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Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009
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Reading coach all_roleofthe_readingliteracycoach_sept42009

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  • Although the IRA (International Reading Association) document that includes these standards specifically address middle and high school literacy coaches, these standards seem to apply to all literacy coaches at any level.
  • This information comes from Chapter One in The Literacy Coach: Guiding in the Right Direction .
  • Susan
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  • Guiding Question: What can we do as coaches in enhance our craft so that we can have the greatest impact on instruction and student achievement?
  • Transcript

    • 1. Kathy BaichInstructional Reading SpecialistCapacity Development and School Reform AccountabilityKathyann.Panusbaich@palmbeach.k12.fl.usThe Role of theReading/Literacy Coach
    • 2. Reading (Literacy) CoachAnticipation GuidePlease write (A) for agree and (D) for disagree for each of the statements below_____A reading/literacy coach is a classroom supporter whose purpose is to increase qualityand effectiveness in classroom instruction._____A reading/literacy coach is responsible for preparing and/or demonstrating modellessons in classrooms for teachers._____A reading/literacy coach should spend 40% of his/her workweek: working withstudents ._____A reading/literacy coach works with teachers to ensure that research-based readingprograms and strategies are implemented with fidelity._____A reading/literacy coach models in a class where the classroom teacher is NOT present._____Spend a large portion of time administering or coordinating assessments.
    • 3. What is a Reading/Literacy Coach?The Just Read, Florida! officedefined a reading coach as follows:“A reading coach is a professional development liaisonwithin the school to support, model, and continuouslyimprove SBRR [Scientifically Based Reading Research]instructional programs in reading to assure readingimprovement for ALL students.”Just Read, Florida!2005-2006 K-12 Comprehensive Research-Based Reading Plan
    • 4. Standards for Reading/Literacy Coaches:Literacy coaches need to be skillful:collaboratorsjob-embedded coachesevaluators of literacy needs(and strengths)instructional strategistsInternational Reading Association, 2006Standards for Middle and High School Literacy Coaches
    • 5. 10 Roles of Reading/Literacy CoachesResource provider – the purpose is to expand teacher’s useof a variety of resources to improve instruction.Data coach – the purpose is to ensure that studentachievement data drives instructional decisions at the classroomand school level.Curriculum specialist – the purpose is to ensureimplementation of adopted curriculum.Instructional specialist – the purpose is to align instructionwith curriculum to meet the needs of all students.Joellen Killion & Cindy Harrison, 2006Taking the Lead: New Roles for Teachers and School-based Coaches
    • 6. 10 Roles of Reading/Literacy CoachesClassroom supporter – the purpose is to increase thequality and effectiveness of classroom instruction.Mentor – the purpose is to increase instructional skills of thenovice teacher and support school-wide induction activities.Learning facilitator – the purpose is to design collaborative,job-embedded, standards-based professional learning.Joellen Killion & Cindy Harrison, 2006Taking the Lead: New Roles for Teachers and School-based Coaches
    • 7. 10 Roles of Reading/Literacy CoachesSchool leader – the purpose is to work collaboratively withthe school’s formal leadership to design, implement, andassess school change initiatives to ensure alignment and focuson intended results.Catalyst for change – the purpose is to createdisequilibrium with the current state as an impetus to explorealternatives to current practice.Learner – the purpose is to model continuous learning, tokeep current, and to be a thoughtful leader in the school.Joellen Killion & Cindy Harrison, 2006Taking the Lead: New Roles for Teachers and School-based Coaches
    • 8. Reading/Literacy Coaches…“…drive change in schools by disseminating literacyinformation and inciting enthusiasm about improvingstudents’ reading and writing.”As a resident expert of literacy education in a school, areading coach provides in-school support for teachers as theydevelop and improve their instructional and assessment skills.Part of the job includes assisting teachers in implementingstrategies for grouping students and solving literacy-relatedproblems.David Booth & Jennifer Roswell, 2002, p. 16-17The Literacy Principal: Leading, Supporting and Assessing Reading and Writing Initiatives
    • 9. Expectations of the CoachWork with teachers to plan, implement and to reflect onliteracy instruction using the Florida ContinuousImprovement Model (FCIM)Model best practices in reading and language artsprofessional development sessionsAttend weekly, full-day training sessions (Fridays) and otherdistrict –mandated trainings to aid in increasing knowledgein best practice strategies for reading, language arts and thecontent areasAnalyze data and assists the administrative team in developingcorrective action plans and reading initiatives for the year
    • 10. Expectations of the CoachAssist teachers in interpreting diagnostic testsWorks with teachers to ensure that research based readingprograms and strategies are implemented with fidelityMeets regularly with leadership teamProvide daily coaching and mentoring support to all contentand/or reading teachers including ESOL and ESEKeeps a “Coach Binder” documenting all support services
    • 11. Expectations of the CoachKeeps an electronic log of their work(PMRN) and develops a weeklycoaching calendar (see hand-out)
    • 12. PMRN Coaches LogThe Coach’s Log Form is divided into 12 task areas in an effort to assist Coaches in categorizing time and,ultimately, in making decisions on how best to use time to improve student performance in reading.1.Professional Development: Providing or facilitating professional development such as seminars, actionresearch, or study groups designed to increase educators’ knowledge of Scientifically Based Reading Research(SBRR).This includes presenting reading-related information to parents or serving as a substitute while a teacherobserves a model lesson elsewhere.2.Planning: Planning, developing, or preparing professional development.Activities may include surveyingteachers as to their needs, preparing content, scheduling, and gathering materials.3.Modeling Lesson: Preparing for and/or demonstrating model lessons in classrooms for teachers.4.Coaching: Coaching (the observation process that includes planning conversation, observation, and reflectingconversation) teachers in classrooms.5.Coach-Teacher Conferences: Meeting with teachers regarding lesson planning, grouping for instruction,intervention strategies, etc.These conversations can be in person, by phone, or E-mail.
    • 13. PMRN Coaches Log6. Student Assessment: Administering or coordinating student assessments.Activities can includemanaging student rolls in the PMRN, notifying teachers of the test schedule, or scheduling tests.7. Data Reporting: Entering student assessment scores into the PMRN (Coaches should spend limitedtime, if any, on this task.)8. Data Analysis: Analyzing student data such as examining PMRN or other data reports or meeting withadministrators or teachers to review student data.9. Meetings: Attending meetings with administrators, other Coaches, or community groups in yourschool, district, or region regarding reading issues.10. Knowledge Building: Building knowledge of SBRR and/or assessment through personal study orprofessional development by attending workshops or conferences, reading journal articles, attendingtraining, or taking other duties assigned, such as a course or class.11. Managing Reading Materials: Budgeting for, ordering, inventorying, and delivering readingmaterials/resources.12. Other: Other duties as assigned, such as travel time, nonreading related meetings, or entering data intothe Coach’s Log.
    • 14. Agree or Disagree. . .and Why?“If you are a successful literacy coach, a healthy portion ofyour time must be invested in working with students in theclassroom consistently, since credibility is a key componentof successful literacy coaching. Coaches gain this credibilityby the demonstrations they provide when they work withthe students of those teachers being coached.”Enrique A. Puig & Kathy S. Froelich, 2007, p. 9The Literacy Coach: Guiding in the Right Direction
    • 15. What Should aLiteracy Coach Do?40% of the workweek: Work with students20% of the workweek: Engage in dialogicconversations with teachers and observations20% of the workweek: Plan and prepare fortraining sessions10% of the workweek: Provide observation lessons10% of the workweek: Engage in professional bookstudyEnrique A. Puig & Kathy S. Froelich, 2007, p. 9The Literacy Coach: Guiding in the Right Direction
    • 16. Continuum of CoachingCONTINUUM OF COACHINGProvide anobservation lessonto improveinstruction andstudent learning withfeedback andcollaborative input.Co-teach withcolleague to improveinstruction and studentlearning based onmutually agreed uponlearning goals andsuccess indicators.Confer,observe, anddebrief toimproveinstruction andstudentlearning.Facilitate a studygroup or literacyleadership team toinvestigate commoninterest topics toimprove instructionand studentlearning.Facilitate actionresearch to seekresources afterreflection toimproveinstruction andstudent learning.Inter-active coaching Intra-active coachingIncreased scaffolding Decreased scaffoldingTransformation may occur when teachers/coaches are provided opportunities toobserve, co-teach, confer, study, research, and reflect on practice.SUBJECT-CENTERED PROBLEM-CENTEREDFacilitate aworkshop orsession toimproveinstructionand studentlearningadapted fromE. A. Puig & K. S. Froelich, 2007The Literacy Coach: Guiding in the Right Direction
    • 17. Coaches are not expected to…Be assigned as a regular classroom teacherPerform administrative functions that would confuse his/herrole for teachersSpend a large portion of time administering or coordinatingassessments, as these tasks prohibit the coach from providingprofessional development to teachersModel in a class where the classroom teacher is NOT present
    • 18. Reading (Literacy) CoachAnticipation GuidePlease write (A) for agree and (D) for disagree for each of the statements below___A__A reading/literacy coach is a classroom supporter whose purpose is to increase quality andeffectiveness in classroom instruction.___A__A reading/literacy coach is responsible for preparing and/or demonstrating model lessonsin classrooms for teachers.___A__A reading/literacy coach should spend 40% of his/her workweek: working withstudents.___A__A reading/literacy coach works with teachers to ensure that research-based readingprograms and strategies are implemented with fidelity.___D__A reading/literacy coach models in a class where the classroom teacher is NOT present.___D__Spend a large portion of time administering or coordinating assessments.
    • 19. 3 -2–1 Exit Slip3 – Concerns you have about your role as a Reading/Literacy coach at either anelementary or secondary school (please circle one).2 – Professional development opportunities you would like to have provided to you,as a Reading/Literacy Coach during this 2009-2010 school year.1 –Thing you learned today that was new to you about Reading/Literacy Coaching.
    • 20.  Froelich, K.S. & Puig, E.A. (2010). The literacy leadership team:Sustainingand expanding success.Allyn & Bacon/ Pearson. Gersten, R., Compton, D., Connor,C.M., Dimino, J., Santoro, L.,Linan-Thompson, S., &Tilly,W.D. (2008). Assisting students strugglingwith reading:Response to Intervention and multi-tier intervention for reading inthe primary grades. A practice guide. (NCEE 2009-4045). Washington,DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and RegionalAssistance,Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Little, M.E. (2009). Response to Intervention (RtI) for teachers:Classroominstructional problem solving. Love Publishing Company. Puig, E.A. & Froelich, K.S. (2007). The literacy coach:Guiding in the rightdirection. Allyn & Bacon/ Pearson.References

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