Manchuria Cartoon interpretation
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Manchuria Cartoon interpretation

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Manchuria Cartoon interpretation for lesson: How successful was the league in the 1930s?

Manchuria Cartoon interpretation for lesson: How successful was the league in the 1930s?

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Manchuria Cartoon interpretation Manchuria Cartoon interpretation Presentation Transcript

  • This cartoon of 1933, by the British cartoonist David Low, is entitled: 'The Doormat'.
  • What is the message of this cartoon?
  • To do this question, you need first to borrow two concepts from English: Denotation (what you see) Connotation (how it affects its audience) This cartoon of 1933, by the British cartoonist David Low, is entitled: 'The Doormat'.
  • Denotation A Japanese soldiers tramples over a beautiful woman and the document beside her. Connotation The beautiful woman represents the League, and the document is the Covenant. Meaning Japan – by its actions in Manchuria – is trampling over the League and the Covenant. This cartoon of 1933, by the British cartoonist David Low, is entitled: 'The Doormat'.
  • Denotation The figure in the doorway bows down to the Japanese soldier and presents him with flowers. Connotation Bowing represents servility, surrender. Flowers welcome a conqueror. Meaning The League is not standing up to Japan – rather the League has allowed Japan to win. This cartoon of 1933, by the British cartoonist David Low, is entitled: 'The Doormat'.
  • Denotation Another figure is powdering the League’s face with a ‘face-saving kit’. Connotation The figure represents the British Foreign Secretary John Simon. ‘Saving face’ = making excuses. Meaning The British are not interested in doing the right thing – they are just trying to ‘save face’ (not look as spineless as they are). This cartoon of 1933, by the British cartoonist David Low, is entitled: 'The Doormat'.
  • Finally, always remember to look at: Origin (who drew it) Date (when it was published) This cartoon of 1933, by the British cartoonist David Low, is entitled: 'The Doormat'.
  • Origin The British cartoonist David Low. Details Low was a great supporter of the League. Significance Low (as many British people) was outraged saw by the Manchuria failure, which he saw as a great humiliation for the League. This cartoon of 1933, by the British cartoonist David Low, is entitled: 'The Doormat'.
  • Date 1933. Details When it was clear that the League was not going to do anything about Japan. Significance It is a criticism, not of the League, but of its leaders, who have allowed Japan to win. This cartoon of 1933, by the British cartoonist David Low, is entitled: 'The Doormat'.
  • Date 1933. Details When it was clear that the League was not going to do anything about Japan. Significance It is a criticism, not of the League, but of its leaders, who have allowed Japan to win. This cartoon of 1933, by the British cartoonist David Low, is entitled: 'The Doormat'.