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Pygmalion: Analysis
Pygmalion: Analysis
Pygmalion: Analysis
Pygmalion: Analysis
Pygmalion: Analysis
Pygmalion: Analysis
Pygmalion: Analysis
Pygmalion: Analysis
Pygmalion: Analysis
Pygmalion: Analysis
Pygmalion: Analysis
Pygmalion: Analysis
Pygmalion: Analysis
Pygmalion: Analysis
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Pygmalion: Analysis

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  • دكتور بسالك مسرحيه دكتور فوستس و بجماليون من اي وجه نظر محكيه frıst or thırd
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  • دكتور من فضلك يمديك تعيد المراجعه حق بكره في المسرحيه يوم الاربعاااء
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  • thanks
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  • @n-n Actually, they are only 5 slides.
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  • ارجو الرد
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  • 1. PYGMALIONANALYSIS
  • 2. The Pygmalion legendShaw draws upon the Greek myth ofPygmalion, recounted by Ovid inMetamorphoses.• The myth• Shaw’s version, similarities and differences.
  • 3. Eliza DoolittlePygmalion is about the poor flower girl fromthe slums, the guttersnipe, the “squashed cabbageleaf” who turns into a fine lady.At the beginning of the play, Eliza appears as avulgar, low class girl, totally devoid of manners andwho speaks a horrible form of English. Eliza is avictim of society and family conditions; her fatheris not there for her during her lifetime and onlyshows up when he finds an opportunity to winsome money, paying her to Higgins.
  • 4. Higgins says that she "has no right to be anywhere -no right to live,” and that she is “a disgrace to humanity.”But Eliza is not totally without good qualities at thatpoint; she prides herself on being “a good girl,” whodoes not steal or sell herself in spite of her poverty. Sheis also ambitious and wants to improve herself. Herdream is to find a job in a flower shop. Understandingthat education is the key, she goes to Higgins to teachher. She is very serious and ready to suffer Higgins’arrogance and harsh treatment in order to achieve hergoal. But she remains sensitive to ill-treatment; shedoes have feelings, although Higgins does notunderstand this about her, which results in her finalrebellion against him, when she throws the slippers inhis face. Eliza is also very smart and fast-learner;Higgins’ teaching abilities would not have worked thatmiraculous transformation if not for her readiness andintelligence.
  • 5. Eliza changes gradually throughout the play, whichmakes her the main source of interest in the work. Herlanguage changes because of Professor Higgins teaching ofher, and her manners change, mainly through ColonelPickering’s treatment of her. Eliza says that "the differencebetween a lady and a flower girl is not how she behaves, buthow shes treated.” She adds that "I shall always be a flowergirl to Professor Higgins, because he always treats me as aflower girl, and always will; but I know I can be a lady to you,because you always treat me as a lady, and always will.” Thetrue difference between the upper and the lower class lies inthe way in which they are treated by others, Elizaunderstands. She becomes a lady. More importantly, Elizabecomes stronger and more independent and self-assertiveby the end of the play. She is no longer the submissive girl atthe beginning. She defies Higgins and tells him that he hasno right to treat her as a mere object.
  • 6. But Eliza’s change is never complete. Even when she saysthat she cannot return to her old accent even if she tries, wesee that she does switch to it from time to time. But neitherher older personality nor her new one is her real self. She hasbecome a multi-layered character, the result of a richexperience. In other words, she becomes a complex and multi-dimensional person.During the experiment, Eliza becomes devoted to hermaster, who remains emotionally aloof and free of any realfeelings towards her. Her reaction is that she rejects him; shedeclares that she can live without him. She will be a teacherherself. Higgins and Eliza are worlds apart: While Higgins livesfor himself and his intellectual interests, Eliza wants to have anordinary home with someone who respects and loves her. Shebelieves that Freddy can be that man. Although he isconsidered a trivial person, by Higgins’ standards, he can giveher what she wants: love and respect.
  • 7. Professor HigginsProfessor Higgins is a brilliant, educated and talentedintellectual. He has great achievements in his field of study,phonetics.However, Higgins is completely socially incompetent;his manners are so bad. He is rude to everybody, especiallyEliza. He is insensitive to the feelings of others in general.He is like a bully. To accomplish his aims, he will trample onanyones feelings.Higgins is a confirmed bachelor. He is a woman-hater,who treats women like trash. He treats Eliza as an inhumanobject, without feelings.He is proud of his work; he calls Eliza garbage, baggage,guttersnipe and a “squashed cabbage leaf.” He refers toher as "his masterpiece.“ He doesn’t acknowledge Eliza’srole in his success and fails to congratulate her for herperformance during the party, which makes her very upset.
  • 8. ThemesLanguageOne of the important themes in the play is thatof language. Language is shown to be a majorclass marker, dividing people into the poor andthe rich, flower girls and ladies. Assuch, language is both a means ofcommunication and of lack of communication:dividing people, rather than getting themcloser to each other.Higgins experiment proves language to be ameans of social mobility, helping Eliza bridgethe gap between classes.

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