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Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
Bioastronomy - Craig Brown
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Bioastronomy - Craig Brown

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  • 1. An inquiry approach in usingAn inquiry approach in using Bioastronomy as a context for learningBioastronomy as a context for learning science in middle schools.science in middle schools. Craig Brown Deputy Principal Sylvania High School Australian Schools Innovation inAustralian Schools Innovation in Science, Technology and MathematicsScience, Technology and Mathematics (ASISTM Project 2007-2009)(ASISTM Project 2007-2009)
  • 2. What is Bioastronomy?What is Bioastronomy?  An integrated discipline of ScienceAn integrated discipline of Science which aims to answer THREEwhich aims to answer THREE questions:questions:  Is there life beyond Earth?Is there life beyond Earth?  What is the origin of life on Earth?What is the origin of life on Earth?  What is the fate of life in the universe?What is the fate of life in the universe?
  • 3. Integrated Unit OverviewIntegrated Unit Overview ‘The Search for Life on Mars’‘The Search for Life on Mars’ Science – Learning about bioastronomy 6 weeks 22 hours Maths –What maths skills are needed to achieve mission goals? Technology– Using robotics to obtain Martian rock for testing Primary – COGS style unit based around bioastronomy Link – Peer mentoring & teacher associate visits
  • 4. Bioastronomy and ContextualBioastronomy and Contextual Learning in the Middle SchoolLearning in the Middle School  This project aimed to use Bioastronomy as a context toThis project aimed to use Bioastronomy as a context to develop a fully integrated science, technology anddevelop a fully integrated science, technology and mathematics unit for both primary and secondary students.mathematics unit for both primary and secondary students.  The context of the two units was the return of a Martian rockThe context of the two units was the return of a Martian rock sample so it could be examined for past or present life.sample so it could be examined for past or present life.  The units was aimed at developing knowledge,The units was aimed at developing knowledge, understanding, skills, values and attitudes in the Middleunderstanding, skills, values and attitudes in the Middle School.School.  Year 8 students from four high schools completedYear 8 students from four high schools completed approximately 40 hours of integrated course instruction andapproximately 40 hours of integrated course instruction and acted as peer tutors to engage students from local primaryacted as peer tutors to engage students from local primary schools in Years 5/6 in a complementary curriculum unitschools in Years 5/6 in a complementary curriculum unit involving the programming of a model robotic Martian Roverinvolving the programming of a model robotic Martian Rover and the analysis of Martian soil sample.and the analysis of Martian soil sample.
  • 5. Intended Teacher OutcomesIntended Teacher Outcomes 1. Develop experience in the design of programs using contextual learning and the NSW QTL framework. 2. Develop skills in robotics and related computer technologies as well as knowledge and expertise in current scientific research. 3. Collaborate across KLAs, a range of different school types and various educational and other organisations. 4. Develop skills in dealing with teaching and learning issues related to middle schooling and aspects of literacy and numeracy within teaching programs. 5. Integrate cross curricular perspectives and mentor other colleagues in defined areas of professional learning.
  • 6. Intended Student OutcomesIntended Student Outcomes 1. Develop leadership, team building and peer tutoring skills. 2. Gain a better understanding of how Science, Mathematics and Technology work together in the real world and its significance. 3. Develop deep knowledge and understanding, problem solving and experience high level engagement. 4. Engage in co-operative learning, research skills and capitalise on the strengths that individuals bring to team situations.
  • 7. Intended Teacher Associate &Intended Teacher Associate & Partner Organisation OutcomesPartner Organisation Outcomes 1. Gain insight and appreciation of how students learn and are nurtured into fields of scientific endeavour. 2. Experience close partnership development between educators and other organisations and recognise the value that organisations bring to such endeavours.
  • 8. SchoolsSchools
  • 9. School PartnersSchool Partners  Beverly Hills Girls High SchoolBeverly Hills Girls High School  Beverly Hills North Public SchoolBeverly Hills North Public School  Caringbah High SchoolCaringbah High School  Caringbah North Public SchoolCaringbah North Public School  Georges River College Hurstville BoysGeorges River College Hurstville Boys CampusCampus  Hurstville Public SchoolHurstville Public School  Narwee Public SchoolNarwee Public School  Sylvania Heights Public SchoolSylvania Heights Public School  Sylvania High SchoolSylvania High School  Sylvania Public SchoolSylvania Public School
  • 10. Organisation PartnersOrganisation Partners  Australian Centre for Astrobiology (ACA)Australian Centre for Astrobiology (ACA)  Macquarie ICT Innovagtions CentereMacquarie ICT Innovagtions Centere  Mars Society of Australia (MSA)Mars Society of Australia (MSA)  National Aeronautics & SpaceNational Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA)Administration (NASA)  SETI InstituteSETI Institute  University of Western SydneyUniversity of Western Sydney
  • 11. Teacher Associates mentoringTeacher Associates mentoring teachers.teachers.
  • 12. Peer Tutoring-MentoringPeer Tutoring-Mentoring with SETI Teacher associatewith SETI Teacher associate (Science/Maths)(Science/Maths)
  • 13. Peer Tutoring-MentoringPeer Tutoring-Mentoring at MacICTat MacICT –– (Robotics)(Robotics)
  • 14. Peer Tutoring-MentoringPeer Tutoring-Mentoring in Rocketry - Michael Westin Rocketry - Michael West (Science)(Science)
  • 15. Peer Tutoring-MentoringPeer Tutoring-Mentoring in Early Earth - Prof. Malcolmin Early Earth - Prof. Malcolm Walter (Science)Walter (Science)
  • 16. Peer Tutoring-MentoringPeer Tutoring-Mentoring in ‘Martian Soil’ Testingin ‘Martian Soil’ Testing –– Local High SchoolsLocal High Schools (Science/Maths)(Science/Maths)
  • 17. Project Findings ForProject Findings For Primary StudentsPrimary Students (University of Western Sydney )(University of Western Sydney ) Students had a high level of overall interest in Science, Mathematics, and Technology experiences. Student interest before & after project in order: Technology Science Mathematics The learning experiences improved student knowledge, especially in bioastronomy, rocketry, robotics and conditions for life on early Earth.
  • 18. Primary student interest in the specific areas of the integrated unit in order were: 1. ICT Robotics (program / playing) 2. IMAX 3. High School visits - microbiology 4. Making rockets 5. Teacher associate activities 6. Making movies eg (Claymation) Project Findings ForProject Findings For Primary StudentsPrimary Students (University of Western Sydney )(University of Western Sydney )
  • 19. Project Findings ForProject Findings For Primary StudentsPrimary Students (University of Western Sydney )(University of Western Sydney ) This data suggests the importance of practical activities to support leaning in the primary area. STUDENT ENGAGEMENT?
  • 20. There were many free responses that made statements that declared positive changes to student values with regard to science and mathematics. “.. it has changed my views in the way that I now know that there can be many fun projects to do in Science and maths.” “…it has made me more interested and curious because the activities we did was fun and cool.” “…before the Bioastronomy unit I didn't like Maths and now l love Maths and Science more.” Project Findings ForProject Findings For Primary StudentsPrimary Students (University of Western Sydney )(University of Western Sydney )
  • 21. VSSECVSSEC
  • 22. For further information or a copyFor further information or a copy of the “Search For Life on Mars”of the “Search For Life on Mars” DVDDVD Craig.Brown@det.nsw.edu.au

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