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The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop
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The JLeRN Experiment: Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop

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Overview slides for workshop at educational developers hack event Dev8eD in Birmingham, England in 2012.

Overview slides for workshop at educational developers hack event Dev8eD in Birmingham, England in 2012.

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  • 1. Presentation by Sarah Currier JLeRN Project Lead, Mimas 29 May 2012 Dev8eD 2012 Learning Registry Workshop, Day 1 Birmingham, UK
  • 2. Amplifying • Please use hashtags: #jlern #learningreg • Contact me at: sarah.currier@manchester.ac.uk • Contact project dev Nick Syrotiuk at syrotiuk@manchester.ac.uk • Get involved via Learning Registry lists: Updates; Collaborate; Developers
  • 3. Project overview • JISC asked Mimas to set up and run an experimental Learning Registry node (Nov. 2011). • I started as Project Lead (0.25FTE) Dec. 2011. • Bharti Gupta (0.25FTE) was a Project Developer, Jan.- Apr. 2012. • Nick Syrotiuk (0.2FTE) has been a Project Developer since Dec. 2011. • Project funded to 31 Oct. 2012. • Working closely with JISC CETIS, The Learning Registry and an informal Task Group.
  • 4. JISC said … “JISC will be participating in the Learning Registry project by setting up an experimental node in the UK with a focus on content from the higher education and cultural sectors. Utilising the expertise and content available to JISC, the project will explore contributing data and analysing it. JISC hopes to collaborate with the Learning Registry in exploring the infrastructure considerations and to help specify and support useful applications.” – Learning Registry website: http://www.learningregistry.org/community/jisc
  • 5. JISC said … “JISC will be participating in the Learning Registry project by setting up an experimental node in the UK with a focus on content from the higher education and cultural sectors. Utilising the expertise and content available to JISC, the project will explore contributing data and analysing it. JISC hopes to collaborate with the Learning Registry in exploring the infrastructure considerations and to help specify and support useful applications.” – Learning Registry website: http://www.learningregistry.org/community/jisc
  • 6. JISC said … “JISC will be participating in the Learning Registry project by setting up an experimental node in the UK with a focus on content from the higher education and cultural sectors. Utilising the expertise and content available to JISC, the project will explore contributing data and analysing it. JISC hopes to collaborate with the Learning Registry in exploring the infrastructure considerations and to help specify and support useful applications.” – Learning Registry website: http://www.learningregistry.org/community/jisc
  • 7. JISC said … “JISC will be participating in the Learning Registry project by setting up an experimental node in the UK with a focus on content from the higher education and cultural sectors. Utilising the expertise and content available to JISC, the project will explore contributing data and analysing it. JISC hopes to collaborate with the Learning Registry in exploring the infrastructure considerations and to help specify and support useful applications.” – Learning Registry website: http://www.learningregistry.org/community/jisc
  • 8. 1. Setting up an experimental node in the UK • What do we mean by “node”? • What options are there for Learning Registry nodes? • Where do they fit in the Learning Registry model?
  • 9. 1. Setting up an experimental node in the UK There are three levels of togetherness in the Learning Registry: • Nodes • Networks • Communities
  • 10. 1. Setting up an experimental node in the UK We can: (1) share data with others via a single node; (2) widen our sharing to a network of nodes with shared policies about access etc.; (3) widen our sharing even further within communities of networks.
  • 11. Learning Registry Network Model From: Learning Registry Resource Distribution Network Model: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1msnZC6RU9N72Omau0F4FNBO5YCU6hZrG1kKRs_z42Mc/edit?hl=en_GB
  • 12. 1. Setting up an experimental node in the UK Nodes are the building blocks of the Learning Registry. They enable decentralised networks for sharing data about learning resources and their use. • Anyone can set up a node wherever they like by installing the node code and making it available to whomever they like. • They can also restrict access to the node if they choose. • Others can publish their data to the node, or extract anyone's data from the node. • A completely open node allows literally anyone to publish or access data. There are two kinds of node: common nodes and gateway nodes. Each kind of node supports distinct activities.
  • 13. 1. Setting up an experimental node in the UK There are two kinds of node: common nodes and gateway nodes. Each kind of node supports distinct activities. • A common node can support specific services to push, pull, distribute, and process resource data with external sources, and within a network of nodes. • A gateway node allows different networks to connect with each other to share data. It provides a data distribution connection between one network and another, because nodes cannot belong to more than one network, and a clearly defined pipeline is needed, for security and other policy reasons.
  • 14. Learning Registry Network Model From: Learning Registry Resource Distribution Network Model: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1msnZC6RU9N72Omau0F4FNBO5YCU6hZrG1kKRs_z42Mc/edit?hl=en_GB
  • 15. 1. Setting up an experimental node in the UK The JLeRN team have implemented a common node, without requiring signatures to push and pull data out of the node. http://jlernexperiment.wordpress.com/about-the-jlern-node/ Until the JLeRN Team has some pressing use case or strong steer for testing a gateway node, we're working with a common node for now.
  • 16. 1. Setting up an experimental node in the UK What can a common node do? Common nodes can offer five kinds of service: • Publish Services allow data to be published to the node from external sources. We can choose which publishing APIs we will support (e.g. SWORD), but we have to (and we do) support the Basic Publish Service. We’ve also responded to community use cases by developing OAI-PMH feed publish (more later from Nick). • Access Services allow data to be pulled, or accessed from the node or the distribution network the node is part of. Again, different APIs (e.g. OAI- PMH) can be, but don't have to be, supported. • Distribution Services allow data to be replicated and transferred between nodes. We’re looking at replication between our two nodes. • Broker Services allow us to "augment, transform or process resource data held at that node to produce new or updated resource data for access or distribution". Interesting! • Administrative Services, which "are used to query a node to obtain its status or to trigger node administrative actions."
  • 17. 1. Setting up an experimental node in the UK What can a common node do? Common nodes can offer five kinds of service: • Publish Services allow data to be published to the node from external sources. We can choose which publishing APIs we will support (e.g. SWORD), but we have to (and we do) support the Basic Publish Service. We’ve also responded to community use cases by developing OAI-PMH feed publish (more later from Nick). • Access Services allow data to be pulled, or accessed from the node or the distribution network the node is part of. Again, different APIs (e.g. OAI- PMH) can be, but don't have to be, supported. • Distribution Services allow data to be replicated and transferred between nodes. We may look at replication between two nodes. • Broker Services allow us to "augment, transform or process resource data held at that node to produce new or updated resource data for access or distribution". • Administrative Services, which "are used to query a node to obtain its status or to trigger node administrative actions."
  • 18. Learning Registry Network Model From: Learning Registry Resource Distribution Network Model: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1msnZC6RU9N72Omau0F4FNBO5YCU6hZrG1kKRs_z42Mc/edit?hl=en_GB
  • 19. 1. Setting up an experimental node in the UK What about Networks and Communities? "A resource distribution network is a group of one or more connected nodes, with each node providing node services. All nodes in a resource distribution network operate under the same policies. Multiple resource distribution networks MAY be established."
  • 20. 1. Setting up an experimental node in the UK What about Networks and Communities? "A resource distribution network is a group of one or more connected nodes, with each node providing node services. All nodes in a resource distribution network operate under the same policies. Multiple resource distribution networks MAY be established."
  • 21. 1. Setting up an experimental node in the UK Important things about networks are: • Common nodes can be part of networks. • Networks can be connected via gateway nodes. • When networks are connected, this is called a network community. • A node can only be part of one network, and is subject to the policies of that network. A gateway node is needed for a common node to connect to a different network. • Network policies include such things as security requirements for sharing data via nodes in the network, e.g. whether signatures are required, data deletion, etc. • A network can be part of only one community (so if you want your node to interface with other communities, you'll need to set up and connect via a gateway node).
  • 22. 1. Setting up an experimental node in the UK What about communities? "A network community is a collection of interconnected resource distribution networks. A community MAY contain one or more resource distribution networks. A resource network SHALL be a member of only one community.” Open communities, or social communities, and closed communities are both allowed. JLeRN’s nodes are not currently part of any network or community
  • 23. 2. Exploring contributing data and analysing it • Published Jorum metadata via standard, openly available OAI-PMH feed of >15K resources. – Required code development by JLeRN. – Same use case from Open University (and likely from others as OAI- PMH is widely implemented in repositories). – Jorum exploring framework for capturing paradata about resources. – We converted Jorum dc:subject metadata into Learning Registry tags. • Six JISC OER Rapid Innovation projects. • Supporting Liverpool University’s EngRich project in setting up a node for capturing student paradata. – We’re developing a case study on this. • Nick has developed a Node Explorer (more later). • More please!
  • 24. What do we want to use Dev8ed for? Ideas -- > Use Cases -- > Useful services, tools, apps … • Today’s ideas: – ?? • What to do tomorrow? – ??
  • 25. Where to next? • With 5 months to go, what should JLeRN do? – Use cases? Services? Tools? Additional nodes? Networks and Communities? Dissemination activities? • What recommendations should we make to JISC and the wider community? – Ongoing funding for a test node? A node service? Funding for any of the above activities? Let’s return to this tomorrow! Thank you! Over to Nick …

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