"Chunking" Content: Disaggregation by          Market Channel              Michael Cairns        AAUP Meeting – Chicago 2012
2Real or Hype?•   Chunking educational content is inexorable•   Large textbook publishers may be disadvantaged•   Potentia...
3Firstly, the Educational Content in MarketContext  Ref: Bowker Pubtrack BISG Making Information Pay Conference
4Pricing Always Slopes Up  Ref: Bowker Pubtrack BISG Making Information Pay Conference
5Individual Books Are Big Business  Ref: Bowker Pubtrack BISG Making Information Pay Conference
6The Franchise Textbook  Ref: Bowker Pubtrack BISG Making Information Pay Conference
7Custom Small but Growing  Ref: Bowker Pubtrack BISG Making Information Pay Conference
8Addressing the Changes in Education• Managing the cost of education & materials• Faculty and educators demand more choice...
9Thoughts and Trends• ‘Traditional’ content structured linearly• Books/Textbooks all inclusive monoliths   o Generally to ...
10Some Examples• Indiana University   o Digital platform   o Content agreements with publishers• California State Universi...
11Publisher Value ChallengesCustom and disaggregated content distribution models areinevitable so how will publishers bene...
12Bookstore Value PropositionCustom solutions help college bookstores to take advantage of realtangible benefits from a cu...
13Last word on Protecting Content and Copyright• Georgia Case;   o Making content easily available and priced reasonably• ...
14In the end we all try to “COPE”
15                        Michael Cairns                      Managing PartnerMichael.Cairns@InfoMediaPartners.com        ...
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Content Chunking & New Revenue Streams

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Presentation at AAUP 2011 discussing opportunities for publishers to market and sell their content in small chunks: Chapters, images, cases, etc. What are the motivations and what are the hurdles.

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Content Chunking & New Revenue Streams

  1. 1. "Chunking" Content: Disaggregation by Market Channel Michael Cairns AAUP Meeting – Chicago 2012
  2. 2. 2Real or Hype?• Chunking educational content is inexorable• Large textbook publishers may be disadvantaged• Potential for price erosion• Many media examples o Music o Newspapers o Television o Journals• COPE: o Create Once Publish Everywhere
  3. 3. 3Firstly, the Educational Content in MarketContext Ref: Bowker Pubtrack BISG Making Information Pay Conference
  4. 4. 4Pricing Always Slopes Up Ref: Bowker Pubtrack BISG Making Information Pay Conference
  5. 5. 5Individual Books Are Big Business Ref: Bowker Pubtrack BISG Making Information Pay Conference
  6. 6. 6The Franchise Textbook Ref: Bowker Pubtrack BISG Making Information Pay Conference
  7. 7. 7Custom Small but Growing Ref: Bowker Pubtrack BISG Making Information Pay Conference
  8. 8. 8Addressing the Changes in Education• Managing the cost of education & materials• Faculty and educators demand more choice• Seeking intuitive and flexible content creation processes• Expect to share content and collaborate across ‘networks’• Migration to electronic delivery of content• Growth of open-access and ‘free’ content• Growing expectation for highly customizable solutions for publishers and institutions
  9. 9. 9Thoughts and Trends• ‘Traditional’ content structured linearly• Books/Textbooks all inclusive monoliths o Generally to a set formula• Movement from ‘Creamy’ to ‘Chunky’: Digital components o Chapters, summaries, tests, supplemental material, etc.• Higher Ed leading progression seemingly inexorable o Cost drivers o Open source o Foundations and government• Technology enabling this transition
  10. 10. 10Some Examples• Indiana University o Digital platform o Content agreements with publishers• California State University o Publisher agreements: Cengage• MIT Open Courseware o Web-based publication of virtually all MIT course content o Students and ‘self-learners’ account for 85% of access• University of Minnesota
  11. 11. 11Publisher Value ChallengesCustom and disaggregated content distribution models areinevitable so how will publishers benefit?• Permissions revenues considered incremental will become a primary revenue source• Participating on/in platforms to for broad distribution• Improve metadata at the ‘unit’ level• Offer your own custom publishing solution• Link content across library: Leverage the principles of cross and upselling
  12. 12. 12Bookstore Value PropositionCustom solutions help college bookstores to take advantage of realtangible benefits from a custom publishing program.Opportunity: • Exclusive content for the bookstore: Single source for student • Implement a flexible, specific business model for each bookstore • Custom content drives student demand* o Higher sell-through: 91-99% o Lower (none) custom returns o Increased foot traffic: Students buy more • Students more satisfied with content’s higher utility • No product substitution available: custom by definition • Presents opportunities to reduce labor & production costs * Research: NACS, Pearson Education
  13. 13. 13Last word on Protecting Content and Copyright• Georgia Case; o Making content easily available and priced reasonably• Fact: Users want to pay for content o Apple experience with music• Clearing copyright – either via CCC or directly with a publisher – has been cumbersome o Users give-up and/or steel o Technology enables better solutions o More policing – specifically LMS restraints.• Easier access to appropriate permissions will drive revenue• Permissions models will become more simple & transparent
  14. 14. 14In the end we all try to “COPE”
  15. 15. 15 Michael Cairns Managing PartnerMichael.Cairns@InfoMediaPartners.com 908 938 4889 Twitter: @personanondata
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