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Pittsburgh Bridges

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  • (TITLE)
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  • Born 1806 (Bicentennial Year) Est. Saxonburg, PA – Butler County John A. Roebling, and Sons, Inc. Wire Rope Eventually moved to New Jersey Built many New York Bridges
  • Wire Rope Suspension Bridge Over the Allegheny River 1857-59, John A. Roebling; replaced 1892
  • AKA John A. Roebling Bridge (name changed in 1983) Covington Kentucky Completed 1866 Largest suspension bridge in the world, when built First permanent bridge over the Ohio River
  • John A. Roebling – designed the bridge, died before construction began. Washington Roebling – his son, was appointed Chief Engineer. He became sick from caisson’s disease. Emily Roebling – Washington’s wife, took on some of his duties. She was very skilled at inspection and management. Bridge opened on May 24, 1883. 1,595 ft. – 6 inches, 58 Main span
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  • World War I Service – 1917 – Calvary First Lieutenant BS – University of Colorado – 1920 Wyoming Department of Highways University of Pennsylvania Instructor
  • INFORMATION ON SLIDE
  • Structural and Architectural Achievement Richardson, Gordon and Associates Design
  • The dean of Pittsburgh bridge engineers – Fortune magazine 1967 Responsible for many of today’s modern Pittsburgh bridges
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  • Manchester Bridge – Background – built 1915 Removed 1970 Subdivided Pratt through truss, 2 spans 2 main spans @ 531 ft. each 1877 Point Bridge – Foreground Trussed eyebar suspension bridge
  • Manchester Bridge – Background – built 1915 1927 Point Bridge in the foreground Closed 1959, demolished 1970 670 ft. main span Curved upper chord, cantilever through truss with hangers George S. Richardson, chief engineer
  • I-279 – 2 lanes each way plus ramps = 8 lanes wide R.C. Arch 3 Vault 182 ft. main span 1961-1963, George S. Richardson, engineer
  • I – 279, US 22, US 30 Penn Lincoln Parkway West Four lanes on each deck Steel Bowstring Arch, double deck Wire suspenders Warren Truss configuration Opened 1959 George S. Richardson, engineer
  • I – 279 Four lanes each deck Steel bowstring Arch, double-deck 426 ft. main span Built 1958 – 1963 by PennDOT Opened for traffic in 1969 “ Bridge to Nowhere”
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  • Replaced A John Roebling Bridge Twin 360 foot spans Built in 1883 First Lenticular (lens shaped) Truss in America Designed by Gustav Lindenthal Upstream added 1889 - Widened to match downstream in 1911
  • Note the Scaffolding required for construction
  • Original Configuration of the Single Portal
  • Originally Built for the Pennsylvania Railroad “Panhandle” Division Now carries 2 tracks of the PAT “T” light rail system Numerous types of approach spans Steel camelback Pratt through truss, Pennsylvania Pratt through truss (channel), Pennsylvania Pratt through truss, steel Warren deck truss (two span continuous) 351 ft. clear between piers Built in 1903
  • Four lanes undivided (center lanes reversible) Steel cantilver deck truss 448 ft. on two main spans Built 1926-28 George S. Richardson, engineer
  • Four lanes undivided Steel Suspension Main span 725 ft. Built 1933 George S. Richardson, with A. D. Nutter and Sidney A. Shubin
  • Monongahela Connecting Railroad Bridge (vehicles) Hot Metal Bridge (pedestrian and bicycles) Built 1887 Engineer – William Glyde Wilkins ? (many alterations and others may have been involved) Benjamin Franklin Jones – American Iron Works 1850 South bank of the Monongahela James Laughlin – junior partner in 1854 Jones & Laughlin Steel (J&L)
  • Pa Route 885 – 4 lanes Steel Cantilever through warren truss Main Span 557 ft. Built 1966 by County of Allegheny
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  • Self-anchored Suspension Cables are steel eye bar chain Steel eyebar suspenders 442 ft. main span “ Three Sisters” Identical bridges Built 1925 – 1928 County of Allegheny
  • Open-Spandrel 3-hinged arches, with 4 ribs Built 1919 – 1924 County of Allegheny Washington crossed the Allegheny here on December 29, 1753
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  • US 19 – 2 lanes each direction Steel Trussed Through Tied-Arch Steel Cable Suspenders 780 ft. main span 1930-32, County of Allegheny Outstanding Civil Engineering Achievement Award 1991 – Pittsburgh Section, ASCE
  • Built 1931, County of Allegheny 4 lanes McKees Rocks Bridge (Ohio River Crossing) Steel Trussed Through Arch, Deck Trusses, etc. Main Span 750 ft. McKees Rocks Bridge (western section over Bottoms) Twin 300-foot crescent arches.
  • Steel Cantilever Warren Through Truss Built in 1981 Richardson Gordon and Associates, Inc Arthur W. Hedgren, Jr. – Project Engineer Main Span 724 ft. Original Bridge Built in 1911
  • 460 FT. Main Span 153.5 ft. Rise 1929-1932 County of Allegheny George S. Richardson and A. D.Nutter Carried the Lincoln Highway, US30 Over Turtle Creek Valley and Westinghouse Electric Plant
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  • Transcript

    • 1. Bridge Design and Evaluation: Bridges of Pittsburgh
    • 2. LOCAL BRIDGE HISTORY (FAMOUS BRIDGE ENGINEERS)
    • 3. JOHN A. ROEBLING
    • 4. SIXTH STREET (ST CLAIR ST.) BRIDGE
    • 5. CINCINNATI - COVINGTON BRIDGE
    • 6. BROOKLYN BRIDGE – NEW YORK
    • 7. LOCAL BRIDGE HISTORY (George S. Richardson)
    • 8. GEORGE S. RICHARDSON
    • 9. GEORGE S. RICHARDSON
      • 13 YEARS – ALLEGHENY COUNTY DEPTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS
      • ASSISTANT CHIEF ENGINEER
      • 1939 – FORMED RICHARDSON, GORDON AND ASSOCIATES (NOW PART OF HDR, INC.)
    • 10. ST. LOUIS ARCH
    • 11. GEORGE S. RICHARDSON BRIDGES
    • 12. BRIDGES AT THE POINT (CONVERGENCE OF PITTSBURGH’S 3 RIVERS)
    • 13. PITTSBURGH’S POINT (CIRCA 1925)
    • 14. PITTSBURGH’S POINT (CIRCA 1947)
    • 15. PORTAL BRIDGE – POINT STATE PARK
    • 16. FORT PITT BRIDGE
    • 17. FORT DUQUESNE BRIDGE
    • 18. BRIDGES ON THE MONONGAHELA RIVER (TRAVELING UPSTREAM FROM THE POINT)
    • 19. SMITHFIELD STREET BRIDGE
    • 20. SMITHFIELD STREET BRIDGE
    • 21. SMITHFIELD STREET BRIDGE (CIRCA 1883)
    • 22. PANHANDLE BRIDGE
    • 23. LIBERTY BRIDGE
    • 24. SOUTH TENTH STREET BRIDGE
    • 25. MON CON BRIDGE / HOT METAL BRIDGE
    • 26. GLENNWOOD BRIDGE
    • 27. BRIDGES ON THE ALLEGHENY RIVER (TRAVELING UPSTREAM FROM THE POINT)
    • 28. 6 TH , 7 TH , AND 9 TH STREET BRIDGES 6 th Street Roberto Clemente 7 th Street Andy Warhol 9 th Street Rachel Carson
    • 29. WASHINGTON’S CROSSING (40 TH STREET)
    • 30. BRIDGES ON THE OHIO RIVER (TRAVELING DOWNSTREAM FROM THE POINT)
    • 31. WEST END BRIDGE
    • 32. MCKEES ROCKS BRIDGE
    • 33. SEWICKLEY BRIDGE
    • 34. WESTINGHOUSE MEMORIAL BRIDGE
    • 35. THANK YOU SPECIAL THANKS TO: Bruce S. Cridlebaugh

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