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Adverbs
Adverbs
Adverbs
Adverbs
Adverbs
Adverbs
Adverbs
Adverbs
Adverbs
Adverbs
Adverbs
Adverbs
Adverbs
Adverbs
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Adverbs

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Student Teaching Adverb powerpoint notes

Student Teaching Adverb powerpoint notes

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  • 1. Ms. Pinzon 28 September 2010
  • 2. 11-1—What is an adverb? <ul><li>An adverb is a word that tells more about a verb, a verb phrase, and adjective, or another adverb. </li></ul><ul><li>An adverb tells how, where, when, or how many times an action takes place. </li></ul>
  • 3. What is an adverb? <ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>She hung posters quickly. ( tells how ) </li></ul><ul><li>She hung posters everywhere. ( tells where ) </li></ul><ul><li>She hung posters yesterday. ( tells when ) </li></ul><ul><li>She hung posters twice. ( tells how many times ) </li></ul>
  • 4. 11-2 –Adverbs that tell more about adjectives <ul><li>Some adverbs tell more about adjectives. These adverbs tell to what degree. </li></ul><ul><li>Some examples of adverbs that tell more about adjectives are shown in the box. </li></ul>Adverbs almost especially extremely fairly quite rather really somewhat too truly unusually very
  • 5. <ul><li>  </li></ul><ul><li>Remember: Adjectives describe nouns and pronouns. </li></ul><ul><li>That is very powerful car. (Very tells how powerful the car is.) </li></ul><ul><li>The car is too expensive for me. (Too tells how expensive the car is.) </li></ul><ul><li>The engine is rather unsafe. (Rather tells how unsafe the engine is.) </li></ul>Adverbs almost especially extremely fairly quite rather really somewhat too truly unusually very
  • 6. 11-3 –Adverbs that tell more about other adverbs <ul><li>The manager spoke fairly briefly. (Fairly tells how briefly.) </li></ul><ul><li>He hit the ball especially hard. (Especially tells how hard.) </li></ul><ul><li>Ted played rather well. (Rather tells how well.) </li></ul>Adverbs almost especially extremely fairly quite rather really somewhat too truly unusually very
  • 7. 11-4—Knowing when to use adjectives and adverbs <ul><li>Use adjective to tell more about nouns and pronouns. </li></ul><ul><li>Use adverbs to tell more about verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs. </li></ul><ul><li>Use the adjective good to tell more about a noun or pronoun. Use the adverb well to tell more about a verb or verb phrase. </li></ul>
  • 8. <ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>The man’s voice was loud. (the adjective loud tells more about the noun voice. </li></ul><ul><li>It rained quite heavily. ( the adverb quite tells more about eh adverb heavily.) </li></ul><ul><li>Ms. Pablo has a good car. ( the adjectiv e good tells more about the noun car.) </li></ul>
  • 9. 11-5—Using Adverbs to Make comparisons <ul><li>Adverbs can be used to compare two or more actions. To compare two actions, use an – er ending with a few short adverbs. Use more or less before most adverbs. </li></ul><ul><li>When you compare more than two actions, use an </li></ul><ul><li>– est ending with a few short adverbs. Use mos t or leas t with longer adverbs. </li></ul><ul><li>The forms of the adverb well are well , bette r, and bes t. Use better when comparing two. Use best when comparing more than two. </li></ul>
  • 10. <ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>He walks faster than his brother. </li></ul><ul><li> He walks more quickly than his brother </li></ul><ul><li> He walks less quickly than his brother. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Jenny spoke the earliest of all the guest speakers. </li></ul><ul><li>Vanessa spoke the most thoughtfully of al the guest speakers. </li></ul><ul><li>Elizabeth spoke the least thoughtfully of all the guest speakers. </li></ul><ul><li>3. John writes well. </li></ul><ul><li>Nick writes better than his friend. </li></ul><ul><li>Who writes the best of all? </li></ul>
  • 11. 11-6—Avoiding double negatives <ul><li>Using negatives correctly </li></ul><ul><li>**A negative is a word or phrase that means “no.” Some negative words are adverbs. </li></ul><ul><li>The words in the box are negatives. </li></ul>Negatives Barely Hardly Neither Never No Nobody None Not Nothing Nowhere No one scarcely
  • 12. <ul><li>A negative word may change the whole meaning of a sentence. Use only one negative word to make a sentence mean no or not. Avoid double negatives. </li></ul><ul><li>Incorrect: No one never understands how I feel. (double negative) </li></ul><ul><li>Correct: No one ever understands how I feel. (one negative) </li></ul><ul><li>Correct: Hardly anyone ever understands how I feel. (one negative) </li></ul>Negatives Barely Hardly Neither Never No Nobody None Not Nothing Nowhere No one scarcely
  • 13. Using Contractions Correctly: <ul><li>The word not can be joined to a verb to form a contraction. </li></ul><ul><li>A contraction is a shortened form of a group of words. </li></ul><ul><li>An apostrophe takes the place of the missing letter or letters. </li></ul><ul><li>Some contractions are shown in the box . </li></ul>Verb +Not Contraction Verb + Not Contraction are + not aren’t should + not shouldn’t could + not couldn’t was + not wasn’t did + not didn’t were + not weren’t do + not don’t will + not won’t is + not isn’t would + not wouldn’t
  • 14. <ul><li>When you use a contraction with the word not, </li></ul><ul><li>do not use another negative word in the sentence. </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>Incorrect: Bob didn’t do nothing . </li></ul><ul><li>Correct: Bob didn’t do anything. </li></ul><ul><li>Correct: Bob did nothing. </li></ul>
  • 15. 11-7—Specific Adverbs <ul><li>Using specific adverbs can make your writing clearer and more interesting. </li></ul><ul><li>Read these three sentences. Decide which sentence gives the clearest picture.. Why? </li></ul><ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>Nina skated. </li></ul><ul><li>Nina skated well. </li></ul><ul><li>Nina skated quickly and gracefully </li></ul>
  • 16. &nbsp;

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