I Never Forget A Face

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Research which helps understand face recognition. Includes quiz with some famous faces.

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I Never Forget A Face

  1. 1. Research on understanding face recognition I never forget a face
  2. 2. Never forget a face? <ul><li>Research: Face recognition skill may vary widely, following a spectrum </li></ul><ul><li>Prosopagnosics at one end (no skill) </li></ul><ul><li>Super-recognizers at other end (easily recognize, even after years) </li></ul><ul><li>Reason why this is a “new” phenomena? Only recently have we interacted with such large numbers of people over our lifetime. </li></ul><ul><li>Research conduced by U.S. National Eye Institute and the U.K. Economic & Social Research Council </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090519172204.htm </li></ul>
  3. 3. Are you face blind? <ul><li>Research: Emotional information in the face increases neural activity in area of brain associated with face recognition. Problems in face recognition may lie in cortical part of brain. </li></ul><ul><li>Scientists say that emotional stimuli can trigger higher level of arousal and emotion in face, which adds additional information for recognizing faces in prosopagnosics. </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion: Emotional information in face processing important. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/09/080916215122.htm </li></ul>
  4. 4. The Nose knows <ul><li>Research: During face recognition, first two places we look at are around the nose, with first fixation being slightly to left of nose. </li></ul><ul><li>Two fixations are optimal for face recognition. </li></ul><ul><li>Second fixation allows for more information from a different location </li></ul><ul><li>The nose may be the center of attention (according to researchers) </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081020171452.htm </li></ul>
  5. 5. The eyes have it <ul><li>Research: Brain extracts information for face recognition primarily from eyes, then from mouth and nose. </li></ul><ul><li>Most useful information is from images of around 30 X 30 pixels </li></ul><ul><li>Images of eyes are least “noisy” (more reliable than mouth and nose) </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/03/090326215054.htm </li></ul>
  6. 6. It takes two <ul><li>Research: The image of our own face can change through shared experiences with other people’s faces </li></ul><ul><li>While watching the face of another person being touched as their face was touched (as in a mirror), their ability to recognize their own face was not as consistent. </li></ul><ul><li>Later, when asked to recognize picture of own face, they tended to include features of face that they saw earlier. </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion: sharing experience with another person may change own perception, may relate to our self identify, and with those who have appearance-related concerns. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/01/090107092720.htm </li></ul>

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