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Using Standars in Peer Education Using Standars in Peer Education Presentation Transcript

  • Using Standards to Support Peer Education The 2008 National Conference for Advisors of Peer Education Groups Michael McNeil, Columbia University Assistant Director, Alice! Health Promotion Program Downstate NY Coordinator, The BACCHUS Network Past Chair, Health Promotion Section, ACHA
  • For Today
    • At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to:
      • Describe the application of professional standards to peer education
      • List two sources of information for professional standards
      • Discuss the use of standards with peer education on their respective campuses
  • Models of Peer Education
    • Common Program Structures
      • Academic Course
      • Formal Peer Programs
      • Student Club/Registered Student Organization
    • Common Advisor Models
      • Health Promotion, Health Center, or Counseling Services
      • Faculty Advisor
      • Residence Life
      • Student Services/Activities
      • Others?
  • Three Sources
    • Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care
    • Council for the Advancement of Standards
    • Standards of Practice for Health Promotion in Higher Education
  • Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care
    • AAAHC chapter on Health Education & Health Promotion
    • Provides limited support for health promotion including peer education and other methodologies (adjunct standard)
    • If you are part of a AAAHC accredited health center then this chapter (number 24) may be applicable to you
  • Council for the Advancement of Standards
    • CAS Standards are widely used in student affairs to evaluate and benchmark programs and services
    • Provides a tool for developing support from administrators
    • CAS Standards are helpful for:
      • Self-study
      • Program & Service development
      • Staff development
      • Academic preparation
      • Developing credibility and accountability
  • Council for the Advancement of Standards
    • CAS Standards (2006)
      • Health Promotion Programs
      • Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Programs
      • Counseling Services
      • Clinical Health Programs
      • Internship Programs
      • Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Programs
      • Outcomes Assessment and Program Evaluation
      • Service-Learning Programs
      • Student Leadership Programs
  • Council for the Advancement of Standards
    • Framework for Assessing Learning and Development Outcomes (FALDOs)
    • Help to develop learning outcomes for peer education programs
    • Link to the ACHA SPHPHE (Standard 1)
  • Standards of Practice for Health Promotion in Higher Education
    • 1996 ACHA appointed the Task Force on Health Promotion in Higher Education to study the scope and practice of health promotion in colleges and universities.
    • 2001 ACHA published the culmination of research as the first edition of the Standards of Practice for Health Promotion in Higher Education.
    • 2004 ACHA published a second edition, a revision that provided measurable guidelines for enhancing the quality of campus health promotion programs.
  • Standard 1 – Integration with the learning mission
    • Effective practice of health promotion in higher education requires professionals to incorporate individual and community health promotion initiatives into the learning mission of higher education.
      • 1.1 Develop health-related programs and policies that support student learning.
      • 1.2 Incorporate health promotion initiatives into academic research, courses, and programs.
      • 1.3 Disseminate research that demonstrates the effect of individual health behaviors and environmental factors on student learning.
    Standard 1 – Integration with the learning mission
    • With an academic class model the links are the strongest
    • Draw direct connections between the peer education program and the FALDOs (Frameworks for Assessing Learning and Development Outcomes)
    • Demonstrate how the mission of the peer education program is in alignment with the institutional mission
    Standard 1 – Integration with the learning mission
    • Intellectual growth
    • Effective communication
    • Enhanced self-esteem
    • Realistic self-appraisal
    • Clarified values
    • Career choices
    • Leadership development
    • Healthy behavior
    • Meaningful interpersonal relationships
    • Independence
    • Collaboration
    • Social responsibility
    • Satisfying and productive lifestyles
    • Appreciating diversity
    • Spiritual awareness
    • Personal and educational goals
    Standard 1 – Integration with the learning mission FALDOs (Frameworks for Assessing Learning and Development Outcomes)
    • Peer educators will learn specific competencies in health promotion sufficient to be nationally certified peer educators.
    • Students exposed to the Washroom Weekly will report increases in health knowledge.
    Standard 1 – Integration with the learning mission
  • Standard 2 – Collaborative practice
    • Effective practice of health promotion in higher education requires professionals to support campus and community partnerships to advance health promotion initiatives.
  • Standard 2 – Collaborative practice
    • 2.1 Advocate for a shared vision that health promotion is the responsibility of all campus and community members.
    • 2.2 Develop and participate in campus and community partnerships that advance health promotion initiatives.
    • 2.3 Utilize campus and community resources to maximize the effectiveness of health promotion initiatives.
    • 2.4 Advocate for campus, local, state, and national policies that address campus and community health issues.
    • 2.5 Advocate for the institutionalization of health promotion initiatives through inclusion in campus strategic planning and resource allocation processes.
  • Standard 2 – Collaborative practice
    • Work with campus partners that actively, consistently and openly support peer education
    • Develop networks to train your peers
      • Campus & Community support
    • Invite participation in the programs and services of your peer program
  • Standard 2 – Collaborative practice
    • In order to be an ongoing player on campus and be truly collaborative, a peer education program must be:
      • Institutionalized
      • Resourced
      • Part of the strategic plan
    • Send representatives from your peer education program to other groups, organizations, task forces, etc.?
  • Standard 3 – Cultural Competence
    • Effective practice of health promotion in higher education requires professionals to demonstrate cultural competency and inclusiveness in advancing the health of individuals and communities.
  • Standard 3 – Cultural Competence
    • 3.1 Identify the social, cultural, political, and economic disparities that influence the health of students.
    • 3.2 Design health promotion initiatives that reflect the social, cultural, political, and economic diversity of students.
    • 3.3 Develop health promotion mission statements, program policies, staff recruitment and retention practices, and professional development goals that reflect the social, cultural, political, and economic diversity of the campus.
    • 3.4 Provide leadership for campus-wide understanding of the connection between culture, identity, social justice, and student health status.
  • Standard 3 – Cultural Competence
    • Provide intentional training on cultural competence as a part of peer education training
    • Make sure that all efforts are inclusive, supportive, and multi-faceted
    • What does your program “look” like?
  • Standard 3 – Cultural Competence
    • Peer educators should be active leaders on issues of diversity and social justice
    • Use campus data to determine if there are sub-populations of greater need
    • Make sure your confidentiality policy, mission statement, etc. are clear on peer educators and cultural competency?
  • Standard 4 – Theory-based practice
    • Effective practice of health promotion in higher education requires professionals to understand and apply professionally recognized and tested theoretical approaches that address individual and community health.
  • Standard 4 – Theory-based practice
    • 4.1 Review health promotion research from interdisciplinary sources as a guide for the development of health promotion initiatives.
    • 4.2 Apply professionally recognized methods and tested theories to the development of health promotion initiatives.
    • 4.3 Articulate the theoretical frameworks used in health promotion decision-making to the campus community.
  • Standard 4 – Theory-based practice
    • Health Behavior
      • Diffusion of Innovation
      • Ecological Model
      • Social Learning Theory
      • Social Marketing
      • Social Norm Theory
      • Social Support Model
      • Stages of Change
    • Student Development
      • Psychosocial
      • Cognitive-Structural
      • Person-Environment
      • Humanistic-Existential
      • Process Models
      • Identity Development/
      • Formation Theories
  • Standard 4 – Theory-based practice
    • Each program, service, etc. within a peer education program should have one or more theory clearly documented
    • Program development and practice should be guided by those with appropriate training
    • Consider both health behavior theories and student development theories
  • Standard 5 – Evidence-based practice
    • Effective practice of health promotion in higher education requires professionals to understand and apply evidence-based approaches to health promotion.
  • Standard 5 – Evidence-based practice
    • 5.1 Review data gathered from published research on campus, local, state, and national health priorities.
    • 5.2 Conduct population-based assessments of health status, needs, and assets of students.
    • 5.3 Conduct environmental assessments of campus community health needs and resources.
    • 5.4 Develop measurable goals and objectives for health promotion initiatives.
    • 5.5 Evaluate health promotion initiatives using valid and reliable quantitative and qualitative approaches.
    • 5.6 Report evaluation data and research results to students, faculty, staff, and campus community.
  • Standard 5 – Evidence-based practice
    • Utilize data collection tools like the ACHA-NCHA, the CORE Survey, the Tobacco Use and Attitude Survey
    • Use existing data sources like patient visit data, crime statistics, etc.
    • Use tools like environmental scans to determine program needs
  • Standard 5 – Evidence-based practice
    • Strategies without evidence
      • Single session speakers
      • Health information tables
      • Awareness campaigns
      • Strictly knowledge-based efforts
      • BAC feedback
      • Residence hall workshops
    Unfortunately, the most commonly conducted health promotion efforts on college campuses tend be from this list.
  • Standard 5 – Evidence-based practice
    • Strategies with evidence
      • Brief motivational interventions
      • Challenging alcohol expectancies
      • Policy/legal enhancements
      • Skills-based development
      • Ecological model approaches
      • Comprehensive approaches that are focused, consistent, sustained and adequately resourced
  • Standard 6 – Professional development and service
    • Effective practice of health promotion in higher education requires professionals to engage in on-going professional development and service to the field.
  • Standard 6 – Professional development and service
    • 6.1 Apply ethical principles to the practice of health promotion.
    • 6.2 Participate regularly in formal professional development.
    • 6.3 Assist others in strengthening their health promotion skills.
  • Standard 6 – Professional development and service
    • Alice! and Health Services at Columbia are committed to supporting the ongoing development of professional and student staff in order to advance the mission of Alice!, Health Services at Columbia and Columbia University. Additionally, professional development supports a commitment to the values of Alice!
  • Standard 6 – Professional development and service
    • Benefits of this professional development plan include:
      • Focusing on the opportunities that are based on competencies required for a specific role;
      • Containing carefully engineered learning experiences designed to develop the specified competencies in staff members;
      • Staff are active in determining the pace, sequence, and strategy of the learning;
      • Provide the opportunities for the staff member to practice the skill or internalize learned knowledge;
      • Provide the opportunity for the staff member to perform the skill or use the knowledge under conditions closely resembling their responsibilities;
      • Provide the opportunity for staff members to test themselves on the skills and knowledge taught; and
      • Provide the opportunity for the staff member to clearly articulate the knowledge, tools and skill s/he has learned during her/his tenure with Alice!
  • Standard 6 – Professional development and service
    • Professional development and service includes:
      • Actively seeking new learning and growth opportunities
      • Participate in campus provided development programs (not just from the peer program)
      • Attending relevant conferences and trainings
      • Serve in leadership roles with organizations (local, regional and/or national)
  • Standard 6 – Professional development and service
    • Peer Educator Code of Ethics
    • Peer educators should have responsibilities to help teach and develop the knowledge and skills of newer students
      • CPE
      • Program planning
      • Evaluation
      • Presentation skills
      • How to get things done on campus
  • Small Group Discussion
    • Working with people near you, please select one of the standards and discuss how it can be applied to peer education programs on your campus.
    • Be sure to discuss the potential for success, challenges, and ideas for replication on other campuses.
  • Resources
    • Copies of the Standards are available for free on the ACHA website.
    • http://www.acha.org/info_resources/SPHPHE_statement.pdf
    • (Acrobat Reader needed to view)
    • Vision Into Action – a companion document to support the Standards is also available from ACHA.
    • http://www.acha.org
  • Resources
    • CAS Professional Standards for Higher Education (6 th Edition).
    • http://www.cas.edu
    • AAAHC Standards
    • http://www.aaahc.org
  • Contact Me
    • Michael P. McNeil
    • [email_address]
    • 212-854-5453
    • www.alice.columbia.edu