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In This presentation, by means of statistics, the opportunity to start up a business in various countries compared. And 5 best country, depends on Forbes data introduced. ...

In This presentation, by means of statistics, the opportunity to start up a business in various countries compared. And 5 best country, depends on Forbes data introduced.
در این ازایه موقعیت کار آفرینی و فاکتورهای آن در کشورهای محتلف مقایسه و 5 کشور برتر معرفی شده است.

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  • Profile Over the past 20 years the government has transformed New Zealand from an agrarian economy dependent on concessionary British market access to a more industrialized, free market economy that can compete globally. This dynamic growth has boosted real incomes - but left behind some at the bottom of the ladder - and broadened and deepened the technological capabilities of the industrial sector. Per capita income rose for ten consecutive years until 2007 in purchasing power parity terms, but fell in 2008-09. Debt-driven consumer spending drove robust growth in the first half of the decade, helping fuel a large balance of payments deficit that posed a challenge for economic managers. Inflationary pressures caused the central bank to raise its key rate steadily from January 2004 until it was among the highest in the OECD in 2007-08; international capital inflows attracted to the high rates further strengthened the currency and housing market, however, aggravating the current account deficit. The economy fell into recession before the start of the global financial crisis and contracted for five consecutive quarters in 2008-09. In line with global peers, the central bank cut interest rates aggressively and the government developed fiscal stimulus measures. The economy posted a 2% decline in 2009, but pulled out of recession late in the year, and achieved 1.7% growth in 2010 and 2% in 2011. Nevertheless, key trade sectors remain vulnerable to weak external demand. The government plans to raise productivity growth and develop infrastructure, while reining in government spending .
  • Profile This thoroughly modern market economy features a high-tech agricultural sector, state-of-the-art industry with world-leading firms in pharmaceuticals, maritime shipping and renewable energy, and a high dependence on foreign trade. Denmark is a member of the European Union (EU); Danish legislation and regulations conform to EU standards on almost all issues. Danes enjoy among the highest standards of living in the world and the Danish economy is characterized by extensive government welfare measures and an equitable distribution of income. Denmark is a net exporter of food and energy and enjoys a comfortable balance of payments surplus but depends on imports of raw materials for the manufacturing sector. Within the EU, Denmark is among the strongest supporters of trade liberalization. After a long consumption-driven upswing, Denmark's economy began slowing in 2007 with the end of a housing boom. Housing prices dropped markedly in 2008-09 and, following a short respite in 2010, continued to decline in 2011 though at a slower pace. The global financial crisis has exacerbated this cyclical slowdown through increased borrowing costs and lower export demand, consumer confidence, and investment. The global financial crises cut Danish real GDP by 0.8% in 2008 and 5.8% in 2009. Denmark made a modest recovery in 2010 with real GDP growth of 1.3%, in part because of increased government spending; however, the country experienced a technical recession in late 2010-early 2011. Historically low levels of unemployment rose sharply with the recession and have remained at about 6% in 2010-11, based on the national measure, about two-thirds average EU unemployment. An impending decline in the ratio of workers to retirees will be a major long-term issue. Denmark maintained a healthy budget surplus for many years up to 2008, but the budget balance swung into deficit in 2009. In spite of the deficits, the new coalition government plans to deliver a modest stimulus to the economy in 2012. Nonetheless, Denmark's fiscal position remains among the strongest in the EU at 46.5% of GDP in 2011. Despite previously meeting the criteria to join the European Economic and Monetary Union (EMU), so far Denmark has decided not to join, although the Danish krone remains pegged to the euro. Denmark held the EU presidency during the first half of 2012; priorities included promoting a responsible, dynamic, green, and safe Europe, while working to steer Europe out of its euro zone economic crisis .
  • Profile Hong Kong has a free market economy, highly dependent on international trade and finance - the value of goods and services trade, including the sizable share of re-exports, is about four times GDP. Hong Kong's open economy left it exposed to the global economic slowdown that began in 2008. Although increasing integration with China, through trade, tourism, and financial links, helped it to make an initial recovery more quickly than many observers anticipated, it again faces a possible slowdown as exports to the Euro zone and US slump. The Hong Kong government is promoting the Special Administrative Region (SAR) as the site for Chinese renminbi (RMB) internationalization. Hong Kong residents are allowed to establish RMB-denominated savings accounts; RMB-denominated corporate and Chinese government bonds have been issued in Hong Kong; and RMB trade settlement is allowed. The territory far exceeded the RMB conversion quota set by Beijing for trade settlements in 2010 due to the growth of earnings from exports to the mainland. RMB deposits grew to roughly 7.8% of total system deposits in Hong Kong by the end of 2011, an increase of over 59% since the beginning of the year. The government is pursuing efforts to introduce additional use of RMB in Hong Kong financial markets and is seeking to expand the RMB quota. The mainland has long been Hong Kong's largest trading partner, accounting for about half of Hong Kong's exports by value. Hong Kong's natural resources are limited, and food and raw materials must be imported. As a result of China's easing of travel restrictions, the number of mainland tourists to the territory has surged from 4.5 million in 2001 to 28 million in 2011, outnumbering visitors from all other countries combined. Hong Kong has also established itself as the premier stock market for Chinese firms seeking to list abroad. In 2011 mainland Chinese companies constituted about 43% of the firms listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange and accounted for about 56% of the Exchange's market capitalization. During the past decade, as Hong Kong's manufacturing industry moved to the mainland, its service industry has grown rapidly. Growth slowed to 5% in 2011. Credit expansion and tight housing supply conditions caused Hong Kong property prices to rise rapidly in 2010 and inflation to rise 5.3% in 2011. Lower and middle income segments of the population are increasingly unable to afford adequate housing. Hong Kong continues to link its currency closely to the US dollar, maintaining an arrangement established in 1983 .
  • Profile Singapore has a highly developed and successful free-market economy. It enjoys a remarkably open and corruption-free environment, stable prices, and a per capita GDP higher than that of most developed countries. The economy depends heavily on exports, particularly in consumer electronics, information technology products, pharmaceuticals, and on a growing financial services sector. Real GDP growth averaged 8.6% between 2004 and 2007. The economy contracted 1.0% in 2009 as a result of the global financial crisis, but rebounded 14.8% in 2010 and 4.9% in 2011, on the strength of renewed exports. Over the longer term, the government hopes to establish a new growth path that focuses on raising productivity, which has sunk to a compound annual growth rate of just 1.8% in the last decade. Singapore has attracted major investments in pharmaceuticals and medical technology production and will continue efforts to establish Singapore as Southeast Asia's financial and high-tech hub .
  • Profile As an affluent, high-tech industrial society in the trillion-dollar class, Canada resembles the US in its market-oriented economic system, pattern of production, and affluent living standards. Since World War II, the impressive growth of the manufacturing, mining, and service sectors has transformed the nation from a largely rural economy into one primarily industrial and urban. The 1989 US-Canada Free Trade Agreement (FTA) and the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) (which includes Mexico) touched off a dramatic increase in trade and economic integration with the US its principal trading partner. Canada enjoys a substantial trade surplus with the US, which absorbs about three-fourths of Canadian exports each year. Canada is the US's largest foreign supplier of energy, including oil, gas, uranium, and electric power. Given its great natural resources, highly skilled labor force, and modern capital plant, Canada enjoyed solid economic growth from 1993 through 2007. Buffeted by the global economic crisis, the economy dropped into a sharp recession in the final months of 2008, and Ottawa posted its first fiscal deficit in 2009 after 12 years of surplus. Canada's major banks, however, emerged from the financial crisis of 2008-09 among the strongest in the world, owing to the financial sector's tradition of conservative lending practices and strong capitalization. Canada achieved marginal growth in 2010 and 2011 and plans to balance the budget by 2015. In addition, the country's petroleum sector is rapidly becoming an even larger economic driver with Alberta's oil sands significantly boosting Canada's proven oil reserves, ranking the country third in the world behind Saudi Arabia and Venezuela .

Start business comparison Start business comparison Presentation Transcript

  • ‫بهترین کشورها جهت ایجاد کسب و‬‫کار‬‫بررسی مقایسه ای محیط سیاسی، اقتصادی، قانونی و‬‫اجتماعی‬ ‫ارایه دهنده: محمدرضا سیف اللهی ‪mr.seifollahi@ut.ac.ir‬‬ ‫‪LOGO‬‬
  • ‫معرفی فاکتورهای‬ ‫بررسی‬ Trade Freedom 1. Monetary Freedom 2. Property Rights 3. Innovation 4. Technology 5. Red Tape 6. Investor Protection 7. Corruption 8. Personal Freedom 9. Market Performance 10. GDP Growth 11. GDP/Capita 12. Trade Balance 13. Population 14. Public Debt As % of GDP 15. Tax Burden 16.
  • Trade Freedom Free trade is a policy by which a government does not discriminate against imports or interfere with exports by applying tariffs (to imports) or subsidies (to exports) or quotas. According to the law of comparative advantage, the policy permits trading partners mutual gains from trade of goods and services. Global Enabling Trade Report Global Enabling Trade Report By World Economic Forum By World Economic ForumResources:World Economic Forum’s Executive Opinion Survey International Trade Centre World Bank the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) IATA,ITUGlobal Express Associationsub-indexes:Market accessBorder administrationTransport and communications infrastructureBusiness environment
  • The Enabling Trade Index 2012 http://www.weforum.org/reports
  • Monetary Freedom The Index of Economic Freedom is a series of 10 economic measurements created by The Heritage Foundation and The Wall Street Journal. Its stated objective is to measure the degree of economic freedom in the worlds nations.
  • Index of Economic Freedomrankings 2012http://www.heritage.org/index/ranking?src=home
  • Property Rights Property rights are a controversial, theoretical construct in economics for determining how a resource is used, and who owns that resource - government, collective bodies, or by individuals.
  • Bundle Of Rights
  • Property Rightshttp://www.internationalpropertyrightsindex.org/ranking
  • Innovation INSEAD and the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO, a specialized agency of the United Nations) co-publish The Global Innovation Index (GII) since 2012
  • Global Innovation Index rankingshttp://www.globalinnovationindex.org/gii/main/fullreport/files/Global%20Innovation%20Index%202012.pdf
  • Technologyhttp://www.nationmaster.com/red/graph/eco_tec_ach-economy-technological-achievement&b_printable=1
  • Red TapeAnswers.com:The collection or sequence of forms and procedures required to gain bureaucraticapproval for something, especially when oppressively complex and time-consuming. Paperwork Bureaucracyhttp://www.answers.com/topic/red-tape#ixzz1CwZvWSJz
  • : World Bank( Start-up procedures to register a business (numberCountry Name 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012Canada 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00New Zealand 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00Australia 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00Georgia 9.00 9.00 8.00 7.00 5.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 2.00Kyrgyz Republic 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 4.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 2.00Macedonia, FYR 13.00 13.00 13.00 10.00 9.00 7.00 4.00 3.00 3.00 2.00Madagascar 15.00 13.00 11.00 10.00 5.00 5.00 2.00 2.00 3.00 2.00Rwanda 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 8.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00Slovenia 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 9.00 5.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 2.00Armenia 9.00 9.00 9.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 5.00 5.00 3.00 3.00Belgium 7.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00Burkina Faso 12.00 12.00 12.00 8.00 6.00 5.00 4.00 4.00 3.00 3.00Finland 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00Hong Kong SAR, China 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00Malaysia 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 9.00 3.00 3.00Senegal 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 10.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 3.00 3.00Singapore 7.00 7.00 6.00 6.00 5.00 4.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00Sweden 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00Afghanistan   28.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00.Iran, Islamic Rep 9.00 9.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 7.00 6.00 6.00 7.00http://www.worldbank.org/
  • : World Bank( Cost of business start-up procedures (% of GNI per capita Country Name 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Slovenia 0.10 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Denmark 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.20 Ireland 0.30 0.30 0.40 0.40 0.30 South Africa 6.00 5.90 6.00 0.30 0.30 Canada 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.40 New Zealand 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.40 0.40 Sweden 0.60 0.60 0.60 0.60 0.50 Kazakhstan 5.20 4.80 1.00 0.80 0.60 Singapore 0.70 0.70 0.70 0.70 0.60 Australia 0.80 0.80 0.70 0.70 0.70 Bahrain 0.60 0.50 0.80 0.70 0.70 Trinidad and Tobago 0.90 0.70 0.80 0.80 0.70 United Kingdom 0.80 0.70 0.70 0.70 0.70 France 1.00 0.90 0.90 0.90 0.90 Puerto Rico 0.80 0.70 0.70 0.60 0.90 Finland 1.00 0.90 1.10 1.00 1.00 Bulgaria 2.00 1.70 1.60 1.50 1.10 Kuwait 1.30 1.00 1.30 1.20 1.10 Lithuania 2.70 2.40 2.80 2.80 1.10 .Iran, Islamic Rep 4.60 3.90 4.00 3.80 3.30http://www.worldbank.org/
  • : World Bank( Time required to start a business (days Country Name 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 New Zealand 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 Australia 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 2.00 Georgia 3.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 2.00 Macedonia, FYR 9.00 4.00 3.00 3.00 2.00 Hong Kong SAR, China 11.00 6.00 6.00 3.00 3.00 Rwanda 14.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Singapore 4.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 3.00 Albania 8.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 4.00 Belgium 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 Belarus 31.00 6.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 Canada 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 Hungary 5.00 4.00 4.00 4.00 5.00 Iceland 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 5.00 Netherlands 8.00 8.00 8.00 8.00 5.00 Portugal 6.00 6.00 6.00 5.00 5.00 Senegal 8.00 8.00 8.00 5.00 5.00 Denmark 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 Italy 10.00 10.00 6.00 6.00 6.00 Liberia 31.00 20.00 20.00 6.00 6.00 .Iran, Islamic Rep 28.00 9.00 8.00 8.00 13.00http://www.worldbank.org/
  • Investor Protection The term “investor protection” defines the entity of efforts and activities to observe, safeguard and enforce the rights and claims of a person in his role as an investor.
  • Corruption Since 1995, Transparency International (TI) publishes the Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) annually ranking countries "by their perceived levels of corruption, as determined by expert assessments and opinion surveys. The CPI generally defines corruption as "the misuse of public power for private benefit."http://www.transparency.org/cpi2012/results
  • Corruptionhttp://www.transparency.org/cpi2012/results
  • Corruptionhttp://www.transparency.org/cpi2012/results
  • (Personal Freedom (Civil liberties Civil liberties are civil rights and freedoms that provide an individual specific rights. "Civil liberties" typically include basic rights and freedoms that are guaranteed by law -- either explicitly identified in laws and constitutions, or interpreted through the years by courts and lawmakers http://www.worldaudit.org/civillibs.htmhttp://civilrights.findlaw.com/civil-rights-overview/civil-liberties.html
  • (Personal Freedom (Civil liberties http://www.worldaudit.org/civillibs.htm
  • Marketing Performance Marketing is the process of communicating the value of a product or service to customers.
  • GDP GrowthThe figures are estimates from the CIA World Factbook.
  • GDPhttp://databank.worldbank.org/databank/download/GDP.pdf
  • GDP GrowthWorld Bank Data http://www.worldaudit.org/civillibs.htmhttp://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.MKTP.KD.ZG/countries/1W?display=map
  • GDP GrowthWorld Bank Data Country Name 2008 2009 2010 2011 Macao SAR, China 3.33 1.72 27.04 20.74 Qatar 17.70 12.00 16.60 18.80 Mongolia 8.90 1.27- 6.37 17.26 Ghana 8.43 3.99 8.01 14.39 Panama 10.12 3.20 8.30 10.60 Timor-Leste 14.63 12.77 9.47 10.60 Iraq 9.50 4.20 0.84 9.90 Turkmenistan 14.70 6.10 9.20 9.90 Zimbabwe 17.67- 5.98 9.01 9.30 China 9.60 9.20 10.40 9.30 Solomon Islands 7.30 1.20- 7.00 9.00 Papua New Guinea 6.70 5.50 8.00 9.00 Argentina 6.76 0.85 9.16 8.87 Eritrea 9.79- 3.88 2.20 8.72 Rwanda 11.20 4.10 7.20 8.60 Turkey 0.66 4.83- 9.16 8.49 Liberia 10.53 13.06 10.29 8.48 Bhutan 4.67 6.73 7.44 8.41 Uzbekistan 9.00 8.10 8.50 8.30 .Iran, Islamic Rep 2.30 1.80    http://search.worldbank.org/quickview?name=%3Cem%3EGDP%3C%2Fem%3E+%3Cem%3Egrowth%3C%2Fem%3E+%28annual+%25%29&id=NY.GDP.MKTP.KD.ZG&type=Indicators&cube_no=2&qterm=gdp+growth
  • %(GDP per capita growth (annualWorld Bank Data Country Name 2008 2009 2010 2011 Macao SAR, China 0.79 0.71- 24.12 18.12 Mongolia 7.15 2.88- 4.65 15.41 Ghana 5.86 1.55 5.49 11.76 Qatar 0.67- 2.14- 5.92 11.73 Panama 8.31 1.54 6.61 8.92 China 9.04 8.65 9.87 8.79 Lithuania 3.46 14.27- 2.95 8.64 Turkmenistan 13.31 4.79 7.85 8.54 Argentina 5.83 0.03- 8.22 7.93 Zimbabwe 17.47- 5.79 8.16 7.73 Estonia 3.60- 14.23- 2.27 7.65 Timor-Leste 11.24 9.50 6.36 7.46 Turkey 0.66- 6.05- 7.80 7.18 Sri Lanka 5.02 2.36 6.95 7.13 Iraq 6.29 1.14 2.12- 6.80 Bhutan 2.76 4.89 5.63 6.60 Papua New Guinea 4.21 3.07 5.56 6.58 Lao PDR 6.20 5.92 6.97 6.54 Moldova 7.97 5.87- 7.21 6.49 .Iran, Islamic Rep 1.09 0.62    
  • Trade Balance The balance of trade, or net exports (sometimes symbolized as NX), is the difference between the monetary value of exports and imports of output in an economy over a certain period. It is the relationship between a nations imports and exports.http://www.imf.org/
  • Percent Of GDP Trade BalanceInternational Monetary Fund Data 2012 2011 2010 Country 49.081 48.549 45.453 Brunei Darussalam Democratic Republic of 45.415 57.24 48.073 Timor-Leste 44.072 43.98 31.927 Kuwait 29.559 30.221 26.652 Qatar 26.067 26.545 14.641 Saudi Arabia 21.803 1.317 19.808 Libya 20.953 21.932 24.412 Singapore 20.351 26.453 28.423 Azerbaijan 15.223 14.48 12.427 Norway 14.024 16.72 8.608 Oman 10.053 10.524 14.267 Switzerland 9.903 12.554 3.578 Bahrain 9.293 9.74 3.217 United Arab Emirates 9.088 10.591 9.062 Gabon 8.541 9.611 9.024 Angola 8.24 8.46 7.048 Netherlands 8.106 7.066 20.007 Trinidad and Tobago 7.51 11.021 11.079 Malaysia 7.333 7.084 7.674 Luxembourghttp://www.imf.org/
  • PopulationBy Geohivehttp://www.geohive.com/earth/population1.aspx
  • Public Debt As % of GDP Public debt is the most relevant data for discussions of government default and debt ceilings. Although of similar magnitude for the US (2010), it is different from external debt, which instead reflects the foreign currency liabilities of both the private and public sector.
  • http://www.forbes.com/best-countries-for-business/
  • Trade Freedom 34 Monetary Freedom 7 Property Rights 6 Innovation 26 Technology 23 Red Tape 1 Investor Protection 1 Corruption 1 Personal Freedom 1 Tax Burden 20 Market Performance 12http://www.forbes.com/best-countries-for-business/
  • http://www.forbes.com/best-countries-for-business/
  • http://www.forbes.com/best-countries-for-business/
  • http://www.forbes.com/best-countries-for-business/
  • http://www.forbes.com/best-countries-for-business/
  • References1. http://www.weforum.org/reports2. http://www.internationalpropertyrightsindex.org/ranking3. http://www.heritage.org/index/ranking?src=home4. http://www.globalinnovationindex.org/5. http://www.nationmaster.com/graph/eco_tec_ach-economy-technological-achievement6. http://www.transparency.org/cpi2012/results7. http://civilrights.findlaw.com/civil-rights-overview/civil-liberties.html8. http://www.worldaudit.org/civillibs.htm9. http://www.wto.org/10. http://www.imf.org/11. http://www.geohive.com/earth/population1.aspx12. http://www.forbes.com/best-countries-for-business/13. http://www.wikipedia.org/
  • Thank You mr.seifollahi@ut.ac.ir ‫ارایه دهنده: محمدرضا سیف اللهی‬ LOGO