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Can ssd and ssi beneficiaries work and still receive payments
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Can ssd and ssi beneficiaries work and still receive payments

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Eligibility for SSD and SSI benefits is decided on the basis of a medical evaluation and medical record review. Beneficiaries can work and still receive payments under SSA’s work incentive programs. …

Eligibility for SSD and SSI benefits is decided on the basis of a medical evaluation and medical record review. Beneficiaries can work and still receive payments under SSA’s work incentive programs.


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  • 1. Can SSD and SSI Beneficiaries Work and Still Receive Payments? Eligibility for SSD and SSI benefits is decided on the basis of a medical evaluation and medical record review. Beneficiaries can work and still receive payments under SSA’s work incentive programs. The answer is “yes” – there are special rules that allow you to continue receiving your monthly payments and still work. SSA calls these rules “work incentives,” and these include but are not limited to monthly payments and Medicare / Medicaid coverage. The rules are different though for both programs. Whether you are an SSD beneficiary or covered by SSI, you have to promptly inform the SSA when you start or stop working and also when some change occurs that may affect your benefits. The following information is provided by the United States Social Security Administration on their official website.
  • 2. SSD Rules • You have a trial work period wherein you can test your ability to work for at least 9 months. You are entitled to your full Social Security benefits during this period irrespective of your earnings, provided you report your work activity and continue to have a disability. In 2013, a trial work month is defined as any month in which your total earnings are over $750. If you are self-employed, you must earn more than $750 (after expenses) or work more than 80 hours in your own business. This trial work period goes on till you have worked 9 months within a period of 60 months. • Once your trial work period is over, for the next 36 months you can work and continue receiving benefits for any month your earnings are not “substantial.” In 2013, SSA considers earnings more than $1040 ($1740 for blind people) as “substantial.” During this period you need not submit a new application or be subject to a disability decision. (Usually, disability decisions are made on the basis of a thorough medical evaluation and a medical record review of your healthcare reports.) • When your earnings are substantial and your benefits stop, you are allowed 5 years during which period you can always request the SSA to start your benefits if you find that you are unable to work on account of
  • 3. your medical condition. Your medical condition will be reviewed to ensure you are still disabled, during which period you don’t have to file a new disability application. Neither will you have to wait for your benefits to start. • If your SSD benefits stop, but you are still disabled you are eligible for your free Medicare Part A coverage for a minimum of 93 months after a 9-month trial work period. After that period, you can buy Medicare Part A coverage by paying a monthly premium. In case you have Medicare Part B coverage, you have to continue paying the premium. To end your Part B Medicare coverage, request in writing. • Any work expenses you may incur in relation to your disability such as transportation to and from work, counseling services, co-payments for prescription drugs, a wheelchair or any specialized work equipment, a personal attendant etc., may be deducted from your total earnings when determining your eligibility for benefits. Rules Pertaining to SSI SSI beneficiaries are people age 65, blind or disabled and have low income/resources. • Your SSI benefits will continue if you work in spite of your disability, until your earnings plus any other income you have exceed the SSI income limits. The SSI income limit is different in each state. Your Medicaid coverage will continue even after your SSI
  • 4. payments stop, provided your earnings are less than your state level. • You can always ask the SSA to reinstate your payments if you become unable to work again on account of your medical condition. You are not required to file a new disability application provided this request is made within 5 years after the month your benefits stopped. • When determining your eligibility for benefits, work expenses related to your disability may be deducted from your monthly earnings. If the SSA approves a work plan you may have that will reduce your reliance on SSI benefits, the expenses you incur in this regard will not be counted when they calculate how your current income and resources affect your SSI payment. The Work Incentive Programs of SSD and SSI are clearly outlined in their official publication, and are a great option for disabled people wanting to try to return to work and yet do not want to lose cash benefits or Medicare/Medicaid eligibility during the trial period. These programs include vocational training, continuing Medicare/Medicaid coverage, continuing cash benefits, and reimbursement of work expenses related to individual disabilities. Posted by MOS Medical Record Review Company http://www.mosmedicalrecordreview.com/

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