, present and mathematics Level 2 communicate information Interpreting and Level 2 presenting results Level 2 Unit 6 • Speaking and • Representing situations • Use ICT systems Level 2 listening Level 2 using mathematics Level 2 3 Understanding • Find and select information business in a • Reading Level 2 • Analysing and Level 2 changing world processing using • Writing Level 2 • Develop, present and mathematics Level 2 communicate information • Interpreting and Level 2 presenting results Level 2 Unit 7 • Speaking and • Representing situations • Use ICT systems Level 2 listening Level 2 using mathematics Level 2 Success • Find and select information at work • Reading Level 2 • Analysing and Level 2 processing using • Writing Level 2 • Develop, present and mathematics Level 2 communicate information Interpreting and Level 2 presenting results Level 2 14
  16. 16. 3.3 Level 2 Units Level 2 Unit 1: Business enterprise What is this unit about? The purpose of this unit is to help learners to appreciate the characteristics of entrepreneurs and to understand how entrepreneurship can benefit society through innovation and creativity. Learning about the processes involved in planning, setting up and running a business venture is an essential part of this unit. This will help learners to develop a wide range of skills associated with many aspect of business. Through this, learners will explore the aims and functions of different types of businesses and how external and internal factors, such as legislation, can impact on business plans and activities. Learners will have the chance to encounter first hand the various aspects of running a business. Learning what makes a product viable as a business proposition, as well as the processes involved in planning and 3 setting up the business, and the financial, marketing and sales aspects of the business, are all areas that the learners will have an opportunity to experience. This unit has close links with the rest of the qualification and, as such, it is suggested that learners are introduced to this topic at the start of the learning programme and that it is taught concurrently with the remaining units. Learners are expected to use ICT to help select, develop, communicate and implement their business idea wherever appropriate. This unit has particular emphasis for the following Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills (PLTS): • independent enquirers • creative thinkers • reflective learners. Guided learning hours This unit has 60 GLH assigned to it, of which 20 hours will be needed for the assessment. Details of specific controls needed in relation to the internal assessment are shown in the Assessment section of this unit. Overall information on controls is on pages 113–117 of this specification 15
  17. 17. Content details Learning outcomes Assessment criteria PLTS The learner will: The learner can: 1 Understand the impact a describe the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurs on business b evaluate how business enterprises benefit from entrepreneurship c evaluate how the UK economy and society benefit from entrepreneurship 2 Be able to develop a generate a range of ideas for a business enterprise CT1 a business enterprise idea b compare the viability of the business enterprise ideas 3 c select and develop a business idea 3 Be able to present a present the merits of a business idea to prospective IE6 a business idea to investors, using reasoned arguments and evidence, prospective investors and respond positively to feedback b review and revise the business idea in light RL3 of feedback 4 Be able to start up a a create a business plan to start up a business enterprise business enterprise b identify how performance would be monitored and success measured Where the Assessment criteria show a direct link to an area of the PLTS framework, it is referenced here. Further information on PLTS is available on pages 10–12 of the specification and also within this unit in the section on Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills. 16
  18. 18. Scope of content This section gives details of the scope of content to be covered in the teaching of the unit, to ensure that all the Learning outcomes can be met. This includes examples relating to breadth and depth where applicable. Learning outcome 1 Learners must be taught about entrepreneurs as sources of innovation and creativity. The personal characteristics of entrepreneurs, must be outlined including: • charisma • strong desire to achieve • enthusiasm • ability to solve problems • competitiveness • goal-orientated behaviour • commitment • self-confidence • innovation • calculated risk-taking. 3 Learners must be taught how entrepreneurs impact on enterprise, through: • innovation • brand • personal support of product/service • generation of ideas. Learners must also be taught how entrepreneurs impact on the UK economy and society, including that entrepreneurship creates: • new business • businesses, pre-existing or otherwise, with typically higher growth than non-entrepreneurial competitors • employment opportunities • customer choice through new products and services. Learning outcome 2 Learners must be supported in developing the skills to generate ideas and explore possibilities for business enterprises. When generating, selecting and developing product ideas, learners must be advised to consider the following stages of the development process: • techniques used for generation of ideas • initial research into production costs, customer opinions and competing products. Learners must be taught how to compare the viability of business ideas, in terms of: • comparing production costs • customer opinions • competing products • ease of production. Learners must be shown how to select the most viable business idea and to develop this idea. The development of the idea may include, for example, determining: • the nature of the product • product pricing • functionality • provision. • appearance 17
  19. 19. Learning outcome 3 Learners must be supported in developing the skills needed to communicate the merits of a business idea to prospective investors, using reasoned arguments and evidence. Learners must be advised to take into consideration: • the size of investment requested • the business idea, its product and associated features • the impact of any relevant legislation and regulation ie health and safety, consumer protection and environmental protection • the impact of any relevant external factors ie local and national economic conditions, competitor activities, technology and social trends • initial estimates of expected sales, profit and return on investment. Learners must be taught how to deal with feedback, including praise, setbacks and criticism, in such a way that they do not take it personally and are encouraged to improve their work. 3 Learners must be supported in reviewing and revising their business idea in light of feedback, including deciding which feedback to act upon and which to disregard. Learning outcome 4 Learners must be taught to create a business plan to start up and operate a small business. The business plan must include the following: • business activities and objectives • personnel requirements, ie knowledge, skills and personal attributes • resource requirements ie physical and financial • implementation plan ie marketing and sales, operations and finance. Learners must be advised that their business plans should take into account possible internal and external influences that may affect the business. When using a business plan, learners must consider how the plan will: • assist in setting up the business, eg indicating start-up finance required and types of stock needed • assist in running the business, eg informing marketing and operations activities. The importance of organising time and resources efficiently, having clearly set goals and working with initiative, commitment and perseverance, must be emphasised to learners. Learners must be taught to review their business plan in terms of: • the extent to which they found the plan helped them to operate the business • how events caused them to take actions not indicated by the plan • the extent to which they believed they took appropriate actions in the face of events • revisions to be made to the business plan. Learners must be taught to identify how performance would be monitored and success measured. 18
  20. 20. Assessment This unit is assessed through a centre set and marked assessment. Internal assessments are subject to moderation by AQA-City & Guilds. The learner will complete an assignment on a business idea of their choice. The assignment will require the learner to provide evidence of generating ideas for a product (good or service), and of selecting and developing one idea, having considered the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs. The learner will then prepare and communicate a presentation to prospective investors which requests funds necessary for starting up a business, based on the developed product idea. Finally, the assignment will require the learner to prepare, use and review a business start-up and implementation plan. Task setting Internal assessments must aim to be holistic in nature and encourage learners to produce evidence to cover the Assessment criteria. The assignment set must cover the tasks as set out in the table below. 3 Task Form(s) of evidence LO mapping Analysis of business ideas The following must be provided: LO2 • report or notes or table Presentation of idea for investors The following must be provided: LO3 • recording or • transcript or • witness statement of presentation Business plan The following must be provided: LO4 • written or electronic document Review of actual business The following must be provided: LO1, 3, 4 • any appropriate format Duration The assignment should take a maximum of 20 of the 60 guided learning hours available for this unit. The presentation to prospective investors can take any suitable form, but should be limited to a maximum of 5 minutes. Sector relevant purpose The learner will complete an assignment which will enable them to generate and select ideas, then set up and run a business. The learner should draw on the entrepreneurial skills that they have developed in order to generate the idea and the plan for running the business. Demand The business plan should be of a suitable length no more than 10 sides of A4. Plans in draft format are acceptable. The business start-up and implementation plan should take no longer than 2 hours. Task taking Details of controls that should be applied during the taking of the assessment tasks are set out on pages 113–115 of the specification. 19
  21. 21. If part of this assignment is taking place as group work, the learner must present their own evidence and be able to identify the exact work which they have carried out. This identification should be submitted with the evidence. For purposes of the presentation, the teacher or a suitable assessor should play the role of the investor. If the learner is seeking real funding, this presentation can be made to the real sponsor. However, the assessor should also be present and assist in marking. The business start-up and implementation plan must be done as an individual piece of work. Weighting of Learning outcomes Learning outcomes Marks Weighting 1 Understand the impact of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurs 9 15% 3 on business 2 Be able to develop a business enterprise idea 15 25% 3 Be able to present a business idea to prospective investors 12 20% 4 Be able to start up a business enterprise 24 40% Total 60 100% 20
  22. 22. Assessment grid Please note that the descriptions in this marking grid relate to the top of each band. Further guidance on using marking grids is available in the Assessment section of this specification. Learning outcomes Band 1 Band 2 Band 3 The learner has: 0 to 3 marks 4 to 6 marks 7 to 9 marks 1 Understand the Given a basic description Described, using realistic Described, using realistic impact of of the characteristics of examples, the characteristics and detailed examples, the entrepreneurship and successful entrepreneurs. of successful entrepreneurs. characteristics of successful entrepreneurs on entrepreneurs. business Evaluated how business Evaluated, in-depth, how Offered an insightful and enterprises, benefit from business enterprises, benefit in-depth evaluation of how entrepreneurship, showing from entrepreneurship, business enterprises, benefit 3 limited depth and insight. showing some insight and from entrepreneurship, using relevant examples. pertinent examples. Evaluated how the UK Evaluated in-depth how the UK Offered an insightful and economy and society benefit economy and society benefit in-depth evaluation of how the from entrepreneurship, showing from entrepreneurship, UK economy and society benefit limited depth and insight. showing some insight and from entrepreneurship using using relevant examples. pertinent examples. 0 to 5 marks 6 to 10 marks 11 to 15 marks 2 Be able to develop Demonstrated aspects of Demonstrated all stages of Demonstrated all stages of a business generating and comparing generating and comparing generating and comparing enterprise idea product ideas, then selecting product ideas, then selecting product ideas, then selecting and and developing one idea. and developing one idea. developing one idea, making clear and sensible decisions. Generated a minimal selection Generated a wide selection of Generated a wide selection of of product ideas. product ideas. product ideas showing thought as to realistic ideas. Compared the ideas on a Compared the ideas using a Compared the viability of the miniumum of criteria. number of criteria. ideas, looking at all criteria in-depth and logically. Selected and developed Selected and developed one idea, Selected the most viable product one idea. showing consideration of the idea based on the comparisons, comparisons, and developed the and developed the idea to an idea giving consideration to the in-depth extent showing thought design, functionality and look, but to a number of factors. neglecting price and provision. 0 to 4 marks 5 to 8 marks 9 to 12 marks 3 Be able to present a Presented an outline of the Presented, using some reasoned Presented, using consistently business idea to merits of the business arguments, the merits of the reasoned arguments, the merits prospective investors idea to prospective investors business idea to prospective of the business idea to and attempted to respond investors, and responded prospective investors; invited to feedback. positively to feedback. feedback and responded positively to praise and criticism. Reviewed and revised the idea, Reviewed and revised the idea Reviewed and revised the taking account of limited in line with feedback. idea in line with feedback, elements of the feedback. discerning between valid and less valid feedback. 21
  23. 23. Assessment grid (continued) Learning outcomes Band 1 Band 2 Band 3 The learner has: 0 to 8 marks 9 to 16 marks 17 to 24 marks 4 Be able to start up a Demonstrated business planning Demonstrated business planning Demonstrated business planning business enterprise by completing aspects of a by completing a business by completing a coherent business start-up and start-up and implementation business start-up and implementation plan, attempting plan containing realistic implementation plan containing to account for circumstances. components, considering the realistic and appropriately influence of circumstances. detailed components, realistically considering the influence of circumstances. Identified how performance Identified how performance Identified a highly appropriate 3 would be monitored, showing would be monitored, showing method for monitoring limited consideration of the most consideration of the most performance and appropriate monitoring method. appropriate monitoring method. measuring success. 22
  24. 24. Guidance for delivery This unit has close links with the rest of the qualification and, as such, it is suggested that learners are introduced to this topic at the start of the learning programme and that it is taught concurrently with the remaining units. It would be expected that the assessment of this unit would occur at the end of the learning programme. Entrepreneurs are individuals who take risks with their time, reputation and/or money to make things happen. Considering the characteristics of successful entrepreneurs can give an insight into enterprising behaviour that provides benefits for the individual entrepreneur and also for both business and society. Studying entrepreneurs illustrates the creativity that can be brought to many problems and the innovative solutions that can be found. Examples of high profile business entrepreneurs can be considered, such as Richard Branson or Bill Gates. However, it is important to capture the imagination of the age group for this qualification by considering more recent entrepreneurs such as Richard Reed, Adam Balon and Jon Wright, the co-founders of Innocent Drinks. Exemplar entrepreneurs may not necessarily come from traditional business people. Celebrity chefs like 3 Jamie Oliver and Gordon Ramsey are businessmen for the restaurants that they own and run, but both bring enterprise to their other activities: for example, Jamie Oliver’s school dinners campaign and his Fifteen charity restaurant where he trained fifteen disadvantaged young people to work in the hospitality industry. The work of Bob Geldof on the Live 8 concert and the Make Poverty History campaign is an example of how things can be made to happen and in a global context. The not-for-profit sector is a rich source of entrepreneurial activity. Whether organised as social enterprise, charities or local community groups, enterprising activity is happening throughout the UK. The Social Enterprise Coalition (www.socialenterprise.org.uk) publishes a list of social enterprise case studies. However, it should be possible to find enterprising not-for-profit activity locally, and groups are likely to be responsive to approaches for visits or talks. Learners can make use of their studies of entrepreneurs to consider how ideas can be generated. They can consider the merits of the products developed by entrepreneurs: for example, what market need was being addressed by the product or service, what was different or unique about the product, and how it was presented to the public. Learners within the group could each select a product of a different entrepreneur, make a presentation on its merits and allow the group to vote on who had the best product idea. The activity could be run along the lines of the ‘Great Britons’ television programme. There are many activities that can be used to generate business ideas. However, they all involve a process of brainstorming, generating a list of options and producing a ranking for the various options. Each business idea will have a unique selling point (USP), even if it is simply that of being the only one of its type in the area. Learners should be given the opportunity to describe different business ideas and their USPs. The subjects for brainstorming activities could take several forms. For example, learners could be provided with existing products or services and be challenged to come up with an improvement or added value. Alternatively, learners could conduct surveys to find gaps in the local market (which could be their school or college). Learners will have to work with a business idea for assessment purposes and care will need to be taken in the selection of this idea in order that the full range of marks can be accessed by the learner. It is important that the idea chosen is not too simple or too complex, meaning that the learner is overwhelmed by the task. It is probably best if it is an idea that is small scale and delivered locally. As the idea will need to have a presentation prepared and the idea promoted for assessment purposes, it would be help if the idea were for a product that the learner could realistically provide. Teachers can help learners by selecting a range of either products or scenarios from which the learners can select ideas for whole class investigation. Alternatively, if learners wish to select their own ideas, teachers can help filter out ideas that are not viable, perhaps through initial ‘Dragons’ Den’ type activity using initial research. An early ‘Dragons’ Den’ will be good practice for putting together the presentation to prospective investors required for assessment purposes. 23
  25. 25. For this part of the unit, and in order to prepare a presentation to prospective investors, learners should be encouraged to use a two folder approach. The first folder will ultimately be the business start-up and implementation plan. Teachers can provide a template or writing frame for this. A research file or set of appendices will make up the second folder. In this folder, all learner research and thinking can be collected and this can be used to inform the final start-up and implementation plan, which will be completed after research has taken place. The completed start-up and implementation plan will begin with an explanation of the business’s activities and aims. However, this section will be finalised after all the research for the business idea has been completed. Learners will need to research the knowledge, skills and personal attributes of personnel in relation to the business idea. It will once again be helpful if the business idea chosen is one that the learner can realistically work with, as the learners themselves are likely to be the key personnel. They will research personnel requirements and include in their research folder the main findings highlighted in the main business and implementation plan. Research is likely to include draft job descriptions, based on an exploration of the necessary knowledge and skills required. There are multiple choice questionnaires that can be used to establish learners’ own personal and enterprise attributes. The key findings of 3 these questionnaires could be included in the business and implementation plan as a spreadsheet generated chart. Market research can be carried out to establish a sensible sales forecast which will inform the business start-up and implementation plan. Market research should include primary and secondary research. Primary research can include questionnaires, focus groups and observation techniques. Secondary research can include internet and library research. In addition to establishing a sales forecast, the market research will provide details of customers, competitors and local PEST factors as well as the practical application of the 4 Ps. There will be opportunities to consider consumer protection here. Once a sales forecast is in place it can be used to drive operations and to draw up finance plans. Teachers might want to consider providing learners with an interlinked spreadsheet from sales forecast through costings to cash budget and profit. Physical resources will need to be identified and costed. Learners will need to consider health and safety and environmental factors in their research and include key findings in their final start-up and implementation plan. A financial plan will follow from sales forecasts and resource requirements and should be detailed enough to provide sensible estimates of profits and return on investment, rather than trying to get a very accurate forecast that might overwhelm learners. Opportunities for applied learning By studying both entrepreneurs and social entrepreneurs, learners can appreciate determination and a ‘can do’ approach which they can consider in relation to their own career planning. Learners could prepare a written personal development plan that can focus their thoughts for their future career. Learners could be set the task of identifying quality of life issues in the area surrounding the school and college. They could make suggestions for improvements and present these to an audience. The audience could include, for example, a local councillor. Working in groups, learners could research their local area. Learners could design a questionnaire that the whole group could use, allowing for an extensive survey. They could select a representative focus group, prepare questions for the focus group and run a group session. Secondary research through the internet and library research could further inform their analysis. Because cost will be an issue, learners could prioritise their findings as part of a presentation to an invited audience. Groups of learners could act as champions for different proposals. The invited audience could provide judgement of the best proposal. 24
  26. 26. Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills The list below is indicative of the way this unit supports the development of PLTS, as opposed to the achievement of PLTS that are possible through the assessment. The unit supports the development of more PLTS than are covered through the assessment criteria alone. Alternative approaches could be selected. The learner could develop PLTS by: Independent enquirers • identifying questions to answer and problems to resolve when exploring ideas for viable products • conducting SWOT analysis of business viability, appreciating the consequences of decisions • considering the influences of entrepreneurial behaviour on decisions and events Creative thinkers • generating ideas and exploring possibilities for viable products and services, trying out alternatives 3 and following ideas through • asking questions of entrepreneurs in order to extend their thinking • identifying a unique selling point for a business idea • connecting their own ideas and experiences with that of successful entrepreneurs • trying out alternative or new product ideas and following ideas through Reflective learners • reviewing progress during the enterprise activity and acting on the outcomes • inviting feedback from prospective investors and dealing positively with praise, setbacks and criticism • evaluating their performance in the enterprise activity and learning to inform future progress Team workers • reaching agreements with prospective investors, managing discussions to achieve results • showing fairness and consideration to others when acting as prospective investors during each other’s presentation of business cases, providing constructive support and feedback • taking responsibility for their ideas, showing confidence in themselves as entrepreneurs Self-managers • working towards business targets, showing initiative, commitment and perseverance • dealing with competing pressures, including personal and work-related demands • managing the business enterprise assignment, ensuring that suitable research is completed in time to produce an effective business start-up and implementation plan and associated presentation Effective participators • participating in presentations to prospective investors or stakeholders • presenting a persuasive business case to prospective investors • proposing practical ways forward for the implementation of their business ideas, breaking these down into manageable steps • trying to influence prospective investors, negotiating and balancing diverse views to reach workable solutions. 25
  27. 27. Opportunities for Functional Skills development This unit and its associated learning activities will provide the learner with opportunities to develop and use English, mathematics and ICT in a number of ways. Learning about entrepreneurship and product development will provide ample opportunities for learners to develop their speaking and listening skills. The planning aspects of the unit will involve a range of writing tasks alongside some number work. Legislative information which needs to be considered in the product development work will require accessing a number of texts, thus developing reading skills. 3 26
  28. 28. Suggested learning resources Books Marcouse, I. (2006). GCSE Business Studies: Introduction to Enterprise. Published: Hodder Arnold. ISBN: 978-0340926987. CDs, CD-ROMs and DVDs • Trailblazers DVD – www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/third_sector/social_enterprise/ambassadors.aspx • Risk and reward CD-ROM – www.pfeg.com Journals and magazines • Trailblazers Magazine www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/third_sector/social_enterprise/make_your_mark.aspx#trailblazers Websites 3 • Bank of Scotland www.bankofscotland.co.uk • BBC: Dragons’ Den www.bbc.co.uk/dragonsden • BBC GCSE Bitesize: Business Studies www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ gcsebitesize/business • Biz/ed www.bized.co.uk • British Chambers of Commerce www.britishchambers.org.uk • The British Franchise Association www.thebfa.org • Business Link www.businesslink.gov.uk • Changemakers www.changemakers.org.uk • Enterprise Educators UK www.enterprise.ac.uk • Enterprise Nation www.enterprisenation.com • Fifteen www.fifteen.net • FunderFinder www.funderfinder.org.uk • Growing Business www.growingbusiness.co.uk • The Guardian www.guardian.co.uk • HSBC: Business Banking www.hsbc.co.uk/1/2/business/home • Innocent Drinks www.innocentdrinks.co.uk • Live 8 – The Long Walk To Justice www.live8live.com • Lloyds TSB: Business Banking www.lloydstsbbusiness.com • Make Your Mark www.makeyourmark.org.uk • NatWest www.natwest.com • Personal Finance Education Group www.pfeg.org • The Prince’s Trust www.princes-trust.org • The Royal Bank of Scotland www.rbs.co.uk • Riverford Organic Vegetables www.riverford.co.uk/franchising • Shell Livewire www.shell-livewire.org 27
  29. 29. • Social Enterprise Coalition www.socialenterprise.org.uk • Social Enterprise Magazine www.socialenterprisemag.co.uk • SmallBusiness.co.uk www.smallbusiness.co.uk • Start Business www.startbusiness.co.uk • Startups www.startups.co.uk • TeacherNet www.teachernet.gov.uk • TESconnect Resources www.tes.co.uk/resources • tutor2u www.tutor2u.net • UnLtd www.unltd.org.uk • Voluntary Matters 1+2 www.voluntarymatters1and2.org • Small Firms Enterprise Development Initiative www.sfedi.co.uk • The Management & Leadership Network: Links www.mln.org.uk/links.asp 3 • Channel 4: Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares www.channel4.com/food/on-tv/ ramsays-kitchen-nightmares • Cabinet Office: Social Enterprise Ambassadors www.cabinetoffice.gov.uk/third_sector/ social_enterprise/ambassadors.aspx 28
  30. 30. Level 2 Unit 2: Business communication and administration What is this unit about? The purpose of this unit is to develop learners’ understanding of effective communication in business contexts and to give them an appreciation of how communication styles, methods and media can and should be adapted for different purposes and audiences. Learners will develop their communication skills, including the use of electronic communications media, and be able to use them confidently and sensitively, to build positive relationships with others in business contexts. They will also be able to produce business documents using appropriate English and ICT skills. This unit also focuses on administrative functions and roles, and the contribution these make to the success of businesses. During the course of this unit, learners will gain experience of performing a range of administrative tasks, developing organisational skills and an awareness of health and safety 3 requirements in business environments. This unit will provide learners with a firm foundation in communication and administrative skills for their work in other Level 2 Principal Learning units. Learners will have been using various communication methods from birth onwards, and will bring their ideas and experience to the study of this unit. The ability to express oneself and listen to others positively and successfully is highly valued in all business environments, as well as being a fundamentally important life skill, transferable to most situations. Learners will be able to experiment with conveying messages in different ways to different people, using a wide variety of methods. They will apply their understanding of communication to administrative tasks, and will have opportunities to experiment with creating business documents and co-ordinating meetings and events. Learners will appreciate that an element of administration is involved in almost all business roles, and that people at all levels of organisations and, by extension, society, depend upon individuals with strong administrative skills. This unit has particular emphasis for the following Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills (PLTS): • independent enquirers • team workers • self-managers. Guided learning hours This unit has 60 GLH assigned to it, of which 5 hours will be needed for the assessment. Details of specific controls needed in relation to the internal assessment are shown in the Assessment section of this unit. Overall information on controls is on pages 113–117 of this specification. 29
  31. 31. Content details Learning outcomes Assessment criteria PLTS The learner will: The learner can: 1 Understand effective a describe the factors involved in communicating communication in the effectively within the business environment business environment b explain the importance of building good relationships, developing rapport and communicating sensitively with others in business contexts c compare the different styles, methods and media of IE4 internal and external communication used in a variety of business contexts d describe the different factors affecting how IE5 3 communication styles are chosen 2 Understand the a explain the purposes and benefits of different forms benefits of electronic of electronic communication available in the global communication in business environment the global business environment b compare good and bad practice in relation to using electronic communication for business 3 Understand the role of a interpret the requirements of a variety of commonly efficient administration used business functions for administrative skills to the success of businesses b explain the administrative roles and why administrative skills are critical to business success 4 Be able to a communicate effectively and sensitively with others in TW4, 5 demonstrate effective business contexts communication skills b select and use styles, methods and media appropriate TW3 to the situation and audience when communicating in business environments c produce a range of simple business documents 5 Be able to carry out a a carry out a range of administrative tasks effectively SM3 range of administrative processes safely b apply the appropriate health and safety requirements in relation to administrative functions Where the Assessment criteria show a direct link to an area of the PLTS framework, it is referenced here. Further information on PLTS is available on pages 10–12 of the specification and also within this unit in the section on Personal, Learning and Thinking Skills. 30
  32. 32. Scope of content This section gives details of the scope of content to be covered in the teaching of the unit, to ensure that all the Learning outcomes can be met. This includes examples relating to breadth and depth where applicable. Learning outcome 1 Learners must be made aware of the following factors that contribute to effective communication in business contexts: • appropriate method and format to communicate the particular message to the target audience • appropriate level of language and choice of words for the audience • clarity of meaning and intention in verbal and written communications • body language and eye contact • tone 3 • active listening and responsiveness • respect for the individual • consideration of cultural and linguistic differences • open-mindedness – avoiding assumptions and reserving judgement • suitable time and place to communicate the message. A familiarity with the above will help learners to understand the importance of building good relationships, developing rapport and communicating sensitively with others in the business environment. Learners must be reminded that it is important to consider one’s approach to communication in internal and external contexts. The importance of the following must be explained to learners: • the speed and timing of communications • building lines of communication between business partners • establishing and maintaining a good reputation, including how this can be done and potential risks to reputation • word of mouth • business and brand loyalty • consistent and reliable customer service • considering different types of audience and sensitivity to individuals. Learners must be taught about the different styles, methods and media used in business contexts. This will involve teachers informing learners about: • the difference between internal and external communication • styles of communication such as formal and informal • styles and formats of business documents • methods of communication, including written, verbal, non-verbal • different media available – face-to-face, letters, memos, etc, as well as electronic media (see Learning outcome 2). 31
  33. 33. Learners must be supported in gaining the understanding needed to compare the use of the above methods for different purposes. Learners must be taught how different styles, methods and media are selected in different situations, and the factors affecting an appropriate choice, including: • the audience with which the communication is being held • formal and informal meetings and the different styles to adopt • the nature of the message to be communicated. Learning outcome 2 Learners must be made aware of the following electronic communications media available in the global business environment, and their purposes: • email/internet • bluetooth technology • telephone, including mobile phones and faxing 3 • telephone and videoconferencing. Learners must be shown how to assess the benefits of the above electronic methods of communication by carrying out a cost-benefit analysis, covering: • the cost implications of accessing such resources • the adaptability of each form in the future as a result of advances in technology • the technical support that will be needed to ensure that the technology functions correctly at all times and the respective costs attached • the advantages and drawbacks of each method, ie in terms of speed, confidentiality issues, ‘personal touch’. Learners must be taught about good and bad practice in relation to using electronic communication methods in business environments, including: • ‘netiquette’ when emailing • company procedures regarding the use of electronic communication to exchange information • Data Protection issues. Learning outcome 3 Administrative tasks must be linked with the requirements of different functions within a company, and it must be emphasised how crucial efficient administration is to the success of a business. Learners must be taught how administrative personnel can be effective in the support of such functions to ensure that the business is successful, and how to measure the success of the business. Learners must be taught about the different roles in businesses that encompass administrative skills: • secretarial • clerical • reception. 32
  34. 34. The tasks involved with administrative roles must be explained, including: • producing documents • maintaining spreadsheets and databases • maintaining and updating websites and intranets • devising office systems • ordering office supplies and stock control • organising and storing paper-based and electronic documents and files • organising and supporting internal and external meetings and events, including: booking rooms distributing agendas and support materials housekeeping assisting with presentations 3 taking minutes any follow-up activity • arranging travel and accommodation • invoicing and other financial tasks • liaising with employees in other departments or outside the company • taking dictation and using shorthand. Learners must be taught why administrative skills are critical to business success. For example: • keeping everything organised and orderly • take care of essential day to day tasks. Learning outcome 4 It must be emphasised that, in order to communicate effectively and sensitively with others in business contexts, using styles, methods and media appropriate to the situation and audience, learners must consider what has been covered for Learning outcomes 1 and 2, and draw it together to put it into practice. Learners must be advised to show fairness and consideration to others and to take responsibility, showing confidence in themselves and their contribution. Learners must be taught how to produce simple business documents, taking into consideration: • the purpose, content and quality standards required for the document • the audience for which the document is intended • the language to be used, including business terminology, eg product-related terms • the agreed style for the document from the person requesting it, and the house conventions and/or format of the company (regarding font size and typeface, layout, spelling, grammar) • the different styles available, eg formal, informal • the avoidance of certain styles in business documents, eg ‘text speak’, use of colloquialisms, slang • the agreed deadline for the document. 33
  35. 35. Learning outcome 5 Learners must be prepared to carry out a range of administrative tasks, including: • ensuring and maintaining security • reproducing information • recording and updating information • communicating information • processing data • receiving and transmitting information • organising and supporting meetings. In order to organise and support meetings, learners must be aware of the standard procedures and documentation involved in meetings, including: • duties of personnel – chairman, treasurer, secretary 3 • documentation – notice, agenda, minutes, attendance register • key factors to consider when planning an internal or external event eg purpose, attendees, venue, equipment, materials. Learners must be shown how to: • ensure that all parties know the venue, time, date and purpose of the meeting • ensure that the needs of all parties are met, including dietary and other special requirements • produce an agenda • be present in the meeting to assist with presentations, etc • carry out any follow-up actions arising from the meeting by deadlines imposed at the meeting • follow the appropriate health and safety requirements in relation to the administrative functions undertaken, such as access for those with special requirements, the layout of the room, evacuation procedures and the dissemination of this information • organise time and resources, prioritising their actions. Learners must also be taught how to comply with the relevant health and safety legislation and requirements when carrying out administrative functions, including: • Health and Safety at Work Act • Display Screen Equipment Regulations • Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR) and Control of Substances Hazardous to Health (COSHH), as applicable • Workplace Regulations • First Aid Regulations • Risk assessment. 34
  36. 36. Assessment This unit is assessed through a centre set and marked assessment. Internal assessments are subject to moderation by AQA-City & Guilds. The learner will complete an assignment based on a case study, taken under controlled conditions, in which they produce an electronic communication for internal circulation to employees of a business. The focus of the communication will be a sensitive business issue which needs to be communicated to external customers carefully and appropriately. The learner will choose a suitable format and style, and use appropriate language, to give guidance and provide recommendations to staff on how to explain the issue to customers. The communication must also update staff on an aspect of health and safety in the business environment, and on the importance of a specific administrative procedure being performed effectively. Secondly, the learner will produce a non-electronic communication for external customers regarding the issue discussed in the first part of the assessment task, putting into practice the advice that they have provided for colleagues. 3 Task setting Internal assessments must aim to be holistic in nature and encourage learners to produce evidence to cover the Assessment criteria. The internal communication task set must allow learners to meet the Assessment criteria. It is likely that learners will be asked to convey a message regarding the use of communication methods and/or the importance of administrative roles to the business. The external communication can be in any suitable non-electronic format. The task should be one that would take place in a workplace. The assignment set must cover the tasks as set out in the table below. Task Form(s) of evidence LO mapping Electronic internal communication The following must be provided: LO1, 2, 3, 4, 5 • a printed copy of an e-mail or internal e-newsletter Non-electronic communication to The following must be provided: LO1, 2, 3, 4, 5 external business customers • a printed copy of a non-electronic communication to external business customers Duration The assignment will take approximately 5 of the 60 guided learning hours available for this unit. Sector relevant purpose The assignment will involve learners in thinking carefully about how they communicate, and experimenting with a range of methods, media and styles. These abilities are important to all roles in business, administration and finance. The tasks set must be relevant to the business workplace ie make use of realistic business scenarios. Demand Learners must observe health and safety requirements in the performance of administrative tasks. 35
  37. 37. Task taking Details of controls that should be applied during the taking of the assessment tasks are set out on pages 113–115 of the specification. Weighting of Learning outcomes Learning outcomes Marks Weighting 1 Understand effective communication in the business 15 25% environment 2 Understand the benefits of electronic communication in the 6 10% global business environment 3 3 Understand the role of efficient administration to the success 15 25% of businesses 4 Be able to demonstrate effective communication skills 9 15% 5 Be able to carry out a range of administrative processes safely 15 25% Total 60 100% 36
  38. 38. Assessment grid Please note that the descriptions in this marking grid relate to the top of each band. Further guidance on using marking grids is available in the Assessment section of this specification. Learning outcomes Band 1 Band 2 Band 3 The learner has: 0 to 5 marks 6 to 10 marks 11 to 15 marks 1 Understand effective Described a limited range of Described a range of factors Offered a comprehensive communication in the factors involved in effective involved in effective description of a range of business environment communication. communication, relating them factors involved in effective to the business environment. communication in the business environment. Explained in simple terms the Explained the importance Explained the importance of importance of building good of building good relationships, building good relationships, 3 relationships, developing rapport developing rapport and developing rapport and and communicating sensitively communicating sensitively with communicating sensitively with others. others in business contexts. with others in business contexts, making a distinction between internal and external communication. Offered a simple comparison Compared the different styles, Provided a detailed and accurate of the different styles, methods and media used comparison of how different methods and media used in business contexts for styles, methods and media in business contexts. different purposes. are used in business contexts, formally and informally and internally and externally, for different purposes. Given a limited description Given a description of the Given an in-depth description of of the factors which affect factors which affect which the factors which affect which how communication styles communication styles are communication styles, giving are chosen. chosen, showing limited realistic examples and noticing knowledge of the small changes. the finer points. 0 to 2 marks 3 to 4 marks 5 to 6 marks 2 Understand the Offered a simple explanation of Explained the purpose and Offered an in-depth explanation benefits of electronic the purpose and benefits benefits of different electronic of the purpose and benefits communication in the of different electronic communication methods. of different electronic global business communication methods. communication methods. environment Provided a brief comparison of Provided a detailed comparison Provided a logical and insightful the good and bad practice of of good and bad practice comparison of good and bad using electronic communication relating to their use of electronic practice relating to the use of for business. communication in business. electronic communication for business; given realistic examples. 37
  39. 39. Assessment grid (continued) Learning outcomes Band 1 Band 2 Band 3 The learner has: 0 to 5 marks 6 to 10 marks 11 to 15 marks 3 Understand the Related administrative tasks Accurately related administrative Interpreted the requirements role of efficient to commonly used business tasks to of a range of business administration to the functions with some accuracy. the requirements of a range functions in order to specify success of of business functions. the administrative tasks businesses which are involved in each. Offered a limited explanation of Offered a valid explanation of Offered an insightful administrative roles and the administrative roles and the explanation of administrative importance of administrative roles importance of administrative roles roles and the importance to the success of businesses. to the success of businesses. of administrative roles to 3 the success of businesses. 0 to 3 marks 4 to 6 marks 7 to 9 marks 4 Be able to Communicated effectively and Demonstrated effective, fair Consistently and confidently demonstrate effective sensitively in business contexts and considerate communication demonstrated effective, fair communication skills at times. with others in business contexts. and considerate communication with others in business contexts. Shown limited consideration of Adapted their use of styles, Adapted their use of styles, appropriate styles, methods and methods and media for different methods and media of media when communicating. situations and purposes when communication for different communicating. situations and purposes, and taking responsibility for their contribution. Produced simple business Produced simple business Produced simple business documents which are fit for documents which are suitable documents which are ideal purpose in some respects. for the purpose and audience, for the purpose and audience, and which demonstrate the and which demonstrate flair consideration of appropriate and accuracy in the use of format, language and style. appropriate format, language and style. 0 to 5 marks 6 to 10 marks 11 to 15 marks 5 Be able to carry Carried out a limited range of Carried out a range of Carried out a wide range of out a range of administrative tasks, attempting administrative tasks, completing administrative tasks, completing administrative to complete them within them within deadlines and them within deadlines and processes safely deadlines, demonstrating a demonstrating efficiency demonstrating a high degree limited degree of efficiency. most of the time. of efficiency and organisation throughout. Shown limited consideration of Applied health and safety Shown considerable health and safety requirements requirements in relation to awareness of health and in relation to administrative administrative functions. safety requirements in functions. relation to a range of administrative functions, and followed them consistently. 38

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