THE POTENTIAL FOR
EDUCATION 3.0 IN A
DEVELOPING CONTEXT USING
GIDDENS’ STRUCTURATION
THEORY
Michael Paskevicius (PSKMIC001...
Tag Cloud
Presentation Agenda
The World Today
         Analog   ⇒   Digital
      Tethered    ⇒   Mobile
       Isolated   ⇒   Connected
        Generic...
The Student Today
   Media mogul
   New expectations of pace and content
   Mobile
   Resourceful
   Short Attention ...
Skills Required for the 21st Century
   Digital Age Literacy
   Inventive Thinking
   Social and Personal Skills
   Pr...
Education 3.0 Primer
   Consider all of the facilities
    available to a student interacting
    with a social network s...
Education 3.0
    There is no need to assume scarcity
    Institutional boundaries are blurred
    Students create cont...
The Role of Technology

     Studying without the use
     of technology is
     increasingly like learning
     to dive w...
Structuration Theory Basics
   When considering social life both macro and micro level
    perspectives must be consider ...
Structuration Theory and the Role of Technology
Recreation of Structure
   People engage with technology                         Actions of
    in social settings and in...
Technologies in Practice
When people use technology they draw on:
 Properties of the technological artifact
        Prop...
The Principle of Choice
                                                People have the option, at any moment
           ...
Technology Landscape
   Many principles that embody the education 3.0 movement are already
    being adopted by students ...
Challenges to Education 3.0 in South Africa
   Legal Landscape (Legitimation, Moral Norms)
   Physical Access (Dominatio...
Opportunities for Education 3.0 in South Africa
   Evidence towards shrinking skills divide
   Tech-Savvy Students
   O...
Conclusion
   Technology as enabler
   Technologies themselves are changed by users in
    order to afford desired struc...
Thanks to Dr. Dick Ng’ambi for running such
an interesting and engaging module!
Keats, D, Schmidt, P, The Genesis and Emer...
This work is licenced under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-
Commercial-Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License. To view...
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The Potential for Education 3.0

  1. 1. THE POTENTIAL FOR EDUCATION 3.0 IN A DEVELOPING CONTEXT USING GIDDENS’ STRUCTURATION THEORY Michael Paskevicius (PSKMIC001) - Date Submitted: Saturday July 11, 2009 EDN6102S – Educational ICTs for Developing Contexts
  2. 2. Tag Cloud
  3. 3. Presentation Agenda
  4. 4. The World Today Analog ⇒ Digital Tethered ⇒ Mobile Isolated ⇒ Connected Generic ⇒ Personalized Consumption ⇒ Creating Closed ⇒ Open Wiley, 2008
  5. 5. The Student Today  Media mogul  New expectations of pace and content  Mobile  Resourceful  Short Attention Spans  Advancing technical ability  Increasing use of digital communication
  6. 6. Skills Required for the 21st Century  Digital Age Literacy  Inventive Thinking  Social and Personal Skills  Producer of High Quality State-of-the-Art Results Metiri Group
  7. 7. Education 3.0 Primer  Consider all of the facilities available to a student interacting with a social network such as Facebook  How do they create, share, validate, and disseminate their digital artefacts Creative commons image by rutty http://www.flickr.com/photos/rutty/2193213362/
  8. 8. Education 3.0  There is no need to assume scarcity  Institutional boundaries are blurred  Students create content  Students design their own learning  Physical aggregation is not required Keats & Schmidt 2007 Creative commons image by craignos http://www.flickr.com/photos/craignos/1098510795/
  9. 9. The Role of Technology Studying without the use of technology is increasingly like learning to dive without water. Tony Bates http://www.tonybates.ca/2009/06/24/e-learning-and-21st-century-skills- and-competences/ Creative commons image by lucias clay http://www.flickr.com/photos/lucias_clay/2207148004/
  10. 10. Structuration Theory Basics  When considering social life both macro and micro level perspectives must be consider equally  Repetition of acts of individual agents reproduce structure  Social structures are not unchangeable or permanent  Social structures constrain the actions of individuals  Structure and action constrain each other in an evolving way
  11. 11. Structuration Theory and the Role of Technology
  12. 12. Recreation of Structure  People engage with technology Actions of in social settings and in doing so Agent (Unintended or create or recreate the structure Intended) of those social environments.  People’s repeated engagement with new technology Creates Anew Recreates consequently can produce new forms of structure. Structure
  13. 13. Technologies in Practice When people use technology they draw on:  Properties of the technological artifact  Properties inscribed by the designers  Properties added by users through customization  Their own skills, power, knowledge, assumptions, and expectations  Their own training, communication, and expertise  Knowledge of and experience within the institutional contexts in which they live and work Orlikowski, 2001
  14. 14. The Principle of Choice  People have the option, at any moment and within the existing conditions and material to choose to do otherwise with technology. The potential for innovation, learning and change lie in the possibility to do otherwise. (Orlikowski, 2001) Creative Commons image by night86mare http://www.flickr.com/photos/night86mare/2461659034/
  15. 15. Technology Landscape  Many principles that embody the education 3.0 movement are already being adopted by students in other social settings.  Students are using social networks to create artefacts which exist having education 3.0 like properties.  Consider the use of Facebook and similar social networks and the collaborative nature in which they allow people to share, review, rate, and remix digital content.  The relative ease of use built into these systems and the signification gained from participating with others in this social network seem to provide incentives to participate.
  16. 16. Challenges to Education 3.0 in South Africa  Legal Landscape (Legitimation, Moral Norms)  Physical Access (Domination, Resources)  Skills Access (Domination, Authority)  Rigid Structure of HE (Signification, Legitimation, Interpretive Schemes)
  17. 17. Opportunities for Education 3.0 in South Africa  Evidence towards shrinking skills divide  Tech-Savvy Students  Opportunities for Mobile Use  Institutional Openness (Avoir, OER UCT)
  18. 18. Conclusion  Technology as enabler  Technologies themselves are changed by users in order to afford desired structures  Principles of choice will change assessment and classroom models
  19. 19. Thanks to Dr. Dick Ng’ambi for running such an interesting and engaging module! Keats, D, Schmidt, P, The Genesis and Emergence of Education 3.0 in Higher Education and its Potential for Africa (2007) First Monday, Volume 12, Number 3, March 5th, 2007 http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/ article/view/1625/1540 Metiri Group, 21st Century Skills Brief, http://www.metiri.com/21/Metiri-NCREL21stSkills.pdf Orlikowski W. Using Technology and Constituting Structures: A Practice Lens for Studying Technology in Organizations. Organization Science [serial online]. July 2000;11(4):404-428. Wiley, D, Openness and the Disaggregated: Future of Education, (2008) Brigham Young University Presentation from E- Learn 2008-Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE) http://opencontent.org/blog/archives/660 Accessed June 30, 2009 Any creative commons images found within this presentation should be reused/sourced from their original locations on flickr.
  20. 20. This work is licenced under the Creative Commons Attribution-Non- Commercial-Share Alike 2.5 South Africa License. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/za/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California 94105, USA.
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