Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Assess without Distress:  Authentic Assessment for ELLs in the Classroom
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Assess without Distress: Authentic Assessment for ELLs in the Classroom

1,843

Published on

Everyone is talking about it, but what do we do …

Everyone is talking about it, but what do we do
about it? In this workshop, participants examine
the difficulties inherent in assessing content and
language learning for English language learners. They explore teacher-created instruments for assessing content, language acquisition, and developmental growth over time.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,843
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
24
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Trish Morita Mullaney, ABD, MSD Lawrence Township, Indianapolis, INSusan R. Adams, ABD, College of Education, Butler University, Indianapolis, IN TESOL 2011 New Orleans, LA March 16, 2011 Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 2. Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 3. Identities concealed to protect the guilty Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 4. Standards‐based Assessment or Criterion‐ referenced Assessment (e.g. state standardized assessments, ACT) Students demonstrate mastery of explicit  domains, often with a cut‐score, dividing 2‐ digit numbers with 80% correct, no  comparison)In our state, students score Pass, Pass Plus or  Did not PassCopyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 5. Norm‐referenced Assessment (SAT, GRE,)  Students are compared to the performance of  peers. There is no passing or failing. Think Bell Curve. Think percentiles. Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 6. Ipsative Assessment (bonus points if you  know this one!) (e.g. physical education,  individual assessments, video gamesStudent is compared to his own previous  performance and is encouraged to “beat” his  own score to show improvement.  Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 7. Teacher‐created AssessmentsQuizzes, tests, projects, assignments Performance‐based AssessmentsSkills tests, presentations, demonstrations Portfolio AssessmentsExemplars of peak performance on a variety of student  work collected and displayed in a physical or digital site Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 8. When the cook tastes the soup,  thats formative. When the guests taste the soup,  thats summative*This is frequently where educators are satisfied to stop,  but for ELLs, assessment is much more complicated.*Quote by Robert Stake in Scriven, M. (1991). Evaluation thesaurus. 4th ed. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications. Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 9. Our working definition of authentic assessment of ELL  learning emerges from the root word, assess:Assidēre (Latin) to sit beside someone. This evolved into the idea of sitting beside a judge to  help him in his deliberations (especially in determining  property values or  calculating fines  or taxes to be paid). Source: Word‐Origins.com Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 10. Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 11. 1) ESL teachers discussing standards Consider knowledge base of ESL teachers’ understanding of standards2) Content area teacher Naming & Connecting:  Significant for transformation &  change3) ESL teacher Content and English4) Student work Product:  What do students show and how do they  understand it? Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 12. Content Curriculum offered to studentsProcess How content is instructedProduct What teachers ask students to produceDistinguish between production and reproduction.  When students produce, how do you know they really understand?Tomlinson, C. (2001). How to differentiate instruction in mixed-ability classrooms.Alexandria, VA: ASCD. Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 13. How might ESL teachers use the notion  of assidēre to develop authentic assessment practices that  distinguish what ELLs know and can do from their  ability to communicate their  learning in English?  Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 14. Together, think of an example you  have seen of a student’s content  knowledge or skill being assessed by her/his ability to  demonstrate that knowledge or skill in English.  Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 15. What content knowledge or skill does this ELL  student demonstrate?How do you know?  Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 16. Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 17. CONTENT  ABILITY TO COMMUNICATE KNOWLEDGE OR SKILLS IN ENGLISH I em playing basketball. I love to play  basketball. I just shoot. I like to play  ugest my bruthr. Sum times I win. Sum times he plays ese.  My bruthr tot me to play basketball he  told me that wen you stop grebling you cant start to  grebling again. I am playing basketball. I love to play  basketball. I just shoot. I like to play  against my brother. Sometimes I win. Sometimes he  plays easy. My brother taught me to  play basketball. He told me that when you stop dribbling  you can’t start dribbling again. Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 18. CONTENT  ABILITY TO COMMUNICATEKNOWLEDGE OR SKILLS IN ENGLISH Test Question: Explain how to  use a microscope properly.  Include details such as the  process of creating,  inserting and examining  slides correctly.  Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 19. Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 20. What observational knowledge do we have of student mastery? How might we document student mastery of content area standards?How might we keep records of student learning and performance?Under what conditions do ELLs show us what they know and can do?What don’t mainstream teachers know about ELL content knowledge and skill mastery? Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 21. TRADITIONAL TEST  ESL TEACHER EVIDENCE OF MEETING RESULTS CONTENT AREA STANDARDS Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 22. Success breeds success: students who get acknowledgment of  skills and knowledge are encouraged and are motivated to keep  trying. Failure breeds dropout: students who receive an F in the first 9 weeks of high school are much more likely to drop out of high school. What the research says about immigrant youth and dropping out of high school: “Dropouts school grades were lower than those of continuing students, and those that were ever held back in school had higher dropout rates.” p. 866 “Each one‐letter improvement in GPA in middle school lowered the chances of dropping out in freshman or sophomore year by almost half. Having been held back a grade prior to high school was associated with a much higher risk of early dropout.” p. 869“Risk of High School Dropout among Immigrant and Native Hispanic Youth,” Anne K. DriscollSource: International Migration Review, Vol. 33, No. 4 (Winter, 1999), pp. 857‐875Published by: The Center for Migration Studies of New York, Inc.Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/2547355  Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 23. Create instruction that enhances content area mastery WHILE students acquire academic EnglishCollect convincing evidence of student skills and conceptual understandings.Cooperate with mainstream teachers to support innovative alternative assessments.Collaborate with teachers and administrators to evaluate each child’s learning coherently from an asset‐based perspective with a view to long‐term success instead of short‐term failure. Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 24. Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)
  • 25. Trish Morita Mullaneypatriciamorita@msdlt.k12.in.usSusan R. Adamssradams@butler.edu Copyright Morita‐Mullaney, T. & Adams, S.R. (TESOL, 2011)

×