Albany Plan of Union <ul><li>Plan proposed by Benjamin Franklin </li></ul><ul><li>Called for a council of delegates from e...
Proclamation of 1763 <ul><li>Prohibited colonists from settling west of the Appalachian Mountains </li></ul><ul><li>Dislik...
Sugar Act <ul><li>Tax on foreign molasses and sugar </li></ul><ul><li>Colonists refused to pay it </li></ul>Road to Revolu...
Quartering Act <ul><li>Required colonists to house British soldiers and provide them with food and supplies </li></ul>Road...
Stamp Act <ul><li>First direct tax on colonists by Parliament </li></ul><ul><li>Forced people to pay a tax on items such a...
Sons/Daughters of Liberty <ul><li>Protest group who helped organize boycotts </li></ul><ul><li>Sam Adams was an outspoken ...
Boycott <ul><li>Refusal to buy goods or have dealings with a country or other entity </li></ul><ul><li>Colonists boycotted...
Declaratory Act <ul><li>Act stated that parliament had the right to rule and tax the colonies </li></ul><ul><li>Passed aft...
Townshend Acts <ul><li>Set of laws designed to raise money from the colonies </li></ul><ul><li>Acts placed import taxes on...
Boston Massacre <ul><li>Boston citizens were angry at the sight of red-coated soldiers on the streets. </li></ul><ul><li>G...
Boston Massacre Road to Revolution 1770
Committees of Correspondence <ul><li>Network of communication for passing along news of British activity to the colonies <...
Tea Act <ul><li>Designed to help the East India Company, who was struggling financially </li></ul><ul><li>Gave company exc...
Boston Tea Party <ul><li>Organized by a group of about 50 men (from the Sons of Liberty), disguised as Mohawk Indians </li...
Coercive (or Intolerable) Acts <ul><li>Laws meant to punish the colonists for the Boston Tea Party </li></ul><ul><li>Close...
Quebec Act <ul><li>Extended the Canadian province of Quebec south to the Ohio River </li></ul><ul><li>Allowed French Canad...
First Continental Congress <ul><li>Group of delegates from every colony except Georgia who met in Philadelphia </li></ul><...
Suffolk Resolves <ul><li>Set of resolutions passed at a meeting in Boston </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Demanded return to constit...
Militia <ul><li>A group of citizens who would be ready to fight in any emergency </li></ul>Road to Revolution 18
Minutemen <ul><li>Members of a militia who could be ready to fight at a “minute’s” notice </li></ul><ul><li>Minutemen were...
Lexington and Concord Road to Revolution 1775
Lexington and Concord <ul><li>First battles of the American Revolution </li></ul><ul><li>British soldiers marched toward C...
Second Continental Congress <ul><li>Delegates from all 13 colonies met in Philadelphia </li></ul><ul><li>George Washington...
Olive Branch Petition <ul><li>Petition sent to the King by the Second Continental Congress begging him to stop the war and...
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R2r4

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  • March 5, 1770 3 colonists lay dead and 2 others mortally wounded; 6 others would later recover from their wounds. The Boston Massacre was, of course, not a “massacre.” Samuel Adams and other propagandists immediately capitalized on this incident, using it to fan colonial passions. Paul Revere assisted the effort by issuing one of his most famous engravings, possibly plagiarized, depicting the American version of the event. In response to these tensions, Lieutenant Governor Thomas Hutchinson ordered that the British soldiers be withdrawn to Castle Island, giving the colonists a much-celebrated victory and indicating the rudderless nature of British policy. A combined funeral for the slain was held a few days later and the procession was said to have been joined by 10,000 people.
  • March 5, 1770
  • The British reasoned that the Americans would willingly pay the tax if they were able to pay a low price for the tea.
  • Coercive Acts were so harsh that they were called the Intolerable Acts throughout the colonies.
  • Georgia decided against roiling the waters; they were facing attacks from the restive Creek on their borders and desperately needed the support of regular British soldiers. Some of the most prominent figures of the era were among the 55 delegates in attendance, including George Washington , Samuel Adams , John Adams , Patrick Henry , Richard Henry Lee , John Jay and John Dickinson .
  • Called Coercive Acts “the attempts of a wicked administration to enslave Americans”
  • Minutemen were a small hand-picked elite force which were required to be highly mobile and able to assemble quickly. Minutemen were selected from militia muster rolls by their commanding officers. Typically 25 years of age or younger, they were chosen for their enthusiasm, reliability, and physical strength. Usually about one quarter of the militia served as Minutemen, performing additional duties as such. The Minutemen were the first armed militia to arrive or await a battle.
  • R2r4

    1. 1. Albany Plan of Union <ul><li>Plan proposed by Benjamin Franklin </li></ul><ul><li>Called for a council of delegates from each colony with a leader appointed by the British king </li></ul><ul><li>Not approved because each colony wanted to control its own taxes and make its own decisions </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1
    2. 2. Proclamation of 1763 <ul><li>Prohibited colonists from settling west of the Appalachian Mountains </li></ul><ul><li>Disliked by many of the colonists </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1763 2
    3. 3. Sugar Act <ul><li>Tax on foreign molasses and sugar </li></ul><ul><li>Colonists refused to pay it </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1764 3
    4. 4. Quartering Act <ul><li>Required colonists to house British soldiers and provide them with food and supplies </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1765 4
    5. 5. Stamp Act <ul><li>First direct tax on colonists by Parliament </li></ul><ul><li>Forced people to pay a tax on items such as newspapers, playing cards, and legal documents </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1765 <ul><li>Colonists believed it went against the idea of no taxation without representation (since no American voted in elections to Parliament) </li></ul>5
    6. 6. Sons/Daughters of Liberty <ul><li>Protest group who helped organize boycotts </li></ul><ul><li>Sam Adams was an outspoken leader of the Sons of Liberty in Boston </li></ul><ul><li>Women signed pledges against drinking tea, promised not to buy British-made cloth, and met at spinning clubs to make their own cloth </li></ul>Road to Revolution 6
    7. 7. Boycott <ul><li>Refusal to buy goods or have dealings with a country or other entity </li></ul><ul><li>Colonists boycotted (or, refused to buy or sell) British goods </li></ul>Road to Revolution 7
    8. 8. Declaratory Act <ul><li>Act stated that parliament had the right to rule and tax the colonies </li></ul><ul><li>Passed after Parliament put an end to the Stamp Act, to warn colonists against future protests </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1766 8
    9. 9. Townshend Acts <ul><li>Set of laws designed to raise money from the colonies </li></ul><ul><li>Acts placed import taxes on paint, glass, lead, paper, and tea coming into America. </li></ul><ul><li>Acts also allowed British officials warrants to search anywhere for suspected smuggled goods. </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1767 9
    10. 10. Boston Massacre <ul><li>Boston citizens were angry at the sight of red-coated soldiers on the streets. </li></ul><ul><li>Group of Boston civilians began insulting and throwing snowballs at a British guard. More soldiers arrived. </li></ul><ul><li>Mob of civilians surrounded soldiers in protest, and in the confusion the soldiers fired their guns into the crowd and 5 civilians died. </li></ul><ul><li>Following Boston Massacre, Townshend Acts were repealed (ended), except for the tax on tea. </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1770 10
    11. 11. Boston Massacre Road to Revolution 1770
    12. 12. Committees of Correspondence <ul><li>Network of communication for passing along news of British activity to the colonies </li></ul><ul><li>Organized by Samuel Adams in Massachusetts </li></ul><ul><li>Also formed in other colonies </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1772 11
    13. 13. Tea Act <ul><li>Designed to help the East India Company, who was struggling financially </li></ul><ul><li>Gave company exclusive rights to sell tea directly to the Americans without paying the British import tax </li></ul><ul><li>Cut out business for colonial sea captains and merchants </li></ul><ul><li>Colonists protested the act </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1773 12
    14. 14. Boston Tea Party <ul><li>Organized by a group of about 50 men (from the Sons of Liberty), disguised as Mohawk Indians </li></ul><ul><li>Dumped 342 chests of tea into the harbor from a ship in Boston </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1773 13
    15. 15. Coercive (or Intolerable) Acts <ul><li>Laws meant to punish the colonists for the Boston Tea Party </li></ul><ul><li>Closed port of Boston until payment made for tea </li></ul><ul><li>British officials accused of a crime were to be tried in English rather than American courts </li></ul><ul><li>British troops could be quartered in any town in Massachusetts—even in private homes </li></ul><ul><li>Reduced Massachusetts’ right to self government </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1774 14
    16. 16. Quebec Act <ul><li>Extended the Canadian province of Quebec south to the Ohio River </li></ul><ul><li>Allowed French Canadians to keep their laws, language, and Roman Catholic religion </li></ul><ul><li>Colonists saw act as first step toward doing away with jury trials and Protestantism in the colonies, and an attempt to keep American settlers out of the western lands </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1774 15
    17. 17. First Continental Congress <ul><li>Group of delegates from every colony except Georgia who met in Philadelphia </li></ul><ul><li>Did not seek independence at this time </li></ul><ul><li>Sought rather to right the wrongs that had been inflicted on the colonies and hoped that a unified voice would gain them a hearing in London </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1774 16
    18. 18. Suffolk Resolves <ul><li>Set of resolutions passed at a meeting in Boston </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Demanded return to constitutional government </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Demanded an end to trade with Great Britain </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plan for arming and training of militia </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Paul Revere brought a copy to First Continental Congress, who passed the resolves </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1774 17
    19. 19. Militia <ul><li>A group of citizens who would be ready to fight in any emergency </li></ul>Road to Revolution 18
    20. 20. Minutemen <ul><li>Members of a militia who could be ready to fight at a “minute’s” notice </li></ul><ul><li>Minutemen were usually 25 years of age or younger, and they were selected (from the militia) for their enthusiasm, reliability, and strength </li></ul>Road to Revolution 19
    21. 21. Lexington and Concord Road to Revolution 1775
    22. 22. Lexington and Concord <ul><li>First battles of the American Revolution </li></ul><ul><li>British soldiers marched toward Concord to take American’s supply of guns and gunpowder </li></ul><ul><li>British were surprised by group of minutemen in Lexington (a town on the way to Concord) </li></ul><ul><li>British casualties were nearly three times those of the Americans </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1775 20
    23. 23. Second Continental Congress <ul><li>Delegates from all 13 colonies met in Philadelphia </li></ul><ul><li>George Washington chosen to build a Continental Army </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1775 21
    24. 24. Olive Branch Petition <ul><li>Petition sent to the King by the Second Continental Congress begging him to stop the war and make peace with the colonists </li></ul><ul><li>Unsuccessful—George III declared the Americans to be rebels and the colonies went to war </li></ul>Road to Revolution 1775 22

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