Source Selection

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  • 1. Source  Selec)on  
  • 2. What  type  of  informa)on  do  you  need   for  this  topic?   Once  you  have  formulated   a  topic  ques)on  you  can   determine  the  type  of   informa)on  that’s  needed   to  develop  a  theme.              
  • 3. Primary   This  is  firsthand  informa)on.     Lincoln’s  GeAysburg  Address   is  primary  informa)on.  It  was   wriAen  by  Lincoln  himself.     It  contains  his  thought’s   about  the  situa)on.    
  • 4. Primary  Source  Examples   They  can  come  in  many  forms.     •  Diaries   •  Speeches   •  Photographs   •  Le1ers   •  Manuscripts   •  Oral  Histories   •  Poli8cal  Cartoons   •  Sheet  Music   •  Sound  Recordings   •  Mo8on  Pictures   •  Maps   •  Some  autobiographies   •  Other   A  primary  resource  provides  direct,  first-­‐ hand,  evidence  of  the  topic  under   inves)ga)on    
  • 5. Secondary   This  is  secondhand  informa)on.     A  book  wriAen  commen)ng  on   the  historical  importance  of   Lincoln’s  GeAysburg  Address  is   an  example  of  a  secondary   source.     It  contains  another  person’s   reflec)ons  aMer  the  fact  of  the   speech.    
  • 6. Secondary  Source  Examples   They  can  come  in  many  forms.     •  Books  about  an  event   •  Commentaries   •  Disserta)ons   •  Biographies   •  Indexes   •  Abstracts   •  Journal  Ar)cles     A  secondary  source  is  something  wriAen  about   a  primary  source  event.  It  provides  analysis,   cri)que  or  interpreta)on  of  the  topic  under   inves)ga)on.  
  • 7. This  is  thirdhand  informa)on.     An  ar)cle  on  the  GeAysburg  Address   in  an  encyclopedia  is  a  ter)ary   resource.     It  contains  informa)on  about  the   speech  in  a  brief  form.   Ter)ary  
  • 8. Ter)ary  Source  Examples   They  can  come  in  many  forms.     •  Almanacs   •  Digests   •  Dic)onaries   •  Encyclopedias   •  Fact  books   •  Pathfinders   •  Overviews   •  Guide  Books   •  Overviews   A  ter)ary  source  provides  the  bare   facts  without  analysis,  cri)que  or   interpreta)on  of  the  topic  under   inves)ga)on.  
  • 9. It Can Be Complicated.   A  journal  ar)cle  wriAen    in  2010   about  the  causes  of  the  Great   Depression  is  a  secondary  source.     However,  a  journal  ar)cle  wriAen   in  1925  about  the  causes  of  the   Great  Depression  may  be   considered  a  primary  source.   Since  the  author  is  reflec8ng  on   current  circumstances.     In  doubt  ask  ques8ons.  Your   professor  or  the  librarians  can   help  you.  
  • 10. Confused?   For  now,  think  of  it  this  way.     For  background  informa)on  you  use   ter)ary  sources.   •  Dic)onaries   •  Encyclopedias   •  Guides   •  Fact  books     The  sources  provide  thirdhand   informa)on  discussing  the  bare  facts.  
  • 11. This  is  what  you’ll  need.   The  primary  and  secondary   sources  are  the  sources  you’ll   use  in  construc)ng  your   research.     They  provide  firsthand  access   to  the  original  events  and  the   secondhand  reflec)on  upon   the  events.          
  • 12.  We’ll  answer  the  ques)on,  “Where  do  I  start?”           Do  the  student  ac)vity  for  this  lesson.     AMer  that  proceed  to  the  next  lesson.