Our National Pastimehttp://farm4.static.flickr.com/3387/3599784525_8951cb70ec_b.jpghttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c...
Our National Pastime                                                                         Mike Popowiczhttp://farm4.sta...
Thesis            Baseball has been around us for over a hundred             years. Followers today know for sure that thi...
Thesis            Baseball has been around us for over a hundred             years. Followers today know for sure that thi...
http://seephiladelphia.blogspot.com/2011_02_22_archive.html&IP=192.168.1.6&CAT=WEBLOG&USER=116975
ersonal Relevancehttp://seephiladelphia.blogspot.com/2011_02_22_archive.html&IP=192.168.1.6&CAT=WEBLOG&USER=116975
Origin
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/40/99849394_7517c7028a_o.jpg
Cri ckethttp://farm1.static.flickr.com/40/99849394_7517c7028a_o.jpg
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3161/2907179945_3dab7f7835_b.jpghttp://farm5.static.flickr.com/4123/4920535760_d380350219_b...
Roundershttp://farm4.static.flickr.com/3161/2907179945_3dab7f7835_b.jpghttp://farm5.static.flickr.com/4123/4920535760_d380...
Roundershttp://farm4.static.flickr.com/3161/2907179945_3dab7f7835_b.jpghttp://farm5.static.flickr.com/4123/4920535760_d380...
http://allairevillage.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/town-ball.jpghttp://www.thephoenixpub.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/800...
Town Ballhttp://allairevillage.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/town-ball.jpghttp://www.thephoenixpub.com/wp-content/uploads/20...
http://allairevillage.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/town-ball.jpghttp://www.thephoenixpub.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/800...
Who Created Baseball?
Abner Doubleday                             June 16, 1819-93http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Doubledayo.jpg
Or Did He?http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Doubledayo.jpg
Or Did He?http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Doubledayo.jpg
http://s3.hubimg.com/u/1564394_f520.jpg
Inventor?           • Alexander Cartwright                 • April 17, 1820-92http://s3.hubimg.com/u/1564394_f520.jpg
First Organized                                          New York NickerbockersFormed: September 23, 1845                 ...
Who Gets The Credit?
We are not sure...
The MLBhttp://farm4.static.flickr.com/3272/2382660602_dd7d044293_b.jpghttp://faninterference.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/n...
Then and Now
The MLB Players Associationhttp://www.dezignwithaz.com/images/pitcher.pnghttp://www.openclipart.org/image/250px/svg_to_png...
Free Agency
Arbitration
Declining Youth Sport                     • Kids ranging from 7 to 17 years of agehttp://si.wsj.net/public/resources/image...
Dover Little League• ...49 strong seasons• Only 17 kids have signed up for this  year.
Marietta Bantam Little League   • This league used to hold 50 teams!   • This league has held on for more than     50 years.
Personal Knowledge• Bridgeport Little League• Upper Merion Baseball Assosiation
What Is The Cause?
http://www.gifsoup.com/view/88651/new-ps3-start-up-logo.html http://www.gifsoup.com/download.php?id=2168909&d=animatedgifs...
http://www.gifsoup.com/view/88651/new-ps3-start-up-logo.html http://www.gifsoup.com/download.php?id=2168909&d=animatedgifs...
http://www.gifsoup.com/view/88651/new-ps3-start-up-logo.html http://www.gifsoup.com/download.php?id=2168909&d=animatedgifs...
Interview Of A Fan• Happens to be my Dad & Coach
Ken Morse• Baseball today is too soft• Parents were a lot more respectful back then• You need to let kids be kids
Cha Ching!• Cost of Equipment• Cost of Tickets
http://www.bgc-gkc.org/FileUploads/RBI2008Logo-color.gif
http://www.bgc-gkc.org/FileUploads/RBI2008Logo-color.gif   Created by:                                                    ...
“MLB Always Epic”
“MLB Always Epic”
“MLB Always Epic”
“MLB Always Epic”www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Pwoqliogcs
http://www.ibaf.org/photo-show.aspx?id=647&size=
What is this?              •      Created by Hill Holiday              •      More than 30 players will                   ...
How Can We Change?
http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_zwyRdUo8A-E/TQav3ffOs5I/AAAAAAAAEyA/H-LaPHETuxw/s1600/IMG_6629%2B-%2BFirst%2BClass.JPG
1936: The First ClassChristyMathewson                                                                                     ...
1936: The First ClassChristyMathewson                                                                                     ...
1936: The First ClassChristyMathewson                                                                                     ...
1936: The First ClassChristyMathewson                                                                                     ...
1936: The First ClassChristyMathewson                                                                                     ...
1936: The First ClassChristyMathewson                                                                                     ...
t ion      licaAppDesigned by: Justin Cunnane
Upper Merion Middle School                                      Gym 1                                                     ...
Soft Toss/                                                                                                     2. Swing An...
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/180/370973576_9c1c871c39_o.jpghttp://www.mustangsathletics.com/images/header.jpghttp://uplo...
Putting The Pieces Together                     Bridgeporthttp://farm1.static.flickr.com/180/370973576_9c1c871c39_o.jpghtt...
My Four Stations
Infield Drills• Ground Balls• Bunt Situations• Double Plays
Outfield Drills• Over head fly balls• Catching Line-Drives• Hitting Cut-Off Man
Bunting Station          • Correct Way To            Bunt          • Bunting with            accuracy
Swing Analysis• Video Taping Swing                       • Show them what they                         need to improve on
The Turnout...
Debriefing• Noticed a lot of enthusiasm• Everyone I asked enjoyed it
Class Activity• Crossword
Works Cited•   "rounders." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. Encyclopædia    Britannica, 2011. Web....
Media Cited• Photos                                                                                               http://w...
Conclusion
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  • Briefly explain the purpose of why you’re going to explain the roots of where this sport came from. \n-Starts off with crickett which is believe to be the earliest ancestor of baseball.\n-Rounders was believe to be built off of Crickett and was the first Europe style of baseball.\n-Town ball was the American version of Rounders. It was unorganized at first, \ndifferent places having slightly different rules. Pickup games were very common in the 19th and early 20th century until Cartwright and Doubleday contributed to the official rules and field. \n
  • With evidence of this sport dating back to as far as the 13th century, Cricket is believed to be the basis of where all baseball related sports have come from. Although baseball has come from cricket, its rules are considerably different between the two. The balls that are played with are generally the same weight. The bats, however, the cricket bat is not round like a traditional baseball bat. It is a D shaped piece of wood and you use the flat side to swing at the ball. 11 people play on each team with the “bowler” (pitcher throwing) would throw the ball underhanded to the batter. Over time as the sport developed, the pitcher would begin throwing overhand which then proved to be too difficult for players over time. Rules were passed trying to control the height at which the ball was allowed to be released from the hand trying to limit the speed. Speeds could reach as high as 85 miles per hour over hand which shouldn’t be too bad. But the weird thing is that you bounce your pitch before the battsman is allowed to actually swing at it, proving to be very difficult. The way you score in this game is very unusual from baseball. Instead of homeplate you get these two ends with three posts sticking out called wickets. If the batsman hits the ball far enough they can run to opposite sides of the wickets they are on, scoring runs each time they are completed. If you hit the wickets while pitching, that was considered a strike.\n
  • The earliest reference made to this sport was the year 1744 in the book “A Little Pretty Pocket-Book”. In 1828 the sport got a whole section in the book in 1828. The sport rounders is believed to be a descendant from baseball. This sport never really got the attention it deserved as much as cricket got its on. This was the next step up in the evolutionary cycle that will eventually lead to what we know today as baseball. The balls used were significantly lighter, about half the size of an ordinary baseball or cricket ball. The bowler will throw the ball in the batting square which is identical to what we call the strike zone. 9 players are allowed to be playing at one time on the field and the game is played with 2 innings, but 9 outs for each inning. \n\n*Effects*\n\nInstead of running back and forth from the wickets like you would in cricket, rounders has 4 different posts you run to and they are essentially the same concept as baseball with their 3 bases and home plate. The only difference, as you can see, is that the four posts do not created the diamond we use.\n
  • The earliest reference made to this sport was the year 1744 in the book “A Little Pretty Pocket-Book”. In 1828 the sport got a whole section in the book in 1828. The sport rounders is believed to be a descendant from baseball. This sport never really got the attention it deserved as much as cricket got its on. This was the next step up in the evolutionary cycle that will eventually lead to what we know today as baseball. The balls used were significantly lighter, about half the size of an ordinary baseball or cricket ball. The bowler will throw the ball in the batting square which is identical to what we call the strike zone. 9 players are allowed to be playing at one time on the field and the game is played with 2 innings, but 9 outs for each inning. \n\n*Effects*\n\nInstead of running back and forth from the wickets like you would in cricket, rounders has 4 different posts you run to and they are essentially the same concept as baseball with their 3 bases and home plate. The only difference, as you can see, is that the four posts do not created the diamond we use.\n
  • The earliest reference made to this sport was the year 1744 in the book “A Little Pretty Pocket-Book”. In 1828 the sport got a whole section in the book in 1828. The sport rounders is believed to be a descendant from baseball. This sport never really got the attention it deserved as much as cricket got its on. This was the next step up in the evolutionary cycle that will eventually lead to what we know today as baseball. The balls used were significantly lighter, about half the size of an ordinary baseball or cricket ball. The bowler will throw the ball in the batting square which is identical to what we call the strike zone. 9 players are allowed to be playing at one time on the field and the game is played with 2 innings, but 9 outs for each inning. \n\n*Effects*\n\nInstead of running back and forth from the wickets like you would in cricket, rounders has 4 different posts you run to and they are essentially the same concept as baseball with their 3 bases and home plate. The only difference, as you can see, is that the four posts do not created the diamond we use.\n
  • The earliest reference made to this sport was the year 1744 in the book “A Little Pretty Pocket-Book”. In 1828 the sport got a whole section in the book in 1828. The sport rounders is believed to be a descendant from baseball. This sport never really got the attention it deserved as much as cricket got its on. This was the next step up in the evolutionary cycle that will eventually lead to what we know today as baseball. The balls used were significantly lighter, about half the size of an ordinary baseball or cricket ball. The bowler will throw the ball in the batting square which is identical to what we call the strike zone. 9 players are allowed to be playing at one time on the field and the game is played with 2 innings, but 9 outs for each inning. \n\n*Effects*\n\nInstead of running back and forth from the wickets like you would in cricket, rounders has 4 different posts you run to and they are essentially the same concept as baseball with their 3 bases and home plate. The only difference, as you can see, is that the four posts do not created the diamond we use.\n
  • The earliest reference made to this sport was the year 1744 in the book “A Little Pretty Pocket-Book”. In 1828 the sport got a whole section in the book in 1828. The sport rounders is believed to be a descendant from baseball. This sport never really got the attention it deserved as much as cricket got its on. This was the next step up in the evolutionary cycle that will eventually lead to what we know today as baseball. The balls used were significantly lighter, about half the size of an ordinary baseball or cricket ball. The bowler will throw the ball in the batting square which is identical to what we call the strike zone. 9 players are allowed to be playing at one time on the field and the game is played with 2 innings, but 9 outs for each inning. \n\n*Effects*\n\nInstead of running back and forth from the wickets like you would in cricket, rounders has 4 different posts you run to and they are essentially the same concept as baseball with their 3 bases and home plate. The only difference, as you can see, is that the four posts do not created the diamond we use.\n
  • The earliest reference made to this sport was the year 1744 in the book “A Little Pretty Pocket-Book”. In 1828 the sport got a whole section in the book in 1828. The sport rounders is believed to be a descendant from baseball. This sport never really got the attention it deserved as much as cricket got its on. This was the next step up in the evolutionary cycle that will eventually lead to what we know today as baseball. The balls used were significantly lighter, about half the size of an ordinary baseball or cricket ball. The bowler will throw the ball in the batting square which is identical to what we call the strike zone. 9 players are allowed to be playing at one time on the field and the game is played with 2 innings, but 9 outs for each inning. \n\n*Effects*\n\nInstead of running back and forth from the wickets like you would in cricket, rounders has 4 different posts you run to and they are essentially the same concept as baseball with their 3 bases and home plate. The only difference, as you can see, is that the four posts do not created the diamond we use.\n
  • The earliest reference made to this sport was the year 1744 in the book “A Little Pretty Pocket-Book”. In 1828 the sport got a whole section in the book in 1828. The sport rounders is believed to be a descendant from baseball. This sport never really got the attention it deserved as much as cricket got its on. This was the next step up in the evolutionary cycle that will eventually lead to what we know today as baseball. The balls used were significantly lighter, about half the size of an ordinary baseball or cricket ball. The bowler will throw the ball in the batting square which is identical to what we call the strike zone. 9 players are allowed to be playing at one time on the field and the game is played with 2 innings, but 9 outs for each inning. \n\n*Effects*\n\nInstead of running back and forth from the wickets like you would in cricket, rounders has 4 different posts you run to and they are essentially the same concept as baseball with their 3 bases and home plate. The only difference, as you can see, is that the four posts do not created the diamond we use.\n
  • The next step up from rounders. Baseball came to the United States from Europe. Back at that time there were so rules that were “The RULES OF BASEBALL”. People from different places played different rules, which is where town ball most likely got its name. Town Ball was also known as the Massachusetts game. This type of baseball is actually the direct descent of the game rounders. Like rounders, the ball used was nearly half the weight of a regular baseball. The bats are round and could not have a diameter exceeding 2 and 1/2 inches down the barrell. This was the first time a ball was forced to be thrown over hand and took on many of the characteristics including the foul tip and etc..Instead of a bowler, you had the thrower, which was obviously the pitcher and the striker which was the batter. The thrower stood 35 feet away from the striker! which is almost half the distance in a traditional baseball game, which is close by all means. There were no set amount of innings in this game. The object of the game was to score 100 talleys (runs) to win.\n\n*Effect*\n\nAs you can see. The field layout is similar to our traditional baseball field except where the thrower is throwing the ball (not to home plate) but instead in the middle of the baseline. The dimensions were also smaller than our regular field also. the pitcher being 35 feet away and the baselines only being 60 feet in lengh. This is actually more similar to a little league baseball field. \n\n*Effects* \nInstead of running back and forth from the wickets like you would in cricket, rounders has 4 different posts you run to and they are essentially the same concept as baseball with their 3 bases and home plate. The only difference, as you can see, is that the four posts do not created the diamond we use.\n\n\n\n\n
  • The next step up from rounders. Baseball came to the United States from Europe. Back at that time there were so rules that were “The RULES OF BASEBALL”. People from different places played different rules, which is where town ball most likely got its name. Town Ball was also known as the Massachusetts game. This type of baseball is actually the direct descent of the game rounders. Like rounders, the ball used was nearly half the weight of a regular baseball. The bats are round and could not have a diameter exceeding 2 and 1/2 inches down the barrell. This was the first time a ball was forced to be thrown over hand and took on many of the characteristics including the foul tip and etc..Instead of a bowler, you had the thrower, which was obviously the pitcher and the striker which was the batter. The thrower stood 35 feet away from the striker! which is almost half the distance in a traditional baseball game, which is close by all means. There were no set amount of innings in this game. The object of the game was to score 100 talleys (runs) to win.\n\n*Effect*\n\nAs you can see. The field layout is similar to our traditional baseball field except where the thrower is throwing the ball (not to home plate) but instead in the middle of the baseline. The dimensions were also smaller than our regular field also. the pitcher being 35 feet away and the baselines only being 60 feet in lengh. This is actually more similar to a little league baseball field. \n\n*Effects* \nInstead of running back and forth from the wickets like you would in cricket, rounders has 4 different posts you run to and they are essentially the same concept as baseball with their 3 bases and home plate. The only difference, as you can see, is that the four posts do not created the diamond we use.\n\n\n\n\n
  • \n
  • Abner Doubleday, He was born June 16 1819 and died the year 1893. He was credited supposedly for creating the popular game town ball which eventually shaped into baseball. Someone who claimed to be a friend of Abner Doubleday also claimed that he saw him first hand creating this game. After his death the legend was confirmed when they had found a worn down concept of a baseball in his belongings. In 1907 The story was set in stone that doubleday did indeed invent baseball.\n\n*effect*\n\nOr did he. After further investigating this situation it was found that while his friend may have been around Cooperstown to be reporting all of this news. But while at the same time, Doubleday was over 100 miles away from the area... in the military. This story went on for around 50 years until it was finally deemed... myth. *flames*\n\n\n
  • Abner Doubleday, He was born June 16 1819 and died the year 1893. He was credited supposedly for creating the popular game town ball which eventually shaped into baseball. Someone who claimed to be a friend of Abner Doubleday also claimed that he saw him first hand creating this game. After his death the legend was confirmed when they had found a worn down concept of a baseball in his belongings. In 1907 The story was set in stone that doubleday did indeed invent baseball.\n\n*effect*\n\nOr did he. After further investigating this situation it was found that while his friend may have been around Cooperstown to be reporting all of this news. But while at the same time, Doubleday was over 100 miles away from the area... in the military. This story went on for around 50 years until it was finally deemed... myth. *flames*\n\n\n
  • Abner Doubleday, He was born June 16 1819 and died the year 1893. He was credited supposedly for creating the popular game town ball which eventually shaped into baseball. Someone who claimed to be a friend of Abner Doubleday also claimed that he saw him first hand creating this game. After his death the legend was confirmed when they had found a worn down concept of a baseball in his belongings. In 1907 The story was set in stone that doubleday did indeed invent baseball.\n\n*effect*\n\nOr did he. After further investigating this situation it was found that while his friend may have been around Cooperstown to be reporting all of this news. But while at the same time, Doubleday was over 100 miles away from the area... in the military. This story went on for around 50 years until it was finally deemed... myth. *flames*\n\n\n
  • Abner Doubleday, He was born June 16 1819 and died the year 1893. He was credited supposedly for creating the popular game town ball which eventually shaped into baseball. Someone who claimed to be a friend of Abner Doubleday also claimed that he saw him first hand creating this game. After his death the legend was confirmed when they had found a worn down concept of a baseball in his belongings. In 1907 The story was set in stone that doubleday did indeed invent baseball.\n\n*effect*\n\nOr did he. After further investigating this situation it was found that while his friend may have been around Cooperstown to be reporting all of this news. But while at the same time, Doubleday was over 100 miles away from the area... in the military. This story went on for around 50 years until it was finally deemed... myth. *flames*\n\n\n
  • Now, should this guy be the one who is responsible for inventing this game. He was responsible for starting the first professional team Dubbed the New York Knickerbockers. As he was made his team he developed the set of rules that are mostly used for today. It was Cartwright who dictated that there shall only be 3 outfielders and that you could only tag runners and not hit them with the actual baseball. \n
  • Now, should this guy be the one who is responsible for inventing this game. He was responsible for starting the first professional team Dubbed the New York Knickerbockers. As he was made his team he developed the set of rules that are mostly used for today. It was Cartwright who dictated that there shall only be 3 outfielders and that you could only tag runners and not hit them with the actual baseball. \n
  • Now, should this guy be the one who is responsible for inventing this game. He was responsible for starting the first professional team Dubbed the New York Knickerbockers. As he was made his team he developed the set of rules that are mostly used for today. It was Cartwright who dictated that there shall only be 3 outfielders and that you could only tag runners and not hit them with the actual baseball. \n
  • This is a photo of the team that Cartwright organized. For the most part int he beginning they would end up scrimmaging themselves for about a year until in 1846 they ended up playing the first game between 2 professional teams. They were killed by the New York club by a miserable score of 23-1. Nevertheless, this was a historic time for this game and was a huge milestone. \n
  • So do we know who invented it? \n\n*effect*\n\nUltimately the answer is indeed no sadly. Baseball has proved to be created over evolution and many different people contributed to its creating its existance. But nothing was written on paper back then so we have no idea who really invented the game we play today. \n
  • So do we know who invented it? \n\n*effect*\n\nUltimately the answer is indeed no sadly. Baseball has proved to be created over evolution and many different people contributed to its creating its existance. But nothing was written on paper back then so we have no idea who really invented the game we play today. \n
  • So do we know who invented it? \n\n*effect*\n\nUltimately the answer is indeed no sadly. Baseball has proved to be created over evolution and many different people contributed to its creating its existance. But nothing was written on paper back then so we have no idea who really invented the game we play today. \n
  • In 1858 the first league was introduced for Major League Baseball. The leagues name was “ The National Associate of Base Ball Players. The league adopted the rules from which the Knickerbockers played by. This is where money became involved with the game for the first time ever. For the first year it seemed over 5,000 fans would come to watch the games, which caught the attention of the origination and saw its potential for making money. Although the league prohibited salaries to the players, there were loopholes around them. Leagues like this came and went over the problem of not being stable enough to continue. The trend ended when in 1876 the National League was born and enabled salaries for players. The only other league that stayed alive and became just as stable as the National League was the well known Western League, a.k.a The American League. In Modern day today the National League has 14 teams while the american league has 16\n
  • \n
  • Over the years after the MLB players association was introduced which was the first players union in baseball. The first union was founded in 1885 and failed along with a few other attempts right behind it. Finally the year 1965 came around and the players attempted to regroup again this time seeking outside help for them to aid. They came across Marvin Miller who was a famous American Economist who in the past helped out the United Steelworkers of America. His first actions included educating the players about licensing and how to organize. In 1968 he helped the players organize the first collective bargaining agreement between the players and the association. This agreement boosted their starting salaries from $6,000 dollars to now $10,000 dollars. The original 6,000 dollars remained the same for around 25 years which really hurt the players forcing them to pick up jobs on the offseason or even when playing. After that there was another huge milestone achieved.\n
  • That achievement was free agency. Before free agency all the players in the mlb were forced to follow something called the reserve clause. The reserve claus meant that player’s contracts would automatically renew with the team after it expired so that would prevent people from changing teams... unless their team no longer wanted them and decided to drop them. It basically confined players to one place for their whole career., but was that really bad? Some purists hated this idea of free agency and said it too away ffrom the game because it became more about money. December 1975 the players were finally rewarded with free agency, which meant that when their contracts expired they were allowed to go here and see if any other teams would want to sign them. This led to people making more money. \n
  • Another thing the union sorted out was arbitration which meant if the player had disagreements with the team while signing this would resolve it. This was a court case that would determine someones salary by how well he plays for the next season.\n
  • \n\n
  • Dover Little League has entered its dark ages, perhaps to be done for a while. This year marked the 50th year anniversary of the organization running and at this point it looks like they are coming up short. 17 kids signed up for the organization this year which isn’t even enough to supply two teams for the league to play against each other. League President Ronan O'Doherty spoke about possibly multiple factors leading up to this including the rise of other sports such as lacrosse, soccer, and skateboarding. One of the possible solutions they had hoped for was to possibly merge with a second little league but by the looks of things it didn’t seem to fall through. Ronan is being optimistic in hoping that the league will resume in 2012 if they get enough players. \n
  • Not too much different from Dover Little League, Bantam is suffering the same poison but to a lower degree. They still have seasons going which is a good thing. But their team count has nearly dropped by 50% which is scary. The league is huge, they still have 30 teams playing each other this year but their pony system is in a little danger. They only have 2 teams right now on that level so what is going to happen to them in the future? Possibly Dover’s fate. They league has, like Dover, blamed their declining on the rising of other youth sports. \n
  • There are two leagues I’ve participated in during my childhood and those two were Bridgeport Little League and UMBA. The two are baseball on too different leagues, Little League and Babe Ruth Baseball. Both of these leagues have gotten smaller from the time since I play on them. Back in 2005, my last little league season. I remember there was 4 teams for Bridgeport, 8 teams for UMBA. Now onto today, there are no teams in Bridgeport, except 1 now that has to travel in order to play people. UMBA is down to 4 teams now, so where are we going in the future...\n
  • \n
  • One big reason why youth sports are different from today are from more distractions. This era has so many things you can do, technology people! Air conditioning, television, computers, music and video games are keeping kids inside and away from playing sports which is leading to another topic like obesity. According to my father he used to wake up in the morning, meet up with his friends, and then go play baseball until it was time for dinner. That is unheard of now! The only “comfort” that they had back then that we have now is television which was a lot more limited back then with only a handful of channels to choose from. \n
  • One big reason why youth sports are different from today are from more distractions. This era has so many things you can do, technology people! Air conditioning, television, computers, music and video games are keeping kids inside and away from playing sports which is leading to another topic like obesity. According to my father he used to wake up in the morning, meet up with his friends, and then go play baseball until it was time for dinner. That is unheard of now! The only “comfort” that they had back then that we have now is television which was a lot more limited back then with only a handful of channels to choose from. \n
  • One big reason why youth sports are different from today are from more distractions. This era has so many things you can do, technology people! Air conditioning, television, computers, music and video games are keeping kids inside and away from playing sports which is leading to another topic like obesity. According to my father he used to wake up in the morning, meet up with his friends, and then go play baseball until it was time for dinner. That is unheard of now! The only “comfort” that they had back then that we have now is television which was a lot more limited back then with only a handful of channels to choose from. \n
  • One big reason why youth sports are different from today are from more distractions. This era has so many things you can do, technology people! Air conditioning, television, computers, music and video games are keeping kids inside and away from playing sports which is leading to another topic like obesity. According to my father he used to wake up in the morning, meet up with his friends, and then go play baseball until it was time for dinner. That is unheard of now! The only “comfort” that they had back then that we have now is television which was a lot more limited back then with only a handful of channels to choose from. \n
  • One big reason why youth sports are different from today are from more distractions. This era has so many things you can do, technology people! Air conditioning, television, computers, music and video games are keeping kids inside and away from playing sports which is leading to another topic like obesity. According to my father he used to wake up in the morning, meet up with his friends, and then go play baseball until it was time for dinner. That is unheard of now! The only “comfort” that they had back then that we have now is television which was a lot more limited back then with only a handful of channels to choose from. \n
  • One big reason why youth sports are different from today are from more distractions. This era has so many things you can do, technology people! Air conditioning, television, computers, music and video games are keeping kids inside and away from playing sports which is leading to another topic like obesity. According to my father he used to wake up in the morning, meet up with his friends, and then go play baseball until it was time for dinner. That is unheard of now! The only “comfort” that they had back then that we have now is television which was a lot more limited back then with only a handful of channels to choose from. \n
  • One big reason why youth sports are different from today are from more distractions. This era has so many things you can do, technology people! Air conditioning, television, computers, music and video games are keeping kids inside and away from playing sports which is leading to another topic like obesity. According to my father he used to wake up in the morning, meet up with his friends, and then go play baseball until it was time for dinner. That is unheard of now! The only “comfort” that they had back then that we have now is television which was a lot more limited back then with only a handful of channels to choose from. \n
  • One big reason why youth sports are different from today are from more distractions. This era has so many things you can do, technology people! Air conditioning, television, computers, music and video games are keeping kids inside and away from playing sports which is leading to another topic like obesity. According to my father he used to wake up in the morning, meet up with his friends, and then go play baseball until it was time for dinner. That is unheard of now! The only “comfort” that they had back then that we have now is television which was a lot more limited back then with only a handful of channels to choose from. \n
  • One big reason why youth sports are different from today are from more distractions. This era has so many things you can do, technology people! Air conditioning, television, computers, music and video games are keeping kids inside and away from playing sports which is leading to another topic like obesity. According to my father he used to wake up in the morning, meet up with his friends, and then go play baseball until it was time for dinner. That is unheard of now! The only “comfort” that they had back then that we have now is television which was a lot more limited back then with only a handful of channels to choose from. \n
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  • Ken Morse brings up a powerful discussion about what is happening to youth sports and what made it the way it is today. In the article he had wrote, he came up with some key parts in the project. He points out that the kids in teeball and pee wee level are having fun, exactly what I picked up when I did this camp! So i knew this would be valuable information. Now he dips into what he thinks happens to some of us while we move up the ranks. One of these issues are parents. Parents could be responsible for a couple of things. The very first and earliest things they could be guilty of is making their kids play in the first place. In some cases the kids best interest in heart is sometimes not taken into account. The sport could turn into being played just so they could achieve pro level and make big money when they grow up, which is not the way it is meant to be played in my opinion. This added stress to the kid would deteriorate any interest they had in the first place in no time. Ken also pointed out the level of respect then in the 70s or 80s was a lot higher than what you would have in todays world. Parents would rarely yell at umpires or anything, instead they would sometimes show up in support for their kid. These factors raise the bars for success, like I said before in effect will raise the stress level and take the fun out of the game. Another thing I picked up on was where is the drive to succeed anyways. Ken Morse said that when he was young he was cut from 4 little league teams, something you would never hear of in this age. His response to that, it shaped him, at a young age it taught him to never give up and that led for him to go on and play semi pro baseball for 8 years. Also the whole trophy thing, if everyone gets a trophy, then what fuels your desire to win if everyone gets something, lame.\n
  • \n
  • -Does anybody know what RBI stands for in this organization?\n\nRBI stands for Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities. The organization was founded in 1989 so now it is entering its 21st anniversary this year. The person responsible was John Young, a former MLB player and then scout. The original place for this took place in South Central Los Angeles but since then has expanded to as far as out of our country, talleying up to more than 200 cities worldwide participating and around 120,000 players participating. The reason this organization started there was because that is where Young grew up as a kid. That place harbored him and many other future professional players during his time. However when he became a major league scout he noticed a significant decrease in kids coming out of that area so thats when he decided to start this organization. Their target is in inner cities because they believe kids growing up in there had a disadvantage to learn this sport because open baseball fields are less common in the area. Young also did some research and learned that most kids will drop out of this sport between the age of 13 and 16 years old due to muliple factors. These factors include poor funding, lack of organization, and the falling structure of the environment. What I mean by that is the dangers increasing in Inner Cities such as gangs forming and etc... The organization started up slow at first having only 11 kids showing up to the first tryout after they kept at it, their first year they managed to get 180 kids playing the first season. Then after 5 years of success he decided to expand it, and here we are today with it. \n
  • -Does anybody know what RBI stands for in this organization?\n\nRBI stands for Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities. The organization was founded in 1989 so now it is entering its 21st anniversary this year. The person responsible was John Young, a former MLB player and then scout. The original place for this took place in South Central Los Angeles but since then has expanded to as far as out of our country, talleying up to more than 200 cities worldwide participating and around 120,000 players participating. The reason this organization started there was because that is where Young grew up as a kid. That place harbored him and many other future professional players during his time. However when he became a major league scout he noticed a significant decrease in kids coming out of that area so thats when he decided to start this organization. Their target is in inner cities because they believe kids growing up in there had a disadvantage to learn this sport because open baseball fields are less common in the area. Young also did some research and learned that most kids will drop out of this sport between the age of 13 and 16 years old due to muliple factors. These factors include poor funding, lack of organization, and the falling structure of the environment. What I mean by that is the dangers increasing in Inner Cities such as gangs forming and etc... The organization started up slow at first having only 11 kids showing up to the first tryout after they kept at it, their first year they managed to get 180 kids playing the first season. Then after 5 years of success he decided to expand it, and here we are today with it. \n
  • -Does anybody know what RBI stands for in this organization?\n\nRBI stands for Reviving Baseball in Inner Cities. The organization was founded in 1989 so now it is entering its 21st anniversary this year. The person responsible was John Young, a former MLB player and then scout. The original place for this took place in South Central Los Angeles but since then has expanded to as far as out of our country, talleying up to more than 200 cities worldwide participating and around 120,000 players participating. The reason this organization started there was because that is where Young grew up as a kid. That place harbored him and many other future professional players during his time. However when he became a major league scout he noticed a significant decrease in kids coming out of that area so thats when he decided to start this organization. Their target is in inner cities because they believe kids growing up in there had a disadvantage to learn this sport because open baseball fields are less common in the area. Young also did some research and learned that most kids will drop out of this sport between the age of 13 and 16 years old due to muliple factors. These factors include poor funding, lack of organization, and the falling structure of the environment. What I mean by that is the dangers increasing in Inner Cities such as gangs forming and etc... The organization started up slow at first having only 11 kids showing up to the first tryout after they kept at it, their first year they managed to get 180 kids playing the first season. Then after 5 years of success he decided to expand it, and here we are today with it. \n
  • MLB is a new advertising campaigned that has just started. Here are two sample commercials that are being aired right now, some of you may have already viewed these in the past.\n
  • MLB is a new advertising campaigned that has just started. Here are two sample commercials that are being aired right now, some of you may have already viewed these in the past.\n
  • MLB is a new advertising campaigned that has just started. Here are two sample commercials that are being aired right now, some of you may have already viewed these in the past.\n
  • MLB is a new advertising campaigned that has just started. Here are two sample commercials that are being aired right now, some of you may have already viewed these in the past.\n
  • MLB is a new advertising campaigned that has just started. Here are two sample commercials that are being aired right now, some of you may have already viewed these in the past.\n
  • Since we know from before that some key reasons why kids are losing interest is because they say it is boring or too slow for them. Well there was a new marketing campaign launched March 31st, opening day for the mlb. This was the first advertising created by Hill Holiday for the MLB. This is significant because this campaign steers away from traditional approaches to commercials such as reshowing highlights and old footage to try and capture young kid’s attention. This new creative approach is said trying to capture the personalities of the players and extend that out to young viewers and let their imagination run wild with it. The first three “lucky” major leagues that are featured in this are three pitchers including Brian Wilson, Ubaldo Jimenez, and Felix Hernandez. By the end of the 2011 season its said there should be around 30 or more players featured in commercials. \n
  • Since we know from before that some key reasons why kids are losing interest is because they say it is boring or too slow for them. Well there was a new marketing campaign launched March 31st, opening day for the mlb. This was the first advertising created by Hill Holiday for the MLB. This is significant because this campaign steers away from traditional approaches to commercials such as reshowing highlights and old footage to try and capture young kid’s attention. This new creative approach is said trying to capture the personalities of the players and extend that out to young viewers and let their imagination run wild with it. The first three “lucky” major leagues that are featured in this are three pitchers including Brian Wilson, Ubaldo Jimenez, and Felix Hernandez. By the end of the 2011 season its said there should be around 30 or more players featured in commercials. \n
  • \n
  • This is called “The first Class”. These were the first 5 players voted into the Hall of Fame, Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and Walter Johnson. I’m going to give a brief summary of each of them. \n\nChristy Mathewson has been called one of the best pitchers ever. As a pitcher he won over 373 games and that is such an accomplishment for a pitcher because modern day pitchers today will probably never come close to the milestone 300 ever again because all organizations are extra cautions in todays age and will never get enough starts. \n\nNext up is Babe Ruth, the Bambino, is the most recognizable name in baseball. He was an all around great batter for the New York Yankees, and helped shape that organization. He was the home run king for around 50 years and people thought he record would never be broken. Eventually it was though by a player named Henry Aaron, but sadly he is not part of my project.\n\nThird player up is Tyrus Raymond Cobb if there was a player you would call arrogant in sports, this is your guy. This man used to sharpen is baseball cleats and aim them at infielders when he slid into bases. Besides his attitude, his batting average was great. Over 10 seasons this guy had bated over .400 and his whole career batting average is .367. Both are rediculous numbers. \n\nHonus Wagner is our next guy, he was the greatest shortstop of his time playing in the 30s. He was one of the few that had reached over the milestone of having 3,000 hits. He has alsmo put up other impressive numbers like his .321 batting average and 723 Stolen bases.\n\nThe last guy on this board is Walter Johnson, one of the more unorthodox pitchers that you will ever see. If you guys thought it was rare hitting 300 wins as a pitcher, this guy had 417 games... He was a lengendary pitcher and his arm motion was very weird as you can see \n*video*\nIt may look weird but it actually feels natural. I use this same arm motion at first base while throwing ground balls into the infield because its easier on my arm and the spin keeps the balls from hopping. \n\n\n
  • This is called “The first Class”. These were the first 5 players voted into the Hall of Fame, Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and Walter Johnson. I’m going to give a brief summary of each of them. \n\nChristy Mathewson has been called one of the best pitchers ever. As a pitcher he won over 373 games and that is such an accomplishment for a pitcher because modern day pitchers today will probably never come close to the milestone 300 ever again because all organizations are extra cautions in todays age and will never get enough starts. \n\nNext up is Babe Ruth, the Bambino, is the most recognizable name in baseball. He was an all around great batter for the New York Yankees, and helped shape that organization. He was the home run king for around 50 years and people thought he record would never be broken. Eventually it was though by a player named Henry Aaron, but sadly he is not part of my project.\n\nThird player up is Tyrus Raymond Cobb if there was a player you would call arrogant in sports, this is your guy. This man used to sharpen is baseball cleats and aim them at infielders when he slid into bases. Besides his attitude, his batting average was great. Over 10 seasons this guy had bated over .400 and his whole career batting average is .367. Both are rediculous numbers. \n\nHonus Wagner is our next guy, he was the greatest shortstop of his time playing in the 30s. He was one of the few that had reached over the milestone of having 3,000 hits. He has alsmo put up other impressive numbers like his .321 batting average and 723 Stolen bases.\n\nThe last guy on this board is Walter Johnson, one of the more unorthodox pitchers that you will ever see. If you guys thought it was rare hitting 300 wins as a pitcher, this guy had 417 games... He was a lengendary pitcher and his arm motion was very weird as you can see \n*video*\nIt may look weird but it actually feels natural. I use this same arm motion at first base while throwing ground balls into the infield because its easier on my arm and the spin keeps the balls from hopping. \n\n\n
  • This is called “The first Class”. These were the first 5 players voted into the Hall of Fame, Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and Walter Johnson. I’m going to give a brief summary of each of them. \n\nChristy Mathewson has been called one of the best pitchers ever. As a pitcher he won over 373 games and that is such an accomplishment for a pitcher because modern day pitchers today will probably never come close to the milestone 300 ever again because all organizations are extra cautions in todays age and will never get enough starts. \n\nNext up is Babe Ruth, the Bambino, is the most recognizable name in baseball. He was an all around great batter for the New York Yankees, and helped shape that organization. He was the home run king for around 50 years and people thought he record would never be broken. Eventually it was though by a player named Henry Aaron, but sadly he is not part of my project.\n\nThird player up is Tyrus Raymond Cobb if there was a player you would call arrogant in sports, this is your guy. This man used to sharpen is baseball cleats and aim them at infielders when he slid into bases. Besides his attitude, his batting average was great. Over 10 seasons this guy had bated over .400 and his whole career batting average is .367. Both are rediculous numbers. \n\nHonus Wagner is our next guy, he was the greatest shortstop of his time playing in the 30s. He was one of the few that had reached over the milestone of having 3,000 hits. He has alsmo put up other impressive numbers like his .321 batting average and 723 Stolen bases.\n\nThe last guy on this board is Walter Johnson, one of the more unorthodox pitchers that you will ever see. If you guys thought it was rare hitting 300 wins as a pitcher, this guy had 417 games... He was a lengendary pitcher and his arm motion was very weird as you can see \n*video*\nIt may look weird but it actually feels natural. I use this same arm motion at first base while throwing ground balls into the infield because its easier on my arm and the spin keeps the balls from hopping. \n\n\n
  • This is called “The first Class”. These were the first 5 players voted into the Hall of Fame, Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and Walter Johnson. I’m going to give a brief summary of each of them. \n\nChristy Mathewson has been called one of the best pitchers ever. As a pitcher he won over 373 games and that is such an accomplishment for a pitcher because modern day pitchers today will probably never come close to the milestone 300 ever again because all organizations are extra cautions in todays age and will never get enough starts. \n\nNext up is Babe Ruth, the Bambino, is the most recognizable name in baseball. He was an all around great batter for the New York Yankees, and helped shape that organization. He was the home run king for around 50 years and people thought he record would never be broken. Eventually it was though by a player named Henry Aaron, but sadly he is not part of my project.\n\nThird player up is Tyrus Raymond Cobb if there was a player you would call arrogant in sports, this is your guy. This man used to sharpen is baseball cleats and aim them at infielders when he slid into bases. Besides his attitude, his batting average was great. Over 10 seasons this guy had bated over .400 and his whole career batting average is .367. Both are rediculous numbers. \n\nHonus Wagner is our next guy, he was the greatest shortstop of his time playing in the 30s. He was one of the few that had reached over the milestone of having 3,000 hits. He has alsmo put up other impressive numbers like his .321 batting average and 723 Stolen bases.\n\nThe last guy on this board is Walter Johnson, one of the more unorthodox pitchers that you will ever see. If you guys thought it was rare hitting 300 wins as a pitcher, this guy had 417 games... He was a lengendary pitcher and his arm motion was very weird as you can see \n*video*\nIt may look weird but it actually feels natural. I use this same arm motion at first base while throwing ground balls into the infield because its easier on my arm and the spin keeps the balls from hopping. \n\n\n
  • This is called “The first Class”. These were the first 5 players voted into the Hall of Fame, Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and Walter Johnson. I’m going to give a brief summary of each of them. \n\nChristy Mathewson has been called one of the best pitchers ever. As a pitcher he won over 373 games and that is such an accomplishment for a pitcher because modern day pitchers today will probably never come close to the milestone 300 ever again because all organizations are extra cautions in todays age and will never get enough starts. \n\nNext up is Babe Ruth, the Bambino, is the most recognizable name in baseball. He was an all around great batter for the New York Yankees, and helped shape that organization. He was the home run king for around 50 years and people thought he record would never be broken. Eventually it was though by a player named Henry Aaron, but sadly he is not part of my project.\n\nThird player up is Tyrus Raymond Cobb if there was a player you would call arrogant in sports, this is your guy. This man used to sharpen is baseball cleats and aim them at infielders when he slid into bases. Besides his attitude, his batting average was great. Over 10 seasons this guy had bated over .400 and his whole career batting average is .367. Both are rediculous numbers. \n\nHonus Wagner is our next guy, he was the greatest shortstop of his time playing in the 30s. He was one of the few that had reached over the milestone of having 3,000 hits. He has alsmo put up other impressive numbers like his .321 batting average and 723 Stolen bases.\n\nThe last guy on this board is Walter Johnson, one of the more unorthodox pitchers that you will ever see. If you guys thought it was rare hitting 300 wins as a pitcher, this guy had 417 games... He was a lengendary pitcher and his arm motion was very weird as you can see \n*video*\nIt may look weird but it actually feels natural. I use this same arm motion at first base while throwing ground balls into the infield because its easier on my arm and the spin keeps the balls from hopping. \n\n\n
  • This is called “The first Class”. These were the first 5 players voted into the Hall of Fame, Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and Walter Johnson. I’m going to give a brief summary of each of them. \n\nChristy Mathewson has been called one of the best pitchers ever. As a pitcher he won over 373 games and that is such an accomplishment for a pitcher because modern day pitchers today will probably never come close to the milestone 300 ever again because all organizations are extra cautions in todays age and will never get enough starts. \n\nNext up is Babe Ruth, the Bambino, is the most recognizable name in baseball. He was an all around great batter for the New York Yankees, and helped shape that organization. He was the home run king for around 50 years and people thought he record would never be broken. Eventually it was though by a player named Henry Aaron, but sadly he is not part of my project.\n\nThird player up is Tyrus Raymond Cobb if there was a player you would call arrogant in sports, this is your guy. This man used to sharpen is baseball cleats and aim them at infielders when he slid into bases. Besides his attitude, his batting average was great. Over 10 seasons this guy had bated over .400 and his whole career batting average is .367. Both are rediculous numbers. \n\nHonus Wagner is our next guy, he was the greatest shortstop of his time playing in the 30s. He was one of the few that had reached over the milestone of having 3,000 hits. He has alsmo put up other impressive numbers like his .321 batting average and 723 Stolen bases.\n\nThe last guy on this board is Walter Johnson, one of the more unorthodox pitchers that you will ever see. If you guys thought it was rare hitting 300 wins as a pitcher, this guy had 417 games... He was a lengendary pitcher and his arm motion was very weird as you can see \n*video*\nIt may look weird but it actually feels natural. I use this same arm motion at first base while throwing ground balls into the infield because its easier on my arm and the spin keeps the balls from hopping. \n\n\n
  • This is called “The first Class”. These were the first 5 players voted into the Hall of Fame, Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and Walter Johnson. I’m going to give a brief summary of each of them. \n\nChristy Mathewson has been called one of the best pitchers ever. As a pitcher he won over 373 games and that is such an accomplishment for a pitcher because modern day pitchers today will probably never come close to the milestone 300 ever again because all organizations are extra cautions in todays age and will never get enough starts. \n\nNext up is Babe Ruth, the Bambino, is the most recognizable name in baseball. He was an all around great batter for the New York Yankees, and helped shape that organization. He was the home run king for around 50 years and people thought he record would never be broken. Eventually it was though by a player named Henry Aaron, but sadly he is not part of my project.\n\nThird player up is Tyrus Raymond Cobb if there was a player you would call arrogant in sports, this is your guy. This man used to sharpen is baseball cleats and aim them at infielders when he slid into bases. Besides his attitude, his batting average was great. Over 10 seasons this guy had bated over .400 and his whole career batting average is .367. Both are rediculous numbers. \n\nHonus Wagner is our next guy, he was the greatest shortstop of his time playing in the 30s. He was one of the few that had reached over the milestone of having 3,000 hits. He has alsmo put up other impressive numbers like his .321 batting average and 723 Stolen bases.\n\nThe last guy on this board is Walter Johnson, one of the more unorthodox pitchers that you will ever see. If you guys thought it was rare hitting 300 wins as a pitcher, this guy had 417 games... He was a lengendary pitcher and his arm motion was very weird as you can see \n*video*\nIt may look weird but it actually feels natural. I use this same arm motion at first base while throwing ground balls into the infield because its easier on my arm and the spin keeps the balls from hopping. \n\n\n
  • This is called “The first Class”. These were the first 5 players voted into the Hall of Fame, Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and Walter Johnson. I’m going to give a brief summary of each of them. \n\nChristy Mathewson has been called one of the best pitchers ever. As a pitcher he won over 373 games and that is such an accomplishment for a pitcher because modern day pitchers today will probably never come close to the milestone 300 ever again because all organizations are extra cautions in todays age and will never get enough starts. \n\nNext up is Babe Ruth, the Bambino, is the most recognizable name in baseball. He was an all around great batter for the New York Yankees, and helped shape that organization. He was the home run king for around 50 years and people thought he record would never be broken. Eventually it was though by a player named Henry Aaron, but sadly he is not part of my project.\n\nThird player up is Tyrus Raymond Cobb if there was a player you would call arrogant in sports, this is your guy. This man used to sharpen is baseball cleats and aim them at infielders when he slid into bases. Besides his attitude, his batting average was great. Over 10 seasons this guy had bated over .400 and his whole career batting average is .367. Both are rediculous numbers. \n\nHonus Wagner is our next guy, he was the greatest shortstop of his time playing in the 30s. He was one of the few that had reached over the milestone of having 3,000 hits. He has alsmo put up other impressive numbers like his .321 batting average and 723 Stolen bases.\n\nThe last guy on this board is Walter Johnson, one of the more unorthodox pitchers that you will ever see. If you guys thought it was rare hitting 300 wins as a pitcher, this guy had 417 games... He was a lengendary pitcher and his arm motion was very weird as you can see \n*video*\nIt may look weird but it actually feels natural. I use this same arm motion at first base while throwing ground balls into the infield because its easier on my arm and the spin keeps the balls from hopping. \n\n\n
  • This is called “The first Class”. These were the first 5 players voted into the Hall of Fame, Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and Walter Johnson. I’m going to give a brief summary of each of them. \n\nChristy Mathewson has been called one of the best pitchers ever. As a pitcher he won over 373 games and that is such an accomplishment for a pitcher because modern day pitchers today will probably never come close to the milestone 300 ever again because all organizations are extra cautions in todays age and will never get enough starts. \n\nNext up is Babe Ruth, the Bambino, is the most recognizable name in baseball. He was an all around great batter for the New York Yankees, and helped shape that organization. He was the home run king for around 50 years and people thought he record would never be broken. Eventually it was though by a player named Henry Aaron, but sadly he is not part of my project.\n\nThird player up is Tyrus Raymond Cobb if there was a player you would call arrogant in sports, this is your guy. This man used to sharpen is baseball cleats and aim them at infielders when he slid into bases. Besides his attitude, his batting average was great. Over 10 seasons this guy had bated over .400 and his whole career batting average is .367. Both are rediculous numbers. \n\nHonus Wagner is our next guy, he was the greatest shortstop of his time playing in the 30s. He was one of the few that had reached over the milestone of having 3,000 hits. He has alsmo put up other impressive numbers like his .321 batting average and 723 Stolen bases.\n\nThe last guy on this board is Walter Johnson, one of the more unorthodox pitchers that you will ever see. If you guys thought it was rare hitting 300 wins as a pitcher, this guy had 417 games... He was a lengendary pitcher and his arm motion was very weird as you can see \n*video*\nIt may look weird but it actually feels natural. I use this same arm motion at first base while throwing ground balls into the infield because its easier on my arm and the spin keeps the balls from hopping. \n\n\n
  • This is called “The first Class”. These were the first 5 players voted into the Hall of Fame, Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and Walter Johnson. I’m going to give a brief summary of each of them. \n\nChristy Mathewson has been called one of the best pitchers ever. As a pitcher he won over 373 games and that is such an accomplishment for a pitcher because modern day pitchers today will probably never come close to the milestone 300 ever again because all organizations are extra cautions in todays age and will never get enough starts. \n\nNext up is Babe Ruth, the Bambino, is the most recognizable name in baseball. He was an all around great batter for the New York Yankees, and helped shape that organization. He was the home run king for around 50 years and people thought he record would never be broken. Eventually it was though by a player named Henry Aaron, but sadly he is not part of my project.\n\nThird player up is Tyrus Raymond Cobb if there was a player you would call arrogant in sports, this is your guy. This man used to sharpen is baseball cleats and aim them at infielders when he slid into bases. Besides his attitude, his batting average was great. Over 10 seasons this guy had bated over .400 and his whole career batting average is .367. Both are rediculous numbers. \n\nHonus Wagner is our next guy, he was the greatest shortstop of his time playing in the 30s. He was one of the few that had reached over the milestone of having 3,000 hits. He has alsmo put up other impressive numbers like his .321 batting average and 723 Stolen bases.\n\nThe last guy on this board is Walter Johnson, one of the more unorthodox pitchers that you will ever see. If you guys thought it was rare hitting 300 wins as a pitcher, this guy had 417 games... He was a lengendary pitcher and his arm motion was very weird as you can see \n*video*\nIt may look weird but it actually feels natural. I use this same arm motion at first base while throwing ground balls into the infield because its easier on my arm and the spin keeps the balls from hopping. \n\n\n
  • This is called “The first Class”. These were the first 5 players voted into the Hall of Fame, Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and Walter Johnson. I’m going to give a brief summary of each of them. \n\nChristy Mathewson has been called one of the best pitchers ever. As a pitcher he won over 373 games and that is such an accomplishment for a pitcher because modern day pitchers today will probably never come close to the milestone 300 ever again because all organizations are extra cautions in todays age and will never get enough starts. \n\nNext up is Babe Ruth, the Bambino, is the most recognizable name in baseball. He was an all around great batter for the New York Yankees, and helped shape that organization. He was the home run king for around 50 years and people thought he record would never be broken. Eventually it was though by a player named Henry Aaron, but sadly he is not part of my project.\n\nThird player up is Tyrus Raymond Cobb if there was a player you would call arrogant in sports, this is your guy. This man used to sharpen is baseball cleats and aim them at infielders when he slid into bases. Besides his attitude, his batting average was great. Over 10 seasons this guy had bated over .400 and his whole career batting average is .367. Both are rediculous numbers. \n\nHonus Wagner is our next guy, he was the greatest shortstop of his time playing in the 30s. He was one of the few that had reached over the milestone of having 3,000 hits. He has alsmo put up other impressive numbers like his .321 batting average and 723 Stolen bases.\n\nThe last guy on this board is Walter Johnson, one of the more unorthodox pitchers that you will ever see. If you guys thought it was rare hitting 300 wins as a pitcher, this guy had 417 games... He was a lengendary pitcher and his arm motion was very weird as you can see \n*video*\nIt may look weird but it actually feels natural. I use this same arm motion at first base while throwing ground balls into the infield because its easier on my arm and the spin keeps the balls from hopping. \n\n\n
  • This is called “The first Class”. These were the first 5 players voted into the Hall of Fame, Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and Walter Johnson. I’m going to give a brief summary of each of them. \n\nChristy Mathewson has been called one of the best pitchers ever. As a pitcher he won over 373 games and that is such an accomplishment for a pitcher because modern day pitchers today will probably never come close to the milestone 300 ever again because all organizations are extra cautions in todays age and will never get enough starts. \n\nNext up is Babe Ruth, the Bambino, is the most recognizable name in baseball. He was an all around great batter for the New York Yankees, and helped shape that organization. He was the home run king for around 50 years and people thought he record would never be broken. Eventually it was though by a player named Henry Aaron, but sadly he is not part of my project.\n\nThird player up is Tyrus Raymond Cobb if there was a player you would call arrogant in sports, this is your guy. This man used to sharpen is baseball cleats and aim them at infielders when he slid into bases. Besides his attitude, his batting average was great. Over 10 seasons this guy had bated over .400 and his whole career batting average is .367. Both are rediculous numbers. \n\nHonus Wagner is our next guy, he was the greatest shortstop of his time playing in the 30s. He was one of the few that had reached over the milestone of having 3,000 hits. He has alsmo put up other impressive numbers like his .321 batting average and 723 Stolen bases.\n\nThe last guy on this board is Walter Johnson, one of the more unorthodox pitchers that you will ever see. If you guys thought it was rare hitting 300 wins as a pitcher, this guy had 417 games... He was a lengendary pitcher and his arm motion was very weird as you can see \n*video*\nIt may look weird but it actually feels natural. I use this same arm motion at first base while throwing ground balls into the infield because its easier on my arm and the spin keeps the balls from hopping. \n\n\n
  • This is called “The first Class”. These were the first 5 players voted into the Hall of Fame, Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and Walter Johnson. I’m going to give a brief summary of each of them. \n\nChristy Mathewson has been called one of the best pitchers ever. As a pitcher he won over 373 games and that is such an accomplishment for a pitcher because modern day pitchers today will probably never come close to the milestone 300 ever again because all organizations are extra cautions in todays age and will never get enough starts. \n\nNext up is Babe Ruth, the Bambino, is the most recognizable name in baseball. He was an all around great batter for the New York Yankees, and helped shape that organization. He was the home run king for around 50 years and people thought he record would never be broken. Eventually it was though by a player named Henry Aaron, but sadly he is not part of my project.\n\nThird player up is Tyrus Raymond Cobb if there was a player you would call arrogant in sports, this is your guy. This man used to sharpen is baseball cleats and aim them at infielders when he slid into bases. Besides his attitude, his batting average was great. Over 10 seasons this guy had bated over .400 and his whole career batting average is .367. Both are rediculous numbers. \n\nHonus Wagner is our next guy, he was the greatest shortstop of his time playing in the 30s. He was one of the few that had reached over the milestone of having 3,000 hits. He has alsmo put up other impressive numbers like his .321 batting average and 723 Stolen bases.\n\nThe last guy on this board is Walter Johnson, one of the more unorthodox pitchers that you will ever see. If you guys thought it was rare hitting 300 wins as a pitcher, this guy had 417 games... He was a lengendary pitcher and his arm motion was very weird as you can see \n*video*\nIt may look weird but it actually feels natural. I use this same arm motion at first base while throwing ground balls into the infield because its easier on my arm and the spin keeps the balls from hopping. \n\n\n
  • This is called “The first Class”. These were the first 5 players voted into the Hall of Fame, Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and Walter Johnson. I’m going to give a brief summary of each of them. \n\nChristy Mathewson has been called one of the best pitchers ever. As a pitcher he won over 373 games and that is such an accomplishment for a pitcher because modern day pitchers today will probably never come close to the milestone 300 ever again because all organizations are extra cautions in todays age and will never get enough starts. \n\nNext up is Babe Ruth, the Bambino, is the most recognizable name in baseball. He was an all around great batter for the New York Yankees, and helped shape that organization. He was the home run king for around 50 years and people thought he record would never be broken. Eventually it was though by a player named Henry Aaron, but sadly he is not part of my project.\n\nThird player up is Tyrus Raymond Cobb if there was a player you would call arrogant in sports, this is your guy. This man used to sharpen is baseball cleats and aim them at infielders when he slid into bases. Besides his attitude, his batting average was great. Over 10 seasons this guy had bated over .400 and his whole career batting average is .367. Both are rediculous numbers. \n\nHonus Wagner is our next guy, he was the greatest shortstop of his time playing in the 30s. He was one of the few that had reached over the milestone of having 3,000 hits. He has alsmo put up other impressive numbers like his .321 batting average and 723 Stolen bases.\n\nThe last guy on this board is Walter Johnson, one of the more unorthodox pitchers that you will ever see. If you guys thought it was rare hitting 300 wins as a pitcher, this guy had 417 games... He was a lengendary pitcher and his arm motion was very weird as you can see \n*video*\nIt may look weird but it actually feels natural. I use this same arm motion at first base while throwing ground balls into the infield because its easier on my arm and the spin keeps the balls from hopping. \n\n\n
  • This is called “The first Class”. These were the first 5 players voted into the Hall of Fame, Christy Mathewson, Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and Walter Johnson. I’m going to give a brief summary of each of them. \n\nChristy Mathewson has been called one of the best pitchers ever. As a pitcher he won over 373 games and that is such an accomplishment for a pitcher because modern day pitchers today will probably never come close to the milestone 300 ever again because all organizations are extra cautions in todays age and will never get enough starts. \n\nNext up is Babe Ruth, the Bambino, is the most recognizable name in baseball. He was an all around great batter for the New York Yankees, and helped shape that organization. He was the home run king for around 50 years and people thought he record would never be broken. Eventually it was though by a player named Henry Aaron, but sadly he is not part of my project.\n\nThird player up is Tyrus Raymond Cobb if there was a player you would call arrogant in sports, this is your guy. This man used to sharpen is baseball cleats and aim them at infielders when he slid into bases. Besides his attitude, his batting average was great. Over 10 seasons this guy had bated over .400 and his whole career batting average is .367. Both are rediculous numbers. \n\nHonus Wagner is our next guy, he was the greatest shortstop of his time playing in the 30s. He was one of the few that had reached over the milestone of having 3,000 hits. He has alsmo put up other impressive numbers like his .321 batting average and 723 Stolen bases.\n\nThe last guy on this board is Walter Johnson, one of the more unorthodox pitchers that you will ever see. If you guys thought it was rare hitting 300 wins as a pitcher, this guy had 417 games... He was a lengendary pitcher and his arm motion was very weird as you can see \n*video*\nIt may look weird but it actually feels natural. I use this same arm motion at first base while throwing ground balls into the infield because its easier on my arm and the spin keeps the balls from hopping. \n\n\n
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  • I’ll have to be honest with you, these stations/drills didn’t come from the internet. Every part of my application came from different schools and baseball leagues, combining the best of the best from where at least I’ve been to. The mustangs introduced me (and darnell) the concept of throwing frissbees to batters forcing them to watch the bat hit the target. University of Penn taught me two huge things including how to bunt accurately and the whole swing analysis we did. Believe it or not even a small time thing like Bridgeport taught me the importance of stretching and how it would prevent injuries. I made sure all of these got accross to the kids. \n
  • I’ll have to be honest with you, these stations/drills didn’t come from the internet. Every part of my application came from different schools and baseball leagues, combining the best of the best from where at least I’ve been to. The mustangs introduced me (and darnell) the concept of throwing frissbees to batters forcing them to watch the bat hit the target. University of Penn taught me two huge things including how to bunt accurately and the whole swing analysis we did. Believe it or not even a small time thing like Bridgeport taught me the importance of stretching and how it would prevent injuries. I made sure all of these got accross to the kids. \n
  • I’ll have to be honest with you, these stations/drills didn’t come from the internet. Every part of my application came from different schools and baseball leagues, combining the best of the best from where at least I’ve been to. The mustangs introduced me (and darnell) the concept of throwing frissbees to batters forcing them to watch the bat hit the target. University of Penn taught me two huge things including how to bunt accurately and the whole swing analysis we did. Believe it or not even a small time thing like Bridgeport taught me the importance of stretching and how it would prevent injuries. I made sure all of these got accross to the kids. \n
  • I’ll have to be honest with you, these stations/drills didn’t come from the internet. Every part of my application came from different schools and baseball leagues, combining the best of the best from where at least I’ve been to. The mustangs introduced me (and darnell) the concept of throwing frissbees to batters forcing them to watch the bat hit the target. University of Penn taught me two huge things including how to bunt accurately and the whole swing analysis we did. Believe it or not even a small time thing like Bridgeport taught me the importance of stretching and how it would prevent injuries. I made sure all of these got accross to the kids. \n
  • I’ll have to be honest with you, these stations/drills didn’t come from the internet. Every part of my application came from different schools and baseball leagues, combining the best of the best from where at least I’ve been to. The mustangs introduced me (and darnell) the concept of throwing frissbees to batters forcing them to watch the bat hit the target. University of Penn taught me two huge things including how to bunt accurately and the whole swing analysis we did. Believe it or not even a small time thing like Bridgeport taught me the importance of stretching and how it would prevent injuries. I made sure all of these got accross to the kids. \n
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  • During the clinic after I was done filming and helping out with other stations, I stopped and pulled over random kids in each station and asked if they were having fun or not. Each one of them eagerly said yes, which was great. If there was one thing I got out of this, it was that there is so much more enthusiasm at this level of baseball, so much that I kinda forgot that I was at that level at one point. So after seeing this I decided to go back to do a tiny bit more research on what was happening with youth sports and I ended up stumbling upon an article written by Ken Morse. \n
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  • Transcript of "Slide share"

    1. 1. Our National Pastimehttp://farm4.static.flickr.com/3387/3599784525_8951cb70ec_b.jpghttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/28/Baseball_(crop).png
    2. 2. Our National Pastime Mike Popowiczhttp://farm4.static.flickr.com/3387/3599784525_8951cb70ec_b.jpghttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/28/Baseball_(crop).png
    3. 3. Thesis Baseball has been around us for over a hundred years. Followers today know for sure that this sport is not what it used to be back in the day. After all of these years of baseball being America’s pastime young fans are losing interest consistently year after year. Now finally organizations are taking the challenge to bring this sport back to being our favorite pastime once again.http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/28/Baseball_(crop).png
    4. 4. Thesis Baseball has been around us for over a hundred years. Followers today know for sure that this sport is not what it used to be back in the day. After all of these years of baseball being America’s pastime young fans are losing interest consistently year after year. Now finally organizations are taking the challenge to bring this sport back to being our favorite pastime once again.http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/28/Baseball_(crop).png
    5. 5. http://seephiladelphia.blogspot.com/2011_02_22_archive.html&IP=192.168.1.6&CAT=WEBLOG&USER=116975
    6. 6. ersonal Relevancehttp://seephiladelphia.blogspot.com/2011_02_22_archive.html&IP=192.168.1.6&CAT=WEBLOG&USER=116975
    7. 7. Origin
    8. 8. http://farm1.static.flickr.com/40/99849394_7517c7028a_o.jpg
    9. 9. Cri ckethttp://farm1.static.flickr.com/40/99849394_7517c7028a_o.jpg
    10. 10. http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3161/2907179945_3dab7f7835_b.jpghttp://farm5.static.flickr.com/4123/4920535760_d380350219_b.jpghttp://aresson.co.uk/aresson/files/2010/11/rounders-england-300x155.jpghttp://www.knowledgerush.com/wiki_image/0/0a/Rounders_pitch_small.png
    11. 11. Roundershttp://farm4.static.flickr.com/3161/2907179945_3dab7f7835_b.jpghttp://farm5.static.flickr.com/4123/4920535760_d380350219_b.jpghttp://aresson.co.uk/aresson/files/2010/11/rounders-england-300x155.jpghttp://www.knowledgerush.com/wiki_image/0/0a/Rounders_pitch_small.png
    12. 12. Roundershttp://farm4.static.flickr.com/3161/2907179945_3dab7f7835_b.jpghttp://farm5.static.flickr.com/4123/4920535760_d380350219_b.jpghttp://aresson.co.uk/aresson/files/2010/11/rounders-england-300x155.jpghttp://www.knowledgerush.com/wiki_image/0/0a/Rounders_pitch_small.png
    13. 13. http://allairevillage.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/town-ball.jpghttp://www.thephoenixpub.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/800px-Cricket_pitch.svg.pnghttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/89/Baseball_diamond_clean.svg/650px-Baseball_diamond_clean.svg.pnghttp://www.knowledgerush.com/wiki_image/0/0a/Rounders_pitch_small.png
    14. 14. Town Ballhttp://allairevillage.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/town-ball.jpghttp://www.thephoenixpub.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/800px-Cricket_pitch.svg.pnghttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/89/Baseball_diamond_clean.svg/650px-Baseball_diamond_clean.svg.pnghttp://www.knowledgerush.com/wiki_image/0/0a/Rounders_pitch_small.png
    15. 15. http://allairevillage.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/town-ball.jpghttp://www.thephoenixpub.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/800px-Cricket_pitch.svg.pnghttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/89/Baseball_diamond_clean.svg/650px-Baseball_diamond_clean.svg.pnghttp://www.knowledgerush.com/wiki_image/0/0a/Rounders_pitch_small.png
    16. 16. Who Created Baseball?
    17. 17. Abner Doubleday June 16, 1819-93http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Doubledayo.jpg
    18. 18. Or Did He?http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Doubledayo.jpg
    19. 19. Or Did He?http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Doubledayo.jpg
    20. 20. http://s3.hubimg.com/u/1564394_f520.jpg
    21. 21. Inventor? • Alexander Cartwright • April 17, 1820-92http://s3.hubimg.com/u/1564394_f520.jpg
    22. 22. First Organized New York NickerbockersFormed: September 23, 1845 First Game: June 19, 1846http://www.19cbaseball.com/images/new-york-knickerbockers-1862.jpg
    23. 23. Who Gets The Credit?
    24. 24. We are not sure...
    25. 25. The MLBhttp://farm4.static.flickr.com/3272/2382660602_dd7d044293_b.jpghttp://faninterference.files.wordpress.com/2009/07/national_league12.png?w=300&h=300http://www.theheadrush.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/american_league1.png
    26. 26. Then and Now
    27. 27. The MLB Players Associationhttp://www.dezignwithaz.com/images/pitcher.pnghttp://www.openclipart.org/image/250px/svg_to_png/baseball_player_silhouette.pnghttp://uanggratis.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/make-money.png
    28. 28. Free Agency
    29. 29. Arbitration
    30. 30. Declining Youth Sport • Kids ranging from 7 to 17 years of agehttp://si.wsj.net/public/resources/images/OB-NH791_baseba_G_20110330173153.jpg
    31. 31. Dover Little League• ...49 strong seasons• Only 17 kids have signed up for this year.
    32. 32. Marietta Bantam Little League • This league used to hold 50 teams! • This league has held on for more than 50 years.
    33. 33. Personal Knowledge• Bridgeport Little League• Upper Merion Baseball Assosiation
    34. 34. What Is The Cause?
    35. 35. http://www.gifsoup.com/view/88651/new-ps3-start-up-logo.html http://www.gifsoup.com/download.php?id=2168909&d=animatedgifs3&n=xbox-360-intro&s=ohttp://www.techzine.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/windows7.png http://electrostyleest.byethost7.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/iTunes-10.pnghttp://www.gifsoup.com/view/93840/wii-logo.html http://sourceforge.net/apps/mediawiki/samygo/nfs/project/s/sa/samygo/c/c9/Logo.png
    36. 36. http://www.gifsoup.com/view/88651/new-ps3-start-up-logo.html http://www.gifsoup.com/download.php?id=2168909&d=animatedgifs3&n=xbox-360-intro&s=ohttp://www.techzine.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/windows7.png http://electrostyleest.byethost7.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/iTunes-10.pnghttp://www.gifsoup.com/view/93840/wii-logo.html http://sourceforge.net/apps/mediawiki/samygo/nfs/project/s/sa/samygo/c/c9/Logo.png Distractions
    37. 37. http://www.gifsoup.com/view/88651/new-ps3-start-up-logo.html http://www.gifsoup.com/download.php?id=2168909&d=animatedgifs3&n=xbox-360-intro&s=ohttp://www.techzine.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/windows7.png http://electrostyleest.byethost7.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/iTunes-10.pnghttp://www.gifsoup.com/view/93840/wii-logo.html http://sourceforge.net/apps/mediawiki/samygo/nfs/project/s/sa/samygo/c/c9/Logo.png Distractions
    38. 38. Interview Of A Fan• Happens to be my Dad & Coach
    39. 39. Ken Morse• Baseball today is too soft• Parents were a lot more respectful back then• You need to let kids be kids
    40. 40. Cha Ching!• Cost of Equipment• Cost of Tickets
    41. 41. http://www.bgc-gkc.org/FileUploads/RBI2008Logo-color.gif
    42. 42. http://www.bgc-gkc.org/FileUploads/RBI2008Logo-color.gif Created by: Est. 1989 John YoungReviving Baseball in Inner Cities
    43. 43. “MLB Always Epic”
    44. 44. “MLB Always Epic”
    45. 45. “MLB Always Epic”
    46. 46. “MLB Always Epic”www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Pwoqliogcs
    47. 47. http://www.ibaf.org/photo-show.aspx?id=647&size=
    48. 48. What is this? • Created by Hill Holiday • More than 30 players will be apart of thishttp://www.ibaf.org/photo-show.aspx?id=647&size=
    49. 49. How Can We Change?
    50. 50. http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_zwyRdUo8A-E/TQav3ffOs5I/AAAAAAAAEyA/H-LaPHETuxw/s1600/IMG_6629%2B-%2BFirst%2BClass.JPG
    51. 51. 1936: The First ClassChristyMathewson Honus Wagner TyCobb Babe Ruth WalterJohnsonhttp://4.bp.blogspot.com/_zwyRdUo8A-E/TQav3ffOs5I/AAAAAAAAEyA/H-LaPHETuxw/s1600/IMG_6629%2B-%2BFirst%2BClass.JPG
    52. 52. 1936: The First ClassChristyMathewson Honus Wagner TyCobb Babe Ruth WalterJohnsonhttp://4.bp.blogspot.com/_zwyRdUo8A-E/TQav3ffOs5I/AAAAAAAAEyA/H-LaPHETuxw/s1600/IMG_6629%2B-%2BFirst%2BClass.JPG
    53. 53. 1936: The First ClassChristyMathewson Honus Wagner TyCobb Babe Ruth WalterJohnsonhttp://4.bp.blogspot.com/_zwyRdUo8A-E/TQav3ffOs5I/AAAAAAAAEyA/H-LaPHETuxw/s1600/IMG_6629%2B-%2BFirst%2BClass.JPG
    54. 54. 1936: The First ClassChristyMathewson Honus Wagner TyCobb Babe Ruth WalterJohnsonhttp://4.bp.blogspot.com/_zwyRdUo8A-E/TQav3ffOs5I/AAAAAAAAEyA/H-LaPHETuxw/s1600/IMG_6629%2B-%2BFirst%2BClass.JPG
    55. 55. 1936: The First ClassChristyMathewson Honus Wagner TyCobb Babe Ruth WalterJohnsonhttp://4.bp.blogspot.com/_zwyRdUo8A-E/TQav3ffOs5I/AAAAAAAAEyA/H-LaPHETuxw/s1600/IMG_6629%2B-%2BFirst%2BClass.JPG
    56. 56. 1936: The First ClassChristyMathewson Honus Wagner TyCobb Babe Ruth WalterJohnsonhttp://4.bp.blogspot.com/_zwyRdUo8A-E/TQav3ffOs5I/AAAAAAAAEyA/H-LaPHETuxw/s1600/IMG_6629%2B-%2BFirst%2BClass.JPG
    57. 57. t ion licaAppDesigned by: Justin Cunnane
    58. 58. Upper Merion Middle School Gym 1 Gym 2 4 2 1 Or 5 g ******* ********* 3 an Stations Schedule *Will use squishy Baseballs* 1. Pre-Clinic - Set everything up and make izi1. Ground ball drills - take a bat and start sure everyone knows what they are doing. hitting them baseballs (10-15 minutes) 2. Speech - Explain why Im here and explain 2. Soft Toss Swing Analyzer- line up to why theyre here and what were going to tryunder-hand baseballs to the batter while and show them.(no more than 5-6 minutes) someone records. 3. Stretching and Conditioning - Provide a *will require addition person to record* brief explanation why you want to stretch, and continue on doing it with me and 3. Soft Toss Feedback - hopefully i get teammates leading the whole thing.(10-15 minutes)the father figure or some other coach tospeak with the kids to show them how to 4. Warm - up Catch - Get the kids loose improve on swing. (10-15 minutes) ng 5. Sort everyone into Groups - There will be4. Mini-disc soft toss- another soft - toss at least 5 groups so i will need at least 5 exercise but instead will use anything people helping me for that night. (60-90 that can simulate a Frisbee effect. Will minutes)force them to watch the bat hit the ball. 60 minutes 5 stations= 12 minutes per 60 minutes 6 stations= 10 minutes per 5.Fly-Ball Drill - Have the kids run out 90 minutes 5 stations= 18 minutes per 90 minutes 6 stations= 15 minutes perand catch balls over their head through by the squad leader. Total time= 2 hours Would need people early to set up. *Additional Possible Drills*Infield Situations - Set up rubber bases and show them the proper way how to turn double plays with second base toshort stop and etc... also when to throw where with so and so outs. Hitting of the Tees - self explained. Pending.... Cut off relay
    59. 59. Soft Toss/ 2. Swing Analysis TeesLocated at the Upper Merion Highschool Baseball Field Ba tti Or ng C ag1. Shagging Fly Balls/ e Other Outfield Drills g an 4. Bunting Drill/ Mini Disc Toss 3. Infield Drills izi Schedule 1. Pre-Clinic - Set everything up and make sure everyone knows Changes: what they are doing. (10-15 minutes) We will be using REAL baseballs for all of our stations now since we have a much 2. Speech - Explain why Im here and explain why theyre here bigger space to work with. and what were going to try and show them.(no more than 5-6 minutes) My Goal will be to keep every one moving, and everyone active this entire Clinic. I will make sure this is a fun experience for the 3. Stretching and Conditioning - Provide a brief explanation why kids because the last thing I would want to you want to stretch, and continue on doing it with me and ng happen is to change their interests. teammates leading the whole thing.(10-15 minutes) 4. Warm - up Catch - Get the kids loose (10-15 minutes) Stations 5. Sort everyone into Groups - There will be at least 5 groups so i will need at least 5 people helping me for that night. (60-901. Outfield Drills - This includes over the head fly ball drills, ground ball drills, and all while minutes) using a cut-off man half way to demonstrate the effectiveness of having one. 2. Swing Analysis: We will either be throwing pitches to them in the cage or getting a 60 minutes 5 stations= 12 minutes perpitching machine to do so. One person (preferably me) will be along side of the cage video 60 minutes 6 stations= 10 minutes pertaping the swings. Later after the clinic if i have enough time I will go over each video. Use 90 minutes 5 stations= 18 minutes per a program that will track the path of the bat as you swing, give suggestions on how 90 minutes 6 stations= 15 minutes percorrecting it, and then email the clip to the person. *Soft toss will be for the kids that are not up yet so they can stay active and warm up* Total time= 2 hours Would need people early to set up.3. Infield Drills- This will start off by hitting ground balls to fielders and having them throw to first base. If I can get fake bases I will set up a smaller diamond to simulate a Little SInce this new layout has 1 less station than the original gym League field and will do situation drills showing them what to do at a given time. clinic layout. I plan to use the extra time to do a classic drill called the cutoff drill. I will line them up and they are going to 4. Bunting/Mini Disc - This station we will be teaching them how to line up for a proper throw the ball down the line to simulate cutoff men. The object is bunt and show them how to bunt accurately down the first or third base line with ease (a to throw the ball as quickly as possible while still hitting your method taught at UPENN). After that we will throw mini discs that fly like frisbees to test target accurately. their contact ability and help them watch the bat hit the target.
    60. 60. http://farm1.static.flickr.com/180/370973576_9c1c871c39_o.jpghttp://www.mustangsathletics.com/images/header.jpghttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/ce/Penn_Athletics_logo.png
    61. 61. Putting The Pieces Together Bridgeporthttp://farm1.static.flickr.com/180/370973576_9c1c871c39_o.jpghttp://www.mustangsathletics.com/images/header.jpghttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/ce/Penn_Athletics_logo.png
    62. 62. My Four Stations
    63. 63. Infield Drills• Ground Balls• Bunt Situations• Double Plays
    64. 64. Outfield Drills• Over head fly balls• Catching Line-Drives• Hitting Cut-Off Man
    65. 65. Bunting Station • Correct Way To Bunt • Bunting with accuracy
    66. 66. Swing Analysis• Video Taping Swing • Show them what they need to improve on
    67. 67. The Turnout...
    68. 68. Debriefing• Noticed a lot of enthusiasm• Everyone I asked enjoyed it
    69. 69. Class Activity• Crossword
    70. 70. Works Cited• "rounders." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. Encyclopædia Britannica, 2011. Web. 08 May. 2011. <http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/ 510872/rounders>. • "rounders." Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. Encyclopædia Britannica, 2011. Web. 08 May. 2011. <http://www.britannica.com/ EBchecked/topic/510872/rounders>.• Alston, Rex, Andrew Longmore, and Marcus K Williams, comps. “Cricket.” Encyclopedia Britannica. N.p., n.d. Web. 6 Apr. 2011. <http://www.britannica.com/‌EBchecked/‌topic/‌142911/‌ cricket/‌30476/‌History>. • Morse, Ken. “Morse: Fun in youth sports on the decline.” Citizen’s News. N.p., 16 June 2010. Web. 3 May 2011. <http://www.mycitizensnews.com/‌2010/‌06/‌morse-fun-in-youth- sports-on-the-decline/>.• “Bantam Baseball adjusts to realities.” The Marietta Times. The Marietta Times, n.d. Web. 26 Apr. 2011. <http://www.mariettatimes.com/‌page/‌content.detail/‌id/‌535558/‌Bantam-Baseball- adjusts-to-realities.html?nav=5004>. • Oller, Rob. “Changing tastes erode some sport’s popularity.” The Columbus Dispatch [Columbus] 1 Feb. 2007: n. pag. EBSCO host. Web. 16 Feb. 2011. <http:// search.ebscohost.com/‌login.aspx?• “Baseball: A Cultural Timeline.” Field Museum. N.p., 2007. Web. 17 Feb. 2011. <http:// direct=true&db=nfh&AN=2W62W63869559024&site=ehost-live>. www.fieldmuseum.org/‌baseball/‌timeline.html> • Spagnolo, Joe. “Active kids do better.” The Sunday Times [Perth] 18 July 2010: n. pag.• Baseball Reference. Sport Reference LLC, 2011. Web. 24 Apr. 2011. <http://www.baseball- EBSCO Newspaper Source. Web. 17 Feb. 2011. <http://search.ebscohost.com/‌login.aspx? reference.com/‌players/‌j/‌johnswa01.shtml>. direct=true&db=nfh&AN=201007181018327915&site=ehost-live>.• Doyle, John. “Dover Little League to cease operations.” Fosters. Foster’s Dailey Democrat , 8 • Spokny, Morgan. “An in depth analysis of the decline of baseball popularity.” Bottom Line Apr. 2011. Web. 17 Apr. 2011. <http://www.fosters.com/‌apps/‌pbcs.dll/‌article?AID=/‌20110408/‌ Sports’ Show Blog. N.p., 18 Feb. 2010. Web. 23 Dec. 2010. <http:// GJSPORTS_01/‌704089864/‌-1/‌FOSNEWS>. bottomlinesportsshow.wordpress.com/‌2010/‌02/‌18/‌2009-nfl-preseason-preview/>.• Hallmich, Nanci. “How active are kids’ sports?” USA Today 7 Dec. 2010: n. pag. ebsco • “Town Ball : The Rules of the Massachusetts Game .” Baseball Almanac . N.p., n.d. Web. 8 masterFile Premier. Web. 22 Dec. 2010. <http://search.ebscohost.com/‌login.aspx? Mar. 2011. <http://www.baseball-almanac.com/‌ruletown.shtml>. direct=true&db=nfh&AN=J0E301076767710&site=ehost-live>. • Verducci, Tom, and Albert Chen. “10 Reasons Why Baseball is Back.” Sports Illustrated 5• “HISTORY OF MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL.” Sports Know How. Sports Know How, n.d. July 2004: 44-54. EBSCO web. Web. 4 Nov. 2010. <http://web.ebscohost.com/‌ehost/‌detail? Web. 8 Apr. 2011. <http://www.sportsknowhow.com/‌baseball/‌history/‌baseball-history-1.shtml>. vid=1&hid=9&sid=d8dda765-d2ec-44a5- aa0b-7a0ba63ab566%40sessionmgr15&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d• “History of RBI.” MLB.com. MLB Advanced Media, n.d. Web. 5 Apr. 2011. <http:// %3d#db=ulh&AN=13622465>. mlb.mlb.com/‌mlb/‌official_info/‌community/‌rbi_history.jsp>. • Thorn, John. Treasures of the Baseball Hall of Fame. New York: Villard, 1998. Print.• “History of the Major League Baseball Players Association .” MLB Players . MLBPA, 2011. Web. 1 May 2011. <http://mlb.mlb.com/‌pa/‌info/‌history.jsp>. Tiemann, Bob, and Andy SInger. “First National Association Game.” Retrosheet. N.p., n.d. Web. 6• “Major League Baseball Launches New Campaign, ‘MLB Always Epic.” MLB Always Epic. Apr. 2011. <http://www.retrosheet.org/‌1stGame.htm>. MLB, 31 Mar. 2011. Web. 5 May 2011. <http://mlb.mlb.com/‌news/‌press_releases/‌ press_release.jsp?
    71. 71. Media Cited• Photos http://www.bgc-gkc.org/FileUploads/RBI2008Logo-color.gif http://www.ibaf.org/photo-show.aspx?id=647&size= http://farm1.static.flickr.com/180/370973576_9c1c871c39_o.jpghttp://farm4.static.flickr.com/3387/3599784525_8951cb70ec_b.jpg http://www.mustangsathletics.com/images/header.jpghttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/28/Baseball_(crop).png http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/ce/Penn_Athletics_logo.pnghttp://seephiladelphia.blogspot.com/ http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_zwyRdUo8A-E/TQav3ffOs5I/AAAAAAAAEyA/H-2011_02_22_archive.html&IP=192.168.1.6&CAT=WEBLOG&USER=116975 LaPHETuxw/s1600/IMG_6629%2B-%2BFirst%2BClass.JPGhttp://farm1.static.flickr.com/40/99849394_7517c7028a_o.jpg http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d2/http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3161/2907179945_3dab7f7835_b.jpg No_Known_Restrictions_World_Series_at_the_Polo_Grounds,_NY,_October_4,_1922http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4123/4920535760_d380350219_b.jpg ,_Bain_Collection_(LOC)_(453437813).jpghttp://aresson.co.uk/aresson/files/2010/11/rounders-england-300x155.jpg http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4112/5053503058_cd5a60b85c_b.jpghttp://www.knowledgerush.com/wiki_image/0/0a/Rounders_pitch_small.png http://www.dezignwithaz.com/images/pitcher.pnghttp://allairevillage.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/town-ball.jpg http://www.openclipart.org/image/250px/svg_to_png/baseball_player_silhouette.pnghttp://www.thephoenixpub.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/800px-Cricket_pitch.svg.png http://uanggratis.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/make-money.pnghttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/89/Baseball_diamond_clean.svg/650px- http://mlb.mlb.com/images/2005/03/09/owruWVc3.gifBaseball_diamond_clean.svg.png http://si.wsj.net/public/resources/images/OB-NH791_baseba_G_20110330173153.jpghttp://www.knowledgerush.com/wiki_image/0/0a/Rounders_pitch_small.png http://www.gifsoup.com/view/88651/new-ps3-start-up-logo.htmlhttp://www.baseball-almanac.com/townball.jpg http://www.gifsoup.com/download.php?id=2168909&d=animatedgifs3&n=xbox-360-http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Doubledayo.jpg intro&s=ohttp://s3.hubimg.com/u/1564394_f520.jpg http://www.techzine.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/windows7.pnghttp://www.19cbaseball.com/images/new-york-knickerbockers-1862.jpg http://farm4.static.flickr.com/ http://electrostyleest.byethost7.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/iTunes-10.png http://www.gifsoup.com/view/93840/wii-logo.html • Commercials “Brian Wilson’s Epic Beard” MLB Always Epic. Advertisement. MLB Network. MLBN, Jersey, Mar.-Apr. 2011. Television. “Ubaldo’s Epic Arm” MLB Always Epic. Advertisement. MLB Network. MLBN, Jersey, Mar.-Apr. 2011. Television.
    72. 72. Conclusion
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×