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2011 AA Rome Mothershed 2011 AA Rome Mothershed Presentation Transcript

  • ISBN 978-0-557-65791-9 90000 9 780557 657919
  • American Academy in Rome Robert Ira Mothershed 20117 East 60 StreetNew York, New York 10022-1001 USANovember 15, 2010Subject: Portfolio Application – ArchitectureDear American Academy:Thank you in advance for your time and considerations. I am sending this portfolio document for your formal review. Iwould greatly appreciate any sponsorship that the American Academy could host and offer. The highlighted documentrecords the past ten years of proposed designs and previous academic research assignments. Please accept and review thisportfolio material as application for an Architecture Fellowship in upcoming 2011 year. My most sincere aspiration forapplying to this specific fellowship is to acquire time to contemplate and understand the extraordinary built environment P o r t f o l i o APPLICATIONof past and future Rome. From my past personal architectural training, I have found the greatest admiration of Piranesi’sparametric etchings of historical Rome. His drawings augment the imaginations of many architects. My proposal is in-tended to augment his grafting of space onto a new cultural media of virtual space(s).Within the hardcopy of this manual, there is a front introduction with more descriptive writing for the installation–modelproposal. In 2002, I had earned a Master of Architecture from Clemson University and since that time, I have beenblessed with great opportunities to work for outstanding contemporary architects. I see this portfolio entry as a strongcoherent departure point for more architectural investigation and believe that it can set forward more directives to a futuredoctorial scholarship.Best regards,Robert I. Mothershed310-972-0973robmothershed@msn.com
  • +Roman Intermundium:Robert Ira Mothershed ISBN 978-0-557-65791-9 90000 9 780557 657919
  • A Piramide for PIRANESI American Academy in Rome Fellowship Application
  • Who among the wide world of stranger’s will hold our hand, touch our hearts,and make our world beautiful ?Rome was taught to always be the “Eternal City” to all architecture students. True literacy for the ar-chitect is contained within a tripartite idea exchange of seeing, thinking, and understanding. Rome isa navigable non-linear terra forma of Paradise. While, the psycho-geography of Rome encapsulates theradiant past triumphal eras, it still consciously makes new optimistic constructions. Its eternal contra-distinguished energetic laws of motion are perpetually encoded into a dynamic set of political-economicvariables. The computed and engineered iconographic city is a formless matrix of spiritual expressionsand is used to offer its diverse people a substantial surface for creating and making a hackable identity. Itwisely beholds the most instrumental and fundamental urban landscape paradigm of all utopian models.It has socially assimilated and interwoven the infinite democratic ideals that with the opulent mechan-ics of new and old artistic productions. The ever wondering palimpsest city of figurative relics opposesthe undoing of what has already occurred and strives to aspire the spending of intellectual energy andacademic effort to edify its occupants. Culturally, Rome is in a continual spatial flux (never frozen orstatic) and this rhetorical animated point of view mandates a modality that the spirit of architecture isa transported vase-like vehicle that makes ephemeral time concrete. Without contesting or compromis-ing virtue, the transient design for Baroque space is ubiquitously projected onto the Roman psyche.
  • The Baroque’ s visceral use of distorting the virtual x,y,and z dimensions of space have cognitively beengiven birth and digitally deployed in Rome. Sentimental marking (one Rome’s greatest asset) of urbanpatterning can augment parametric illusions of silent collisions, divergent tactics, and strategies of stealthlike symbols. The newest and latest Maxxi National Art XXI Museum designed by Zaha Hadid illustratesthat lines (ideas) drawn no longer need to be straight and in conjunction that all communicational tan-gents of time can connect isolated events in space. Here, the new Liminal space of deconstructed vectorsallow Rome to consciously re-awake from a collective artistic vision of architecture. The symbolic ritual ofspectatorship is now de-constrained the de-funct (Baroque) once again is make alive to the future patronsof Rome. The unique Baroque “ideal ‘ is reorganized and manifested with no final consummation, no ter-minal appearance, and the disappeared loss of subject is again bewildered into geometrically programmedfragments. By implication, one could subjectively suggest that the real genus-loci of this gallery complexare abstractly generated from extracting the electronic theatrical shadows of Giovanni Battista PiranesiCarceri’s etchings. This theoretical fabrication is not based on Patrik Schumacher ‘s dramatic postulatesof Parametricism but in counter based on the revolutionary excessively coding of infinitely expandingperspectives that are deeply anamorphic. The overlapped and montaged computer generated cameraangles that are topographically distort and warp the scontext of Rome. This new obliquely formalizedmuseum actualises the possibility for a revolutionary fractured building to be compatibly understood aslegacy project. The striated instances of this mathematical approach employ a combined smooth spacethat inherently discloses a baroque constellation of collapsed perspectives (P.O.V.).
  • +
  • Reference 2: PROJECTSINTRODUCTION - future USGBC International Library - NALArrival 2: ACADEMIC SPECUALTIONS Sun Chair SCION ShowroomCRASH COURSES IN NEW ARCHITECTURE M.U.D. Kentucky Special – FER Venice Bridge Museum Chicago River Chicago Tower City Crossing Mobile Tower Butterfly Institute Lap Dancer CONTENTS CHAPTER Taipei Performing Arts Center 1 Flower Tower 2 MJ Forever 3 Los Angeles Union Station High Speed Rail Taipei Museum of Glass Hawaii - Malama Learning Research Center LA Sante Fe Lofts Mulholland Drive – Private Residence New York HighLINE Newport Beach Church of Light TNA – Interior Renderings for FORM:uLA Tripple Hopper – Train Depot Chi Chi Earthquake Memorial DIGITAL DIGRESSIONS: INTERVALS - Travel Sketches / STC
  • Proposal: Roman Intermundium: A Piramide for Piranesi The perspectival “exposing of origin” within a field of hidden sacred non-linear spaces invites a moment to build a new paradigm. The objective is to choreographally raster-rize the supernatu- ral by ghost scripting and refolding the Roman Surface (which is a self-intersecting mapping of a real projective light planes into three-dimensional space). The on-line project will trace the penetrated ineffable forces of natural sunlight via through the historical Pantheon’s Oculus using webcam station input points. The site-specific exercise attempts to de-constrain a new virtual dimension of chiaroscuro within the praxis of contemporary parametricism. A Piramide for Piranesi model would be presented as a resin casted paradigm with a phosphorescent ma- terial. The project’s singular stereochromic mapping exercise would also be composed to emit light at night (a forbidden quantum mechanical gesture). A published process journal would accompany a the hyper- textural event of this newly encoded Piramide. Please note : All refernce images are “to become” credited in Chapter 3.
  • Roman Intermundium: A Piramide for Piranesi THE ARTIST DIS-MANTLED SPACE TheMEDIA CRASH COURSE (0) past fifty yearsElectronic Reproduction has taken on an invasion of media that has cre- ated a para-digm shift. This has profoundly affect- ed the practice of architecture. Going from a mechanical to an electronic mode of reproduction, the photograph and the fax remain subject to the human condition. (Peter Eisenman, 556) For Peter Eisenman this argument states that architec- ture overcame the mechanical model because it interpreted the values that society placed on vision. The new media values appearance over existence and this damages architecture’s function. The simulation of what can be seen versus what is pres- ently causes fundamental ambiguities. Peter Eisenman argues that the absorption of the perspective in the fifteen-century assumed a dominating position within the mechanics of representing space. He adds that Brunnelschi’s one-point perspective invention was the vehicle by which anthropocentric vision was crystallized. This confirmed vision as the most dominant form in architectural discourse. Eisenman introduces a “Laconic” notation of space looking back onto itself as a type of disturbance in the visual field of reason. Eisenman’s treatment of Piranesi gets treated as one who has diffracted the monocular subject by superimposing multiple vanishing points where there is no way of correlating what is to be seen as a unified whole (Figure 9). Within modernity, cubism has also undermined the picture plane’s role and has flattened objects to be seen with the outside edges exposed. Eisenman suggests that the looking back in architecture displaces the anthropocentric subject for the object but allows the inscription of space to be dislocated. This would implement architecture as an outside, other text. The electronic fold for Eisenman creates a possibility to expose the presence of dislocation and thus refer an actual looking back. The fold for him produces a dislocation of the dialectical distinction between figure and ground. Eisenman calls upon Gilles Delueze, a critic of contemporary cinema, to make an insertion of creating affectual and effectual spaces. Affectual space in concerned with being more rational, more meaningful, and more functional while effectual functions, shelters, frames, and it thus aesthetic. Delueze calls out a new smooth space that strives for the “aura” that is found in cinema where the light can be found in darkness. This would provide a “gaze” that could offer a new assembly of seeing beyond mere vision The architectural and cinematic implications located within this notation of electronic reproduction provide an interior to exterior position of traditionally locating an audience and spectator. Since the reception for information can be inverted in hyperspace, the temporal shrinkage of space now subscribes to a virtual presence. The actual idea can be applied to a work of art and seen as a form of montage. The dissolution of visual information can be consumed in separate viewings simultaneously in different spaces. This information leads into broadcasting or transmitting live location to distant cultures in distant lands denoting a global presence. Atlanta’s Ted Turner’s CNN provides a contemporary form of casting montage through the haphazard display of visual and audible news reporting . Post-modern deconstrucvist Lebbous Woods architect designed a stage set surveillance mechanism for Terry Gilliam’s1994 12 Monkeys. This mechanical eyeball is construed around the notation of personal observation and public interrogation .
  • SyNTH 1: digital digressionsCRASH COURSE (1) TschumiBernard Tschumi finds pleasure in the dismantling of space and seeks pleasure in the violence of archi-tecture, because it submits a possibility for change. This assertion implies that the encoding of violenceinto objects suggest a collision within a context and metaphorically implements a practice of destruction.Architectural programs, for Tschumi, have the capacity to determine a user’s attitude. Tschumi states thatthe use of violence (broken rules) initiates a common practice for transgressing cultural expectations. Hismotivation to understand the occupancy of architecture preserves a readability of different expressions.He states that in cinema, our emotions are affected by the perception of violence (Tschumi,150). Hedeclares that the place for the body’s position is inscribed in our own imagination, our own consciousin which that is an imaginary local. Space forces an identity on your presence that is marked upon byarchitects. This marking is subject to perverse treatment, which could radically shift our perception.Tschumi adds that the pleasure of violence is an ancient art form in itself and is indicative of every otherhuman endeavor.Bernard Tschumi frames Le Corbusier as one who has transgressed a built form by solidifying theelements that channels movement into his Carpenter Center. This genuine move to selectively inter-rogate the building front commands the provisionality of the promenade. The ramp marks the humaninvolvement by directing people to become obedient to its physical form. This superimposition collectsrandom channels of movement but deliriously victimizes its user. In this application, the body has beentransgressed as a fragment. Tschumi’s notation of designing architecture is that it can be qualified as anorganism that constantly engages intercourse with its users. For Tschumi, human bodies create violencewith unexpected motions within a space by committing actions that push against the limits that werecarefully established. In concluding this material, the overall contents of bodies violating space framescinematic montage an organizational procedure for strategically confronting fragments in space.
  • CRASH COURSE (2) EHGZ | graphic surgery In his drawing of the Manhattan Transcripts , Bernard Tschumi primarily identifies to administer the sequence of space as a way to structure event. His account of event is defined: as an incident, an occurrence, and a particular item in a program. Events can encompass particular uses, singular functions or isolated activities (page XXI, MT). In regard to modernist ideals, his concept of applying a transformative design operation primarily questions preconceived notations toward movement. His ideas offer a system of classification by establishing the frame as the chief ordering device. The frame itself conforms to a plurality of interpretations that associate seen and unseen events while simultaneously making a progression of sequences. This combined structure formulates an approach to forming episodes. With the practice of this procedure, a logical construction (configuration) can determine internal and external relations. The architectural knowledge sought within this reflection presents a linear mode of describing space, which promotes an event to be specified. This characteriza- tion could imply an implicit or explicit reading of spatial depth, mass, and surface. The accumulation of events could also suggest the nature of individual parts that define the whole (montage). This written account indicates that a space has one logic and events could have another. His attitude toward the 20th century states that man has lost unity between himself and objects, objects and events, and events and spaces. This notation would IMAGE = WORD=IMAGE=TAG=mentality foster a post-modern idiom implying a true disjunction where architecture’s meaning is not easily qualified. His analysis toward modernity provides a cinematic thinking that film abstraction has created an inventive catalog of editing space. Tschumi’s work within this four part drawing series (the park, the street, the tower, and the block) theoretically frames the human body within a typological building scenario. While the series is based on the city of Manhattan, the final block series encourages a fragmented montage approach to re-representing his original drawing from that plated series. There are no traces indicated from the ordered panels. He ruthlessly distorts, and compresses the visual information into a total annihilation of information. The objective linear treatment of space was subjectively pulverized from the dissolution of picture grams, perspectives, plans and axonometrics. The end space represents an indirect transfer of scripting, storyboarding, and drawing a hyper sequence version of montage. The transcripts introduce the order of experience, the order of time, and the order of intervals. By consistently adhering to a rational system of framing, Tschumi’s critical deployment of formalizing specific elements (doors, facades, floors, roofs, walls, etc.) constitutes a fragmented cinematic mode of assemblage. The argument to reinforce this statement is determined by how the drawings are visually consumed. The drawings read from left to right promoting a seamless reading, thus enforcing individual contemplation. By stating that space, movement, and events are interdependent, his ideology commands architecture to be postulated in a reciprocal manner. Reciprocity is defined as the state or condition where a relationship is mutual. The influence between two parties gives and takes while the action corresponds to an influence (XXII, MT). The essence of thematically exposing this information is to document his film analogy approach. The individual pieces of framented construction force each shot to accumulate as a dynamic system for assembling visual and experiential discontinuity. For Tschuimi, the integration of narrative action situates a disjunctive harmony bewteen man and building. His deployment of formalizing specific elements (doors, facades, floors, roofs, walls, etc.) constitutes a fragmented cinematic mode of assemblage. The argument to reinforce this statement is determined by how the drawings are visually consumed. The drawings read from left to right promoting a seamless reading, thus enforcing individual contemplation. By stating that space, movement, and events are interdependent, his ideology commands architecture to be postulated in a reciprocal manner. Reciprocity is defined as the state or condition where a relationship is mutual. The influence between two parties gives and takes while the action corresponds to an influence (XXII, MT). The essence of thematically exposing this information is to document his film analogy approach. The individual pieces of framented construction force each shot to accumulate as a dynamic system for assembling visual and experiential discontinuity.+ For Tschuimi, the integration of narrative action situates a disjunctive harmony bewteen man and building.
  • Airplane digression model depicts 911 televised international violence : plexus r + d - december 2003 = Dan Nemec -aka = resin cast master +
  • crash course (4)The Infrastructural Revolution : Television Rob Mothershed ,1995: Self PortraitPost war America cities have received a spatial explosion since World War II. Engineering technologies have produced new social organizations that havebeen successfully implemented in attempt to modernize and restructure the country’s landscape. New automobile road systems were modeled after Germany’sautobahn had dispersed. Most if not all the urban density that existed was disassembled. This move to de-concentrate urban areas has dislocated most civicinteractions. The new infrastructure presented a boom in suburban housing during these times and created neighborhoods that were erected around freeways,shopping malls, gas stations, and drive-in theaters. Society collectively participated in a new isolated form of life. The immediate tradeoff created a moredistributed output of information. In 1947,the number of television sets that were manufactured in America was around four thousand, in 1953 the numberwas almost fourteen million (Figure 12). In 2001, the number is around two hundred and eleven million (Kwinter, 513).The television engineered a natural environment for escape and preserved an event form from the monotony of commuter life. This new linkage from thehome to the workplace demanded that a broadcasted market be established. Television compensated for a new way for people to interact. This new modalityre-channeled an abbreviated form of suburban dread. This commercial framework for feeding entertainment into our households made a disarticulated spaceout of place. This reorganization of public entertainment artificially mandates a new interpretation for realizing our postmodern condition. Public and privatelife logistically functions from these communicational enterprises. This reductive reality is more equiped to foster entertainment for our imaginations. Theforeground presence of television culture has developed into a phenomenal device that preoccupies our visual interest. The action of questioning is a mandate for searching for relative meaning. Only through this instrumental searching for knowl-edge, does one become aware of associations , histories, intentions, and observations. What is a critical architectural investigation? Is it a moment contained within the built world that exhibits a process of contruction ? Does it allow the occupant a new view or understanding of relationships between materials and their assembly? Does it condense and foreground itself in a open environment?+
  • 1995 record players will always exist in my head The garden machine does not plow - IT does not know or do anything hu- man- it does not function- does no do anything - but - it freezes up a uni- verse of new dead technomorphism(s))
  • In December of 2003 – plexus r + d made an interactive gallery installation at the Florida SOA. For one week in time, I assisted with deconstructing machines, found technological ob-jects that were going to be eternally castrated and frozen. The remain of this de-structuring process of manufactured objects made me realize how our human lives are artificially woventhru the commerce of things and what the things themselves do and participate in. The Dis - Mantling of objects imposed a new space distorts any conventional viewing.
  • LA TIMES - DISCOVERY 2004
  • QUESTIONHOW DOES AN ARCHITECT DESIGN FOR THIS CONDITON AND IT NOT “BE “ A SCRAP-YARD ?
  • violencecrash course(6) CITY OF CENTAUR(S) ?Sergei Eisenstein was trained as an architect. His language was founded on Marxist dialectic, where theinteraction between objects codifies a distinct movement. Being a first generation film teacher, he primar-ily worked within silent motion pictures. This era afforded him to not only treat images as words but alsothematically expound his formal architectural training. In observing composition, he instinctively turnsto Piranesi as an architect to model his film practice. Piranesi construes multiple vanishing points thatprovoke conflicting visual information because the reading on this one space has been compositionallypulverized. He learned from this etching how to dismantle the picture frame. He wanted to expose differ-ent readings from a recorded space by fragmenting pieces and parts and within that process reveal howthings may relate at different scales.In Eisenstein’s Battleship Potemkin9 (Appendix B), the editing makes the action more powerful, and it notedas being one of the most agitatational all-time film productions. There is no smooth continuity betweenthe cuts, and there is hardly any match-on action. He did not just limit his perception of editing to just astyle or technique, he employed an architectural approach for defining intervals and directing movement.He created imaginary lines that a viewer might travel upon when watching. These paths were setup up asmoving objects within the narrative. For example, within Battleship Potemkin, he uses the baby carriageas a formal device that gets intercepted toward the culminating action.Eisenstein’s editing is very emotional. The patterns that Eisenstein makes are a montage of collisions.One shot being very different to another. For him, when an image succeeds another instead of lyingalongside it, the exchange is less perceptible because of the instantaneity of the transition. Instead oflooking at the basic juxtaposition of one image that has replaced another, Sergei Eisenstein’s theory ofmontage utilizes a ruthless elimination. He sought out and exploited what Hollywood would call discon-tinuities. He staged, shot and cut his films for the maximum collision set from shot to shot, sequence tosequence. Since he believed that only through being forced to synthesize such conflicts does the viewerparticipate in a dialectical process. James Monaco, film writer, states that a dialectical process cre-ates a third meaning out of the original two meanings of the adjacent shots. Editing thus has only twofundamental methods: cut and overlap. The dialectical process is inherent in any montage, consciousor not. Still pictures cannot be put together the rhythm of the succeeding shots. Any kind of montageis defined according to the action it photographs. Sergei Eisenstein maintained that the meaning of asentence is the direct dialectical interplay of shots.Conflict was important to him because it took on a specific form of expression. His trademark producedtense, violent rhythms and made a principle of combining individual images.
  • IMAGES ON THIS SHEET IS FROM A DIGRESSION MODEL NAMED MAGDALINE - SHE RESIDED IN ATLNTA’S PLEXUS R + D OFFICEAS THE OFFICE RECPTIONIST -2003What intellectual pleasure creates a perverse “ DISMANTLING “ logic onlyin order to keep mutating beings, objects and spaces? Why are humans so compatible with machines but not with each other ?
  • All pictures are from Hans Bellmer - Artist - Sculptor - Ref- Wikipedia.comEisenstein’s Montage of AttractionsMovement in film is an optical illusion. “Movement” in film is not simply what happens. The director has several means to convey motion. Whatdifferentiates a great director from one whom is mere competent is not just a matter of how action unfolds but how things are told. Everything locatedwithin the frame is a symbol. The information has to move the story forward. The audience has to engage the screen action in some form instinctivelyor intuitively. The cinematic frame determines the viewer’s attention while simultaneously revealing a suggestive code of information within a specificduration. The form of movement has to resonate meaning. The three types of movement are frame movement, camera movement, and mechanicaldistortion. Benjamin states that haptic images are equal to retinal images . Architecture combines both.
  • Why keep moving the piloti(s) ? 2004 NOTES for the BOSS SCIARC GALLERY - SHUFFLE -SEPT 2004 EL SEGUNDO OFFICE TEAM MEMBER - AS- SISTED STEEL FABRICATION : DOUG JACK- SON WAS THE PRIMARY DESIGN LEADER From the website www. scirarc.edu The Los Angeles-based architecture firm Jones, Partners: Architecture presented an exhibition at the SCI-Arc Gallery that dramatized the spatial in- fluence of the column. An overhead framework of bridge cranes repositioned three simple columns within the gallery to produce different spatial ar- rangements among the columns, and between them and the surrounding walls of the space. The col- umn’s traditional structural role was suppressed in this demonstration/experiment, isolating its space- defining nature as the sole variable. In deference to the purity of the experience of their spatial affect, the movement of the columns is not featured, despite the clearly expressed means for affecting it. This re- straint was relaxed at the end of the exhibit period, though, in an exuberant performance choreographed for the columns, accompanied by a string quartet. : SOME OF THE TEXTAND IMAGESARE FROM SCIARC.EDU
  • Figure 72. Exterior view of UFA Cinema, Dresden, Figure 73. Interior view of UFA Cinema, http://www.architravel.com/files/ Germany Coop Himmleb(l)au buldingsImages/bulding480/ UFA%20Cinama%20Center_3.jpghttp://www.theage.com.au/articles/2003/03/15/1047583738545.html UNBUILT - RUSSIA BUILT - LA New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 2002, p. 101 Haunted by the remaining destruction of twenty-two years after the atomic bomb was exploded there, Arata Isozaki has projected images of his megastructures onto a photomural of the razed city. In this image his constructions are also in ruins. It is as if he had rebuilt Hiroshima, and it had once again undergone destruction. Ruins provide an important metaphor for Isozaki: "They are dead architecture. Their total image has been lost. The remaining fragments require the operation of the imagination if they are to be restored." Bevin Cline and Tina di Carlo + +
  • REFERENCE - PUBLIC SPACE - VIOLATEDCrash Course (7) Himmleb(l)au Dresden to Los AngelesThe French film critic Andre Bazin coined the term film as a “window to the world”. This metaphor for architecture is applied asa direct transference and implies the reading of the human eye (a transparent door that allows vision into an interior mindscape).The UFA Cinema building alludes to a windowless façade where the firm advocates an in-between viewing state. The foyer isthis aquarium like glass structure is employed as a movie trailer before the actual watching of a film. This public space surpassescinemas built over the past few decades because a time element was deployed (duration). The journey to the viewing is balancedupon the actual arrival into the auditorium.The observer is privileged to visit his surroundings in more numerous ways because the depth of space has been specificallymeasured to that of camera movement. A constant shift of viewpoints complements strongly contrasted-programmed areas. TheUFA cinema functions on a direct relationship between the sensory perception of feeling and seeing. The interior represents a +cinematographic logic where focus and perspective changes. The composition of forms project stark contrasts of high versus low,far versus near, narrowness versus wideness. This blurring of spatial boundaries enlarges our immediate perceptions, thus creatingan optical subconscious according to Walter Benjamin.The overall building configuration acts as open public sphere dedicated to the immediate urban locale that extends itself into thestructure. This extension of the UFA Cinema in Dresden, Germany augments the notation of montage as a spatial device fororganizing form, ideas, and geometry. The cinematographic image has been transformed as a spatial element. It is expressed asan unstructured, fragmented projection. Moving images that pan in conjunction with the crowd movement destroys any temporalcontinuity within the complex. By streaming heterogeneous movements across the open body of space, the architecture reveals acontorted desire for visual consumption.
  • IN 2005 - I STARTED CRASHING DIGITALMODELS INTO OTHER DIGITAL MODELSTHE IDEA CAME FROM WANTING TO DE-FORM AND REFORM PUBLIC SPACES THATWERE TRYING TO BE RESCUED. I FOUNDTHAT PEOPLE WILL ABANDON SPACEAND LEAVE IT TO DIE.
  • REFERENCE - VIOLENCE - 2 - COLLISON MANAGEMENT DIGITAL CRASH 1 NAZCA VERSUS LA +
  • TAG+ VIEW FROM INSIDE THE CRASH
  • +
  • 1983 - CRONENBUG - DIRECTOR OF CRASH- MAKES VIO- LENT SEXUAL MOVIE TITLED “VIDEODROME”Figure 14. Film Still(S) - VIDEODROME, This motion picture offers two main arguments in seeing postmodern society architecturally,Cronenburg , 1983 politically, and spatially. VIDEODROME mandates a rubberized media landscape by featur- ing a specific moment when James Woods, main protagonist, literally pushes televisual space into a new configuration. The new boundaries that are presented in the film establish a new Cronenburg materialized form for the human body. The picture tube gives way to an elastic costume that reads as a soft intermediary material. The three dimensionality of this animated threshold reposi- tions the glass tube as a zone for interactivity. The film transfixes this static realm and creates a dematerialized form by displacing a normalized character as one who is defiantly generic. The political readings of this film are that “TV is better than reality”, and the major corporations have the control to push our emotional buttons. Within the confines of this film, the media has become the message and reality is less than TV. The dark forces that this possesses are attributed to the destructive viewing of sublimated violence that the media brutally presents as appealing. This celluloid production engages contemporary man in pursuit of infinite physical pleasure through a visual medium. To elicit criticism architecturally from this one production, the motion picture provides a new set of spatiotemporal forms. One can visually decipher from the image stills (Fig- ures 14 and 15) that body’s occupation within a framed space has been transported as a disjointed existence. The fact that cinema explores familiar objects and can penetrate transparent thresholds (television screens), provides a literal collision of recognizing unconscious everyday forms.
  • +
  • Aftermath of SNAFUOnly the trace of space is required for comprehending the diagram. The destructive guns toward architecture is aconstant fight and never ending war. Once the diagram is formulated- all constraints within the decision is renderedThe images of 911 have defined my psychotic making process. Have found that the excess brings pleasure to myfacile form making. The virtual camera wi Eisensteinbeobviously model nowimages togetherapproachthere is noa closure of form dynamic thatspectator’sscripts create ing. g within to psychologically penetrated. His assumes anreflects compositional and allowsGhostes mind digital deploys jolting sharp fragmented where animated event. a intensifinovel techtonics. his staged action. His shapeless philosophy mirrors an unbalanced relationship between organic forms and rigid sequences (similar to Piranesi). This fluid naturalism casts a fragmented three-dimensionality where the intellectual syntax (his films and his discourse) is spatially blurred. Eisenstein enjoyed the idea of creating images that were multivalent in nature. This assertion can be valid because he uses Japanese Haiku as an example for sketching impressionistic thoughts. These are considered shots for him, and they also represent perfectly finished sequences. The combinations of these words are systematically arranged and configured for open readings. The building blocks of words as images force disjunctive literary and architectural relationships. Eisenstein later borrows from one of his major sources of Le Corbusier’s theory, Auguste Choisey’s Historie de l’architecture, on which the architect had relied in his elaboration of the promenade architecturale. He wanted to incorprate Le Corbusier’s (Figure 61) lyrical spatial intensity where precisely controlled itineraries are conditioned. Eisenstein had commanded his most notorious theatrical performance on the Odessa Steps for the film Battleship Potemkin. In this specific editing sequence (see appendix B), he contrasts lights with darks, vertical lines with horizontals, lengthy shots with brief ones, static with dynamic, and traveling with stationary. This edited scene screams with extreme violent action that guides the viewer into a state of confused mental state of ecstasy. One that can be architecturally reckoned with Piranesi’s etchings. 58. Sergei M. Eisenstein, diagram of Piranesi’s Carere Oscura, ca. 1947 + +
  • MY IMAGINATION NOW DRAWS NEW THINGS THAT WANT TO BE DEAD - WHY ?THE DEFAULT QUESTION:
  • SyNTH 1: digital digressions essions
  • How does one demarcate a history of culture within a world of demolition, destruction, and devastation ? When students of architecture start design school they become hazed into a studio bauhaus culture. They are superimposed with intense grand objects of complexity that the one can- not have a bearing or position and therefore they only learn to mimic thing that they are attracted to. Student are taught to have their own voice and create their own language. This objective ability to define a shape grammer and form vocabulary into a coherent science is what makes architecture a silent and romantic journey. Students must learn to map a cartography of conditions into a problem statement only in order to defence and explain a deteremined position for fabricating expressive and subversive artificial shelters and struc- tures. Training people at a reality based playground can imprison them to eternally search for corrective measures. SyNTH 1 is a book about decoding the system that monitors our behavior, deeds, and our responses to contemporary man made world.
  • FOG:A2005 - TEAM MEMBER - OLD ATLANTIC YARDSIN LA, LOTS OF ARCHITECTURE DESIGNERS DRIFTTHROUGH THE OFFICE OF FOG. ONCE THEY ENTERAND EXIT THE GARDEN OF COLLISIONS. THEY ARENEVER THE SAME. SINCE 2005, I LOOK FORWARDTO CRASHING, CRUCNHING, WARPING, DISTORT-ING FORMS. THE BENDING AND BREAKING OF MA-TERIAL IS EXCITING AND THE MOMENT RIGHT BE-FORE SOMETHING SNAPS IS THE MOMENT THATDEFINES THE LUXURAY OF CHAOS. +
  • These sketches was completed on-site in Rome, Italy. The major objective for our sketch class was to focus on building plan axonometric that focused on the ortho- All architects are technically trained to dimentianally craft and material space ?graphic representation of different urban building contexts. Given assignments were to focus on small, medium, and large elements at different drawing scales. Thedevelopment of looking at existing spaces provoked a much larger understanding on layering a palimpsest for visually crafting and creating a dense hierarchy of graphicinformation. Utilizing the model for extracting imperative views and axis’s revealed most architectural features and simple themes became apparent by directing thedrawing effort toward the three- dimensional. 2001 - Roma
  • 2001 - Florence
  • 2001 - Sienna
  • 2001 - Sienna
  • 2001 - Parma
  • 2001 - Venice
  • chapter 2
  • chapter 2
  • 1995 - 2010
  • PRISONMODEL FOR SENECA -1995 - PROFESSOR DORI SIMONSNO BRIDGE OF “SIGHS” HERE PRISON CELLS DEATH CHAMBER
  • PARKINGPRISON ENTRY
  • RETRACTABLE ROOFEPHEMERAL HOUSE -1995 - PROFESSOR COLEMAN JORDANThis second year studio project acknowledges the notion ofconstant change and perpetual flux. The ephemeral conceptwas derived from the professor client as a conceptual threadto merge the residence not only to the immediate landscapebut also to the entire Pee Dee marshlands area of the lowercoastland of South Carolina. The house attempts to attachitself loosely to the earth in an aggressive manner where themajor views were going to be fully optimized and where thewindow wall would be mechanized into a physical devicewhere the roof would conceal the exterior partition. By creat-ing a barrier that would disappear, the opportunity to literallyextend the living retreat space into the outdoor balcony porcharea facilitated the definition of being truly able to interact withnatural elements and sustain shelter. The floating horizontalarmatures establish and connect the migration of bird wildlifeand also present a long linear framed view of the territory.The hibernation of animals draws upon the horizon a newvisual extension. The overall design has a gross area of 2000square feet.
  • MARSH LANDSCAPE RETRACTABLE ROOF GARAGE LIVING ROOM FRONT ENTRY
  • Soho - NYNY 1995PARKING STRUCTURE PROFESSORRAY MAGILLThis third year studio project was to house a physical gesture for theselected mid-town area of New York City. By studying the solid/voidrelationships that exist within the contemporary urban fabric, the end-less repetition of street blocks surfaced as the most formal representativedesign element. This incremental tectonic unit for zoning functions asa grid device that orders how rigid the city form has become mani-fested. This pavilion proposal provides a resting ground for re-discover/uncover/recover of the self by way of offering a sanctuary for lookinginto one’s own history and collectively displaying a collaged imagescreen of projected mental thoughts for the visitor. Utilizing hypedup neurological instrumentation and cinematic IMAX projection, theinterior wall becomes a reflective digital mirror for re-representing amulticultural cross-section of humanity. This gesture expresses howtechnology amplifies and reveals a new reality for our social conditionand thus creates a new interaction with our collective identity.How does one frame and learn to di-rect a mechanical existence withinfilm’s linear structure ?
  • What can really be said. An opinion? My reading on the project was to turn the garage into a collector’s gallery/museum and still provide basic storage for parking. The First iteration split this program where driver’s have the opoortunity to showcase. The overall mass of thebuilding is an inverted setback that zoning requires. The site assumes that large scale buildings exist on one side of the block and smaller scale structures on th e other. the roof pitch starts at the sixth floor and drops to the top of the second.
  • Can the modern spectacle of today there be retirement from theater ? This supercrit (1 week design charette) is based on creating a retreat for one of the world’s greatest high wire walker. He has crossed over the Grand Canyon, the world trade center, and also the Eiffel tower. After he retires, he plans on writing a book of memoirs. This proposal uses three conceptual strategies that formulate a basic intervention for this one room project. 1- Insert a new ground plan that bridges two different types of landscape area. 2-liberate the retreat space by mechanically controlling the roof and walls that literally reveal the core interior space to the earth and sky. This feature of adjusting the enclosure allows Philippe Petit (artist) an opportunity to detach him- self physically, mentally, and spiritually. 3- Re-establish the Clemson University natural history museum to its immediate surroundings. A new courtyard emphasizes a larger public offering for accommodat- ing specific venues.
  • SUPER CRIT This supercrit project was a brief 1-week project that introduced the stu- dio to Atlanta. Professor Lloyd Bray provided background information pertaining to the recent history of a new bridge overpass connecting the Midtown area on both sides of interstate. This congested freeway junction sets up the first visual reading of midtown and downtown Atlanta and also establishes a physical threshold. This framed view is guided along the north/south interstate retaining walls. The vertical commuter corridor bifurcates the heart of this urban area. This section cut through the city appears as a never-ending stream of continuous fragmented movements. Within this immediate threshold into the city, a building metamorphosis is occurring architecturally, economically, and culturally (Atlantc Station, home of the old steel mill). The initial proposal had DOT (Department of Transportation) and Santiago Calatrava in collaboration in effort to design this new pedestrian / vehicle overpass. After the schematic design was created, the DOT refused to fund and politically partake in this joint project. My proposal calls for a place to commit suicide. Like that of the city, it comments on the existence and being in an area where something is not wanted and is not valued. After doing research on this subject matter and subscribing to its ritualistic nature, the project establishes a place for private desecration. Of course there are commercial aspects built in to the process by having internal light shows that cast external shadows. (supercrit 2 - DRAW Bridge)studio 5
  • The Conserved SpA Booms Robert MothershedGold is born in Spain, lived in France, and buried in Genova. - 1468 Unknown Writer Genova SpA (Shipping port Authority) is characterized by an edge contour that manifests itself as an industrial front yard. This area of study (an enormous Ligurian coast-line) is conditioned between two powerful natural boundaries (land and water). As an interstitial zone of historical maritime commerce, the man-made extensions (bacinas, berthingplatforms, docks, jetties, piers, quays, walls, etc.) demonstrate an unspoken force about commodity, community, and culture. These physical constructions are localized manipulationsof terrain that provide a platform for trade. Since the Unification of Italy, the port and city’s overall configuration has had immense transition. The formulation of the Iron Triangle(Genova, Milano, and Turino) and newly formed 1903 Consortium (C.A.P.) set in motion the port’s unlimited potential for a new loading/unloading capacity of goods. After decidingdirectional expansion toward the West, major immigration populated the growing labor force and assisted the arrival and departure of bundled cargo. Parallel to increase in ship activity,hydraulic mechanical cranes were employed to further accelerate the transshipment procedure with a higher load capacity. The robotic reliance on operating cranes has enabled the port to adhere and maintain a greater measure of efficiency than with that of human effort. The port cranes presentthemselves as instrumental devices that allowed an unprecedented industrial growth for both the city and port. The crane’s relationship for expediting cargo is indispensable and canbe viewed as indicator for marking economic and land expansion. The cranes are sophisticated mechanical extensions of specialized conveyance networks. Ideally, working cranesmust never be fixed in one singular position, they must have mobile flexibility (see photo 1). This assertion also implies a larger understanding for describing the city’s programmaticinfrastructure development.The ancient harbor’s basin has a limited capacity for the new type of shipping vessel. This territory of older constructions demonstrates the obsolescing of specific buildings, goods,and machinery. They are now seen as remnants of an aggressive industry that constantly upgrades moving procedures for financial profit. The historical Cotton Magazine, which onceheld 43,000 square meters of storage space with an 85,000-bale capacity, now houses a retail center. Within the recent past, the Old Pier (Molo Vecchio) used at maximum productioncapacity had twelve electric 1.5 metric tonn. cranes running simultaneously (see drawing 1 for type). While the original building structure is currently modified, there is five cosemeticallyrepaired unused cranes, which are still positioned on railroad ties and are left virtually isolated and disconnected operationally. These specific cotton cranes can share the same outdoordining space with local yacht members. Nearby, on a 6 foot rusticated stone base, one 1888 spray-painted primer gray features a bronze plaque dedicating the 1992 / five hundred yearChristopher Colombus discovery celebration (see drawing 2 for type).The outlined proposal calls for specific participation with past, present and projected development of cranes and of Genova. The SpA is distanced on 17-kilometer coastline that geo-graphically dominates the city’s water edge condition. This longitudinal dimension affords even greater expansion for more industrialized growth. Everyone whom acknowledges thisimmediate locale of urban cohabitation can place a panoramic glimpse of the modern cacophonic (orderless, perhaps profane) commercial expansion. The SpA ‘s potential threshold forcargo handling could perhaps will never be fully realized when true building boundaries are never defined. The massive overall proportional dimensions of the new Voltri docks havecreated a dehumanized shipping district. The port is constantly under observation in attempt to further expand its capacity to heighten the density of traffic.
  • This multi-functioning international managerial trade center currently uses the area underneath the loop road around La Lanterna as a temporary storing place for outmodedpieces of rusted machinery. This specific area can be seen as a transitional emporium of yesterday’s tools and also the greatest historical Genovese landmark. The sophisticated charac-teristic and manufactured mechanical intelligence within a brief evolution of cranes marks a systematic trajectory about inscribing service and dedication. The cranes have served as setof home-based tools for enabling political seatrade abroad. The outlined proposal calls for specific participation with past, present and projected development of cranes and of Genova.The studio proposal is a physical final resting terminal (graveyard) set into the existing perimeter profile of the loop road underneath La Laterna. The studio proposal works by inform-ing a partially demolished utilitarian overhead passageway with a proposed suspended pedestrian park design by Rem Koolhaus (see photo 6). His future design physically links thishistorical monument with the new Ferry Terminal. The new ground level offering revises the usage of this privitasied property in attempt to engage a somewhat unusual public cemeterysetting. In 1890 this was hinge point site for deciding what direction to expand. The 1997 masterplanned area of San Begnino has two differentiated ground levels of 18.3 meters. The lower proposed pathway will be visually submerged against the built-up datumof the newer industrial service plateau. The design works a large vista on the eastern side of thelighthouse facing toward the inner harbour. The existing vertical ramp and stair circulation ismore emphasised. The entrance and exit bookend this upward path. The new terminal is meantfor re-connecting two open ends (past and future) with the burial of crane booms. This insertionwould re-structure the existing grade surface to allow a larger collection for future crane booms.The largest spatial requirement is inthe cross section of the truss armature. Some floating cranesare to have a 350 tonn. maximum capacity. The boom’s segmental nature would could fostera reading arduous strain and berthing ability. The specific maritime cranes gathered togethercould be examined to educate people about the port’s strategic outlook. One that has alwaysembraced technical knowledge with corporate innovation. The installation articulates a mov-able set of apparatus’ that allow a re-sequencing, like that of the port profile (see drawing 4).The wrought iron cast metal and extruded A36 steel armatures would be minimally securelyfastened below ground at a negative 1-meter subgrade dimension. Using bracketed deviceson an overhead retractable framework would fasten booms to the lowered visible height. Ina metonymic manner, the crane booms are now fixed in a permanent conserved position (anItalian Catholic tradition). The older Cranes of yesterday and tommarrow’s outdated craneswould be openly displayed to re-represent and suggest an ideological machine age thinking (apositive attitude toward hard labor and commitment).
  • Can people celebrate the death of obsolete machines ?
  • Photo 5 - Typical view of cranes working duringthe unloading transhipment berthing time
  • Photo 3 - 40 Tonne Overhead Crane - Calata Sanita Photo 1- Mobile Crane- 20 Tonne Capacity (free)Immigrant Worker - Industrial Revolution
  • Drawing 5 - Developed site plan - indicatinglinear area reconfigured into radial patternedsection cuts of loop road
  • Photo 2- Renzo Piano Spyder /1992 Expo Proposed hoisting detail - plan view XIII century masoic detaiPhoto 6- 1997 Rem Koalhaus San BegninoProposed Model - Suspended Park anchor-ing La Laterna Drawing 5 - Developed site plan - indicating linear area reconfigured into radial patterned section cuts of loop road
  • Proposed detail plan - section viewl Proposed hoisting detail - elevation view
  • 44 Suspended Catwalk Crane45 Existing Lead Factory Converted46 Screnn Wall with Floating Images47 New Corridor48 Drum49 Screen Wall50 Crane/ Catwalk51 Metal Floor Grates52 Existing Train rack Bed53 Mobile Projector Unit
  • IMAGE PARK - THESIS- OPERATION MONTAGE - 2002Since culture is represented within a system of symbols, cinema’s ability to script livable texts presents itself as a substantial aperture (window) for witnessing ourpost-modern world. The final product of this thesis permeates with several layers of cinematic montage. By subscribing the Eisenstein’s method of constantly insertingnew information into the picture plane at different intervals, the intent was to make a visceral reading of this move spatially as well as architecturally. The framedversion of viewing montage is a performance located within the site and outside the building. This occurs within a visually dynamic scene. The examined action wasseamed and encased into a mechanical motion going from left to right. At this outside edge boundary of the site, the content that gets viewed is a clear depiction ofboth midtown and downtown Atlanta. The insertion of both contexts is revealed through a transparent holographic screen that provides a new window for viewingboth the new layer of buildings in Atlanta while still presenting a datum for projecting motion picture artistry. The high-rise construction within the skyline ofAtlanta represents a communion of commercial, technological, economic and social power. This level of interaction between real and imaginary are transfixed intoone social space. The new visual promenade for compounding this invasion between what is seen and what is unseen was determined by the capacity to accommodatethe proposed program.The changes in consciousness that regular cinema affords bridges the openings to the architectural realm by deconstructing optical viewing points within a specificboundary (frame). Architecturally, the dim light of cinema creates an imagination theater. The nature of makeshift (Ad Hoc) approaches to exploring buildingspace has always been a historical cinematic tradition.The participants who visit this proposal see not just new screenings of different media but also share in thefluctuating levels of activated building space. The temporary reading of the moving image that physically moves recognizes a new field of motion. The blurring of focalplanes registers a more detailed area for this interstitial volume. Montage engages the mood of an outdoor environment that is set parallel to the mood or tone of aparticular movie production.This reference utilizes the screen as a non-identifiable platform for motion picture viewings.This dismantling participates in a suggestionto psychologically reinterpret place. This level of interaction between the building and the city ritualizes space in a manner that now allows the a visual penetrationof multiple axis to occur in all directions. The external relationship that is generated from the site makes the city an active audience member. The demonstrationof rhythmic montage also establishes a path of fragmenting circulation views around and through the new proposal. The scope and scale of this cutting techniqueconstitutes the impression of the visual brutality that this editing construct allows. The transverse circulation scenarios run perpendicular to the main processioncompositionally get re-assembled through its random size and random placement of punched openings. In this project, the repositioning of context, cinema, andaudience fosters an ambiguous dialectical reading through the practice of montage. The forms proposed with this thesis are constructed above the existing railroadbeds that physically enter the grounds of the site. The stadium seating is set between the west end of the Butler building addition and the east side of the existingoverhead crane. The new production studio space is superimposed on top of the 1960’s foundation addition.The coterminal/parallel approach to staging events in this space can be denoted from sectional sequence cuts to show the overall organizations of linear volumes setto reface the south elevation. Since the initial program’s manifestation has remained intact, that being a place to view and produce new experimental film productions,the project’s three main components have been spliced together utilizing the most remarkable cultural devices to construct meaning, architecture.
  • VIEW FROM SITE TOWARD MIDTOWN ATLANTASTUDY MODEL INDICATING THE CROSS PROGRAMMING OF SPACE AND FUNCTION BROWN FIELD SITE EPA - HIGH RANKING AS WORST SITES - LEAD SMELTING FACTORY
  • ATLANTIC STEEL RUINS - PRE 2002
  • When will public space exist again where there are no laws, no rules, no order ? Building equals Server The present time in history is emblematic of an overpowering electronic shadow. The connection to, and distribu- tion of information has pervaded all facets of human interaction. Only through the total implementation of this connectivity can a new paradigm be realized. Today’s “Library” is, by definition, a (dis)continuous stratified nucleus of recorded publications in a constructed categorical spectrum. It is, by association, an indexed archive of information describing and augmenting man’s knowledge, resources, and technological status. The proposed project identifies itself as a recording devise: a virtual transcription: the simultaneous portal to and record of humanity through an interactive global network.
  • CLIENT: ARCHI_World InternationalCOMPLETEION Jan 2005DATE:SITE: Peru, South AmericaPROGRAM: Mobile tower - 300 GuestsSIZE: 29,000 sfNOTES: Cannot Touch Site
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  • 2 9 98
  • How can recreational space signify an interwoven non building with nature ? The Chicago River Project Urban Waterways 1: The built environment of Chicago sustains a sophisticated and heroic architectural existence. This constructed city can be described as a dramatic theater of production(s) and negotiation(s). The city’s factual reality creates moments where aggressive buildings narrate and perform in stage-like spectacles. For example, the transitioning buildings castled around Grant Park formally remain directed to a proscenium and shadow an audience of intrigue. Another inherent example is the reciprocal skyline of the city. It lifts its favorite actress in a frozen moment of conclusion and finality. This collective effort overtly creates a dedicated and singular instance for recognition. While the epic sized structures of the city create an exchangeable identity, the river that surges through the city has been forgotten. The river observes a coterminal set of positions within the city’s cast of characters. Meaning, it connotatively spaces the intervals of different plots and directs a silent rhythm. In contrast to the play,the river has been robbed of its historical marvel. It has developed into a memory mechanism of diversion instead of a channel of industrial distribution. The flowing river, which has always been a commercial commodity, has become a central place of spatial programmatic inquiry and social interest. It has become reprogrammed to situating and couching the city as a machined backdrop. The river was also overcome by the generic ordering of streets. The unsympathetic block grid has dominated by the superimposed organization of downtown and lacks a singular attitude /role when dispersed. While the river is a shared public space, it once separated sections of downtown and caused territorial divisions. Now, the living but buried river weaves and stitches the homogenous urban fabric causing a regeneration of different permeable boundaries. In the areas, which are analogous to screenwriting, the river has been scripted to adhere a specific unknown cast role. The mystique of the river demarcates and defines a variable link between the dramatic production of mankind, the fluid productions of nature and the liquid ephemerality of life. The idea of linking multiple zones of spectatorship and docking interactivity can be considered and articulated with the analogous approach to contemporary culture.
  • River Station 1/ Swimming Pool The idealized notation of analogRiver East assumes a theoretical framework to s1 derive and formulate prototypicalWater Taxi program: architecture. Analogs are instrumen-a1_Water taxi dock tal devices that deploy synchroniza-a2_Waiting space tion. Analogs coordinate differenta3_Ticket booth systems of movement patterns and structure in effort to seam a connec-Swimming Pool program: tion or bridge. Analogs allow a plat-a4_Inside/Outside pool form for exchange. It allows variousa5_Locker & shower rooms hardware systems to be operated, commanded, and communicated. The analog exacts a synapse of informa-Shared program: tion to co-exist and also signify meth-a6_Lounge ods input and output. Utilizing this digressive strategy for implementinga7_Public toilets architecture, the insertion of variousa8_Taxi drop off analogs mandates a unique individuala9_Bus stop experience for the city of Chicago.
  • s2
  • River Station 2/ TheaterWacker & MadisonWater Taxi program:c1_Water taxi dockTheater program:c2_Theaterc3_Back-of-housec4_Storagec5_OfficeShared program:c7_Ticket boothc8_Waiting spacec9_Public toiletsc10_Taxi drop offc11_Bus stop
  • s3River Station 3/ BoathouseBubbly Creek (Ashland & Archer)Water Taxi program:b1_Water taxi dockb2_Waiting spaceb3_Ticket boothBoathouse program:b4_Boat docksb5_Meeting spaceb6_Exercise roomb7_Officeb8_Locker & shower roomsb9_Boat storage shedShared program:b10_Public toiletsb11_Bus stopb12_Kiss ‘n ride
  • s3 s2
  • The Black Maria - EDISON OUTDOOR ART TERRACEFLEXIBLE ART MUSEUM FOR UNDERGROUNDARTISTS -CITY CROSSING - CANADAThe modern “Art” museum is infected. It pretends to be a didactic device for thegeneral mass public. Museums are formed and programmed “sponges” of speculativeimportance. Museums are places of collecting cultural fragments. They frame theknowledge of others in attempt to create a reception of meaning. Museums performa civilized organization of information. They (museums) subjectively are preoccupiedwith educating a speculative memory and establishing a dedicated repository of events.They institutionally promote observations about the defined moments of importanceand potential represent significant meanings. While the idealized constructed nota-tion of museum promotes a moment of receptive contemplation; museums construea privileged and civilized outlook toward humanity and its preoccupations. Museumsfragment time by setting a privileged moment of mediation. They fasten to mankind’shistorical memory, manifestations, and observations. Knowing that, a museum cannotsimply be defined as an institutional repository of culturally embedded objects. Themore appropriate origin of the museum was initially conceived as a “prison-house”for the exuberant and exotic collections of worldly masterpieces. These commodifiedobjects are chained entities to their designated historical cells. They are put on constanteducational exhibition for the bourgeois’ and their social exchange. Museums simul-taneously absorb culture and release agents of dis-information. In displaying preciousnegotiable items, social crimes are being committed. The objects captured by the intel-lectual elite. These objects, which are at least to be considered incarcerated artifacts areat best: caged, secured, monitored, locked, and labeled.
  • OUTDOOR ART TERRACEESCALATOR BRIDGE Does the center of urban art activities need a iconic landmark ?
  • METRO - ESCALATOR CONNECTION HORIZONTAL GALLERY
  • SKY DECKVERTICAL GALLERY
  • -0100 +01=02
  • CONCESSIONS PATIO - OUTDOOR TERRACE VERTICA L TRANSPORTATION TO METRO
  • PROGRAMMABLE SKIN - FACADE - NO IMAGE INDICATED NDICATED DICA MAIN ART LOBBY
  • + METRO CONNECTION BELOW
  • SKYDECK VERTICAL GALLERYHORIZONTAL GALLERY LOBBYCONCESSIONS PATIO - OUTDOOR TERRACE +
  • Why does the human species always look to the past for an-swers to the future ?Nazca 2005 Observation TowerPosition:Within contemporary reality; the notion of space has become an archaeological void. Space, today, is a global palimpsest historically fragmented and never fullyunderstood by the present day user. This condition is exacerbated by Man’s reliance on technology and the prolonged pattern that has culturally augmented andsocially formulated how Man experiences his relationship to nature. The machines generated by technological advances are ultimately prosthetic extensions of Mans’existence and are only sensitive to specific programming. They do not have the encoded capacity to react to space, rendering the environment prescriptive. It is thisprescription of modern operation that precludes Man into missing the full meaning of space.Proposal: Hyp(er)_Vyp(r) ®The Nazca Hyp(er)_Vyp(r) ® Observation Tower proposes to construct a new architectural agenda for experiencing the enormous landscape drawings. It is thisproject’s intention to use this agenda as a way for man to use his technology to embrace the anthropological phenomenon here and to reconnect to the essence ofnature once again. The desert surface geoglyphs have become educational diversions now, but can also serve as a coordinate system to communicate with the uniden-tified and mysterious forms of life outside our own. The tri-partite hybrid intervention transplants users into an inspection that displaces modern space and time. Itallows visitors to immediately embrace the historical inscriptions at multiple scale readings potentially in order of magnitude or more. The tower traces the embed-ded etchings as if they were analogous to individual moments of DRAFTing. The hovering tower operates as a memory, recording, and measuring instrument withthe capacity to turn the observer into occupier and participant. The retractable mobile tower project signifies freedom from an absolute set of visual boundaries andextends without restriction. The open performance of the design initiates a machine logic and philosophy as an operational strategy, but focuses on the phenomeno-logical and ephemeral qualities of the drawings as the primary way to evoke Mans’ comprehension of these anthropological masterpieces.The Hyp(er)_Vyp(r) ® physically and viscerally uncoils itself as a way to navigate a collective audience and implant a superimposed memory of how and where thesedrawings came from. By erasing the singular viewpoint, the new tower offers unlimited spatial configuration within the shifting horizon while delivering an enlight-ened human perspective. The intention is to take the spectator to the object of study without harming or damaging the process or means. In addition to the Towerthe project also contains the ARMature. The trajectory of the ARMature scans then traces the drawings based on user input and special interest. The ARMature, inconcert with the Tower, creates shifting zones where the relationship between space and time is integrated with the spirit of the Nazca and their relationship with theEarth through movement along or around the drawings. Dynamic intervals of spirit, place, and event allow a re-engagement with the unknown and foster an educa-tion into the understanding of natural space.
  • ASSISTANT: JASON ALLENMOBILE TOWER
  • MOBILE TOWER +PARKING DECK +
  • rule 1 - THE BUILDING CANNOT TOUCH THE SITE MOBILE TOWER
  • MOBILE TOWER
  • RESIDENT CABINS VERTICAL CIRCULATIONADJUSTIBLE OBSERVATION DECK MOBILE TOWER LIBRARY DECK
  • MOBILE TOWER
  • MOBILE TOWER
  • How does a generic botanical building space become developed and encod-ed within specific functional architectural program ? The idealized notation of Analog assumes a framework to derive and formulate architec- ture. Analogs are instrumental devices that deploy synchronization, coordinate different systems of movement patterns and structure connections or bridges. Analogs allow a platform for exchange. It allows various hardware and software systems to be operated, commanded, and communicated. The analog exacts a synapse of information to co-exist and also signify methods input and output. Utilizing this digressive strategy for imple- menting architecture, the insertion of various analogs mandates a unique individual experience for the Tittot Glass Museum.
  • NO SITE LOCATION = DIAGRAM MODEL EQUALS PROTOTYPE 1 OVERHEAD BUILDING CRANE FOR EXHIBIT SHIFTING GIGIFT SHOP - DINING
  • SIGN - ENTRY STORAGE OVERHEAD BUILDING CRANE FOR EXHIBIT SHIFTING LECTURE HALL GALLERY 2 CLASSROOMSIFT SHOP - DINING TRUCK LOADING GALLERY 1 GIFT SHOP - DINING
  • SIGN - ENTRY STORAGEOVERHEAD BUILDING CRANE FOR EXHIBIT SHIFTING LECTURE HALL
  • USER GROUPS SIGN - SHOW GALLERY 3 SIGN - ENTRYCLASSROOMS GIFT SHOP - DINING
  • LOCAL CONTEXT Do machines within the Garden indicate a reciprocal picturereque dialoge or do they only attract a decision maker ideology?
  • LECTURE HALLSITE SPECIFIC LOCATION RAMP ENTRY GALLERIES SITE SETBACK
  • Can an organism derive a regonial context to make a passive design approach more intel- ligent? The new Malama Learning center is set to anchor itself into its new site providing the campus with direction and a future. The new building will address thee important axis created with the current pathways on campus but also with surrounding residential areas. At the intersection of those new paths the Malama Learning Center will begin to take form. That form will evoke the image of construction and rebirth. Many spaces will be housed under its protective shell while others will such as the amphitheatre and gardens will not. Those spaces not requiring mechanical AC will be protected by the structural skin surrounding it. As the building stiches itself together around the apex of the pedestrian paths its form will collide together in a glassatrium housing the lobby. By merging positive and negative the new center willact as a compass guiding it s students to their future goals.Every Machine is the spiritualization of an organism. - Theo van Doesburg
  • The technological and the bio-logical, once regarded as op-posites, are today increasinglymerging into hybrid constellations. This calls up the old question ofthe definitions of life and nature, andwhat their relation is to technology and culture. We can observe a shift froma world of constants to a world of vari-ables in which the biological is placedever closer to the technologi-cal. This shift takes place si-multaneously with the grow-ing technologisation of society.Christian Moeller
  • 1 PUBLIC SPACES AND CIRCULATION 1a Lobby/Reception/Exhibit/Gift 2a General Circulation2 PERFORMING ARTS/ASSEMBLY 2a Performance/Lecture Hall 2b Exhibition/Set Storage 2c Equipment Storage 2d Performance/Dance Studio 2e Theatre Restrooms (2) 2f Outdoor Gathering Space/ Amphitheater 2g Loading Dock3 ADMINISTRATIVE FUNCTIONS 3a TNC Director’s Office 3b TNC Open Office Plan 3c TNC Office Manager/Reception 3d Volunteer/Open Work Areas 3e MLC Office 3f Staff Lounge 3g Office Supply Storage 3h Office Equipment4 TEACHING AND MEETING SPACES 4a Classroom Spaces (3) 4b Small Conference Room 4c Large Conference Room 4d Visiting Artist/Scholars/Scientist Studios (2) 4e Resource Room 4f Outdoor Teaching Areas5 NATURE CONSERVATION OPERATIONS 5a Clean Lab 5b Nursery/Shadehouse/Repotting Shed 5c Plant Maturation Open Area 5d Covered Repotting Area 5e Outdoor Staging Area 5f Native Hawaiian Ethnobotanical Garden 5g Field Work Area 5h Storage Tool Room 5i Mud Room 5j Bulk Storage 5k Flammables Storage6 SUPPORT SERVICES 6a Kitchenette 6b Staff Restrooms (2 ) 6c Public Restrooms (2 )7 BUILDING SERVICES 7a Custodial Closet 7b Supply Closet 7c Mechanical Room 7d Electrical Room
  • MJ FOREVER - BURIAL TOWER
  • Where does one stop reaching for the sky and where does one lose all connection with the ground ? Archi-logical Design FLOWE(R) TOWER
  • THE SPATIAL SCHEMATA OF LOS ANGE- LES IS A PLEXUS OF COLLISON. THE COR- RIDORS OF THIS MODERN DEVELOPMENT COMPELLS A COLLAPSE OF INDUSTRIALCLIENT: PLANNING. THE HORIZONTAL FLUID OP-COMPLETEION ERATIONS THIS REGION IS BASED ON THE ARCHI_World InternationalDATE: Jan 2005 GROUND PLANE . THE VERTICAL MASSINGSITE: OF THIS CITY IS SMOOTHERED AND COV- Peru, South America WITH SPRAWL .. THE CONTINUOUS EREDPROGRAM: Mobile tower - DETERIORATION OF EDGES HAVE LEFTSIZE: 300 GuestsNOTES: 29,000 sf THE CITY VOID. THERE IS NO DEMARCAT- ING BOUNDARY BETWEEN DISTRICTS, Cannot Touch Site ZONES, TOWNS, AND LOCAL CULTURE. THERE ARE ONLY OBLIQUE MOVEMENTS WITHIN THE DELICATE STREET FABRIC. THE THEORETICAL TRAJECTORIES OF FORM AND FUNCTION SHALL BE RET- ROFITTED ACCORDING TO EXITING INFRASTRUCTURE,EXISTING POPULA- TIONS, AND EXISTING HISTORIES. THE AR- CHITECTURAL POETICS OF URBAN SPACE IS ESTABLISHING A MONUMNETAL THE- ATER FOR FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS WHILE PROMOTING HUMAN OCCUPANCY AND HABITATION. AS A MNUEMONIC ARCHI- TECTURE – THE SCALE OF MEMORY HAS NO SPECIFIC RESPONSE, MEMORY RECOL- LECTION, OR NAVIGATIONAL REQUIRE- MENTS. THE CHRONOLGY OF BUILDINGS WILL TRANSITION AS ORIENTATIONAL DEVICES FOR FURTHER ACKNOWLEDGE- MENT OF PLACE. THE LOST CITY OF LOS ANGELES HAS WILL HAVE TO SACRIFICE ITS HOMOGENOUS MANIC MONOPRO- GRAMMING. THE “FLOWER TOWER” IS OPEN EVENT ARCHITECTURE OF 1 BIL- LION SQUARE FEET.
  • 1,000,000,000 SFFLOWE(R) TOWER
  • 1,000,000,000 SFFLOWE(R) TOWER
  • OUTDOOR TERRACE FACING SUNSET
  • THE NEW SKY MALL
  • SOLARIUM(S) VIEW EAST FROM PROPOSED TOWER LIVE1,000,000,000 SF RECREATIONAL OFFICE VERTICAL TRANS
  • FLOWE(R) TOWER
  • Can a new monumental machine establish a lost identity ? LAp DANCER The overall design intent of this proposal is the mount a new urban space onto the open core of civic/cultural space in front of City Hall. The intervention establishes itself as a physical bridge from existing elevated detached terrace by RE-grounding itself as a new physical threshold. The architecture creates a formal device that aspires to connect the higher pedestrian plane of arts with the concealed lower park of local govern- ments. The Intervention overlaps these two institutions in order to create a more intimate transition while also seamlessly supporting the monu- mental urban presence of the government hall. This illicit bureaucratic intersection can now create a new underground plexus of co-terminal activities. The SPACE of LA can capture the temptation(s), desires, fears, and dreams of any seeking individual. Today, the downtown has become a LOST garden of secret pleasures. It has been abandoned because people fear of not having the social amenities found elsewhere. The core of downtown lacks a friendly outdoor center. The city has become desperate for interfacing with its honorable patrons. PUBLIC space has become subverted to the machine and the pedestrian masses have such been obliterated. The motions through the city should have a human pulse, a human touch, a human connection. This proposal calls forth a re-connection with our contemporary culture in order to provoke a more visceral associa- tion. The proposed architecture informs it self as metaphorical Lap Dancer. This project is a multi-modal pleasure experience. The park is designed to amplify natural senses as the user interfaces with the activity or space/object. The act of pleasure amplification must then be turned into spectacle for other users.There will be visual, textural, olfactory, and auditory stimuli all summoned by the act the user has chosen to participate in. The user has the choice; they have the power to control their level of pleasure. The park works in harmony with the edge conditions of the park boundary. Certain ideas are expressed as super graphics or patterns to relate to the scale of the city. Our generation of the spectacle is a product of over lapping, colliding, and perceived volumes consisting of separation of space and program. The skillful manipulation of visual, textural, auditory, and olfactory proximity make this park the adventure everyone should have.
  • MOBILE SEX MUSEUM BATHHOUSE
  • BRIDGE SITE PLANOPERABLE LAWN - CANOPY
  • MOBILE SEX MUSEUM LOVER LAWN ABOVE PRIVATE ENTRY BELOW
  • A-OUTDOOR LOUNGE B-UNDERGROUND BATHS C-PUBLIC SUANA D-MISTY FOUNTAINS E-LIQUID SPA F-MASSAGE ACADEMY G-SKIMP POOL H-JUICE BAR J-PARLOR ROOM K-MILKY CAFE M-LOVER’S LAWN N-OUTDOOR JUCUZZI P-SEXSCREENRAMP CONCOURSE
  • MOBILE SEX MUSEUM
  • A-OUTDOOR LOUNGEB-UNDERGROUND BATHSC-PUBLIC SUANAD-MISTY FOUNTAINSE-LIQUID SPAF-MASSAGE ACADEMYG-SKIMP POOLH-JUICE BARJ-PARLOR ROOMK-MILKY CAFEM-LOVER’S LAWNN-OUTDOOR JUCUZZIP-SEXSCREEN
  • CLIENT: ARCHI_World InternationalCOMPLETEION Jan 2005DATE:SITE: Peru, South AmericaPROGRAM: Mobile tower - 300 GuestsSIZE: 29,000 sfNOTES: Cannot Touch Site
  • architectural / theater prosthetics - Sleeve + Mask skins / structures / enclosures - are place where the mind seeks to find pleasure / discover rest / live the un-certianity of life Can new space dance, fashion and augment itself as a character on stage and the audience is the city ?architectural puppets are machined costume composite skins / structures / enclosures - are place where the mind seeks to find pleasure / 21 architectural theater - “body forms” are motivated by hybrid operations implying traditional stage language(s) discover rest / live the un-certianity of life architectural poetics - forms that float but never touch or fee the ground
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  • T3 T2 T2 T1SITE PLAN - CITY CONTEXT
  • DIGITAL MODELOVERALL
  • VIEW TOWARD MOUNTAIN ANDMETRO RAIL
  • SOUTH WEST CORNER ELEVATION WITH TOWER BETOND
  • PROCESS MODELS
  • EARLY ROCK FORMATION MODELS
  • ENTRY ARMS FOR DIRECTINGMOTION AROUND SITE PER-
  • T3- PRIMARY PERFORMING ARTS THEATHER
  • T2- - ADJUSTABLE CEILINGS FOR ACOUSTICCONTROL
  • T2- - ADJUSTABLE CEILINGS FOR ACOUSTICCONTROL
  • 3D- SECTION OF PARMETRIC MODEL
  • 3D- SECTION OF PARMETRIC MODEL
  • 3D- SECTION OF PARMETRIC MODEL
  • 3D- SECTION OF PARMETRIC MODEL
  • MAIN ENTRY - ATRIUM
  • MAIN ENTRY - ATRIUM
  • V B M 2005 How can the crafted industrical trades of ship building inform a trade of viewing art ?
  • HOW CAN THE ASSEMBLYLINE PROCESS INFORM AMORE INTELLIGENT ANDINTERACTIVE RETAIL SPACE?
  • How can the density of ironic layering spacesinscribe a new strata for pedestrians withoutautomobiles ?
  • The contemporary practice(s) of making a new architecture for the LAUS can inscribe avernacular spatial (loci) and material coding of building /structure tectonics within theexisting train hub site and manifold itself as new icon for the local downtown travel-ers and international visitors from abroad. The design proposes a re-centralized plexus(foci) of interweaving complex urban design relationships. Using a concept of “Time”,it can be considered an open landscape of hidden imaginary facts that reveal exposedevents, political structures and infinite cultural associations. The mega-autotropolisplace of LA is a woven lamination of various transportation movement patterns. ThisHSR project capitalizes on re-instituting and densify(ing) the central core city areawith 40,000 more human occupants per day. This spatial event actualizes a new set ofnetworked activities back into the city’s origin. The new angelic architecture celebratesthis differentiated event by abstracting an eternal evolutionary set of voluptuous formsand novel geometries. The new facility should augment a new frontier of hybrid startof the art places. The unfolding of this palimpsest refold a connection to the embroidedspaces of Los Angeles.
  • THE BACK IS NOW THE NEW FRONT
  • LAHSR
  • SITEHow can the singular event of crash trigger a synape of randomized filtered forms ?
  • Why do most organic style buildings want to begreen and sustanabile ?
  • LOST ORIGINAL
  • skin-job Can LA just “be” the homestyle junk master it wants to be ? 726 SOUTH SANTE FE
  • RobertsonIn 1797, Etienne Gaspard Robertson was given permission to pres-ent a magic lantern showing to the open public (Figure 3). Thisevent occurred within an abandoned chapel located within theCapuchin monastery (France). The empty chapel was considered anideal venue to sponsor traveling exhibitions. In Robertson’s spectralshowing, he presented a mixed media production combining phan-toms, gouls, and specters. He incorporated mobile lanterns into hisformat by engineering several mechanical apparatuses that featuresfront, side and rear projections. He also deployed smoke, mirrors,and other theatrical contrivances in order to attract Parisian patrons.His material choice to display these moving images was on largepieces of wax coated gauzes. This semi-transparent material con-structed a phantasmagoria to be physically experienced. In this situ-ation, the audience was more actively engaged in the performancebecause the stage area was the entire space. Robertson traveledaround Europe and North America to ultimately become one of themost influential media artists who pioneered the magic lantern withthe social classes of his day. His imagination provokes a new read-ing of entertainment space by interacting with the immediate crowdgathering.
  • How can a large scale urban infrastructural composnet becoma new spine for mixed uses and mixed places ?*team memberstripp andersonjason eggenburgerrob mothershed
  • NY 2003 NEW YORK HIGH LINE ENTRY - RANKED IN TOP 50
  • 2003 NEW YORK HIGH LINE ENTRY
  • 2003 NEW YORK HIGH LINE ENTRY
  • LAX ONE DAY - ALL AIRPLANES WILL BE GROUNDED - THEN WHAT ?RE27
  • ORION
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  • How can the inherent form of site topography directthe interior and exterior relationships ?
  • TRIPPLE HOPPER - 2004 Why do americans insist on an adhoc approach to contemporary design and modern living ?
  • ATLWHY DO MOST AMERICAN PRE-FER AN ADHOC APPROCAH TOBUILDING AND MODERN LIVING?
  • 27 Research Labs28 Central Stair29 Public Entrance30 Auditorium31 Covered Balcony
  • How can the lighting of a path direct the30unfolding of a fixed landscape ?CSOA <html> <head> <title>BUTTERFLY</title> <meta http-equiv=”Content-Type” content=”text/html; charset=iso-8859-1”> <script language=”JavaScript”>
  • Context viewAuditoriumResearc LibraryClassroom
  • What does it take to get the body the have a perfect tan ?32
  • JORDAN WILLIAMS ( FROM PLEXUS R + D) WROTE IN DECEMBER 2003The proposal for the ChiChi Earthquake Memorial park explores the complex relationship between mankind and the nat-ural landscape. This relationship is addressed physically and spatially as well as psychologically and emotionally throughthe design of a park and memorial that reveals the danger inherent in the arrogant assumption that mankind possesses a What if the macro-geologic manipulation of nature was symbolically registratedcomplete understanding of the natural world and that this knowledge provides the ability to control nature.The tragic events of September 21, 1999 remind us, as do all natural disasters, that our relationship with the natural world within the micro space of a new anti-monument ?involves the continual and often unpredictable exchange of control between nature and man. At times humanity is ableto exert control over the landscape, harnessing nature to achieve the goals and aspirations of culture. However, man’sdominance over the natural world is periodically relinquished, and we become subject to the seemingly random forces of The proposal for the ChiChi Earthquake Memorial park explores the complex relationship between mankind and thenature. The ChiChi quake represents one tragic instance of this forfeiture of control. The design for the memorial andpark proposes a rich fabric of distinct threads of experience that allow individuals to develop deep and personal memoriesof the ChiChi quake, thus imprinting their individual memories on the landscape. This process of imprinting suggests natural landscape. This relationship is addressed physically and spatially as well as psychologically and emotionallya declaration of control over the landscape, and is associated with the ritual of grieving, which involves the very personalprocess of coming to terms with a loss. However, the implication of control over the landscape is intentionally questioned through the design of a park and memorial that reveals the danger inherent in the arrogant assumption that man-through a series of devices implemented throughout the park that serve to remind us of the contingent nature of ourcontrol, and the instability of the natural world which is constantly shifting physically and phenomenally. kind possesses a complete understanding of the natural world and that this knowledge provides the ability to controlThe primary diagram is comprised of two systems that frame the dialogue between man and nature. First, a graft ofthe agricultural fields west of the site provide a system to explore the patterns of man’s control over the landscape. The nature.agricultural area was sampled using five distinct criteria in order to map the complex shifts in use as well as the scale ofdevelopment in the landscape. The five basic hues of the agricultural mosaic provided five categories of space includingdense space, porous space, open space, mutating space and object space. The second system is comprised of a series ofthrust and subductive faults that create disruptions in the landscape which allow for differentiation and spatial hierarchy. The design for the memorial and park proposes a rich fabric of distinct threads of experience that allow individuals toThe interaction between these two systems across the site creates a spatial concretization of the intertwined relationshipbetween man and nature, and the fluctuating control of one over the other. The abstract quality of the programmatic cate-gories grafted form the analysis of the agricultural context implies flexibility, or a capacity for mutation. The programmes develop deep and personal memories of the ChiChi quake, thus imprinting their individual memories on the landscape.suggested for the park are secondary to the articulation of a dynamic tissue that is fragile and can be transformed by theusers. This active relationship with the landscape provides a counterpoint to the institutional nature of the victim’s me- This process of imprinting suggests a declaration of control over the landscape, and is associated with the ritual ofmorial, which symbolizes a historical event. The development of a projective programmatic plate to contract the reflectiveprogrammatic plate acknowledges the manner in which monuments evolve in relation to culture. grieving, which involves the very personal process of coming to terms with a loss. However, the implication of controlInitially, the reflective plate will be the dominant programmatic realm psychologically as a consequence of the immediacyof the tragedy and the indelible nature of the loss. However, as time progresses, and as those with intimate knowledge of over the landscape is intentionally questioned through a series of devices implemented throughout the park that servethe tragedy pass, the memories of the event become increasingly abstract and symbolic. At some point in the future, thedominance of the reflective plate will be surpassed by the importance of the projective plate. It is at this point that the to remind us of the contingent nature of our control, and the instability of the natural world which is constantly shift-design of the park, with is layered and flexible tissue, allows for a shift in priority from the grieving of lost souls to the cel-ebration of a civic body that came together in the face of tragedy, reasserting control through the process of rebuilding the ing physically and phenomenally. (jw)city and embarking on the development of a memorial to remember those lost and simultaneously celebrate the future.In order to accommodate this shift in the memorials relationship to the residents, the program has been divided intotwo basic realms. The reflective plane is comprised of activities associated primarily with the sacred quality of themonument to the fallen, the victim’s memorial and the urban memorial. The activities are zoned on the eastern side ofthe site adjacent to the natural topography. The urban memorial contains media documenting the history of ChiChi,the physical effects of the quake and the rebuilding process. This area serves as a transition for the city street to thesacred space of the monument to the fallen, which consists of a surface containing the names of those who lost theirlives as a result of the tragedy.The memorial surface runs parallel with a spatial sequence emphasizing decent into the earth. This decent occurs withinthe space of a fault that lies between the memorial site and the city, and is interpreted as an extension of the geologicalfault that produced the ChiChi quake. The systematic decent into the earth provides a series of varying spaces forgrieving. Some spaces are more open, collective and connected to the context, while others are more intimate, personaland detached from the outside world. In order to allow the families of the victims to create their own distinct memoriesand imprint themselves upon the memorial, each family will install a plate with the engraved name of their loved oneonto an armature. The memorial wall will only be complete once all the families have imprinted their memories byphysically memorializing their loved one. The monument to the fallen sits above the victim’s memorial and acts as ahinge in plan and section and as a symbolic marker for the tragedy. The monument is a mechanical tower that movesfrom a horizontal to a vertical orientation over the course of 365-day period. Each year at exactly 01:47 the tower reachesits maximum vertical position, and proceeds to fall to its horizontal position over the course of 73 seconds, which is theduration of the main ChiChi quake. Once the tower reaches its horizontal position, it begins the year long process ofelevating to the vertical position. This movement creates a permanent and active representation of the earthquake andreminds all that the quake was not a random or isolated event in geological terms, and that the event will be repeatedat some point in the future.The surface of the monument is perforated with 2,455 holes that represent the lives lost as a result of the quake. Inthe horizontal position, the voids create a mosaic of light that teselates the memorial ground plane. In the verticalposition, the voids are backlit, creating the superimposition of a manmade constellation upon the natural constellationsof the night sky.The connection back from the subterranean memorial occurs via the grove of survivors. This orchard of trees is a placeof transition between the memorial and the reflective landscape plane. It provides an intimate space for contemplationas well as a vertical connection to the reflective landscape plane. The reflective plane has been developed as a space ofcontainment for observing the monument to the fallen. This plane is programmed with a series of zones that providealternative landscapes for reflection, ranging from open grass planes to fields of bamboo. Access to the base of the monu-ment to the fallen occurs from the heart of the reflective plane and culminates in a cantilevered plate that sits over thevictim’s memorial. The second realm, the projective plate, is situated between the two thrust faults, and forms a transitionbetween the city and the park. This area is articulated with larger plates of landscape that allow for dynamic activitiesincluding horticulture, recreation, relaxation and entertainment. This area is fluid and has been conceived in such a waythat programmes and activities can mutate.The memorial is a place for grieving; a place for remembering the tragedy and the victims of the earthquake. The specificmanner in which individual victims are remembered constitutes a unique imprint on the fabric of the memorial park.Memory is a subjective and personal act, it is a hidden impulse that needs to be transformed in order to be represented.This project recognizes that the process of memorializing a victim should involve an action that transforms each family’sspecific grief. The action has been given specific quality and value through its intersection with a landscape that is diverseand heterogeneous, filled with places for each family to discover and use as a vehicle to transform their memories.The garden is a place for the community to celebrate the spirit of the reconstruction of ChiChi. Following the tragedy,the community came together to grieve the victims, to provide temporary relief for the survivors and to plan for astrong and vital future. From the consequences of this tragedy arose a sense of community, an understanding of howevery individual is part of a larger body. The garden provides a place for the community to continue coming together.The memorial garden is a place for remembering how our lives are intertwined with the natural world. It is a place ofreminder of the fact that as an integral component of the natural world we have the ability to affect our environment inpowerful ways, and at the same time we are subject to its forces and movements.
  • Diffusing Faults around the site traces the lateral movements thru void sections running parallel with main retaining wall.
  • Can design of a new spiritual center shelter its SKID-ROW in-habitants while also fostering a healthier context to grow andadvance ? E-volo 2010
  • ROBERT MOTHERSHED,AAIA JACQUELINE NGUYEN,AAIA
  • How can a building within a building enframe an open structure while enclosing various functions ?Professional Digital Modeling Consultant for FERStudio - Project is in San Marcos CA - 2005 - 90 LWUnits
  • Professional Digital Modeling Consultant for Plexus R +D Studio - Project is Atlanta GA - 2003 - 4 Town home-UnitsHow can a new residential development re-fit a previousapproved foot print and FAR without going through anynew zoning procedures ?
  • Professional Digital Modeling Consultant for Plexus R +D Studio - Project is Atlanta GA - 2003 - 4 Town home-Units
  • How can the writing of holy scripture suggest a a unique singular contemplative space ? Professional Digital Modeling Consultant for CJA in Costa Mesa , Ca - Ray Varela was lead designer- Project was an invited entry for local Church - Project is Newport BeachCA - 2005 - Wedding / Funeral Chapel
  • How can large scale urban campus set within a generic block connect with a sedimentary terrain of desert , mountain, and river ? Professional Digital Modeling Consultant for COARCITECTS, LA - Paul Zhafen, FAIA was the lead designer - Project was for brand new Biomedical Campus in Downtown Phoenix AZ - 700,000 SF of Lab space with teaching classrooms, library, vivarium, and offices. I worked full time for 1 year doing render model graphics presentation assignements.
  • DOUBLE SKIN FACADE FOR ARIZONA PROJECTRENDERING WAS TO REGISTER PUCNED VOID PATTERN OF CORTEN STEELI PERFORMED IMAGE TEXTURE MAP AND RENDERING VIEWS AT COA
  • How can the continuous vertical stacking of space relate the the citystreets and offer coherence to it occupants ?Housing within the urban fabric of downtownAtlanta has always been a result of large plan-ning efforts. This project recieves its formalmanifestation from its immediate and regionalcontext and formally responds to the typologicalnature of high-rise programming. Retail, Busi-ness Offices, and Housing are the three majoruses for this 300,000 square foot OTIS competi-tion that our third year design studio integrated.The setback of the main tower is positionedtoward the east of the site in order to promotemore open views toward Stone Mountain andalso provide a negative extension of the nearbypark into the front yard of the site. In address-ing the immediate broken geometry of Atlanta’sPeachtree main street, the southern wing ofthis multi-programmed project mimics how astraightforward shift can re-orientate a closedperspective. All the On-Site parking is locatedbeneath the rear of the site and security controlis introduced into the shared public lobby whereinteraction is a forced collective component.This singular space horizontally connects a newMARTA station and existing restaurant with abar of small retail shops. The housing units aresplit into three categories with one being openloft space toward the east where interstate by-ways are introduced to the city. The other unitshave sky lobbies that share open balconies. Tosummarize, the project asserts a passive insertionof democratic tall building space with lower scaleperimeter features that focus pedestrian activityinward at various designated locations that allow38a overlay of protective enclosures.
  • CLIENT: ARCHI_World InternationalCOMPLETEION Jan 2005DATE:SITE: Peru, South AmericaPROGRAM: Mobile tower - 300 GuestsSIZE: 29,000 sfNOTES: Cannot Touch Site
  • When can the material fabrication assembly of transgress its design into a sensual intimate work zone ?Worked container design for both plexus r + d and J:PA - 2004
  • When can the material fabrication as- sembly transgress its design into a sen- sual intimate Live Zone ?Worked as render assistant with FORM:uLABryan Cantley wasthe residental designer
  • When can the material fabrication assembly of transgress its design into a sensual intimate Work Zone ? Worked as render assistant with FORM:uLA Bryan Cantley was the TNA office designer
  • Professional Digital Modeling Consultant for FERStudio - Project is in Lousiville Kentucky CA - 2005- Final SD presentation for Client walk-thru(s)
  • chapter 3 - referrnces
  • chapter 3 - references
  • 2222 South Figueroa Steet PH 13 Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA Phone: 310.972.0973 Email:robmothershed@msn.com Robert I. Mothershed EDUCATION Clemson University Graduate School of Design & Building (May 2002) Master of Architecture (2001)Study Abroad Opportunity: Charles E. Daniel Center of Urban Studies in Genoa, Italy Clemson University College of Art, Architecture, and Humanities (December 1996) BS in DesignGehry Partners, LLP PROFESSIONAL Jones,Partners:Architects (J,P:A) ( August 2004 - November 2004 )Marina del Rey, CA, USA (Jan 2005-May 2005) EXPERIENCE El Segundo, California, USA Temporarily Contracted as a Project Assistant for meeting current design/build project deadlines. Respon-Lead Project Manager, Tensho Takemori sibilities are focused on steel fabrication and material assembly. Construction projects include: SCI-ARCBrooklyn Atlantic Yards Master Plan, New York (SD) Gallery Installation - LA / Jaunita Townhomes - Redondo Beach (interior stairs, balcony screens, metal4 Hotel/ Residential Towers, NBA Arena, underground parking with renovated Subway station- 4.3 billion dollar deck ceiling, guardrails) / Spotwelder’s 4 + 6 20’ Metal Container Addition (structural joists/ beams/ gird-construction project. Schematic design team member responsibilities included: Maintaining current arena floor plans ers )- Venice Beachwith actual program scope areas. Coordinated client presentation drawings with digital parametric model and various PLEXUS r + dphysical Masterplan design models. Assisted structural engineering consultant with locating cantilevered columns with Atlanta, Georgia, USA (July 2003 – August 2004)underground parking entrances, storage docks, freight elevators, delivery stations, and utility connections. Weeklytask Built digital 3D models for commissioned and competition projects. Managed construction document drawingsassignments helped resolve vertical and horizontal circulation issues with media security, private team and public area for building permits and pricing. Researched and specified new building materials and practices. Assistedaccess concerns. with institutional client presentations. Prepared project portfolios and workbooks. Coordinated and drafted design details along with generating door, window, and finish schedules. Helped assemble and design 2Carrier Johnson Architects gallery design exhibitions (1 academic/1 museum).Costa Mesa and San Diego, California, USA (Sept 2004-Jan 2005, July 2005-Feb. 2006) Various Projects include: SPSU Identity Tower, Student Lawn, and Pedestrian Plaza / SPSUCompetitions Labo-Lead Project Supervisor: Ray Varela, AIA, 949-939-2027, rav@carrierjohnson.com ratory / Mooreland Avenue Live/Work / Ponce de Leon Townhomes / University of Florida Exhibition / Chi-ChiCSU Dominguez Hill Learning Resource Addition and Renovation (DD) Earthquake Memorial / Memorial Street Train Depot / Little Azio’s / Dekalb County Government CenterAssisted with overall design development and State Board Chancellor Approvals. Various task components includedbuilding physical pedestrian bridge models, electronically mapping natural sun pathmovements through the primary exterior entry courtyard, material area estimate take-offs, documenting existing site FJClark Incorporated, Architectsconditions, and updated campus project site plan. Anderson, South Carolina, USA (June 1999 – March 2003)Claremont University Master Plan- Graduate School Housing (DD) Lexington County Judicial and Administrative Center l Lexington, SCModified and updated site plan with new floor plan configurations. Completed digital model and generated three-dimensional visualization for county governmentVCCCD Fire / Sheriff Academy (SD) presentation, drafted Schematic Design and Design Development Drawings for the 239 K facility andAssisted with client power-point digital presentations prepared Conceptual Design DocumentCIM Housing I-Hope Tower- Downtown LA- (DD)Developed new rooftop penthouse/loft units (live /work style). Oconee County Courthouse l Walhalla, SCNewport Office Building – (DD) Assisted in master plan study for new 68k SF center, aided in schematic design, design developmentCoordinated all design-build drawings for all team disciplines, building department official, construction contractors. phases and constructed 3D renderings for government clientWestin Hotel Study – Ontario, CA (SD)UC-Irvine-Social and Behavioral Sciences Building (SD) Watkinsville High School l Oconee, GAProject design assistant, printed and fabricated scaled digital study models, constructed physical site models and Built digital model and assembled illustrations for education client and team consultantsprogram massing studies. Worked closely with manager to resolve working schemes that provided efficient building Currently working on construction document bid set (Nov 15 2002)solutions. Attended all client project kick-off user group meetings and presentations. Managed current design draw-ings Feasibility Survey l School District of Pickens County, SCfor campus director approvals. Analyzed, documented, and researched 12 public elementary,middle, and high schools at differentMariner’s Church Chapel (SD) rural locations that would incorporate a new model program for various core student populationsPrepared interior digital model renderings. Actively involved throughout the entire design charette iteration process.Oaklawn Masterplan – Chula Vista (SD) Developed company website in August of 1999Created with project manager’s direction, a new viable urban design solution for new non-traditional housingneighborhood. This complex planning development framed a local vernacular of building with modern placemaking. HOK Architects, IncorporatedFinished a full schematic design package that integrated over 700 residential units. Designed six complimentary Greenville, South Carolina, USA (May 1998 – June 1999 : Greenville-SC Arch. Dept. was closed)prototypical town home unit types that were flexible and feasible. Established presentation graphics and clarifiedconcept models with program scope. Littlejohn Coliseum Renovation/Addition l Clemson University Field verified existing facility, revised Design Development drawings, administered material research,and coordinated construction documentsLiberstudio ArchitectsSanta Monica, California, USA (Oct 2006- current) Greenville History Museum l Greenville, SC Assisted in Pre-schematic Programming Phase and formulated building footprint locationProject CoordinatorLead Project Supervisor: Gregory Hathaway, 310-467-4292 Medical University of South Carolina - Operating Room Expansion l Charleston, SC Coordinated schematic interior design into a constructionrenovation drawing set and performedSubmitted Professional Proposals / Fee Estimates – RFQ/RFP document details for record filesAerospace Corporation Headquarters + Town of Apple Valley ( New Public Works Facility) *IPTAY- Avenue of Champions Project l Clemson UniversitySanta Clarita Sports Complex- Phase 4 Gymnasium Facility + Rock-it Cargo at LAX. Lead al field documentation Constructed scalable stadium site model for design presentation that promoted public outdoor ceremonial for new athletic spacesdrawings for both active buildings and executed overall building furniture drawing.New Gymnasium Addition at the Fiore Teen Center –Thousand oaks, CA (DD)Updated site drawings, floor plans, sections, elevations and roof plans for client approval. Coordinated digital model RELATED EXPERIENCE Anderson College - Anderson , South Carolina (Spring + Fall 2000)renderings with outside resources. Adjunct Professor for two undergraduate courses : Art 353 (Architectural Materials and Methods)Beverly Hills Unified School District – Modernization school projects for Hawthorne, Horace Mann, and El Rodeo Art 151 (Introduction to Architectural Drawing)(CD)Job captain position. Three different urban campus locations that primarily included Auditorium and Toilet facility Clemson University - Clemson, South Carolina (Fall 2000 + Fall/Spring 2001/2002)upgrades.Created all reference plan, section, elevation drawings for entire building project. Managed all electronic filedistribution, format, information for DSA review and submission. Generated accessible sign package.Met with educational user client groups for program scope development and assisted with finalizing summer mainte- AWARDS Harrison and Anne Forrester Travel fellowship – One semester of all academic/ travel expenses paid at the Charles E. Daniel Center of Urban Studies in Genoa, Italy First Place HOK (Hellmouth, Obata, and Kassabaum) Award – Senior Exit Thesis Project (1996) Allen Thompkin’s Scholarship Award for Outstanding Professional Leadership (Chapter President AIAS, 1996) COMPUTER AutoCAD 2010 / FormZ 4.0 / Dreamweaver / Bentley Microstation 8.1/ PowerDraw/ Various Adobe Programs SKILLS
  • REFERENCES 2222 South Figueroa Steet PH 13 Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA Phone: 310.972.0973Bachelor of Science, Design, Clemson University, 1996 Email:robmothershed@msn.comMaster of Architecture, Clemson University, 2002Forrestor Traveling Fellowship - Genoa, Italy 2001HOK -1st place -design sustainabityNO Registration: NCARB registered , current ARE test taker 4.0IDP enrolled-1999- currentAssociate AIA member - since 2007MEDIA member ATL.Clemson Advancement Foundation,CAF Bryan CantleyService: President, AIAS SC Chapter president 1995Clemson University, College of Art, Architecture, and Humanities PrincipalAAH Fall Convention Planning Board, AIA South Carolina, 1996 + FORM:uLA http://www.robmothershed.netBoard of Directors, AIAS South Carolina, 1994,1995, 1996Founder, Design Awards ProgramVisiting Architectural Critic, Clemson University, 1994 to presentWoodbury - San DeigoArt Center - Pasadena - Spring Employer Guest 2008, 2009Anderson College - Professor - Materia + DrawingPublications: LA Times. FORM . Metropolis CSUF - Professor 800 North State College BoulevardTotal Career Experience: 10 years plus Fullerton , CA, 92831 , USA 714.357.2717 bcantley@fullerton.edu Stephen Rhoads, AIA Vice president Fjclark Architects Incorporated 11 Alta Vista Drive Princeton, NJ 08540, USA 864.380.7792 609.730.3880 srhoads@sroadsarchitect.com Dr. Jane Hurt Full Professor School of Architecture- 158 Lee Hall Clemson University Clemson, SC 29634, USA 864.656.3913 hn@clemson.edu Jordan Williams Erik Lewitt , AIA Principal(s) Plexus r + d, Incorporated 230 Peachtree Street NW-Suite 200 Atlanta, GA, 30303, USA 404.519.7728 jwilliams@plexus-architecture.com