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Conjunctions
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Conjunctions

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  • Transcript

    • 1. Simple/Compound Sentences & Conjunctions
    • 2. Simple Sentence
    • 3. Simple Sentence • A simple sentence is a sentence that expresses ONLY ONE complete thought.
    • 4. Simple Sentence • A simple sentence is a sentence that expresses ONLY ONE complete thought. • The subject or predicate may be simple or compound.
    • 5. Simple Sentence • A simple sentence is a sentence that expresses ONLY ONE complete thought. • The subject or predicate may be simple or compound. • EX: Mr. Alfonso went shopping at Arden Fair Mall.
    • 6. Compound Sentence
    • 7. Compound Sentence • A COMPOUND sentence is made up of two or more sentences joined by a conjunction.
    • 8. Compound Sentence • A COMPOUND sentence is made up of two or more sentences joined by a conjunction. • EX: Mr. Alfonso went shopping at Arden Fair Mall and his children stayed home to play.
    • 9. Coordinating Conjunctions
    • 10. Coordinating Conjunctions • Joins words or groups of words that have EQUAL importance in a sentence
    • 11. Coordinating Conjunctions • Joins words or groups of words that have EQUAL importance in a sentence • “Diego AND Irene are in-line skating”
    • 12. Coordinating Conjunctions • Joins words or groups of words that have EQUAL importance in a sentence • “Diego AND Irene are in-line skating” • Coordinating Conjunctions include:
    • 13. Coordinating Conjunctions • Joins words or groups of words that have EQUAL importance in a sentence • “Diego AND Irene are in-line skating” • Coordinating Conjunctions include: • and, but, or, nor, yet, and for.
    • 14. “and”
    • 15. “and” • Use “and” if you’re joining a group of words together that have equal importance.
    • 16. “and” • Use “and” if you’re joining a group of words together that have equal importance. • EX: I bought apples, oranges, and bananas.
    • 17. “and” • Use “and” if you’re joining a group of words together that have equal importance. • EX: I bought apples, oranges, and bananas. • Use “and if you’re joining two sentences together.
    • 18. “and” • Use “and” if you’re joining a group of words together that have equal importance. • EX: I bought apples, oranges, and bananas. • Use “and if you’re joining two sentences together. • EX: I bought groceries and Valerie bought clothes.
    • 19. “or”
    • 20. “or” • Use “or” to indicate choice.
    • 21. “or” • Use “or” to indicate choice. • EX: Buying a car, I had to choose from Honda, Nissan or Toyota.
    • 22. “or” • Use “or” to indicate choice. • EX: Buying a car, I had to choose from Honda, Nissan or Toyota. • EX: She wasn’t sure if she should purchase red, yellow, or green.
    • 23. “but”
    • 24. “but” • Use “but” to indicate the intention of something happening and ends up not happening.
    • 25. “but” • Use “but” to indicate the intention of something happening and ends up not happening. • EX: He decided to ask Riley to dance, but chickened out at the last moment.
    • 26. “but” • Use “but” to indicate the intention of something happening and ends up not happening. • EX: He decided to ask Riley to dance, but chickened out at the last moment. • EX: Mindy wore her blue hat to work, but decided to wear a scarf instead.

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