LEED-ND 251: Principles of LEED for Neighborhood Development

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Presentation used for recent training provided on behalf of the US Green Building Council's Colorado chapter.

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  • This is an official slide given to USGBC Education Providers by the U.S. Green Building Council. This slide should be used in all courses approved by USGBC towards the Green Building Certification Institutes LEED Credential Maintenance Program. This slide may ONLY be used for currently approved courses and may never, under any condition be used in the materials for a course not approved by USGBC. Instructor should announce:This course is approved by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) for [#] GBCI CE Hours towards the LEED Credential Maintenance Program. Upon successful completion of this course, LEED Professionals may submit their hours to Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) under the “Professional Development/Continuing Education” activity type in “My credentials” at www.gbci.org. Some sections of this slide are left as editable. Education Providers should update this template as per the approved course. Font: “ARIAL The following sections should be edited:EDUCATION PROVIDERS NAME (Font: Arial Size: 18) COURSE NAME (Font: Arial Size: 17) [COURSE ID #] (Font: Arial Size: 17) “#” representing the official number of GBCI CE Hours granted. (Font: Arial Size 36)For additional reference, please see the document “Reporting GBCI CE Hours for USGBC Education Provider Courses” found at www.usgbc.org/ShowFile.aspx?DocumentID=6975. Education Providers may contact the USGBC Education Review team for additional questions regarding this slide at EdProvider@usgbc.org
  • Office
  • What it is.-Neighborhood Development Green Rating System-Broadly Measures Location, Urban Design, and Sustainable Infrastructure
  • http://advocacy.britannica.com/blog/advocacy/wp-content/uploads/urban-sprawl-florida.jpgWe are developing land twice as fast as the population is growingVehicle use in America has doubled since 1970, offsetting all the fuel efficiency gainsClimate Change, etc.
  • http://advocacy.britannica.com/blog/advocacy/wp-content/uploads/urban-sprawl-florida.jpgWe are developing land twice as fast as the population is growingVehicle use in America has doubled since 1970, offsetting all the fuel efficiency gainsClimate Change, etc.
  • The rating system is divided into three categories: Smart Location & Linkage, Neighborhood Pattern & Design, and Green Infrastructure & Buildings. All three have prerequisites which are required of all projects and credits which reward performance. There also are ten additional points for Innovation and Design Process (exemplary performance and innovative performance) and Regional Priority Credits.
  • Various Stages for various purposes, pre-approval assistance, plan certification, project certificationRange from single mixed-use building to huge citiesPre-review: Letter Approved Plan: Certificate Completed Project
  • Started from Affordable Housing Grant ProgramBeing rolled out to all ND projects due to limited numberUpon registering a POC will be designated from the 5 ND staff Available for ongoing project assistanceQuarterly webcasts for all interested parties
  • Statistices
  • -2245 Blake, Infill between two existing buildings, proximate to LoDo , recreation and transit
  • Picture: Cliff
  • -previously developed nullifies-50 ft minimum buffer, 100 ft average buffer (if meet water retention goals)Picture: Wikipedia Wetland
  • Picture: Wikipedia Floodplain
  • Now done via intersections/ square mile, not grid Density
  • Picture: Wikipedia Brownfield
  • Picture: Wikipedia Mass Transport
  • FOR ALL PROJECTSThe following features are not considered wetlands, water bodies, or buffer land that must be protected:a. Previously developed land.b. Man-made water bodies (such as industrial mining pits, concrete-lined canals, or stormwater retentionponds) that lack natural edges and floors or native ecological communities in the water and along the edgec. Man-made linear wetlands that result from the interruption of natural drainages by existing rights-of-way.d. Wetlands that were created incidentally by human activity and have been rated “poor” for all measuredwetland functions. Wetland quality assessment must be performed by a qualified biologist using a methodthat is accepted by state or regional permitting agencies.
  • Picture: Wikipedia Wetland
  • Picture: Wikipedia Wetland
  • Wide Sidewalks required (4 ft residential, 8 ft non) and encouraged (5ft res, 10 ft non)Unshuttered grounf floor retail, build to lot lines, stoops for residential projects, mixed-use, variety of house sizes and types, no blank walls, multiple entrances, 60% clear glass façade minimum 3-8 ft above grade for non-res, Building height to street width ration of 1:3, Slow street speeds (20 mph res, 25 mph non-res)
  • Picture: Cliff
  • Picture: Cliff
  • Exercise 1: Calculate the Density of the following mixed-use project:3 acres (net buildable)All designated Mixed-Use Zoning75 DUs average 800 SF each (60,000 SF)20,000 SF of commercial 75% residential = 25 Dus/acre= 4 points *75%= 3 points25% Commercial = 0.15 FAR = 2 points *25% =.5 points3.5 points
  • Can include alleys
  • Picture: Cliff
  • RiverClay
  • Museum in Salem, wikipedia
  • Thank you and I hope we can all help create a more sustainable community.
  • LEED-ND 251: Principles of LEED for Neighborhood Development

    1. 1. U.S. Green Building Council Colorado Chapter is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization established in the state of Colorado in 2003. USGBC Colorado depends on the support of our members to advance our mission…MISSION …to advance and promote sustainable planning, design, construction and operation of the built environment through education, improving industry guidelines, policy, advocacy, and information and resource sharing
    2. 2. Our Members Make A Difference!  Access high quality continuing education  Vote in Chapter Elections  Eligibility to Run for Chapter and Branch Leadership Positions  Attend Events and Activities throughout the State  Have a voice in public policy issues  Network with Colorado’s top green building experts  Get the latest updates from USGBC and GBCI  Receive the Chapter Newsletter2012 Member Support the work of the Chapter MAKE A DIFFERENCE!!!! $50 National Member Employees $65 Regular $45 Emerging Professionals $25 Students Join Today
    3. 3. USGBC Colorado ChapterPrinciples of LEED ND + Course ID# (change Color) x.x
    4. 4. Principles of LEED-ND Journey • Introduction • Rating System: Section by Section • Practical Application • Interactive Discussion
    5. 5. Agenda8:30 am – 9:00 Introductions, Rating System Basics9:00 – 9:45 LEED-ND Fundamentals and Case Study Introductions9:45 – 11:15 Smart Location and Linkages11:15 – 11:30 Break11:30 – 12:00pm LEED ND for Local Governments12:00 – 1:00 Lunch (Developer Presentation from 12:30 – 1:00)1:00 – 2:30 Neighborhood Pattern and Design2:30 – 3:45 Green Building and Infrastructure3:45 – 4:00 Break4:00 – 4:30 Innovation and Regional Priority4:30 – 5:00 Process of LEED-ND, Review, Wrap-Up
    6. 6. Learning Objectives• Learn the basic tenets and credit bundles of the LEED-ND rating system• Apply the knowledge of the LEED-ND rating system to a particular project• Describe the prerequisites and major credit requirements of the LEED for Neighborhood Development (LEED-ND) rating system• Explain the stages and process involved in the LEED-ND certification process• Describe the range of LEED-ND project types and strategies• Determine if a project is eligible for LEED-ND certification• Communicate unique aspects and limitations of LEED-ND
    7. 7. LEED for Neighborhood Development (LEED-ND)Joint effort of the US Green Building Council, the Congress for New Urbanism, and the Natural Resources Defense Council
    8. 8. US Green Building Council (USGBC)
    9. 9. Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU)
    10. 10. Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC)
    11. 11. Why LEED-ND?
    12. 12. Building v. Transportation Energy (kBTUs/SF) Average Building Energy (43%) Transportation Energy (57%) Better Building (13%)Average American Office BuildingBetter Building Energy Assumes ASHRAE 90.1-2004 Code Compliance Source: BuildingGreen,com http://www.buildinggreen.com/auth/article.cfm?fileName=160901a.xml
    13. 13. Urban v Suburban Energy Use Source: Jonathan Rose Companies, LLC for the EPA
    14. 14. Report: 98 Percent Of U.S. Commuters Favor PublicTransportation For Others "With traffic congestion, pollution, and oil shortages all getting worse, now is the time to shift to affordable, efficient public transportation," APTA director Howard Collier said. "Fortunately, as this report shows, Americans have finally recognized the need for everyone else to do exactly that." Source: The Onion, November 29, 2000 | Issue 36•43
    15. 15. ValuesLess Bad More GoodEnergy Health and WellnessWater Fostering communityResources Economic growthHealth Social JusticeLand Use Connection with sources andNatural Systems disposal Connection with natural landscape and agriculture Beauty, civic pride, etc.
    16. 16. Levels of Certification Certified (40-49 points) Silver (50-59 points) Gold (60-79 points) Platinum (80 + points) Total Points = 110
    17. 17. LEED-ND: Quantifiable Sustainability Planning
    18. 18. Phases and Stages
    19. 19. Three Stages of CertificationStage 1 : Pre-Review (optional): Intended to assist with entitlement approvalsStage 2 : Certification of Approved Plan: Certification of what has been approved to buildStage 3 : Certification of a Completed Project: As construction is complete or near complete
    20. 20. LEED-ND: Timeline of a new rating system• Development started in 2004• Pilot opened in May 2007 with 238 project registered• As of 8/8/12: 112 Certified Pilot Projects (29,70,13)• Switched to LEED-ND 2009 in 2009• As of 1/30/13: 15 Certified LEED-ND 2009 Projects (109 Registered)
    21. 21. Enhanced Assistance Program
    22. 22. Costs of LEED-ND• $1500 flat fee for registration• $18,000 initial stage review under 20 acres • $350/acre over 20• CIRs $220• LEED Interpretations- $180/USGBC member, $380/non-USGBC member• Appeals- $500/appeal• Consultant fees • GIS • LEED Champion
    23. 23. SLL Prerequisite Review• Covers both the Project Information Forms and SLL Prerequisites• Additional fee: $2,250
    24. 24. Mapping Applications
    25. 25. Land Development and LEED-ND
    26. 26. Key Definitions• Previously Developed• Infill• Adjacent• Project Boundary• Buildable Land• Construction Impact Zone• Minor Improvements
    27. 27. Project Boundary
    28. 28. Previously Developed
    29. 29. Adjacent Site
    30. 30. Buildable Land
    31. 31. Development Footprint
    32. 32. Urban Design Terminology
    33. 33. Base Calculations
    34. 34. Walking Distances
    35. 35. Case Studies
    36. 36. Park Avenue Redevelopment Block 3B, Denver (Five Points) 2.41 Acres 51 DUs/ Acre 7,301 SF of Non-residential MU-30 ZoningDeveloper: DenverHousing AuthorityArchitect: StudioCompletivaLA: Studio Insite
    37. 37. Block 3 Site Plan
    38. 38. Block 3 Walk-Through
    39. 39. Washington Village Cohousing Project
    40. 40. Residential Pricing Residence Floors Finished Bedrms Baths Estimated QtyBuilding Type Living Sales Price Area sq. ft.Broadway Affordable* 1 605 1 1 $99,300 4North 1 1,017 2 2 $138,000 3East 2 1,379 3 2.5 $169,600 1North, Moderate 1-2 1,017 - 1-2 1-2 $325,000 - 5Historic & Affordable* 1,175 $350,000EastBroadway, Market 1-3 1,017 - 1-3 1-3 $525,000 - 21North, 2,004 $1,125,000Historic &East
    41. 41. Smart Locations and Linkages (SLL) 27 Points Possible 6 Prerequisites  Location  Water  Imperiled Species  Wetlands  Ag. Land  Floodplains Major Credit Bundles 9 creditsPhoto Credit: DenverInfill.com – Infill Redevelopment (10 pts) – Transit (7 pts)
    42. 42. SLLp1: Smart Location• ALL: Served by existing or planned water and wastewater infrastructure• Option 1 (Infill)A: 75% of site borders Previously Developed (PD)• Option 1B: 75% of site + adjacent parcels borders PD• Option 1C: 75% of ½ mile radius PD• Option 1D: 140 intersections/sq. mile in ½ mile radius• Option 2, Adjacent and Connected: 90 intersections/sq. mile AND minimum 600ft block distance in ½ mile radius• Option 3, Transit Corridor: 50% of units within ¼ mile of 60 weekday/40 weekend day transit rides• Option 4, Nearby Assets: ¼ mile from 7 diverse uses (project center)
    43. 43. 1SLLp1: Smart Location
    44. 44. SLLp2: Imperiled Species and Ecological Communities • Option 1: Negative Survey Results • Option 2: Habitat Conservation Plan • Option 3: Habitat Conservation Plan Equivalent
    45. 45. SLLp2: Imperiled Species and Ecological Communities
    46. 46. SLLp3: Wetland and Water Body Conservation• ALL: Comply with regulations• Option 1: No wetlands or land within 50 ft of wetlands, 100 ft of water bodies• Option 2: Wetlands or water bodies within those distances must only include minor improvements OR Earn at least 1 Stormwater Management point AND limit development impact based on density (higher=higher)
    47. 47. SLLp4: Agricultural Land Preservation• Option 1. Protected Soils Not impacted• Option 2. Infill Sites• Option 3. Sites Served by transit• Option 4. Development rights receiving area• Option 5. Sites with impacted soils
    48. 48. SLLp4: Agricultural LandPreservation
    49. 49. SLLp5: Floodplain Avoidance• Option 1. Sites without floodplains• Option 2. Infill or Previously Developed Sites with floodplains : Follow NFIP guidelines for any development• Option 3. All other Sites with floodplains: Only PD portions can be developed, in accordance with NFIP guidelines
    50. 50. SLLp5: Floodplain Avoidance
    51. 51. SLLc1: Preferred Locations• 10 pts available• Option 1. Location Type (5 pts)• Option 2. Connectivity (5 pts)• Option 3. High Priority Redevelopment Area (3 pts)
    52. 52. 1SLLc1: Preferred Locations
    53. 53. SLLc2: Brownfields Redevelopment• 2 pts available• Option 1. Brownfield Site• Option 2. High-Priority Brownfield Site
    54. 54. SLLc3: Reduced Automobile Dependence• 7 pts available• Option 1. Transit-Served Location• Option 2. Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) location with Low VMT : % of average regional VMT per capita (80-90% for 1 pt, 30% or less for 7)
    55. 55. SLLc3: Reduced Automobile Dependence 3
    56. 56. SLLc3 Documentation
    57. 57. SLLc3 Documentation cont.
    58. 58. SLLc4: Bicycle Network and Storage• 1 pt available• BICYCLE NETWORK: 1 of 3 – ¼ mile bicycling distance to 5 mile bicycle network – IF 100% Residential, ¼ mile to a bicycle network connecting to a school or employment center within 3 miles – ¼ mile to bicycle network connecting to 10 diverse uses within 3 miles• AND BICYCLE STORAGE: ALL – 1 enclosed space for 30% for MF residential plus 1 visitor parking per 10 DUs or 4 spaces min. – 1 enclosed space per 10% of workers for retail plus a shower/changing area once 100 workers are projected, plus 1 visitor parking for each 5,00 SF or 4 spaces min. – 1 enclosed space per 10% of planned occupancy for non-retail commercial plus 1 visitor parking space for each 10,000 SF plus 1 shower/changing room once 100 users are projected
    59. 59. SLLc5: Housing and Jobs Proximity• 3 pts available• Option 1. Project with affordable residential component (3 pts): 1/2 mile walk of 1:1 jobs based on Dwelling Units• Option 2. Project with residential component (2 pts): 1/2 mile walk of 1:1 jobs based on Dwelling Units• Option 3. Infill project with nonresidential component (1 pt): ½ walk of transit stop AND ½ mile walk of ½ the number of DUs as jobs created
    60. 60. SLLc5: Housing and Jobs Proximity 5
    61. 61. SLLc6: Steep Slope Protection• 1 pt available• Option 1. No disturbance of slopes over 15%• Option 2. Previously developed sites with slope over 15%: Restore % of slope area based on slope (Greater slope, greater restoration) AND follow Option 3 for any undeveloped slopes• Option 3. Undeveloped sites with slopes over 15%: Do not disturb any over 40%, see rating guide for additional guidance
    62. 62. SLLc6: Steep Slope6Protection
    63. 63. SLLc7: Site Design for Habitat or Wetland Conservation • 1 pt available • Option 1. Sites without significant habitat or wetlands or water bodies • Option 2. Sites with significant habitat: don’t disturb, create management plan • Option 3. Sites with wetlands or water bodies: conserve all on site
    64. 64. SLLc8: Restoration of Habitat or Wetlands• 1 pt available• Restore 10% of development footprint and protect in perpetuity
    65. 65. SLLc9: Conservation Management of Habitat or Wetlands• 1 pt available• Create a minimum 10-year on site conservation management program with dedicated funding source for all sensitive areas
    66. 66. Neighborhood Pattern and Design (NPD) 44 Points Possible 3 Prerequisites  Urban Design  Density  Connectivity Major Point Bundles 15 credits – Urban Design (12 pts) – Density (6 pts) – Mixed-Income AND/OR Diverse Housing Types (7 pts)
    67. 67. NPDp1: Walkable Streets• ALL: – 90% of principal entries must face a public space – 15% of street frontage must meet building height to street width ratio of 1:3 – 90% of streets bust have continuous sidewalks on both sides – No more than 20% of street frontages are faced with garages and service bays
    68. 68. NPDp3: Connected and Development NPDp2: Compact Open Community• Option 1. Projects in Transit Corridors: higher thresholds than Option • Option 1. Projects with Internal 2 for proximate dwelling units Streets : 140 intersections/ sq. mile, no gates AND at least• Option 2. All Otherevery 800 minimum residential density of 7 one throughway Projects: ft DUs/acre AND 0.5 FAR nonresidential • Option 2. Projects Without• EXCLUDES parking structures Internal Streets: existing connectivity within a ¼ mile must be at least 90 intersections/ sq. mile
    69. 69. NPDp3: Connected and Open Community
    70. 70. NPDc1: Walkable Streets• 12 points available• Urban Design credit
    71. 71. NPDc1: Walkable Streets; Facades (a, b, and c)
    72. 72. NPDc1: Walkable Streets; Entries (d and e)
    73. 73. NPDc1: Walkable Streets; Fenestration (f)
    74. 74. NPDc1: Walkable Streets; No Blank Walls (g)
    75. 75. NPDc1: Walkable Streets; Un-shuttered Retail (h)• Must be specified in CC&R or other binding documents
    76. 76. NPDc1: Walkable Streets; On-street Parking (i)
    77. 77. NPDc1: Walkable Streets; Sidewalks (j)
    78. 78. NPDc1: Walkable Streets; Elevated Finish Floor (k)
    79. 79. NPDc1: Walkable Streets; Street Level Retail (l)• 50% of office buildings include ground-floor retail along 60% of street-level façade for nonresidential or mixed-use projects• 100% of mixed-use buildings must have 60% of street-level façade with retail, residential or live/work spaces
    80. 80. NPDc1: Walkable Streets; Height-to-Width Ratio(m)
    81. 81. NPDc1: Walkable Streets; Target Speeds (n and o)• 75% of residential have a target speed of 20 MPH• 70% non-residential/mixed-use streets have a target speed of 25 MPH
    82. 82. NPDc2: Compact Development
    83. 83. NPDc3: Mixed-Use Neighborhood Centers 3
    84. 84. NPDc4: Mixed-income Diverse Communities 4
    85. 85. Mixed-Income Documentation
    86. 86. Mixed-Income Documentation cont.
    87. 87. NPDc5: Reduced Parking Footprint• 1 pt available• Residential: If any lots, locate at the rear or side of buildings• AND use no more than 20% of development footprint for new off- street parking and no lot larger than 2 acres• AND provide bicycle facilities per the bicycle network credit
    88. 88. NPDc5: Reduced Parking Footprint 5
    89. 89. NPDc6: Street Network• 2 pts available• Through ways at every 400ft, 90% of cul-du-sacs having non- motorized connections• AND internal + external connectivity is over 300 (1 pt) or over 400 (2 pts) intersections/ sq. mile
    90. 90. NPDc6: Street Network
    91. 91. NPDc7: Transit Facilities• 1 pt available• All working with local transit authority• Shelters must be covered and include seating and illumination• AND reserve spaces for future transit stops• AND provide kiosks etc.
    92. 92. NPDc8: Transportation Demand Management• 2 pts available (.5 pts per requirements met)• Option 1. TDM program• Option 2. Transit Passes• Option 3. Developer-sponsored transit• Option 4. Vehicle sharing• Option 5. Unbundling of parking
    93. 93. NPDc9: Access to Civic and Public Space• 1 pt available• 90% of dwelling units and nonresidential entrances be located within a ¼ mile walk distance of a street, square, or paseo greater than 1/6 of an acre• Under an acre? No narrow spaces! 1:4 width:length
    94. 94. NPDc10: Access to Recreation facilities• 1 pt available• 90% of dwelling units and nonresidential entrances be located within a 1/2 mile walk distance of an active recreation field at least one acre in size or publically accessible recreation center at least 25,000 SF
    95. 95. NPDc11: Universal Accessibility• 1 pt available• Option 1. Projects with dwelling units: See rating guide• Option 2. Projects with non-compliant public right-of-way or accessible travel routes: design and construct 100% of ROWs in accordance with ADA-ABA Accessibility Guidelines
    96. 96. NPDc12: Community Outreach and Involvement• 2 pts available• Option 1. Community Oureach: open meetings, modified design, ongoing communication• Option 2. Charrette: at least 2 day long charrette
    97. 97. NPDc13: Local Food Production• 1 pt available• ALL: Allow gardening in the project• Option 1. Neighborhood Farms and Gardens• Option 2. Community-Supported Agriculture• Option 3. Proximity to Farmer’s Market
    98. 98. NPDc14: Tree-lined and Shaded Streets• 2 pts available• Option 1. Tree-lined streets: 60% of new and existing streets should have 40 ft spacing (1 pt)• Option 2. Shaded streets: 40% of length of sidewalks shaded (1 pt)
    99. 99. NPDc15: Neighborhood Schools• 1 pt available• Locate or design the project so 50% of the dwelling units are within a ½ mile walk distance of a school
    100. 100. Green Infrastructure and Building (GIB) 29 Points Possible 4 Prerequisites  Certified Green Building  Energy Efficiency  Water Efficiency  Construction Pollution Plan Major Bundles 17 credits – Green Buildings (5 pts) – Stormwater Management (4pts)
    101. 101. GIBp1: Certified Green Building• Design, construct, or retrofit one whole building to be certified under LEED or equivalent (ISO/IEC 17021)
    102. 102. GIBp2: Minimum Building Energy Efficiency• 90% of nonresidential and/or multifamily buildings over three stories must show a 10% improvement over ASHRAE 90.1-2007• 90% of residential buildings must meet ENERGY STAR
    103. 103. GIBp3: Minimum Building Water Efficiency• Indoor water usage in new and majorly renovated buildings must be 20% less than the referenced baseline
    104. 104. GIBp4: Construction Activity Pollution Prevention
    105. 105. GIBc1: Certified Green Buildings• 5 pts available• Option 1. Project with affordable residential component (3 pts): 1/2 mile walk of 1:1 jobs based on Dwelling Units• Option 2. Project with residential component (2 pts): 1/2 mile walk of 1:1 jobs based on Dwelling Units• Option 3. Infill project with nonresidential component (1 pt): ½ walk of transit stop AND ½ mile walk of ½ the number of DUs as jobs created
    106. 106. GIBc2: Building Energy Efficiency• 2 pts available• 90% of nonresidential and/or multifamily buildings over three stories must show a 18% (1 pt) or 26% (2 pt) improvement over ASHRAE 90.1-2007• 90% of residential buildings must meet a HERS score of 75
    107. 107. GIBc3: Building Water Efficiency• 1 pt available• Indoor water usage in new and majorly renovated buildings must be 40% less than the referenced baseline
    108. 108. GIBc4: Water Efficient Landscaping• 1 pt available• 50% reduction in potable water from a baseline midsummer case• No irrigation automatically receives the credit
    109. 109. GIBc5: Existing Building Reuse• 1 pt available• Do not demolish ANY historic structures or cultural landscapes• AND the greater of the following: • a. 50% of one existing building structure (including structural floor and roof decking) and envelope (including exterior skin and framing but excluding window assemblies and nonstructural roofing material). • b. 20% of the total existing building stock (including structure and envelope, as defined above).
    110. 110. GIBc6: Historic Building Preservation and Adaptive Reuse• 1 pt available• Do not demolish ANY historic structures or cultural landscapes• Rehabilitate any historic structure to appropriate standards
    111. 111. GIBc7: Minimized Site Disturbance During Construction• 1 pt available• Option 1. Development footprint on previously developed land• Option 2. Undeveloped portion of project left undisturbed
    112. 112. GIBc8: Stormwater Management• 4 pts available• Retain water on site per the following table:
    113. 113. GIBc9: Heat Island Reduction• 1 pt available• Option 1. Nonroof measures: 50% of hardscape must employ heat island reduction measures (see rating guide)• Option 2. High-reflectance and vegetated roofs: 75% SRI value roofing in the project or 50% vegetated• Option 3. Mixed nonroof and roof measures
    114. 114. GIBc10: Solar Orientation
    115. 115. GIBc11: On-Site Renewable Energy• 3 pts available
    116. 116. GIBc12: District Heating and Cooling• 2 pts available• 80% of the buildings (excluding existing and single family residential) must be heated and/or cooled from a central plant• Additional efficiency requirements in Rating Guide
    117. 117. GIBc13: Infrastructure Energy Efficiency• 1 pt available• All water and wastewater pumps, street lights, and traffic lights must be 15% more efficient than the least-cost options
    118. 118. GIBc14: Wastewater Management• 2 pts available• Reuse wastewater on site per the following table:
    119. 119. GIBc15: Recycled Content in Infrastructure• 1 pt available• 50% of the total materials used in the following categories must be recycled: • Roadways, parking lots, sidewalks, unit paving, and curbs. • Water retention tanks and vaults. • Base and sub-base materials for the above. • Stormwater, sanitary sewer, steam energy distribution, and water piping.
    120. 120. GIBc16: Solid Waste Management Infrastructure• 1 pt available• Meet 4 of 5: • Include at least one recycling drop-off point • Include at least one hazardous materials drop-off point • Include a compost station • Include recycling containers on every block next to trash cans • Recycle/salvage 50% of construction waste
    121. 121. GIBc17: Light Pollution Reduction• 1 pt available• 50% of shared area lights have motion controls• AND all shared area lights must have daylight sensors• AND comply with lighting zone requirements
    122. 122. Innovation in Design (ID) 6 Points Possible  Innovation  Exemplary Performance  LEED Professional
    123. 123. IDPc1: Innovation OR Exemplary Performance• Innovation: Not addressed by the rating system• Exemplary Performance: Typically a doubling of a threshold – ND specifies which credits can get exemplary status and at what threshold
    124. 124. Exemplary Performance• Available for: • SLL Credits 1 (Preferred Locations),3 (Locations with Reduced Automobile Dependence), and 8 (Restoration of Habitat or Wetlands) • NPD Credits 1(Walkable Streets),3(Mixed-use Neighborhood Centers),4 (Mixed-Income Diverse Communities),11(Visitability and Universal Design),13(Local Food Production), and 14(Tree- lined and Shaded Streets) • GIB Credits all except 7
    125. 125. Innovation Credit Example
    126. 126. IDPc2: LEED Accredited Professional• 1 point• Can be EITHER a LEED AP, CNU-A, or Smart Growth Accredited Through the NRDC (Does this exist?)
    127. 127. RPc1: Regional Priority Credit• Attempt to Regionalize LEED• Regional Priority Credit Viewer
    128. 128. Regional Priority (RP) 4 Points Possible (out of 6) For 80203 GIBc15 Recycled Content in Infrastructure GIBc4 Water-Efficient Landscaping NPDc2 Compact Development (>38 DUs/acre ) NPDc5 Reduced Parking Footprint NPDc8 Transportation Demand Management SLLc4 Bicycle Network and Storage
    129. 129. Learning Objectives• Learn the basic tenets and credit bundles of the LEED-ND rating system• Apply the knowledge of the LEED-ND rating system to a particular project• Describe the prerequisites and major credit requirements of the LEED for Neighborhood Development (LEED-ND) rating system• Explain the stages and process involved in the LEED-ND certification process• Describe the range of LEED-ND project types and strategies• Determine if a project is eligible for LEED-ND certification• Communicate unique aspects and limitations of LEED-ND
    130. 130. LEED ND ResourcesUSGBC LEED ND Web Portal• new.usgbc.org/leed/rating-systems/neighborhoods• Download the free rating system and checklist documents• Download the free Government Guide to LEED ND at: • new.usgbc.org/resources/local-government-guide-leed-neighborhood-developmentNRDC LEED ND Web Portal• www.nrdc.org/cities/smartgrowth/leed.asp• Download the free Citizens Guide to LEED ND and a cool slideshowCNU LEED ND Web Portal• www.cnu.org/leednd
    131. 131. Thank You!C2 Sustainability Conor Merrigan | conor@c2sustainability.comwww.c2sustainability.com Cliff Lind | cliff@c2sustainability.com

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