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Assignments for Graduate Programs in Graphic Design - a 60 page documented coursework

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    Coursework - Visual Communication Coursework - Visual Communication Document Transcript

    • Cover page details Industrial Design Centre January 2004 Course 202 | Visualization Drawing Indian Institute of Technology Bombay January 2010EòÉäºÉÇ 202202 | Three-dimensional drawing for Product & Communication DesignersDesigned courseworkfor graduate programsin Visual Communication.Coverpage artifact: Artisan : Kamleshwar Das Photograph: Mandar RaneCane with thermocol inserts. Nail joints. Student : Ashish Singhal Camera: Canon Powershot S2iS. 12X. 05 Mega pixels. www.mrane.com Mandar Rane Assistant Professor +91 022 2576-7839 mrane@iitb.ac.in Visual Communication +91 0 99300 78839
    • || Bless me ||Contents Auspicious beginningsAssignments--------------------------------------- || Shree Gajanan Prasanna ||Course 202 02Visualization DrawingA methodical approach to teachdrawing of three-dimensionalobjects for novices. A basiccourse for product designers aswell as communication designers.--------------------------------------- 2 18Course 106Visual OrderThis course deals withrationalizing sensitive issuesrealted to graphic design.--------------------------------------- 25Course 316Design Analysis & CriticsA sequel to the course ‘VisualOrder’ concerned with practicalapplication of typographic vari-ables. Distance, Value & Scale.--------------------------------------- 32Course 312Corporate Identity ProgramA set of eight assignmentsproviding a systematic guide,traversing across the basicsof figure & ground, as well astypography, to train a studentto design effective logosor symbols. Fig. 1. Featured Content: Indian Auto Rickshaw - a three wheeler passenger vehicle. The cover/ roof of the vehicle is missing revealing the inner structure of the Auto Rickshaw. Location: Faculty gate, outside IIT Guwahati Campus, Assam, India.--------------------------------------- Visualization Drawing -Course 204 41 With the increase in number of computer they begin to consider the skill as an inborn talent,Graphic Design modeling solutions, the reason to learn sketch- which cannot be attained through practice. With--------------------------------------- ing as a skill leads to a debate between novice lear- exposure of computers as a new tool for designers, ners and traditional instructors; whether this skill such students display reluctance to sketch and term 44 is necessary to acquire. The term sketching in the it as an artistic ability rather than comprehending it asCourse 121Computer Graphics course refers to the activity of drawing (represent- a tool to enhance visual thinking. (Bradshaw, 2002) 8.--------------------------------------- ing) three dimensional objects located centrally, surrounded by students along the periphery of To be an efficient product or communication 46 a circle. designer, a student must master his skills of repre-Course 102Elements of Design I senting thoughts in a visual form (2d and 3d) by the--------------------------------------- The art of sketching in design schools is means of sketching. The ability of a student to sketch currently acquired through perseverance and or draw a three dimensional form with precision lies 48Course 105 can be considered liberal to invite a methodical in going beyond the external appearances, to inter-Elements of Design II approach. Growth of impatience and the need nalize the underlying structure and geometry of the--------------------------------------- for instant results in novices are in contrast with form. In real world, the underlying structure (fig.1.) respect to the representation skills which are is never revealed unless the object needs a repair 50 generally achieved by extensive practice and or a new structure has to be built.Course 303Design Project II A patience. Given the context, this course is a collection of students work conducted over two In comprehension to the problem of three two years of teaching drawing of three dimensional dimensional drawing the course presents new objects at the Department of Design, Indian methods to teach transition from two dimensional Institute of Technology Guwahati, Assam, India. to three-dimensional drawing in successive stages. All Courses & It further guides the students towards visualizing Assignments taught Sketching should be understood as skill, which additional forms over the artifacts presented to them. over a period of requires a certain kind of dedication and sustained Moreover the argument, why should novices learn 7 years documented in a single book. enthusiasm. Students with lesser aptitude or weak to draw/ sketch three-dimensional forms as hidden in drawing encounter repeated failures in early structures, (i.e., as opaque objects) is put forward in stages of sketching. This imbibes a fear in them and the form of course work, ‘Visualization Drawing’.
    • 3Student: Abhijit Das(Above) Photography of a large size stapler. (Below) Sketch by the student results in a distorted picture of the attempted effort.A novice attempts to draw a three-dimensional object by following the contours. He adopts the natural way of seeingand drawing; primarily to involve the act of tracing contours of the given object and then his struggle to achieve proportions and planes in which the object lies.
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Visualization Drawing | 202 Credits: 10 Visualization Drawing 4 In the course Visualization drawing 202, our focus would be to hone our abilities to draw three dimensional forms with accuracy and precision rather than realism, (which is usually perceived by most of the novices, as the definition of good dra- wing). This perception induces a fear in them to consider the act of drawing as an inborn talent, which cannot be attained by practice. The course does not seek an expressive or subjective representation of the form. Instead, our aim is to develop our ability to represent the structure of a given form. Your know- ledge of perspective drawing is a prerequisite for this course. Rudimentary levels of the course will engage oneself into seeing and drawing the provided artifacts, until we develop ourselves to draw basic three dimensional forms with precision. The advanced levels of the course will challenge us to vis- ualize an element on the artifact, either to replace the existing element or think of an additional element. For example, if the artifact is a mug we would try to visualize a new handle for the Fig. 1.1 mug. This act will be recorded as drawing of the new visualized mug (a new form). Assignment Task 01: Drawing a cube with closed eyes. This act will help us understand that how one visualizes the structure in his mind, when given the task to draw a three dimensional form. “This technique gives oneself good practice in visualizing a shape in a very concentrated way as well as make positive lines in the right place”, (Robin Capon, 1993) 4. Task 02: In a given rectangle, draw three lines which converge at a single point. It is mandatory that the three lines should touch three different sides of the rectangle and form approximately Fig. 1.2 equal angle amongst themselves i.e., 120° each. Create alterna- tives with orienting those three lines at different positions of the Stationery: given format, to perceive them as three different planes with Pencils: 4B, 6B, or Steadler Lumograph 6B varied area proportions. Shade each plane with an ascending (you need more control over your hand while degree of gradations increasing the percentage of grey handling Steadler Lumograph 6B. The pencil is from 20° to 40° to 70° with a pencil. very smooth and quickly creates dark tones). Paper: 10, A4 size, Alabaster Papers (100 gsm)
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Visualization Drawing | 202 Credits: 10 Visualization Drawing 5 Task 03: 1. Create a point or a dot in the given square format, at the place of your choice. 2. Originating from this point, diverge three lines and touch each of them to three different edges of the outlined square format. The angle created inbetween these lines should be of 120° each. (Please see Figure 2.1). 3. Modify any one of the three lines as shown in 120° the Fig.2.2. The modification of any one of your chosen side need not resemble the figure. Figure is just an example. 120° 120° Line a/d* was modified along the plane and e/f, f/g and g/h were Fig. 2.1 created. Take care e/f and g/h are parallel to side a/b, and f/g parallel to a/d, as it is mandatory to create a shape which forms an angle of either 90° or 45°. *Choose the longest line for modification rather than the shortest amongst the three. Task 04: Complete the rendered version of your d g line creation to reveal the faces of the form. See fig 2.3 90° f b Task 05: h 45° e Extend the three lines which had diverged from the point, beyond the boundaries of the square outline to result in a cube. a Task 06: Rotate the cube mentally on an axis, so that the modified Fig. 2.2 c side has a different orientation in comparison to what it had earlier. Draw this new picture of the cube visualizing in its modi- fied orientation on a new A4 sheet. Create a cube with the altered edge in POP. Note: Please add your Name and Roll No. on the sheets. Keep your sheets clean and tidy while submitting. Fig. 2.3
    • 6Student: Dinesh Nagar. Sketches and three dimensional cube in POP (Plaster of Paris).1. Pencil shading, incremental tonal gradations. 2. Longest edge modification. 3. Extending lines further to complete the cube. 4. Changing viewpoint mentally. 5. Creation of the cube in POP.
    • translationsStudents work: POP Blocks 7Translations from 2D to 3D.
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Visualization Drawing | 202 Credits: 10 Visualization Drawing 8 In the last exercise, we learnt how three lines when shaded along their respective planes were perceived as a corner of the cube. A boolean operation to the modified edge resulted in creation of more faces for the cube. All lines ran parallel along the corresponding faces because the resultant was a cube. It gave us cues to create intrusions along the modi- fied edge. The appropriateness of the modifications were cross- checked with the fact that all lines should be parallel to each other. Task 07: In this exercise, some sample artifacts* will be provided to you. We will draw these artifacts (cubes of various sizes), in different configurations. We would also shift our viewpoints (physically) while drawing them. We may encounter configurations where these opaque cubes would overlap each other and make our task difficult, at times, forcing us to visualize the hidden side. In an opaque object, we can never see the hidden structure *Sample Artifacts (lines or edges) that constitutes a form. Therefore, when we are presented with a complex form (a combination of several forms, Edges of the cubes form e.g. cylinders, cuboids, or pyramids), we usually end up tracing three sets of lines, one vertical and two horizontal, each having the contours of the form (refer page.3). Whereas, when the form is its vanishing points in perspective. simple as a cube we prefer to visualize the structure of the form. When we draw objects kept very close to us, the vanishing points To be able to draw a three dimensional form with precision, of these lines are too far away a student should go beyond external appearance of the form. to converge on paper we draw. He should try to understand the underlying geometry and Forceful convergence of these structure of things. This leads to an argument that while sketch- vanishing points in a drawing, ing three dimensional objects why should one attempt to draw usually makes it look artificial them as solids (opaque objects) with hidden faces or edges? and more mechanical. (Francis D.K. Ching)1. Why cant we make them transperant? Face Task 08: The second session of the assignment will provide artifacts which would be transperant. It means the student will be able to see-through the artifact, making it easy for him Edge to understand the structure of such solids. It is important that Hidden side drawing the structures of cubes and rectangular solids should be practiced regularly, for they being the foundations to construct other forms (cylinders, pyramids, etc.). To resonate to this fact we will draw cylinders inscribed in the cubes and comprehend the exercise.
    • 9Student: Nishant Mungali, (see-through cubes)
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar Rane Accuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design Centre Devotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology Bombay Regularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, India Frequency in interaction with teachers Presentation and documentation Course Details: Time management and punctuality in submission Visualization Drawing | 202 Credits: 10 Visualization Drawing 10 It depends on each individual student as he continues his efforts to hone his skills towards drawing of three dimensional forms. Exercises can only create environments or approaches to understand the basics of 3 dimensional drawings, but to be able to draw them successfully, apart from class assignments, one has to maintain his/ her sketchbook and keep on practicing this art.H.L. Our attempts to draw cubes kept on a white background in the previous task, must have lead us to new experiences and difficulties. To make the task easier, we added colored backgrounds with grids beneath the cubes. It gave us reference points or clues to plot the cubes on a two dimensional surface like paper. We also noticed how solid objects when made transparent, (i.e.,G.P. when we made the structure visible) allowed us to see-through the solid cubes, which usually does not happen in the real world unless the object is made of a transparent material, like glass. In this assignment we will sketch structures in our neighboring Fig. 4.1 environments (outdoors), buildings, large halls, corridors, etc. Task 09: See Fig 4.1 and read the terms explained below the picture. Your task begins with shooting a picture (black and white) as The picture plane is always 90° shown in Fig. 4.1; either in one point or two point perspective. perpendicular to the observer’s central line of sight. Once the picture is shot with a digital camera at a P.P The Object finer quality to which your digital camera supports, take a print of the same on an A4 sheet. Cover this print with a Picture plane (P.P.): tracing sheet of A4 size and trace the picture (not exactly) When we draw a perspective, we transfer onto a drawing surface but to get a general idea of what the picture is about, by creation what we see through an imaginary transparent picture plane; the drawing of contours. No need to shade the picture. It should be a line surface becomes the equivalent of a picture plane. drawing. Be conscious while tracing the lines from the A4 sheet onto the tracing. Complete the picture by depiction of the Ground plane (G.P.): The ground plane is a horizontal plane of reference from which heights in imaginary horizontal line shown in Fig. 4.1. perspective can be measured. For example in the picture above the ground plane is the floor of the passageway. Task 10: Take a new tracing sheet. Keep it above the previous tracing Horizontal line (H.L.): The horizon line runs horizontally across the sheet. Now trace out some structures/ buildings on this tracing picture plane and corresponds to the viewer’s eye-level above the ground sheet and then visualize new structures within the same solution plane. For a normal eye-level perspective, horizon line is at the standing height with modifications. Use horizontal line as a reference to create your of the observer’s eyes. It moves down if we sit down on a chair or moves up new visualized picture. You are expected to alter the picture to if we look from a second storey window. Even if actually not seen, the hori- create new buildings or add trees or imaginary cubes. zon line should be drawn lightly across the drawing surface to serve as a level line of reference for the entire composition. (Francis D.K. Ching)1 Feel free to visualize new and interesting solutions (apart from the mentionted above). In all you submit three A4 sheets, one paper (printout of the picture you shot) and two tracings.
    • 11Student starts with an initial reference (picture below), to guide oneself into the sketch of a new visualized picture (above). Student: Divya Gupta
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76 IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Visualization Drawing | 202 Credits: 10 Visualization Drawing 12Fig. 5.1The figure above shows a Task 11:display of artifacts which will be We continue our efforts to practice new structures,provided in this exercise. A bottle through these provided artifacts. Your knowledge of grounddepicting the inner structure of the plane, picture plane, and horizontal plane will be put to practiceform and a jug (without a handle) in an indoor setting, where in, the object will be kept very closetilted over the bottle representingthe various ellipses to be practiced to you. The horizontal line or your eye level, will affect thewhile sketching, (usually it is difficult way an ellipse is perceived, (above or below) especially withto draw objects when objects are cylindrical objects, which are usually inscribed inside cuboids.opaque, because one has to visualize All cylindrical objects are a result of subtraction from rectangularthe invisible hidden structure (form). solids, so always begin by imagining rectangular solids around cylinders, to deduce the original form. Submit three sketches on an A4 sheet by shifting your positions (physically), as well as changing the configurations of given artifacts.
    • 13Cane artifact to practice ovals and ellipses.
    • Detachable thermocolBelow & above eyelevels. pieces enabling theChanging ellipses. student to see the inner structure of the form. 14 Student: Monil Khare Student: Nishant Mungali Student: Shaiz K.
    • 15Understanding Structures: Seeing through. Creating see-through (transperant) artifacts for opaque objects. Student: Kirti Meera GoelStudent: Nishant Mungali (Shoe sketch with construction of cubiods)
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Visualization Drawing | 202 Credits: 10 Visualization Drawing 16 Task 12: Place the given artifact in adequate light to see it comfortably. Then using a digital camera take a photograph of this object. Take the photograph exactly from the same point of view and distance, with reference to which you’d represent this object in your three dimensional sketch. Now to represent this object on paper, take three tracing sheets (Gateway*) and gradually build up your sketch on each successive sheet. The breakup of the object into basic primitives, central to the object should be considered, as well as the method of inscribing the object inside the cuboid should be practised. For example, you could use the first tracing sheet to draw only the basic shape or lines which contain or define the object. Later, you can add additional contours and indents to the basic shape on the second sheet. Use the third sheet to depict the finer details and complete the 3d representation of this object (in three or four successive stages). (See Fig 6.1).Fig. 6.1Tracing 01 Tracing 02 Tracing 03 You can compare your final sketch with the photograph you shot and edit the tracing sheets individually to remove discrepancies in your drawing. * Gateway is a well-know brand for tracing sheets
    • Before the course After the course 17Employing a methodical approach towards drawing of three dimensional objects. Student: Sumit Nair
    • Rationalizing Design Sensitivity 18 Picture from workshop on Visual Order at Symbiosis Institute of Design, Pune, India. Students: Saibal and Sharad Abstract: The advent of digital technology has created a radical shift in execution tools within the realm of graphic design. This has turned out to be a blessing and a problem in relation to the context and the user. Working with traditional tools, like the brush, ink, paper or pencils, which were simple to use, fortunately allowed errors while executing a task and indirectly promoted learning and sensitivity. More was understood by doing, sharing and observing each other, in comparison to computers, which nowadays, only permit individual participation from the user. Today’s new tools and software offer error-free execution, making a task easier for an individual to create a layout, use a typeface, choose a color or an image with ‘utmost insensitivity,’ particularly among novice learners of the discipline. Apparently, it leads them to demand more rational approaches to understand macro and micro issues related to graphic design. © Visible Language, 39.2 Rationalizing Design Sensitivity, Special issue, Rane M. 2005. 147-167 Download PDF at http://www.mrane.com/visorder01.htm
    • It’s a simple exercise, which provides an analogy to an obvious visual hierarchy, when made to stand together.Visual Order in graphic design, as well as a rationale (See right-hand corner, top). Remaining students of theto understand macro and micro issues in graphic design class shoot/ photograph these subjects in black andrealted to sensitivity. For this assignment we need three white (stills) with a digital camera, within a predefinedsubjects (i.e., in this case students). It is necessary that frame (Horizontal). This frame or the space, remains con-the subjects have an incremental difference in relation stant through out the exercise. The illustration belowto their physical features, as well as they should form will guide us through each task one has to perform. 19 Task 01 Task 02 Task 03 Task 04One subject: Create Interest...Interest here means: The power of attracting or holding picture is shot with the subject. The dots below theone’s (user) interest (because it is unusual or exciting) human figure, symbolize ‘interest levels’ that studentsor to be precise, we can say to create “emphasis”. To should try to create in each frame, in relation to the latter,begin with, some students shoot and execute the task i.e. beginning from task 02. So, one should try to achieve01, with a (single) subject and he acts out a gesture to incremental progress in each gesture with the help ofcreate an interesting frame. Students are free to choose a single subject. Find new ways to shoot the frame, toor direct the subject for the required gesture. The aim is make it more and more interesting than the previous.to create interest/ emphasis in the frame, when the Similar process continues till we reach task 04. Task 05 Task 06 Task 07 Shoot 2 subjects Shoot 2 subjects Shoot 2 subjects with with equal importance with predefined order reversed order in relation to the latterTwo subjects: Predefined order...In the next task, one has to choose the first and the last ould be equal to both the subjects. None of them shouldsubject from the three subjects we discussed in the get prominence/ precede over the other, in relation to thebeginning (or see top right hand corner of this page). It visual preference of the user. In task 06, according to themeans, skip the middle subject and choose the other order described above, (i.e. no.1 & no.2); students shouldtwo. So in physical features, we would have one subject shoot subjects with this pre-defined order, i.e., shoot theas very strong and the other comparatively weaker than subjects in a manner, where the resulting solution wouldthe first. Students should shoot the subjects in task 05 be tested with an user to find whether the desired resultwith equal importance, i.e., when the frame (that was was achieved. The task 07 follows the same procedureshot), is shown to a user, attention or the attraction sh- only with the reversed order. Task 08 Task 09 Task 10 Three subjects: predefined order Ten Subjects: predefined order (to be executed similar to task 06 and task 07) (One of the subject should be a female and she will be no.1 in order)
    • Student: NishantTask 01: Single subject, increasing emphasis 20 Single subject, increasing emphasis (Picture and typography). Comparisons, understanding the meaning of life in a font. Student: Siddharth, Task 01: Typographic Translations
    • Single subject, composition. A single subject in an enclosed space. The subject occupies a position in an empty space. The designer decides thealternative locations for the subject to be placed in an given empty space. 21
    • 22single subjectcreate interestA point of focus.A single element in an enclosed space. The element stands alone inan empty space at a location, in a particular position. The element inthat position interacts with the empty space. The position in which it isplaced divides the space symmetrically or asymmetrically.Attention grabbing with a single element in a predefined spaceis easier, because there is nothing else to look at. Moreover the elementhere is static and not dynamic. The placement of an single elementin a given space is not random, it is purposefull.
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    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Design Analysis and Critics | 316Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 04 Design Analysis & Critics 25 The material and practical nature of the world makes us vertical rather than lateral thinkers. Therefore, assignments in Basic Graphic Design1 are compartmentalized into right and wrong by vertical thinkers and if a functional reason is not found to act upon, then they are labeled as irrational. In such cases, it becomes critical for the instructor to design courses, which can address audiences comfortable to think with both the hemispheres (left & right), instead of creating dominance of one kind of thinking over the other. Metaphors2 and analogies 3 are excellent ways to understand concep- ts which need to be experienced. The course Visual order provides insights to the rationality that exist in the sensitive issues related to Graphic Design (Rane, 2005) 4. Instead of simply allowing oneself to comprehend these issues as in the course Visual Order, the present chapter will focus on task of a more pragmatic nature. It attempts to enable a student to practically do things on his own. The aim here is to work on solutions and analyze them with a solid foundation of elements and principles of design. The primary objective is to assist the students understanding towards analyzing as well as performing the role of a critique, specifically, for communication design solutions related to type and images. Attempt is to prepare the students to judge design solutions with more concrete answers, releasing them from the notions of likes and dislikes. 1 Basic Graphic Design: It includes teaching of elements and principles of Design. These courses are exploratory in nature and the objective is of learning by doing/ experiencing. 2 Metaphor: A metaphor is a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is substituted for a dissimilar subject to suggest a likeness or link between them. The original word or phrase then takes on qualities of the linked subject, increasing understanding. 3 Analogy: Analogy is the term for a description derived from a process of reasoning from parallel or similar cases explaining what unlike things share in common. 2,3 (Elizabeth Resnick, 2003) 5
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Design Analysis and Critics | 316Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 04 Design Analysis & Critics 26 The act of arranging words in a given white space is not random. The words (content) and the space (format) provided, define a correlation, interacting with each other in order to extract a hidden or visible visual hierarchy, usually pre-defined by the graphic designer through his design. As graphic designers, we tend to create order of importance, i.e., try to create emphasis in the elements of the page. Hierarchy defines the visual flow, priority of the elements, from larger to smaller, defining a path for the user’s convenience, while extracting the presented information. We will try to experience these visual hierarchies through a series of assignments and find out how elements and principles of design affect these hierarchies. Birthdate Death Assignment Birthday Task 01: A list of words is provided and you have to arrange these words, either close or far away from each other (in distance) within a given Dumb Name format. Try to exploit the subtle spatial distance, which would exist Intellectual between those two words in reaction to the question asked for each word - Father Mother 1. Your name1 (Write you name in the predefined format?) Friends 2. Birth date (How far you are from the date when you were born?) 3. Death (How far would you aspire to live from the present state?) 4. Birthday (How far or near you are from your next birthday?) 5. Dumb (How far you are from being dumb?) 6. Intellectual (How close you are from being intellectual?) All the questions will be answered 7. Father (How close are you to your father?) in relation to the Distance from the name. Name will act as a central 8. Mother (How close you are to your mother with respect to your father?) element (keyword) to all given 9. Friends (How close are you to your friends than to your parents?) words. This is an endeavor to use typographic variables, to design visual answers for a user/ viewer. One may realize enrichment of sensitivity towards white space or negative space. Note: Use font: Franklin Gothic Medium Condensed/ Regular, font size: 20 pts 1 Do not write your surname (Write your first name)
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Design Analysis and Critics | 316Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 04 Design Analysis & Critics 27 After the successful completion of the task 1, if we analyze the wor- ds and their relationship to the questions asked, we will be able to retrieve some answers resonating from the arrangement of words in relation to their distance, i.e., (away from or near to). Therefore, the probable question to a solution would be - is the student more (close) Variables (away from) (near to) attached to his mother when compared to his father? We can derive *Distance Farther Closer visual answers through subtle spatial distances, deliberately altered Value Lighter Darker by each subject to achieve the desired result in his solution. Now we will study the same questions by changing the acting variable, either Scale Smaller Bigger to the Value or the Scale. *(Already experimented variable in Task 01) Task 02: We are already familiar with the questions asked in the previous assignment. The same questions (as in task 1) are supposed to be addressed in this assignment also. Here you are supposed to replace far and close in relation to the Value Value Scale of the achromatic colour Black. Lighter the value of black more is the distance; darker the value of black, more is the closeness. Comprehending this simple relationship for far and close to Value Scale the given variable Value, you are expected to design task 2. You should not think of the variable Distance, rather you are only working with the variable Value. Please note, your solution Value Scale will be judged on the basis of Value and not the Distance. Value Scale Task 03: This task will tackle the third variable. Scale will act as the third independent variable with the same questions to Value Scale be answered. Something smaller in its scale will be termed as far and bigger in its scale will be considered as near. The variable of Distance and Value, will not be considered while judging Demonstrating meanings of the two variables ‘Value’ and ‘Scale’ your solutions. Complete the task by altering the scale of the words adhering to the logic of the questions asked. Value is the relative lightness or darkness of an area or object. Value adds dimension by creating the illusion of depth in a design. Scale refers to the process of making size relationships.
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Design Analysis and Critics | 316Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 04 Design Analysis & Critics 28 The completion of the three tasks gave us an idea, how the three variables - Distance, Value and Scale, affect the word relationships of away from (far) and near to (close) in a given format. All the variables were trying to create emphasis (a principle of design) for each word, against the posed questions in their respective groups. "Emphasis indicates the most important element on the page based on the message one wants to communicate. It could be said as the element which stands out and gets noticed first. The most emphasized visual element in design is called the focal point, because it attracts the viewer’s attention first". (Resnick, 2003)5. Therefore, we understand that emphasis creates an order of importance for the content (information). Every information that has to be communicated will usually have an order of importance (in the hierarchy of the content or the context to which it relates). It could be also defined as the starting point or the reference point to begin within each chunk of information. As graphic designers, we create these hierarchies in given contextual constraints to ease retrieval of information for the user/ viewer. This hierarchy is achieved in design solutions by employing elements and principles of design to one’s advantage. Task 04: a. Employ line (an element of design) in the background of your solution, in high key, to emphasize your name. Use the line to enhance maximum perception of distance. Your use of line should not disturb readability of the solution. Clue - Attempt to alter the topology of white space to visualize depth. b. Create emphasis for your Name using the variable distance, you are not allowed to change the font. Only variable of distance can be altered to your advantage. Questions to be answered Emphasis attracts the user attention to a particular will remain the same. point in the presented information first. The most emphasized element is called the focal point (for example, No.1 in the c. Fill the whole background with 100% (k) black picture, forces visual attention). Secondary and tertiary focal and try to emphasize your name. (You can to use all points are called accents. (No.2 and No.3 are accents) three variables to achieve your solution, but you cannot Design after all has unique capacity to shape information by: to change the font). Questions to be answered will remain 1. Emphasizing or understanding, the same. 2. Comparing or ordering, 3. Grouping or sorting, 4. Selecting or omitting, 5. Opting for immediate or delayed recognition, 6. Presenting it in an interesting fashion.
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Design Analysis and Critics | 316Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 04 Design Analysis & Critics 29 When we compare a piece of art and the work of the graphic designer from a viewers (user) perspective, it would be necessary Fig. 5.1 for us to understand the difference between both kinds of visual enquiries. An artist creates art for self expression and the viewer has the freedom to interpret meaning out of the artist expression. 01. Your name 02. Birthdate A graphic designer has rarely any room for self expression. 03. Death Moreover, they can never be physically present to explain their 04. Birthday designed solutions to the viewer. Graphic designer has to visually 05. Dumb communicate the clarity of the message in the absense of the 06. Intellectual viewer, to make it least ambiguous as well as achieve their sole 07. Mother goal of effective communication. You have to understand this 08. Friends difference before designing solutions, thus prioritizing the viewer’s perception and perspective. 09. Marriage 10. Ambition 4 new words introduced Task 05: 11. Money In this task one has to predefine the numerical order (1 to 13) 12. God for the words of the previous exercise and the additional words shown in the figure 5.1 as per one’s own preference. This numerical 13. Father order should be independent of the relationships they share with the keyword (name) and has no relation to the questions that were A sample depiction of numerical ordering of the words. asked earlier. Your task is to define your own numerical order to You are free to define your numerical order for words. the given set of words. Your solutions will be judged on the Four new words are added to the previous list. basis of your predefined numerical order. So, first, you begin with assigning a number to each word, including your name. You will present your numerical order in the format that would be provided. Once the numerical orders are frozen write a description for each word consisting of 15 words. (Please revise your description to maintain a minimum of 13 words Father: A source of strength. An idol. or maximum of 17 words). All descriptions have to be presented Source of security and comfort. according to the predefined format. Create your solutions in the A constant motivator. given format. Even though the user will be unaware of the numerical order while judging your solutions, ensure that your solution should A sample description for the word Father. You are free make them perceive the same numerical order which you to write short sentences as in the example above or one had preset. sentence which may comprise of 17 words. You are expected to come up with two solutions: a. Define the order of 13 words without descriptions, use same font, and consider all three variables. b. Define the order of 13 words with descriptions for each word. You have full freedom of using any font with additional elements of design to support your solution.
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Design Analysis and Critics | 316Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 04 Design Analysis & Critics 30 In communication design, an important factor to be considered is the amount of information to be conveyed. It may vary upon what one wants to communicate, in what 01. Your name quantities, and to whom. Communication, therefore, could be 02. Birthdate for a leaflet, a telephone directory, a brochure, or a poster. 03. Death The common criterion that stands out in all these mediums 04. Birthday of communication is to define the order of priority to their related 05. Dumb information. When the amount of information is less or the types 06. Intellectual of information are limited, hierarchy of information in a group or groups needs to be highlighted. In such situations the role of 07. Mother emphasis shifts with respect to each group. It can be also termed 08. Friends as developing a sense of visual/ logical sequence in the information. 09. Marriage For the upcoming task (task 6) we will try to chunk information in groups to understand the concept via the presented hypothetical 10. Ambition situation. 11. Money 12. God Task 06: 13. Father The users are supposed to perceive the same numerical order of words in the solution of this task, as they did in the preceding task. But additionally, the objective is also to make the user perceive A sample depiction of chunking four distinct groups consisting of elements (1 to 3), (4 to 6), (7 to 9), of words in groups. You should still and (10 to 13), respectively, of the predefined numerical order. adhere to the defined order This chunking of elements into four groups should not conflict with of perception. the individual perception/ sequence of these elements from (1 to 13). Here the subject is free to use all elements and principles of design, except the element colour.
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Design Analysis and Critics | 316Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 04 Design Analysis & Critics 31 Task 07: As instructed in advance, you all should have clear, black and white pictures of minimum 150 ppi (postcard size) 01. Your name* of you and your parents. In task07, you will be replacing words 02. Birthdate with images, i.e., replace the words, your name, mother and 03. Death father with their respective photographs. 04. Birthday After these three changes, draw upon your solutions to 05. Dumb the preceding task to maintain the same numerical order and 06. Intellectual perception of the same four groups of elements. Please note that even after the introduction of strong visual elements as 07. Mother* photographs, the user’s perception of your predefined numer- 08. Friends ical order and the hierarchy of groups should not change. 09. Marriage Please note: All solutions are to be rendered in grayscale. No Color/ Sepia tone photographs should be used, only black and white 10. Ambition photographs are allowed. 11. Money 12. God 13. Father* *Replace with Black & White Photos. Replace the mentioned words with photographs without altering the pre- decided numerical order of the task. Execute your solutions so that the user can perceive the same visual order as predefined by you.
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Corporate Identity Program | 312Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 10 Corporate Identity Program 32 "When a black spot is located on a white ground, this is already perceived as a three-dimensional situation. This is cleary reflected in langauge: The spot is said to be on the white ground, i.e., the spot is in the foreground and the white is its background. The eye separates the parts of a two dimensional picture into figure and ground, i.e., it interprets two-dimensional form in a three-dimensional manner. Frequently, linear forms are also perceived as three-dimensional. The criteria for the separation of figure and ground lie in the relative size of the forms and in the shape of their outlines". (Moritz Zwimper, 2001, Chapter 07) 6 Knowledge of figure and ground with typography are indispensable for any graphic designer to design effective logos and symbols. In this assignment, we will try to experience the figure & ground relationship in letterforms. Aim of the exercise is to explore possibilities; as to what is the least amount of ground required to identify a letterform when it is reversed and to get The letterform in sensitive to the subtle changes which matter in recognizing Devnagri Script is an unique the letterforms through an user study. arrangement of the strokes and curves to create an abstract shape which is recognized by a certain Task 01: group of people or culture and Type the first letter of your name in Devnagri Script. used to communicate in the Font face - Manjusha Bold. form of language. Your Name: First Letterform: Add black background to your letterform, so that the letterform appears white and the (ground) as black. Keep on trimming (deleting) the black portion (i.e., the ground) around your letterform (i.e., the figure) to the maximum possible extent without losing the identity of the letterform, meaning you should be able to identify the letterform (figure) with least possible (ground) black area. Generate various An exploration to investigate alternatives by juxtaposing the letterform over the black back- the identity of the letterform by ground to study which are those vital curves/ counters, necessary, creation of ground in least possible to make or break the identity of the letterform. Create five variations counters and the space around to investigate the identity of the letterform within an area 5 x 5 cms. the letterform. Create the identity task with any one Roman letterform. Take care you don’t repeat the letterform amongst yourselves. Create five variations of identity investigations for your chosen Roman letterform.
    • 33 The purpose of the exercise was to extract the most basic curves of the alphabet that made recognition possible by the human eye. As the positive space (the black area) was reduced more and more frivolous curves were dis- carded and the eye moved towards the basic most essential part of the alphabet. The smaller triangles were discarded for the sake of harmony. Student: Sidhharth GuptaLetterform:
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Corporate Identity Program | 312Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 10 Corporate Identity Program 34 Task 02: This exercise tries to formulate a balance between the letterform and added meaning, in other words, you don’t lose the visual appearance of the letterform (i.e., to be able to recognize the letterform when visually perceived) and at the same time it should also express a metaphor (added meaning). It explores the designers ability to represent dual meanings in a single letterform. 1. Use first alphabet of your Surname or Name (in case it starts with W or I, then please use an another letter). 2. Assume a light source from any angle and create depth. Don’t end up creating, mere shadow of the letterform. Find possible solution where the shadow becomes the part of the letterform (as shown in the second stage; Depth of the letter W). 3. In the third stage create a visual surprise out of the letterform without losing the identity of the letterform. Letterform Depth Visual Surprise
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Corporate Identity Program | 312Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 10 Corporate Identity Program 35 Visual + text = Symbol Fig. 3.5 Task 03: Till now, we have understood negative and positive space and creation of depth in the last exercise. While creation of symbols one often has to deal with combination of visual metaphors as well as written text (either the name of the company or initials), fuse together to form a unit as a whole. Communication designers face these challenges while creating symbols. The example shown above is picture of a kid and the shop name “toykid” which has been cleverly transformed to form a single group. The designer has changed the font to (smooth, rounded edges), conscious to the fact of it being a Kid’s store, and substituting the letter “O” with the kid’s face in a circle. You are challenged with a similar task and are expected to come up with alternatives. The aim here is of an exploratory nature where you should create options to generate harmonious combinations of the pictorial element and text to complete the symbol. (It is an exploratory task devoid of context) You are free to alter the font according to the requirements of the symbol. If you don’t find font which suits your purpose, you may try calligraphic strokes instead of true type fonts.
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Corporate Identity Program | 312Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 10 Corporate Identity Program 36 In an elementary stage of symbol design, designer should be aware of basic fundamentals which create a good symbol. Understanding of figure and ground, principles of lines, shape and form are few essentials without which one should not proceed. Other than these there are significant questions such as “why do we need an identity?” “Do non-living things have identity?”, “How does it affect an organization or a product?” etc... Myriad examples of logos, symbols, icons, either typographic, descriptive or abstract can be found in numerous books which are Name : endorsed by principles of basic design. Attempts to search figure First letter : and ground relationships with explorations in negative space has Hostel Room No. : resulted in numerable solutions for Roman Scripts (English). Most of them can be found on hte internet and in books. But, there still lies a lot of potential for indian designers to exploit typographic quality of local languages, (Devangri or Assamese scripts). Task 04: You have to create a small symbol for identification of your hostel rooms. Your creation should be combination of numericals and letterforms (i.e., your Hostel Room No. and your Name or Surname). Combination of these two script elements should emerge as your solution. For example (See Fig. 4.1). You can scale, Fig. 4.1 rotate, or shrink, (but cannot distort or skew) to create a unique identity, which would be reminiscent of your personality (dynamic, imaginative, or extraordinary). This act of designating your identity visually can form doorplates of your hostel rooms or stickers (labels) to personalize your belongings. Does colour evoke Are we important in emotions? identity design? Use one colour of your choice from the limited set of colours shown above and use it for your hostel room no.s (to depict personality of the room) or the letterform (to represent yourself).
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Corporate Identity Program | 312Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 10 Corporate Identity Program 37 Introduction: If we extend the edges of the letterforms along the axis we are able to perceive dimen- sions and depth. Carefully observe the people White space gives Addition of two in (Fig 5.1). Some of them appear hiding behind perception of the white stripes gives Fig. 5.1 an invisible vertical face of the form “ “ which is face or side of a birth to another white. One can use this principle as an advantage three dimensional letter form “E”. to explore other letterforms in that space. plane. Sticker/ Image Mapped on each face The base (ground) of one of the Perceived dimension after of the cube in a 3D software face of the cube was deleted. deletion of the remaining base. Task 05: We have seen explorations of the symbols on different faces. In this exercise you will have to study the mapping of your sym- bol (which you created in the last assignment) not on only cubes (Fig 5.2) but on varied 3D forms (may be cylinders or spheres). Once you have mapped them delete the 3D form in an image editing software. See (Fig 5.3) for reference. The aim in the explorations will not be just random mapping in 3D software, but to learn to see a shape from all possible angles and how an image, just by the way it is mapped creates perception of depth and dimensions when the original form is deleted. The importance of it still being ‘readable’ should be considered while execution.Fig. 5.2 Fig. 5.3
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Corporate Identity Program | 312Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 10 Corporate Identity Program 38 Can one pixel be so critical to identify a Original Letterform Pixelated Letterform letter form? Does adding the pixel enhance the readability of the letter form.Fig. 6.1 Task 06: The illustration in Fig 6.1 describes how a pixel can create difference in recognition of the letterforms made with pixels. Display of these letterforms becomes a critical issue when displayed on small mobile phone screens. We will try to explore various possibilities of curves transforming into pixels and their aspects of legibility and readability for electronic displays. Choose any one pair of letterforms in the circles given below and work in (1x1inch) file of 16 ppi to convert them into pixelated letterforms. Devnagri Script Assamese Script
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Corporate Identity Program | 312Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 10 Corporate Identity Program 39 Letterform “E” E + Fish E + Hot soup Letterforms become interesting when you are able to see a figure in the remaining portion (negative space/ counters) of the letterform. See the above examples in which you can see a letterform as well as a picture. The designer alters the negative space to his advantage, according to the given brief (client’s business). Further he translates the concept of the verbal brief into one integrated visual symbol. Task 07: This assignment is simple as well as complex!. You have to begin with two words. Key and Fire, use the negative space of these two words in an interesting manner, so that it enhances the meaning of the word. One student sample work is provided. You are free to choose a fontface of your choice for both the words. A cohesive integration of the word and the visual element would be a challenge. Your solutions will somewhat resemble Fig 7.1 in principle.Fig. 7.1 Student: Kirti Meera Goel (sample for reference) 1. Key 2. Fire
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Corporate Identity Program | 312Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 10 Corporate Identity Program 40 Task 08: Project Hello class, today we will simulate a real design practice environment. You will be presented with a brief and are ex- pected to come up with ideas for “Connect” (calling the future) a mobile service provider, who is to launch their service in India under the brand name “Connect” with a supporting base line (calling the future). The client aims to launch a chain of shops in all the shopping malls across the country. These chain of shops will be launched under the brand name “Connect” (calling the future). The names written in the (Fig. 8.1) are dummy font faces used by the Senior Designer. Your task is to come up with ideas for the symbol and suggest a suitable font face for the logo. Connect will be providing cellular services throughout the country and claims to provide better connectivity, which is lacking in most of their competitors. Connectivity will be the major highlight due to use of superior technology in comparison to their competitors. Better connectivity, (network access) is Fig. 8.1 the strongest USP the client claims. Connect aims to target rural as well as the urban market. The brand name “Connect”, will appear in different languages for the symbol, as per the state where the service is offered, but the base line (calling the future) will always remain constant. Client expects the design firm to come up with simple graphic design solutions, which can be easily articulated by their con- sumers. The client plans to launch two more services under the same brand by the end of the year. He expects consistency in the brand image which will look modern as well as be appealing to the younger generation.
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Graphic Design - Book Design | 204Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 10 Graphic Design - Book Design 41 The primary objective of this course is to orient you with the meaning of word ‘graphic design’ as a whole, in the context of visual communication through theory and practice. To acquaint oneself with the essentials of basic design, which are mandatory within the knowledge bank of a designer, irrespective of he being a product designer or a graphic designer. This course will instill confidence into students by achievement of specific graphic design skills aimed at employing formal order into visual solutions. The course focuses on primary issues in words and image, which form an integral part of any visual communication. Tasks are designed to comprehend the relationship of the white space to written matter embedding into us the basics of typography. Pragmatic benefits: Awareness to grid in product brochures, leaflets, manuals, etc. Application of design elements and principles to translate rationality in the whole act of designing. Acquiring skills to design your own portfolio and document one’s work irrespective of the medium. Assignment: Creating a book cover design and inside pages for the given topic. Text for the inside pages will be provided to you. Brief: Title of the book “Cognitive Psychology”. Cognitive psychology refers to cognition as higher mental processes. The origin of knowledge and its representation in the mind is the fundamental question that cognitive psychology deals with. In a wider context, however, it refers to knowledge or act of knowing and in socio-cultural context it refers to emergent development of knowledge and concepts within a group. Dimensions: 240 x 180 mm Emotion: Sad + Happy Step 1. You will be provided a graphic. You have to use the graphic and create four options using any one or all principles of design. Each option should be an interesting composition in (black and white) resonating with the theme of the book. Figure and ground relationships should be used to create images with high graphic quality. The graphic should be created in an area of 180 (W) x 240 (H) mm (portrait). You are free to work in a vector program of your choice.
    • Course : Graphic Design DD 204Student : Vamshi ReddyDetails : Perfect Binding, 180 x 240mm (portrait) 42
    • Course : Graphic Design DD 204Student : Aditya Bhandhari & Vikas VaishnavContent : Grid Systems. Book Design Basics 43
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Introduction to Computer Graphics | 121Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 08 Computer Graphics 44 Certain complex objects, living or non-living can be represented in simple graphical forms. Such representations help us to understand one of the aspect of graphic design. Icons and symbols are simplified graphic forms. They facilitate ease in communication as well as save space. Advantages of these simple graphic forms is their property of being language independent and need not be translated. The process of simpli- fication requires design inputs from a graphic designer who has acquired the skill of breaking (realistic) images into simplified two or three dimensional forms. Example: While designing a label for a Honey bottle, attempts to display a realistic representation or a photograph of the honey bee would appear weird and ugly. Whereas, a simplified graphic representation Sample of a detailed picture which has been of the honey bee, semantically cute, accentuates the product simplified in the examples shown below. communication and persuasion. Reducing complex information by use of elements of design to assign it new attributes of outlined Assignment: (curves), Filled (curves), Robotic (solid or geometric). Aim of the exercise will be to work with draw/ vector programs as well as be efficient/ creative in simplifying of a complex form. The challenge lies with the graphic designer as, how can he make a form interesting as well as keep it simple. Your task here will be to simplify your chosen picture and find solutions similar to figure a, b and c.a. b. c. Black & white artworks: Student - Siddharth Gupta Coloured variation of geometric form, Robotic - Solid
    • 45 1. 3. Outline (curves) Robotic (solid) 2. 4. Fill (curves)Student: Siddharth Gupta | Artworks 1,2,& 3
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaPunctuality in submissionInnovativeness in solutions Course Details:Translation into appropriate visual expression Elements of Design | 102 Credits: 04 Elements of Design I 46 Elements of design are: Line, Shape, Space, Size, Texture, & Colour. Principles of design are: The principles of design – Balance, Emphasis, Rhythm, Unity, Contrast. These principles explain why certain orientations of lines, shapes, forms, textures and colours seem to be orderly and pleasing. Assignment: Line: Today we will experiment semantic expressions with one of the element (line). In a given format we will try to depict meanings with lines. We will use lines as the syntax for our assignment. Task 01: To begin with you are given a list of words. You will work in a predefined format. The format will be provided to you in the begining of the assignment. You should work within the predefined area with help of lines to represent semantic expressions of the following words: 01. Travelling/ going away 02. Falling 03. GrowingStudent: Saibal Datta 04. StrugglingInstitute: Symbiosis Institute of Design Pune (SID) 05. Inflate* 06. ExcitedChosen word: Inflate 07. Pushingexpand 08. Runningincrease 09. Flyingenlarge 10. Stop/ haltingpressure 11. Sleepingburst 12. Smile/ frown 13. DyingWhile thinking about the word “inflate”, 14. Killinginitially I was thinking very obvious and illustrative. 15. Jumping.Then I thought these two lines as characters, so asmall line watching other one inflating and taking a shape Constraints: You are allowed to use only two lines.of a balloon - Saibal Datta (SID) The modification of the line (at the nodes) should not create a sharp curve. A smooth continuity of a line is acceptable*Provided solution is an example, you can choose to create your new expression for the word. when done by adjusting the beziers or spline handels. Stroke width of the lines should be 9 points. Please Note: The work area is 240 x 180mm. (Horizontal)
    • PushpressurestrengthsupressmoveshoveThe word “Push” suggestssomething like pressure or probablyjust a simple forward movement. Thatshow I thought of this idea, which is littleillustrative. 47Jumphighflyskipbasket ballspringIntially I thought of a spring jumping and itlooked like a curly line, but it appeared tome very complex. Then I thought of basketball and made this one.GrowincreaseprogressiondeveloplargerexpandGrow sounds something big andprogressing. So, I thought of the obvious,about men made with single lines. Earlier,I thought of tree and plants growing. Butlater when I did this solution, it was lookingbetter than the earlier ones.Student: Saibal Datta - Communication DesignSID. Symbiosis Institute of Design, Pune, IndiaExample of the advanced level of the course. Figure: Dependency.
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar Rane & Utpal BaruaAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaPunctuality in submissionInnovativeness in solutions Course Details:Translation into appropriate visual Elements of Design | 105expression Credits: 04 Elements of Design II 48 A smile in mind: "Thank goodness the brain is designed to be uncreative. With eleven items of clothing to put on there would be 39,916800 ways of getting dressed. The brain is designed to make patterns, to use them and to stick to them. That is why we can get dressed, eat breakfast, cross the road and do more less useful work when we get to office. Creativity, concept formation and all wonderfull aspects of the brain are nothing to do with these established patterns; they arise from the brains defect as an information system". (Foreword by Edward de Bono)7. Elements In the last class we explored line as an element with a given word. All of us concluded with interesting solutions. You need to submit one exploration of line which would finalized by the instructors to be further executed in a vector program Adobe illustrator. Guidelines for submission: You will submit two pdf files Please follow the naming convention: (Add your name not the surname) 1. Yourname_01_mon_dd_yy.pdf 2. Yourname_02_mon_dd_yy.pdf ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- We need to understand the last class of the course as an introduction to working with the tools (softwares) of our pro- fession. These software packages (in our case a vector program like Adobe illustrator) would help us realize our ideas into visual Figure 3.1 expressions. Therefore, proficiency with the software to a mini- mum level seemed to be a prerequisite, before we could dwell into experiencing any further complexities of the course, elements of Design II, Course 105. Assuming all of you are comfortable with the software, Adobe Illustrator we proceed into the next task. Task 03: Draw a blank square of 140 x 140 mm with a stroke width of 0.25pt. centered in an document size of A4, (orientation potrait). With the elements shown in (Figure 3.1) create a face with an expression. Try to orient the elements in different configurations to achieve interesting facial expressions. Keep on generating alternatives and encourage your mind to search for new possibi- lities. Find new ways of organizing the same elements. Under- stand creativity and constraints as an integral part of the design process. Please note the constraints: You cannot use any extra element/ s apart from the depicted in figure 3.1.
    • Advanced levels of the course,Translating expressions out of simple forms. Student: Vineet Chaudhary Expression: Stunned. Shocked 49 Student: Shanuj Sharma Expression: Dejected. Depressed Student: Maadaram Jaychandra Expression: Astonished. Oh!
    • Evaluation Criteria: Mandar RaneAccuracy and neatness in execution Industrial Design CentreDevotion and diligence towards the work Indian Institute of Technology BombayRegularity and punctuality in attendance Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaFrequency in interaction with teachersPresentation and documentation Course Details:Time management and punctuality in submission Design Project II A | 303Innovativeness in solutions Credits: 10 Design Project II A 50 Course Content: System design project to be undertaken from the domain of Communication system/ Product system. Exhibition Design project students are exposed to different parameters of exhibition design/ Information design. It involves development of theme, categorization of information, application of reproduction mediums, designing of physical structures, space planning, costing and new techniques of production and presentation. This project emphasizes on demonstrating the internalization of design studies. The student engages in intensive information collection, analysis and formulation of the design problem. Following this concept generation, detailing and design finalization with suitability for manufacture will be worked out. In this process the student will experience specific challenges faced in design within selected subject area of his choice. Topics: Redesign of the Mumbai City Bus Route Guide - Siddharth Mohan Redesign of IIT Bombay Bus Timetable - Tanuj Shah
    • Course : Design Project 303Student : Siddharth MohanProject : Mumbai Bus route Guide Redesign 51
    • Course : Design Project 303 Student : Tanuj Shah Project : IIT Guwahati Bus Time-table Redesign48 52
    • Evaluation Criteria: Industrial Design CentreAccuracy and neatness in execution Indian Institute of Technology BombayDevotion and diligence towards the work Powai, Mumbai - 76, IndiaRegularity and punctuality in attendanceFrequency in interaction with teachers Course Details:Presentation and documentation Graphic Design - Book Design | 204Time management and punctuality in submission Credits: 10Innovativeness in solutions Course 204. Grade sheet 53Student name Grade Obtained A A A B B B B C C C C D D D 35 - 32 31 - 28 27 - 24 23 - 20 19 - 16 15 - 12 11 - 08Roll No. 3 - Satisfying 5 - Excellent 2 - Average 4 - Good 1 - Poor Evaluation Criteria Scale of 1 - 5 Attendance Cover page (Ideation) Knowledge of software and its use Set 01/ two column grid options Set 02/ three column grid options Binding/ Cutting/ Pasting Precision Articulation/ Devotion/ Diligence Dt. Mon. Yr.Date:Instructor/ s Comment/ s Marks obtained out of 35 You have an incomplete/ fail in this course I F FIndustrial Design Centre,Indian Institute of Technology Bombay,Powai, Mumbai - 76, India. Instructor/ s Signature/ s
    • coming soon! 54Translations from Nature
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    • 56Corruption (§É¹]õÉSÉÉ®ú) Missing (±ÉÖ{iÉú)Horror with hands (¦ÉªÉÉxÉEò ½þÉlÉú) Inhale exhale (ºÉÉÄºÉ ±ÉäxÉÉ +Éè®ú UôÉäc÷xÉÉ)
    • 57Everybody smokes (ºÉ¦ÉÒ vÉÚ©É{ÉÉxÉ Eò®úiÉä ½éþú) Mental hair (¨ÉÉxÉʺÉEò Eòɱ{ÉÊxÉEòiÉÉ)Indian Crabs (¦ÉÉ®úiÉÒªÉ EäòEòcä÷) Transitional (ºÉÆGò¨ÉhÉÄ) Save rth. ea ye ur m arth . Save yo
    • 58Boiled tiger (=¤É±ÉÉ ½Öþ+É ¶Éä®) Development (Ê´ÉEòɺÉ)Constraints ({ÉɤÉÆÊnùªÉÉÄú) A4 ({ɽþÉc÷ Eäò EòÉNÉVÉ)
    • References: Dear Friends, Credits 1. D.K. Ching Francis, Drawing - A creative process, Earlier publications of A5 My sincere thanks to Van Nostrand Reinhold, Newyork 1990, 108. size were too small to be read. all my colleagues at the ISBN- 0 442 31818 9 Therefore a new format was Department of Design, Indian designed, so each assignment Institute of Technology Guwahati, 2. Josef Müller-Brockmann, Grid systems in graphic design, can be read, shared, referred I enjoyed working there and A visual communication manual for graphic designers, typographers and argued upon. this is an sincere attempt to and three dimensional designers, Verlag Niggli AG, 1996. document those memories. ISBN- 3 72 120 145 0 Your comments on design of the book or assignments is Thanks to my students: 3. Philip B. Meggs, Type and Image, welcome. Your feedback would -------------------------------------- The language of graphic design, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1989. be valuable. Ashish Singhal, pp. 1 ISBN- 0 471 28492 0 Kirti Meera Goel, pp. 39,15 Greetings Siddharth Gupta, pp. 33,44,45 4. Robin Capon - Drawing, Mandar Rane Jaini Shiva Rama krishna Teach yourself books, U.K., 1993. Kshitij Gupta 59 ISBN- 0 340 58306 6 Satyendra Nainwal Satyajit Das 5. Elizabeth Resnick, Vinay Mohanty Design for Communication, Conceptual Graphic Design Basics, Tanuj Shah, pp. 52 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 24, 2003. ISBN- O 471 41829 3 -------------------------------------- Abhishek Dhal Amit Bharti 6. Moritz Zwimper, 2D Visual perception, Manshu Aneja Elementary Phenomena of two-dimensional perception. Dinesh Nagar A handbook for artists and designers, Divya Gupta Verlag Niggli AG, Chapter 07, Figure-Ground, 2001. Kartikeya Shandilya ISBN- 3 7212 0277 5 Nishant Mungali, pp. 9,14,15 Vedant Mheta 7. Beryl McAlhone & David Stuart, A Smile in the Mind, Lakshyajeet Gogoi Witty thinking in graphic design, Phaidon Press Limited, 1998. Monil Khare, pp. 14 ISBN- 07148 3812 8 Prashant Dixit Vikram Batra 8. Bradshaw Mike, Research study drawing from visual thinking, Shaiz Kunhimohammed, pp. 14 School for graphic design, London college of printing, The London Institute Siddharth Mohan, pp. 20,51 U.K. Cltda conference 2002 Sumit Nair, pp. 17Further Reading: Saurabh Srivastava -------------------------------------- 9. Indian Symbology - Trilokesh Mukherjee, Shanuj Sharma, pp. 49 (In search of a symbol for India - A problem), Vineet Chaudhary, pp. 49 Industrial Design Centre, IIT, Mumbai, 155. Jan, 1987. Jaya Chandra, pp. 49 --------------------------------------10. Manu Desai, Indian Graphic Symbols, A study by Manu Desai, Soumitra Bhatt Published In India, 1985, Ashutosh Prakashan, 58/ 486, Unnat Nagar 2, Rahul Bhatt Swami Vivekanand Road, Goregoan (West), Bombay - 400602. Navendu Tripathi Kshitij Anand11. Alan Pipes, Third Edition, Production for Graphic Designers, -------------------------------------- Lawrence king Publishing, 1992, 1997, 2001. Symbiosis Institute of Design ISBN- 1 85669 268 X Pune, Maharashtra, India12. Harm J. G. Zwaga, Theo Boersema, Henriëtte C. M. Hoonhout, Tanvi Dalal, pp. 54 Visual information for everyday use, Design and research perspectives Saibal Datta, pp. 47 Taylor & Francis Group, 1999. -------------------------------------- ISBN- 0 7484 0670 0 Mumbai, India13. Rob Carter, Ben Day, Philip Meggs, Typographic Design: Form and Communication, Second Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1993. ISBN- 0-471-28430-014. Deana Mc Donagh, Paul Hekkert, Jeroen Van Erp and Diane Gyi, Design and Emotion: The experience of everyday things, Taylor & Francis Group, London and Newyork, 2004. ISBN- 0-415-30363-X15. H Kumar Vyas, Design The Indian Context, Learning the Historical rationale of the Indian Design Idiom, Tridip Suhrud, Chairman Publications Department, NID, 2000. ISBN- 81-86199 -38-116. Steven Heller, The education of a typographer, Allworth Press, 2004. ISBN- 1-58115-348-117. Wolfgang Weingart, Typography, Basel, Lars Muller, 1989. ISBN- 3-907044-86-X
    • 60Family photograph: Brother, father, mother and myself. With the blessings from my family and you, let my curiosity grow forever and I keep on searching for new avenues in visual domains of design. Mandar Rane.IDC, IIT Bombay