School Administration and Supervision Practicum Portfolio            Submitted by: Lorenzo R. Prillman                  Bo...
Table of ContentsSite Practicum Description .................................................................................
Description of Practicum SiteBenjamin Banneker Middle School is a public school located in the suburbs ofBurtonsville, Mar...
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Philosophy of Education Leadership       My philosophy of education leadership stems from the beliefs of presidential biog...
BibliographyBurns, J.M. (1978). Leadership. New York, New York: Harper & Row.Sergiovanni, T. J. A (2009). The Principalshi...
Internship Project #1: Co-Teaching Analysis Study                                         2010 - 2011Artifact for Standard...
During the first three marking periods, teachers collected end of unit assessment exam scores ofstudents which were later ...
Impact of Co-Teaching Model on Male and Female Student AchievementProfessional Internship Project 1 - Social Studies Depar...
Analysis of the Data        This academic study examined the impact of the co-teaching model on student achievement forspe...
Results                                                Independent Samples Test                                   Levenes ...
Table 2Expected Frequency Counts for Question 3 of Student Questionnaire                                                Ch...
Table 3Expected Frequency Counts for Question 4 of Student Questionnaire                          Chi-Square Tests        ...
Table 4Expected Frequency Counts for Question 5 of Student Questionnaire                                                Ch...
Table 5Expected Frequency Counts for Question 6 of Student Questionnaire                          Chi-Square Tests        ...
Summary and Conclusions        Data results for the essential question of this academic study failed to reject the NullHyp...
Question 6 – there was no significant difference between male and female specialeducation students’ preference for attendi...
Appendices                                 Appendix ASpecial Education                     Special Education is the educat...
Dependent Variable           The change or difference in a behavior or                             characteristic that occ...
Appendix BFigure 1.1Average End of Unit Assessment Scores for Special Education Students                           Group S...
Appendix CIn this questionnaire, you will find questions about yourself. Some questions askfor facts while other questions...
4. Do you believe the co-teaching model has had a significant (major) impact      on your learning (improved reading, writ...
Appendix DFigure 1.2Frequency Count Results for Question 3 of Student Questionnaire                        CrosstabCount  ...
Appendix EFigure 1.3Frequency Count Results for Question 4 of Student Questionnaire                      CrosstabCount    ...
Appendix FFigure 1.4Frequency Count Results for Question 5 of Student Questionnaire                      CrosstabCount    ...
Appendix GFigure 1.5Frequency Count Results for Question 6 of Student Questionnaire                      CrosstabCount    ...
Artifact for Standard 2: Teacher Professional Development Plans, Montgomery County PublicSchools Standards for Teachers, a...
Professional Development PlanName: Lorenzo R. Prillman                                         Date: 04/29/2011Educator’s ...
In reflecting upon this past year as an educator at Benjamin Banneker Middle School, whichmajority was spent analyzing stu...
(It is recommended that you use this stem: I will . . . [research, study, learn, apply,       etc.] So that . . .[describe...
D. Plan for Assessing and Documenting Your Goal(s):Goal 1: Improve Co-Taught Student Performance on Formative and Summativ...
E. Plan to Meet Your Goal(s): Objectives, Activities and Timelines, and Collaboration:     1. Which of the professional de...
3. List Anticipated Resources Needed for Accomplishing the Goal(s) of Your      Professional Development Plan.Goal 1 Resou...
Goal 1: Improve Co-Taught Student Performance on Formative and Summative Assessments Date Initiated: August 2011Objective ...
Objective 2: Develop Product-Based Assessments for Student Portfolios                               Date Completed: June 2...
Goal 2: Improve Student Achievement for all Ethnic Subgroups defined by the MSA                     Date Initiated: August...
Objective 2: Provide On-going Student Achievement Feedback to Parents                        Date Completed: June 2014    ...
Review Checklist for Objectives, Activities and Timelines, and Collaboration:1. Objectiveso Do the objectives directly add...
Professional Development Plan Evaluation Team                   Beginning of Year 1 – Professional Development CycleName: ...
Artifact for Standard 1: A Vision of LearningNames of Artifact(s): Benjamin Banneker Middle School Social Studies Departme...
Artifact for Standard 2: School Culture and Instructional ProgramNames of Artifact(s): Informal Teacher Observation Write-...
Artifact for Standard 3: ManagementNames of Artifact(s): Benjamin Banneker Middle School Social Studies Department: Gradin...
After reviewing teacher grade books for a second time, following the implementation of thegrading and reporting monitoring...
Artifact for Standard 4: Collaboration with Families and the CommunityNames of Artifact(s): Benjamin Banneker Middle Schoo...
Artifact for Standard 5: Acting with Integrity and Fairness, and in an Ethical MannerNames of Artifact(s): Controversial A...
Artifact for Standard 6: The Political, Social, Economic, Legal and Cultural ContextNames of Artifact(s): Co-Teaching Mode...
ISLLC Standard I: An education leader promotes the success of every student by facilitating thedevelopment, articulation, ...
Questions for Consideration/DiscussionA. What answer would you give to the “big question” from the Board? Why?            ...
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  1. 1. School Administration and Supervision Practicum Portfolio Submitted by: Lorenzo R. Prillman Bowie State University School of Education/Department of Education LeadershipESAS 828/858 Seminar & Practicum in Education Leadership Instructor: Dr. Barbara Jackson Submission Date: May 05, 2011 0
  2. 2. Table of ContentsSite Practicum Description ........................................................................................................................... 1Professional Resume………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……...2 - 3College Transcripts…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….….…..4 - 5Teacher Certification .................................................................................................................................... 6Philosophy of Education Leadership……………………………………………………………………………………………….7 - 8Professional Internship Project #1…………………………………………………………………………………………….….9 - 28Professional Internship Project #2…………………………………………………………………………………………………29 - 41ISLLC Activities: Standards 1 – 6………………………………………………………………………………………….…………42 - 48Vignette Activities: Standards 1 –6……………………………………………………………………..…………………………49 - 63Novice Principal Professional DevelopmentPlan…………………………………………….…………….………………64 - 75Novice Principal Work Entry Plan…………………………………………………………………………..………………………76 - 81Six School Administrators Responsibilities………………………………………………………………….…………………82 - 84Practicum Reflections Log………………………………………………………………………………………………………………85 - 92Certificates/Awards……………………………………………………………………………………….…………………………….93 - 103Site Supervisor’s Evaluation…………………………………………………………………………………………………..…..104 - 106 i
  3. 3. Description of Practicum SiteBenjamin Banneker Middle School is a public school located in the suburbs ofBurtonsville, Maryland. The school district in which BBMS resides isMontgomery County Public Schools. The Burtonsville community ispredominantly a blue-collar, working class community. Approximately fifty-onepercent of adults twenty-five years and older hold advanced degrees. The medianfamily income for this city is approximately one-hundred and five-thousanddollars. The demographics of the middle school are approximately 61% African-American, 15% Caucasian-American, 11% Hispanic-American, and 13% Asian-American. There are a total of approximately seven hundred and sixty kids thatattend BBMS. The students who attended this middle school range in age fromeleven to fourteen. The middle school provides educational services for students ingrades six through eight. Additional educational services are also offered to ESOL(English for Speakers of Other Languages) and Special Education students. Theannual academic goals for the school and school district are for students to achievea score of proficient or advanced on the reading/math portion of the MarylandState Assessment exam, and to have students take more rigorous course work(e.g., advanced English, Social Studies, Science, and Math). Benjamin Banneker Middle School 14800 Perrywood Drive Burtonsville, Maryland 20866 1
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  9. 9. Philosophy of Education Leadership My philosophy of education leadership stems from the beliefs of presidential biographerand professor James MacGregor Burns. Transformational leadership was a concept establishedby Burns in his research on prominent political leaders. Transformational leadership is defined asa leadership approach that causes change in individuals and social systems. Leaders who adopt atransformational leadership style develop followers into leaders. According to Burns, thetransformational leadership approach creates significant change in the lives of people andorganizations (Burns, 1978). Transformational leaders develop the ability to create positivechange through modeling expected behavior for individuals, team members, the organization,and/or community. Therefore, my philosophy of education leadership focuses on developingpeople into leaders who facilitate decision making and promote change. Burns states ―followersof transformational leaders feel trust, admiration, loyalty, and respect for the leader because oftheir willingness to work harder than originally expected.‖ I believe transformational leaders appeal to the heart of individuals because they are self-motivated as well as motivate the people around them. According to Thomas Sergiovanni, theheart of leadership deals with a person’s beliefs, values, dreams, and their commitment toanother person’s vision (Sergiovanni, 2009). Transformational leadership allows for a schoolleader to develop and shape school culture through dedication and hard work of investedstakeholders. As a transformational leader, I will ensure students, teachers, and parents areinvolved in the decision making process regarding educational issues like school curriculum,new technology, diversity training, and school-based management. Finally, it is important to notethat transformational leaders are not afraid to take risks in order to improve student achievementand/or school culture. 7
  10. 10. BibliographyBurns, J.M. (1978). Leadership. New York, New York: Harper & Row.Sergiovanni, T. J. A (2009). The Principalship: A Reflective Practice Perspective. Boston, Massachusetts: Allyn and Bacon. 8
  11. 11. Internship Project #1: Co-Teaching Analysis Study 2010 - 2011Artifact for Standard 2: Social Studies Department Co-Teaching Model Study ResultsNames of Artifact(s): Co-Teaching Model Analysis Data Collection Excel Sheets and Co-Teaching Model Study ResultsDate: May 05, 2011Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolMontgomery County Public SchoolsArtifactsThe artifacts listed above illustrate my role as department chair of the Social Studies Departmentwhich requires me to evaluate the co-taught (inclusion) instructional model. The quantitativeresearch study was supported by teachers in the Social Studies Department who assisted withcollecting Special Education students’ achievement data over the course of three markingperiods. Student achievement data was collected on Excel spread sheets and analyzed usingSPSS software. A data analysis report was completed on student achievement results of SpecialEducation students in Social Studies classes. The Social Studies Department Co-TeachingAnalysis Study was conducted as a result of the need to give meaningful and timely feedback onthe progression of our Special Education population within the full inclusion instructional model.In addition, the study wanted to show whether or not the co-taught instructional model was morebeneficial for male or female students. The results of the study were used to make decisionsabout teacher instructional practices under the co-teaching model, and the structure of classes forSpecial Education students for next school year.Reflection NarrativeFollowing the end of the first marking period, the Special Education department chair,administration, and the Social Studies department chair held a meeting to discuss ways toimprove the co-teaching instructional model. Banneker Middle School is currently in the secondyear of implementing the co-taught instructional model for full inclusion of Special Educationstudents. During the meeting, leaders discussed ways in which the school could improve theacademic performance of Special Education students under the co-taught model. As chair of theSocial Studies department, I gave the suggestion of collecting student performance data onSpecial Education students receiving instruction within the full inclusion model. Although thiswas the first year for the Social Studies department participating in the full inclusion model, Iwanted to ensure teachers in my department that the proper steps would be taken to improve theacademic performance of Special Education students for the following school year. Therefore, Ivolunteered to have the Social Studies department collect summative assessment data of SpecialEducation students in their co-taught classrooms. 9
  12. 12. During the first three marking periods, teachers collected end of unit assessment exam scores ofstudents which were later used to measure the impact of the co-taught instructional model onmale and female Special Education achievement. Using SPSS software, student scores wereanalyzed to see if the co-taught instructional model had a greater impact on male or femalestudents. The scores of students were analyzed in this manner due to the lack of studentperformance data from year one implementation of the co-taught teaching model. In addition tocollecting and analyzing student test scores, students were also given a student questionnaire tocomplete which gathered information on their beliefs about the relevancy of the co-taughtinstructional model. The data analysis results for the student end of unit assessment scoresrevealed that the majority of Special Education students, across grade levels, were performing ata below average (66.6%) rate. Although students were performing at a below average rate, thestudent questionnaire revealed that the majority of students believed the co-taught instructionalmodel made a significant impact on their learning, believed the instructional pace of their classeswere fairly appropriate for their learning styles, and wanted to remain in the co-taughtinstructional model in the future. Despite the positive feedback of students thoughts about therelevancy of the co-taught instructional model, the below average student test scores of studentswas a cause for concern.The co-taught instructional model data analysis report made a few recommendations on how toenhance the academic performance of Special Education students’ in the future. First, it wasagreed upon by the Social Studies Department and Special Education Department teachers thatmore frequent checks for student understanding was needed. Second, alternative ways toassessing student mastery of concepts such as product-based assessments was also needed. Thetwo recommendations that were made to improve the academic performance of studentachievement led to the development of my second internship project which involved all sixmembers of the Social Studies department collaborating on writing goals and objectives for theirProfessional Development Plans which related to the instructional needs of Special Educationstudents. Overall, the report raised the questions about whether the placing of Special Educationstudents in advanced courses, which usually move at a faster instructional pace, is appropriate forthe learning challenges they endure. A follow up study was recommended to be conducted on theimpact of the co-taught instructional model on male and female Special Education student’sacademic achievement which would encompass all four core academic subject areas (English,Social Studies, Math and Science). 10
  13. 13. Impact of Co-Teaching Model on Male and Female Student AchievementProfessional Internship Project 1 - Social Studies Department Co-Teaching Model Study Results 2010 - 2011 Research Conducted by: Lorenzo R. Prillman Research Assistants: Tiffany McEwan, Adrienne D’Orazio, Cari Huffman & Sabrina Khan Bowie State University School of Education Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Leadership ESAS 828/858, Practicum/Seminar in School Administration and Supervision Dr. Barbara Jackson May 05, 2011 11
  14. 14. Analysis of the Data This academic study examined the impact of the co-teaching model on student achievement forspecial education students. The Null Hypothesis for this study stated there was no significant differencebetweenacademic performance of male and female special education students receiving regular classroominstruction under the co-teaching model. The significance level for this study was set at .05. The researchstudy explored one essential question pertaining to the importance of the co-teaching model: 1. Did the co-teaching model impact male and female special education student’sacademic achievement differently? The study also observed the level of student interest with attending classes under the co-teachingmodel, and their conviction about the impact of the co-taught instructional model on their learning. Thefour student questionnaire questions analyzed for this portion of the study were as follows: 1. Did special education students enjoy attending instructional classes under the co-teaching model? 2. If given a choice of remaining in the co-taught instructional model or transitioning back into small instructional classes, which instructional model would they choose? 3. Did special education students believe the co-taught instructional model had a significant (major) impact on their learning (improved reading, writing, and communication skills)? 4. Did the instructional pace of the class allow for special education students to learn and retain information (educational concepts) long enough to consistently perform successfully on formative and summative assessments? 12
  15. 15. Results Independent Samples Test Levenes Test for Equality of Variances t-test for Equality of Means 95% Confidence Interval of the Sig. (2- Mean Std. Error Difference F Sig. t df tailed) Difference Difference Lower UpperUnit1 Equal variances .346 .560 1.105 44 .275 4.46857 4.04537 -3.68434 12.62149 assumed Equal variances 1.112 43.532 .272 4.46857 4.01859 -3.63283 12.56997 not assumedUnit2 Equal variances .000 .998 1.071 43 .290 4.35119 4.06427 -3.84518 12.54757 assumed Equal variances 1.072 42.436 .290 4.35119 4.05832 -3.83634 12.53872 not assumedUnit3 Equal variances 2.169 .148 .903 43 .372 4.11310 4.55443 -5.07180 13.29799 assumed Equal variances .926 40.617 .360 4.11310 4.44085 -4.85794 13.08413 not assumed The Independent Samples T- Test was utilized to determine if the variance in scores between male and female special education students were equal. The variance in student scores for each end of unit assessment, reflected the null hypothesis which stated there was no difference in the variance of scores between male and female special education students because P = .275 > .05 (Unit1), P = .290 > .05 (Unit 2), and P = .372 > .05 (Unit 3). Due to the critical value (t) of 1.105 (Unit 1), 1.071 (Unit 2), and .903 (Unit 3) falling inside the acceptance region of the interval scale, the variance in student assessment scores were not considered statistically significant. The results of the test supported the generalization that majority of the male and female students who participated in the co-taught instructional model would benefit academically in similar ways. 13
  16. 16. Table 2Expected Frequency Counts for Question 3 of Student Questionnaire Chi-Square Tests Asymp. Sig. (2- Exact Sig. (2- Exact Sig. (1- Value df sided) sided) sided) aPearson Chi-Square .621 1 .431 bContinuity Correction .194 1 .660Likelihood Ratio .628 1 .428Fishers Exact Test .503 .332Linear-by-Linear Association .607 1 .436N of Valid Cases 45a. 0 cells (.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum expected count is 5.13.b. Computed only for a 2x2 table In the Pearson Chi-Square test for independence, the frequency of student responses tofour questionnaire questions were analyzed to determine student preference for attendinginstructional classes, under the co-teaching model, was directly related to gender. Results of theChi-Square data analysis for question three of the student questionnaire reflected the nullhypothesis which stated there was no significant difference between special education students’gender and their preference for attending instructional classes under the co-teaching modelbecause P = .431 > .05. Due to the critical value (a) of .621 falling within the acceptance regionof the interval scale, frequency results for question three of the student questionnaire was notconsidered statistically significant. The Results of the test supported the generalization thatmajority of male and female students who participated in the co-taught instructional model hadsimilar views regarding their preference for attending class. Out of forty-five special educationstudents surveyed, seventeen boys and seventeen girls stated they liked attending classes underthe co-teaching model. Nonetheless, seven boys and four girls stated they did not like attendingclasses under the co-teaching model (See Appendix D). 14
  17. 17. Table 3Expected Frequency Counts for Question 4 of Student Questionnaire Chi-Square Tests Asymp. Sig. (2- Value df sided) aPearson Chi-Square 1.503 2 .472Likelihood Ratio 1.545 2 .462Linear-by-Linear Association .001 1 .975N of Valid Cases 45a. 2 cells (33.3%) have expected count less than 5. The minimumexpected count is 1.87. The results of the Chi-Square data analysis for question four of the studentquestionnaire reflected the null hypothesis which stated there was no significant differencebetween male and female special education students’ beliefs about academic achievement due tothem attending classes under the co-teaching model because P = .472 > .05. Due to the criticalvalue (a) of 1.503 falling inside the acceptance region of the interval scale, frequency results forquestion four of the student questionnaire were not considered statistically significant. Results ofthe test supported the generalization that majority of male and female students who participatedin the co-taught instructional model had similar views about whether or not the co-taught modelhad a significant impact on their learning. Out of forty-five special education students surveyed,ten boys and seven girls believed the co-teaching model had a significant impact on theirlearning. Eleven boys and thirteen girls believed the co-teaching model somewhat impacted theirlearning. Three boys and one girl believed the co-teaching model did not have a significantimpact on their learning (See Appendix E). 15
  18. 18. Table 4Expected Frequency Counts for Question 5 of Student Questionnaire Chi-Square Tests Asymp. Sig. (2- Exact Sig. (2- Exact Sig. (1- Value df sided) sided) sided) aPearson Chi-Square .379 1 .538 bContinuity Correction .082 1 .775Likelihood Ratio .378 1 .539Fishers Exact Test .743 .387Linear-by-Linear Association .370 1 .543N of Valid Cases 45a. 0 cells (.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum expected count is 6.07.b. Computed only for a 2x2 table The results of the Chi-Square data analysis for question five of the studentquestionnaire reflected the null hypothesis which stated there was no significant differencebetween male and female special education students academic performance on formative andsummative assessments due to the instructional pace of co-taught classes because P = .538 >.05. Due to the critical value (a) of .379 falling inside the acceptance region of the interval scale,frequency results for question five of the student questionnaire were not considered statisticallysignificant. Results of the test supported the generalization that majority of male and femalespecial education students, who received instruction under the co-teaching model, had similarviews as to whether or not the instructional pace of the class enhanced or did not enhance theirperformance on formative and summative assessments. Out of forty-five special educationstudents surveyed, eighteen boys and fourteen girls stated they believed the instructional pace ofthe co-taught class provided them the ability to perform successfully on formative andsummative assessments. Six boys and seven girls stated they did not believe the instructionalpace of the co-taught classes provided for them the ability to perform successfully on formativeand summative assessments (See Appendix F). 16
  19. 19. Table 5Expected Frequency Counts for Question 6 of Student Questionnaire Chi-Square Tests Asymp. Sig. (2- Value df sided) aPearson Chi-Square .621 2 .733Likelihood Ratio .628 2 .730Linear-by-Linear Association .029 1 .865N of Valid Cases 45a. 1 cells (16.7%) have expected count less than 5. The minimumexpected count is 4.67. The results of the Chi-Square data analysis for question six of the student questionnairereflected the null hypothesis which stated there was no significant difference between male andfemale special education student’s preference for attending classes under the co-teaching modelor returning to small instructional classes because P = .733 > .05. Due to the critical value (a) of.621 falling inside the acceptance region of the interval scale, frequency results for question sixof the student questionnaire were not considered statistically significant. Results of the testsupported the generalization that majority of male and female students who participated in theco-taught instructional model had similar views as to whether or not they remained in the co-taught instructional model or return to smaller instructional classes. Out of forty-five specialeducation students surveyed, twelve boys and twelve girls stated they wanted to continueattending classes under the co-taught instructional model. Seven boys and four girls stated theywanted to return to smaller instructional classes. Five boys and five girls stated the instructionalmodel in which they attended classes did not have any relevance (See Appendix G). 17
  20. 20. Summary and Conclusions Data results for the essential question of this academic study failed to reject the NullHypothesis which stated there was no significant difference between the academic performance of maleand female special education students receiving regular classroom instruction under the co-teachingmodel, due to the variance in student end of unit assessment scores not being consideredstatistically significant. The small variance in special education students’ end of unit assessmentscores from the mean score of each assessment revealed the majority of students, male or female,were consistently performing academically on the same level. Special education studentscombined average mean scores for all three end of unit exams was sixty-six percent, a belowaverage assessment score. Data results for questions three, four, five, and six of the student questionnaire failed toreject the Null Hypothesis for each question due to the frequency results of student responses notbeing considered statistically significant. The Null Hypothesis for each question stated thefollowing: Question 3 – there was no significant difference between special education students’gender and their preference for attending instructional classes under the co-teaching model. Question 4 – there was no significant difference between male and female specialeducation students’ beliefs regarding academic achievement due to them attending classes underthe co-teaching model. Question 5 – there was no significant difference between male and female specialeducation students academic performance on formative and summative assessments due to theinstructional pace of co-taught classes. 18
  21. 21. Question 6 – there was no significant difference between male and female specialeducation students’ preference for attending classes under the co-teaching model or returning tosmall instructional classes. Overall results of male and female student responses for each question on thequestionnaire revealed the majority of special education students enjoyed attending class underthe co-taught instructional model, believed the co-taught instructional model made a significantimpact on their learning, believed the instructional pace of their classes were fairly appropriatefor their learning styles, and wanted to remain in the co-taught instructional model in the future. Recommendations First, due to the end of unit assessment scores for special education students in SocialStudies averaging sixty-six percent across all three grade levels, an instructional strategy ofproviding more frequent checks for student understanding, during the course of a lesson, needs tobe implemented. Second, teachers need to develop alternative ways such as product-basedassessments to measure special education students’ mastery of content learning indicators. Third,results from the student questionnaire showed how majority of special education studentsenjoyed spending their class time learning under the co-taught instructional model. The belowaverage end of unit scores, across grade levels, in Social Studies raised concerns about whetherthe placing of special education students in advanced courses, which usually move at a fasterinstructional pace, is appropriate for the learning challenges they endure. Finally, based onoverall results of the data, I recommend a follow-up study be conducted on the impact of the co-taught instructional model on male and female special education student’s academic achievementthat would encompass all four core academic subject areas (English, Social Studies, Math andScience). 19
  22. 22. Appendices Appendix ASpecial Education Special Education is the educating of students with special needs in a way that addresses the students individual differences and needs. Ideally, this process involves individually planned and systematically monitored arrangements of teaching procedures, adapted equipment and materials, accessible settings, and other interventions designed to help learners with special needs achieve a higher level of personal self-sufficiency and success in school and community than would be available if the student were only given access to a typical classroom education.Co-Teaching Model of Inclusion Inclusion in education is an approach to educating students with special educational needs. Under the inclusion model, students with special needs spend most or all of their time with non-disabled students. Fully inclusive schools, which are rare, no longer distinguish between "general education" and "special education" programs; instead, the school is restructured so that all students learn together.Sample Group/Population A number of individuals, items or events selected from a population for a study, preferably in such a way that represents the larger group from which they were selected.Null Hypothesis States there is no significant relation or difference between variables (independent and dependent).Alternative Hypothesis States there is a significant relation between variables (independent and dependent).P Value The p-value is the probability that a research study sample could have been drawn from the population(s) being tested (or that a more improbable sample could be drawn) given the assumption that the null hypothesis is true.Statistical Significance The conclusion of a research study that states the results are unlikely to have occurred by chance— that is the observed relation or difference is probably 1.0 or less. 20
  23. 23. Dependent Variable The change or difference in a behavior or characteristic that occurs as a result of the independent or grouping variable. Also called effect, outcome or posttest variable.Independent Variable A behavior or characteristic under the control of the researcher and believed to influence some other behavior or characteristic. Also called experimental variable, manipulated variable, cause variable or treatment variableStatistical Mean The most common expression for the mean of a statistical distribution with a discrete random variable is the mathematical average of all the terms. To calculate, add the values of all the terms and divide by the number of terms.Independent Sample t-test A parametric test of significance used to determine whether, at a selected probability level, the means of two independent samples are significantly different.Chi Square Test Chi-square is a statistical test commonly used to compare observed data with data we would expect to obtain according to a specific hypothesis. The chi-square test for independence always tests what scientists call the null hypothesis, which state there is no significant difference between the expected and observed result.Variance Variance is defined as the amount of spread among scores. If the variance is small, the scores are close together. If it is large, the scores are more spread out. Calculation of the variance shows how far each score is from the mean.Reliability The degree to which a test (or qualitative research data) consistently measures whatever it measures.SPSS Data Software SPSS Inc. is a leading worldwide provider of predictive analytics software and solutions. SPSS software assists researchers with computing statistical data gathered during research. 21
  24. 24. Appendix BFigure 1.1Average End of Unit Assessment Scores for Special Education Students Group Statistics Gender N Mean Std. Deviation Std. Error MeanUnit1 1.00 25 66.0400 14.11996 2.82399 2.00 21 61.5714 13.10180 2.85905Unit2 1.00 24 73.5417 13.73659 2.80397 2.00 21 69.1905 13.44477 2.93389Unit3 1.00 24 67.2083 17.61664 3.59598 2.00 21 63.0952 11.94113 2.60577 74 72 70 68 66 Unit 1 64 Unit 2 Unit 3 62 60 58 56 Male FemaleAverage Social Studies End of Unit Assessment Scores for Sixth, Seventh and Eighth GradeSpecial Education Students 22
  25. 25. Appendix CIn this questionnaire, you will find questions about yourself. Some questions askfor facts while other questions ask for your opinions.Read each question carefully and answer as accurately as possible. You may askfor help if you do not understand something, or are not sure how to respond. 1. Are you a girl or a boy? Check one box onlyGirl--------------------------------------------------------------------Boy-------------------------------------------------------------------- 2. Which of the following best describes you? Check one or more boxesWhite--------------------------------------------------------------Black or African American-------------------------------------Asian---------------------------------------------------------------Hispanic or Latino------------------------------------------------American Indian or Alaska Native-----------------------------Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander--------------------Mixed Heritage---------------------------------------------------- 3. Do you like attending instructional classes under the co-teaching model? Check one box onlyYES---------------------------------------------------------------NO---------------------------------------------------------------- 23
  26. 26. 4. Do you believe the co-teaching model has had a significant (major) impact on your learning (improved reading, writing, and communication skills)? Check one box only1 – Significant ------------------------------------------------2 – Somewhat Significant-----------------------------------3 – Not Significant------------------------------------------- 5. Did the instructional pace of the class allow for you to learn and retain (hold on to) information long enough to consistently perform successfully on formative and summative assessments?Check one box onlyYES--------------------------------------------------------------NO--------------------------------------------------------------- 6. If you had a choice of remaining in the co-taught instructional model or moving back to small instructional classes, which one would you choose?Check one box only 1 - Remain in current co-taught instructional model-------------- 2 - Return to small instructional classes--------------------------- 3 - Instructional model does not matter to me-------------------- 24
  27. 27. Appendix DFigure 1.2Frequency Count Results for Question 3 of Student Questionnaire CrosstabCount Gender 1.00 2.00 TotalSQQ3R 1.00 17 17 34 2.00 7 4 11Total 24 21 45 18 16 14 12 10 Yes 8 No 6 4 2 0 Male FemaleQuestion 3: Did special education students like attending instructional classes under the co-teaching model? 25
  28. 28. Appendix EFigure 1.3Frequency Count Results for Question 4 of Student Questionnaire CrosstabCount Gender 1.00 2.00 TotalSQQR4 1.00 10 7 17 2.00 11 13 24 3.00 3 1 4Total 24 21 45 14 12 10 8 Significant 6 Somewhat Signficant Not Significant 4 2 0 Male FemaleQuestion 4: Did special education students believe the co-taught instructional model had a significant(major) impact on their learning (improved reading, writing, and communication skills)? 26
  29. 29. Appendix FFigure 1.4Frequency Count Results for Question 5 of Student Questionnaire CrosstabCount Gender 1.00 2.00 TotalSQQ5R 3.00 18 14 32 4.00 6 7 13Total 24 21 45 20 18 16 14 12 10 Yes 8 No 6 4 2 0 Male FemaleQuestion 5: Did the instructional pace of the class allow for special education students to learn and retaininformation (educational concepts) long enough to consistently perform successfully on formative andsummative assessments? 27
  30. 30. Appendix GFigure 1.5Frequency Count Results for Question 6 of Student Questionnaire CrosstabCount Gender 1.00 2.00 TotalSQQR6 1.00 12 12 24 2.00 7 4 11 3.00 5 5 10Total 24 21 45 14 12 10 Remain in Co-Taught Classes 8 Return to Small Classes 6 Instructional Model Does Not 4 Matter 2 0 Male FemaleQuestion 6: If given a choice of remaining in the co-taught instructional model or transitioning back intosmall instructional classes, which instructional model would they choose? 28
  31. 31. Artifact for Standard 2: Teacher Professional Development Plans, Montgomery County PublicSchools Standards for Teachers, and Co-Taught Analysis Study RecommendationsNames of Artifact(s): Sample Teacher Professional Development Plans (Department Goals andObjectives are Related to Internship Project #1)Date: May 05, 2011Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolMontgomery County Public SchoolsArtifactsThe artifacts listed above were used by members of the Social Studies Department, in acollaborative way, to improve student achievement for Special Education students and lowachieving comprehensive students. Teachers in the Social Studies department reviewed theresults of the co-taught analysis study to get an idea of what instructional improvements neededto be made in order to improve student achievement. After reviewing the co-taught analysisstudy recommendations, teachers in the Social Studies Department utilized the MontgomeryCounty Public Schools Teaching Standards Guide to draft preliminary professional developmentgoals and objectives.Reflection NarrativeFollowing the end of the third marking period, teachers in the Social Studies Department cametogether to discuss ways of how to improve student achievement for Special Education studentsand low achieving comprehensive students. As a collaborative group, the department decidedthat there was a need to put an instructional plan together in order to meet the many instructionalchallenges faced by teachers in co-taught classes. During the April department meeting, teacherscollaborated together to produce a universal professional development plan which incorporateddepartment/teacher instructional goals and objectives. Goal one of the Social Studies Departmentprofessional development plan was a shared goal/objectives to be implemented by the entiredepartment in grades six, seven and eight. Goal one of the Social Studies Departmentprofessional development plan was created to improve the formative and summative assessmentscores of Special Education students. Department members developed a system to consistentlycheck for student understanding, during the course of a lesson, and a way to develop multipleproduct-based assessments. Goal two of the PDP allowed for teachers in the Social Studiesdepartment to address one other professional development need. Teachers used the MCPSprofessional growth handbook to choose a teaching standard to address for goal two of theirprofessional development plans. After department members completed their professionaldevelopment plans, they submitted them to their principal and department chair for approval.The Social Studies Department instructional program has significantly improved as a result ofsteps taken to improve the academic outcomes for Special Education students and low achievingcomprehensive students. 29
  32. 32. Professional Development PlanName: Lorenzo R. Prillman Date: 04/29/2011Educator’s School District: Montgomery County Public SchoolsEducator’s Employee ID#: 000069337Educator’s Current Educational Assignment: Content Specialist, Social Studies DepartmentNumber of Year(s) in Current Assignment: 02Years of Educational Experience: 15School: Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolLength of Professional Growth Cycle: ___X_ 3-years ____ 4-years ____5 years (check one)Duration of Plan: May 01, 2011 through May 01, 2014Check – In Dates: December 2011, May 2012, December 2012, May 2013, December 2013 and May 2014End of PDP Cycle Review: May 2014Year in Professional Development Cycle: Year 1Key Note: Prior to developing a Professional Development Plan, teachers should spend sometime reviewing their school district’s goals (School District Improvement Plan), their school’sgoals (School Improvement Plan), and keeping a reflective educational journal that documentsthe many challenges faced by the educator during his/her tenure in the present school. Reviewingboth plans will ensure that the Professional Development Plan is aligned with the district’s andschool’s goals for professional development and accountability. Teachers PDP goal(s),objective(s), and activities(s) must address two or more of the Montgomery County PublicSchools (MCPS) standards for school teachers.Step 1: Preparing to Write the Plan: Self Reflection(Not required to be included in the PDP) 30
  33. 33. In reflecting upon this past year as an educator at Benjamin Banneker Middle School, whichmajority was spent analyzing student academic performance data, I was able to identify twoMontgomery County Public Schools Teaching Standards (MCPSTS) that needed to be addressedin order to improve student achievement. Improving Co-Taught student performance onformative and summative assessments (Standard 2) at BBMS was important in order to addressissues of students failing to master the indicators of learning for the Advanced Social Studiescurriculum. In addition, improving student achievement for all ethnic subgroups as defined bythe Maryland State Assessment (Standard 3) was needed in order to facilitate better workingrelationships with students and parents that will lead to positive academic outcomes for students.Step 2: Writing the Plan: Components (At least two professional development goals areincluded in the plan) A. Contextual Description of Job Site: Teacher SituationI am moving into my second year as the Social Studies Department Content Specialist atBenjamin Banneker Middle School which is located in the suburbs of Burtonsville, Maryland.The community in which the school resides is predominantly a blue-collar, working classcommunity. The demographics of the middle school are approximately 65% African-American,20% Caucasian-American, 10% Hispanic-American, and 5% Asian-American. The annualacademic goals for the school and district are for students to achieve a score of proficient oradvanced on the reading/math portion of the Maryland State Assessment exam and to havestudents take more rigorous course work (e.g., advanced English, Social Studies, Science, andMath). o Did you include a description of your teaching position? o Did you include the number of years you have been a teacher? o Did you include whether the school is located in an urban, suburban, or rural setting? o Did you include the ethnic, cultural, special needs, and socioeconomic makeup of the school population? o Did you include your school building and/or district goals? (Optional) B. Description of the Goal(s) to be Addressed: 31
  34. 34. (It is recommended that you use this stem: I will . . . [research, study, learn, apply, etc.] So that . . .[describe what you want to see happening differently with student learning].)I will improve Co-Taught student performance on Formative and Summative Assessments (Goal1) by developing a system to frequently check for student understanding and developing product-based assessments, so students will have greater success meeting the Social Studies Curriculumindicators of learning. In addition, I will improve student achievement for all ethnic subgroupsdefine by MSA (Goal 2) through developing a positive classroom climate for all students andproviding on-going student achievement feedback to parents, so students will be able tomaximize their learning and achieve high levels of academic success. 1. What is my desired outcome for professional growth? o Will your goal(s) impact your professional growth? o Will the professional growth you identified have an effect on student learning? C. Rationale for Your Goal(s) and Link to Self-Reflection, Educational Situation, and Educational Standards (Relate how your goal(s) is linked to your school district’s goals, your school’s goals, your self-reflection, educational situation, and list the educational standards that you will focus on for your professional growth cycle.)My two professional development goals are linked to my school district and school’s goals bythey both focusing on developing, implementing and assessing activities which will lead toenhanced student academic achievement. As one of the many educators responsible fordelivering instruction to students at BBMS, my first and foremost priority in the building is toimprove student achievement. The MCPS teaching standards I will be focusing on during theimplementation of this professional development plan will be standard 2 and standard 3. 1. How does the outcome relate to the school district’s goals and my school’s goals (SIP) o Does the rationale include how you related your self-reflection to your goal(s)? o Does the rationale tell how your goal(s) connects to your district/school/teacher position? o Did you list the MCPS standards that will promote your professional growth (must select two or more standards)? 32
  35. 35. D. Plan for Assessing and Documenting Your Goal(s):Goal 1: Improve Co-Taught Student Performance on Formative and Summative AssessmentsData sources used to establish outcome Co-Taught Students Formative Assessment Data Co-Taught Students Summative Assessment Data (Unit Exam Scores) Co-Taught Students Instructional Survey ResponsesData sources used to assess achievement of outcome Student Opening, Mid-Point, and Closing Instructional Exit Card Data Student Produced Vocabulary Booklets Student Produced End of Unit Movie Posters Student Produced Visual Representations of Instructional ConceptsGoal 2:Improve Student Achievement for all Ethnic Subgroups Defined by the MSAData sources used to establish outcome School Climate Survey Results (Previous School Year) School Ineligibility Data (Previous and Current School Year)Data sources used to assess achievement of outcome ESOL Student Performance Data on Formative and Summative Assessments (Current School Year) Student Ineligibility Data (Current School Year) Student Classroom Climate Survey Results (Current School Year) Parent Classroom Climate Survey Results (Current School Year) School Communication Log Records with Parents (Current School Year) Teacher-Student Produced Theoretical Framework Models for Student Achievement (Current School Year) 1. What data sources did I use to establish my outcome? What data will I use to assess achievement of my outcome? o Did you include methods to assess your professional growth? o Did you include methods to assess the effect of your growth on student learning? 33
  36. 36. E. Plan to Meet Your Goal(s): Objectives, Activities and Timelines, and Collaboration: 1. Which of the professional development options/strategies/techniques listed below will I use? Collaborative Options Independent Options__X__ Peer Reflective Conversations __X__ Audio/Videotape Analysis__X__ Peer Visits with Reflection (*) _____ Delivery of Workshops/Courses_____ Committee or Task Force Participation __X__ Action Research_____ Delivery of Workshops/Courses _____ Professional School Site Visits__X__ Development of Instructional Materials __X__ Review of Professional Literature__X__ Action Research Study Groups _____ Professional Training_____ Principal Networking Group _____ school-based workshops_____ New Curriculum Development ____ Out of school workshops_____ Professional School Site Visits ____ conference(s)_____ Other (be specific) __X__ Writing of an reflective journal(*) Required one year of each evaluation cycle _____ Other (be specific) 2. PDP Support Team (Resource Teacher, Principal, Assistant Principal(s), Staff Development Teacher, Technology Specialist, etc.)_______Grade Level Cohort Teacher___________ English Resource Teacher_______ Reading Specialist Resource Teacher____ ______ Data Specialist___________ Computer Technology Teacher______ ___________Media Specialist_________ 34
  37. 37. 3. List Anticipated Resources Needed for Accomplishing the Goal(s) of Your Professional Development Plan.Goal 1 Resources: Professional literature on developing formative assessments Co-teacher planning time to develop Opening, Mid-Point, and Closing exit card assessments Co-teacher planning time to develop multiple instructional delivery models to support the learning style needs of co-taught students Co-teacher planning time to develop templates for student Vocabulary Books, End of Unit Movie Posters, and Closed Activities Grant to fund additional planning time for teachers outside the regular classroomGoal 2 Resources: Professional literature on developing classroom learning stations Co-teacher planning time to develop learning station activities for students Co-teacher planning time to develop student and parent surveys Continued professional development on the use of the MCPS communication log Professional literature on developing theoretical framework models Co-teacher planning time to develop Parent Contracts and Report Card templates to upload on departmental website Co-teacher planning time to communicate with parents about social and academic issues concerning students 4. Devise a tentative timeline for the implementation of your plan with periodic benchmarks to judge your progress (Note: Completion date will be filled in as each objective/activity is completed – refer to next page for action plan guide). 35
  38. 38. Goal 1: Improve Co-Taught Student Performance on Formative and Summative Assessments Date Initiated: August 2011Objective 1: Develop A System to Frequently Check for Student Understanding Date Completed: June 2014 Activities Timeline Collaboration Date Completed Assess student August 2011 Social Studies Department Grade Level Cohorts June 2014understanding of key Through will meet on multiple occasions, during theinstructional concepts, from June 2014 regular school year, to plan the format andthe previous lesson, through (On-going) frequency of use of the OPENING EXIT CARDactivating student prior assessment during regular instruction. The collaborative process used will lead to greaterknowledge using OPENING student success on formative and summativeEXIT CARDS to begin assessments through mastering essentialdaily instruction. instructional concepts. Assess student August 2011 Social Studies Department Grade Level Cohorts June 2014understanding of key Through will meet on multiple occasions, during theinstructional concepts, June 2014 regular school year, to plan the format andlearned daily, by requiring (On-going) frequency of use of the MID-POINT LESSONstudents to give a 1 or 2 STUDENT LECTURE assessment during regular instruction. The collaborative processminute lecture at the MID- used will lead to greater student success onPOINT of the lesson using a formative and summative assessments throughholistic scoring scale. mastering essential instructional concepts.Assess student understanding August 2011 Social Studies Department Grade Level Cohorts will June 2014of key instructional concepts, Through meet on multiple occasions, during the regular June 2014 school year, to plan the format and frequency of usefrom the current lesson, of the CLOSING EXIT CARD assessment duringthrough activating student (On-going) regular instruction. The collaborative process usedknowledge using CLOSING will lead to greater student success on formative andEXIT CARDS to end daily summative assessments through mastering essentialinstruction. instructional concepts. 36
  39. 39. Objective 2: Develop Product-Based Assessments for Student Portfolios Date Completed: June 2014 Activities Timeline Collaboration Date CompletedDevelop, implement, and August 2011 Social Studies Content Specialist, English June 2014assess Student Produced Through Content Specialist, Reading Specialist, andVocabulary Books using a June 2014 Social Studies Grade Level Cohorts will meetholistic scoring scale (On-going) once per quarter, during the regular school year,(Vocabulary Assessments) to plan the format and frequency of use of the student-produced vocabulary books during regular instruction. The collaborative process used will lead to greater student success on formative and summative assessments through mastering essential vocabulary concepts.Develop, implement, and August 2011 Social Studies Content Specialist, Computer June 2014assess Student Produced Through Technology Specialist, Media Specialist, andEnd of Unit Movie Posters June 2014 Social Studies Grade Level Cohorts will meetusing a holistic scoring scale (On-going) once per quarter to plan/review the format and(Summative Assessments) computer guidelines to complete the student produced assessment. The collaborative process used will lead to greater student success on summative assessments through mastering multiple learning indicators in a creative way.Develop, implement and August 2011 Social Studies Department Grade Level Cohorts June 2014assess student understanding Through will meet on multiple occasions, during theof lesson concept(s) through June 2014 regular school year, to plan Closed Activitiesusing a CLOSED (On-going) for Co-Taught students which requires them toACTIVITY with visual explain their level of understanding of a concept through visual representation. The collaborativerepresentation. A holistic planning process used to develop Closedscore scale will be used to Activities will lead to greater student success onassess student work. formative and summative assessments. 37
  40. 40. Goal 2: Improve Student Achievement for all Ethnic Subgroups defined by the MSA Date Initiated: August 2011Objective 1: Develop a Positive Classroom Climate for all Students Date Completed: June 2014 Activities Timeline Collaboration Date Completed Develop and implement August 2011 Social Studies Department Grade Level June 2014 learning stations for ESOL Through Cohorts will meet on multiple occasions, students to support student June 2014 during the regular school year, to plan vocabulary and writing (On-going) Learning Station Activities for ESOL skills. students which support the instructional concepts of daily classroom lessons. The collaborative planning process used to develop ESOL student learning station activities will lead to greater student success on formative and summative assessments. Develop, implement, and August 2011 Social Studies Department Grade Level June 2014 analyze quarterly student Through Cohorts will meet once per quarter, during the survey results regarding June 2014 regular school year, to planthe format and classroom climate and (On-going) content of Student Quarterly Surveys. The academic instruction. collaborative planning process used to develop student quarterly surveys will allow teachers to make the proper classroom adjustments to make the educational environment more conducive to learning for all students. Develop, implement, and August 2011 Social Studies Department Grade Level June 2014 revisit quarterly a teacher- Through Cohorts will meet once per quarter to plan the student produced theoretical June 2014 type of theoretical model that will be used to framework for improving (On-going) chart a collaborative path, between student and student achievement. teacher, to reach a level of Academic Self- Actualization bythestudent and teacher. 38
  41. 41. Objective 2: Provide On-going Student Achievement Feedback to Parents Date Completed: June 2014 Activities Timeline Collaboration Date CompletedDevelop and implement the August 2011 Teacher will collaborate with parents to June 2014use of Parent Quarterly Through ensure the academic success of students bySurveys, Parent Academic June 2014 administering Parent Quarterly Surveys,Quarterly Contracts and (On-going) Academic Quarterly Parent Contracts andReport Cards issuing Quarterly Parent Report Cards. The (Parent access through collaborative process used between the teacherdepartmental website). and parents will lead to the lowering of Benjamin Banneker Middle School Ineligibility Rate.Develop and implement the August 2011 Teacher will collaborate with parents to June 2014use of Student Academic Through ensure the academic success of students byGoal Reflection Sheets. June 2014 sharing with them the quarterly academic(Parent access through (On-going) achievement results of their son/daughterdepartmental website). through the use of Student Academic Goal Reflection Sheets.Communicate with parents August 2011 Teacher will collaborate with parents to June 2014on a consistent basis to Through ensure the academic success of students byinform them of academic June 2014 contacting them by phone or e-mail toand/or behavioral concerns. (On-going) inform them of academic and/or behavioral concerns of their son/daughter. Collaborative dialogue records between the teacher and parent will be kept in the school’s Communication Log operated by Montgomery County Public Schools. 39
  42. 42. Review Checklist for Objectives, Activities and Timelines, and Collaboration:1. Objectiveso Do the objectives directly address the goal(s)?o Are the objectives observable and verifiable?2. Description of Activities and Timelineso Do the activities align with the goal(s) and objective(s)?o Do the activities extend throughout the professional development cycle?o Is the timeline stated?3. Plan for Collaborationo Does the plan include collaboration with others? Examples of collaboration may include the following:A. Collaboration with colleaguesB. Collaboration with higher educationC. Collaboration with a professional learning communityD. Collaboration with a mentor 40
  43. 43. Professional Development Plan Evaluation Team Beginning of Year 1 – Professional Development CycleName: Lorenzo R. Prillman Date: 04/29/2011Educator’s School District: Montgomery County Public SchoolsEducator’s Employee ID#: 000069337Educator’s Current Educational Assignment: Social Studies TeacherNumber of Year(s) in Current Assignment: 02Years of Educational Experience: 15School: Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolLength of Professional Growth Cycle: ___X_ 3-years ____ 4-years ____5 years (check one)Duration of Plan: May 01, 2011 through May 01, 2014Check – In Dates: December 2011, May 2012, December 2012, May 2013, December 2013 and May 2014End of PDP Cycle Review: May 2014Year in Professional Development Cycle: Year 1Social Studies Teacher: _________________________________ _______ (Teacher Signature) (Date)Department Chair: ____________________________________ _______ (Department Chair Signature) (Date)Approved by Principal: ________________________________ ________ (Principal Signature) (Date) 41
  44. 44. Artifact for Standard 1: A Vision of LearningNames of Artifact(s): Benjamin Banneker Middle School Social Studies Department: MonthlyInstructional Focus Matrix, Monthly Lesson Plan Submission Template, and Lesson PlanReview and Follow-Up Matrix.Date: November 08, 2010Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolMontgomery County Public SchoolsArtifactsThe artifacts listed above illustrate my role as department chair of the Social Studies Department withdeveloping a systematic plan to promote a monthly departmental instructional focus and teacherconsistency with developing and delivering rigorous and meaningful instruction.The Monthly Instructional Focus Matrix, Monthly Lesson Plan Lesson Plan Template, and Lesson PlanReview and Follow-Up Matrix was developed as a result of a meeting between members of theInstructional Leadership Team, on Tuesday, September 07, 2010, who were discussing ways to create amore rigorous instructional program for students during the 2010 – 2011 school year.Reflection NarrativeAfter making Annual Yearly Progress (AYP) for the previous physical school year, the CommunitySuperintendent of Schools wanted the Instructional Leadership Team at Banneker to focus on improvingteacher instruction. The Community Superintendent thought this would be the best course of action toensure the school would make AYP for the second straight year, and be removed from the Maryland StateDepartment of Education school improvement list. All department chairs were given the task ofdeveloping an instructional focus plan for teachers in their department. At the conclusion of the meeting,the leadership team agreed to assess the progress of teacher instruction by reviewing their monthly lessonplans.On Monday, September 13, 2010 the Social Studies department held its monthly staff meeting. Theagenda for the meeting focused on developing an instructional focus for the department. Departmentmembers shared their thoughts on what areas of instruction needed to be improved across all grade levels.After the meeting, I used the information provided by the teachers and my own ideas (shared vision) todevelop a monthly instructional focus, lesson plan template, and a form to assess the implementation ofkey areas of the department instructional program. The department monthly instructional focus and lessonplan format was reviewed with teachers the following Monday, prior to the start of the regular school day.Following the implementation of the monthly instructional focus plan and lesson plan template, the SocialStudies Department instructional walk-through team began to see greater consistency from teachers withdemonstrating planning for rigorous instructional practices. In addition, the review of departmental lessonplans by the Instructional Leadership Team showed that teachers were making progress with supportingthe instructional vision of the department and school. 42
  45. 45. Artifact for Standard 2: School Culture and Instructional ProgramNames of Artifact(s): Informal Teacher Observation Write-Up and Social Studies DepartmentInstructional Walk-Through Capture SheetDate: November 03, 2010Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolMontgomery County Public SchoolsArtifactsThe artifacts listed above illustrate my role as department chair of the Social Studies Department thatrequires me toevaluate the instructional practices of teachers in which I supervise. The format of theinformal teacher observation write-up is derived from the Montgomery County Public Schools handbookon the six standards of teaching. The Social Studies Department Instructional Walk-Through CaptureSheet was developed as a result of the need to give meaningful and immediate feedback to teachers ontheir instructional practices. In addition, the instructional walk-through form was developed to follow-upwith teachers on improving certain aspects of their instruction following an informal or formalobservation.Reflection NarrativeOn Wednesday, October 20, 2010 I conducted an informal observation of Ms. Sabrina Khan who is a newteacher in the Social Studies Department at Banneker Middle School. On this day, I observed Ms. Khan’ssixth period world studies class. While observing Ms. Khan’s world studies class, there seem to be anarea of instructional concern regarding her ability to plan ―purposefully‖ for instruction. Ms. Khan’sinability to give students the opportunity to summarize their learning of the lesson objectives led to hernot meeting standard three (teachers know the subjects they teach and how to teach those subjects tostudents) of the MCPS handbook on the six standards of teaching. When Ms. Khan and I convened at thepost-observation conference, it was brought to her attention that she needed to put more emphasis onpurposely planning each activity she wants students to complete during the lesson. I offered to assist Ms.Khan with improving her instructional practices in this area. However, she ensured me that she knew howto correct the error in her instruction and would like for me to revisit her class on another occasion. Iagreed to revisit her class on another occasion, unannounced, to conduct an instructional walk-through tolook for purposeful planning in her instruction.On Wednesday, November 03, 2010 I conducted the follow-up instructional walk-through of Ms. Khan’ssixth period world studies class. Ms. Khan was well provisioned for the class. Ms. Khan used flexiblegrouping to seat students for the lesson activity. Ms. Khan’s lesson objective was reviewed with studentsand she explained the importance of the mastery objective. Ms. Khan also used ―calling sticks‖ topurposely call on students who were Maryland State Assessment (MSA) focus kids who neededadditional opportunities to practice responding to critical thinking questions. When Ms. Khan and Ireconvened the following day to review my notes from the instructional walk-through, using theinstructional walk-through capture sheet, she was presently surprised to see that she had made the properadjustments to her instruction to meet standard three of the MCPS handbook on teacher instructionalpractices. Following our meeting, I continued my monthly instructional walk-through of her classes andclasses of other teachers in the Social Studies Department. The instructional program of the Social StudiesDepartment has significantly improved as a result of the evaluation process implemented this school year. 43
  46. 46. Artifact for Standard 3: ManagementNames of Artifact(s): Benjamin Banneker Middle School Social Studies Department: Gradingand Reporting ProtocolsMonitoring Tool; Benjamin Banneker Middle School Social StudiesDepartment: Grading and Reporting Consistency ChecklistEvaluative ToolDate: October 29, 2010Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolMontgomery County Public SchoolsArtifactsThe artifacts listed above illustrate my role as department chair of the Social Studies Departmentwith developing a systematic plan to promote grading and reporting consistency across gradelevels. The grading and reporting protocols and grading and reporting consistency checklist wasdeveloped as a result of a meeting between my staff development coordinator and theadministrator assigned to my department. The artifacts were developed as a result of thecollaborative meeting held on Friday, October 01, 2010.Reflection NarrativeAfter reviewing teacher midterm grade books, for the first quarter, with the staff developmentteacher and subject area supervisor, there appeared to be some concern regarding teacher gradingand reporting consistency within the Social Studies Department. As a result of the meeting, thethree of us came to an agreement on some protocols that teachers needed to follow in the futurewhen assigning student grades. I was given the responsibility of developing a monitoring tooland evaluative tool for my department. At the conclusion of our meeting, we agreed to revisitteacher grade books near the end of the first marking period to see if grade level cohorts gradingand reporting would be more consistent by the end of the first marking period.On Monday, October 04, 2010 the department held its monthly staff meeting. A good portion ofthe meeting agenda involved the discussion around grading and reporting consistency. Teacherswere given a chance to review their grades for the midterm reports and given feedback on how tobe more consistent with grading and reporting among grade level cohorts. I presented themonitoring tool and evaluative tool for grading and reporting which teachers needed to use forthe remainder of the first quarter. Teachers were made aware that they needed to submit a copyof their Grading and Reporting Consistency Monitoring Tool to the department chair every twoweeks.On Thursday, October 28, 2010 a meeting was held to take a second look at the grading andreporting consistency results, for the first quarter, within my department. I attended the meetingalong with the staff development teacher and my subject area administrative supervisor. I openedthe meeting by explaining the steps I had taken to address the problem of grading and reportinginconsistency within my department. After given a brief overview of the course of action I tookto address the problem, the staff development teacher opened up grade books of teachers whoteach the same subject to see if there had been any improvement since the midterm reports. 44
  47. 47. After reviewing teacher grade books for a second time, following the implementation of thegrading and reporting monitoring tool and evaluative tool, we were able to observe greaterconsistency with the reporting of grades among grade level cohorts. Everyone in attendance atthe meeting agreed that the department needs to continue with full implementation of the gradingand reporting monitoring tool and evaluative tool. The grading and reporting consistency toolswill be utilized for the remainder of the 2010 – 2011 school year. After the final marking periodhas ended, the staff development teacher, subject area supervisor and I will assess how effectivethe tools were with promoting grading and reporting consistency within the department.Finally, due to the vast improvement with grading and reporting consistency among thedepartment, administration is considering adopting the monitoring tool and evaluative tool modelto implement school-wide. 45
  48. 48. Artifact for Standard 4: Collaboration with Families and the CommunityNames of Artifact(s): Benjamin Banneker Middle School: PTSA Staff MembershipRecruitment LetterDate: October 18, 2010Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolMontgomery County Public SchoolsArtifact(s)The artifact listed above illustrates my role as a liaison between parent members of the PTSAand staff members at Benjamin Banneker Middle School. In recent years at Banneker MiddleSchool, the lack of staff (teacher) membership in the PTSA has led to a negative relationshipamong teachers and parents within the community. At the last PTSA meeting held on Tuesday,October 12, 2010 the PTSA President discussed the need to have someone take on theresponsibility of getting staff members to join the PTSA. I accepted the responsibility andeventually decided to solicit teacher support for the PTSA by drafting a letter. The artifact wasdeveloped as a way to promote teacher involvement in the PTSA by having them first pay theirmembership dues for the 2010 – 2011 school year.Reflection NarrativeI have been teaching at Benjamin Banneker Middle School since August of 2003. When I firstjoined the Instructional Leadership Team in 2005, there was major concern around the issue ofparents and teachers not working together to improve communication between the two stake-holder groups. In fact, on many occasions parents and teachers would hardly ever be seenworking together at Back-To-School Night, School Dances, or PTSA meetings.Over the past few years, I have been contemplating on how to go about improving thecommunication between staff members and parents. During this current school year I decided tobecome an active member of the PTSA at Benajmin Banneker Middle School. One of the firstassignments the PTSA president gave me to work on was recruiting new members (teachers) into the association. I knew this would be a difficult job based on the history between the twogroups (parents and teachers). I started the task by thinking of a way to reach the majority of thestaff without having to meet with each staff member directly. This process eventually led to medrafting a general letter to staff members at Banneker.The staff letter sent out to teachers made a general request for staff members to support thePTSA through helping to provide funds for social events, community outreach programs, andeducational opportunities for students and teachers. The staff letter generated a large responsefrom the staff that was not really sure how to support the PTSA since the school did not have apresident at the beginning of the school year. I will continue collecting staff membership duesthrough next week. I will report out to PTSA board members on Tuesday, November 9, 2010 onmy efforts to raise revenue for the association. 46
  49. 49. Artifact for Standard 5: Acting with Integrity and Fairness, and in an Ethical MannerNames of Artifact(s): Controversial Advisory Reading on Pakistan’s Staggering DisasterDate: September 23, 2010Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolMontgomery County Public SchoolsArtifactsThe artifact listed above illustrates my role as a member of the school leadership team who is responsiblefor treating all staff members with integrity, fairness, and always acting in an ethical manner. The artifactis an article which was used as a school-wide reading exercise for students during advisory (MarylandState Assessment prep class). The reading itself discussed some recent economic/environmental problemsthe people and government of Pakistan were currently facing. However, the reading questions studentsneeded to answer, following the reading, were not a direct match to the article. In fact, the questionscreated some animosity between a Muslim teacher in my department (Social Studies)and the Englishdepartment chair that was responsible for selecting the reading for student advisory classes.Reflection NarrativeThe day after students read an article on Pakistan, the English department chair approached me to discusswhat he was hearing from another teacher in his department about one of the Social Studies teachersbeing upset with the advisory reading article. The teacher was Muslim and apparently she took offense tothe racial undertone of the reading questions at the end of the article. A few of the questions asked thefollowing: What is the nature of the ―extremist groups‖ in Pakistan? What is the relationship between the U.S. and Pakistan? How do Pakistanis view the U.S.? How does the Afghanistan war affect Pakistan?The English department chair asked me if I could talk with the teacher in order to de-escalate the issuebetween both of them over the advisory reading article. I told the English department chair that I wouldbe willing to assist him in helping to solve the problem. However, I also stated to the English departmentchair that he needs to look at the issue from both sides of the lens. Although the issue could have been amisinterpretation on both parts, the offended teacher’s reality is her reality. Once we concluded ourconversation about the issue, I went to visit the seventh grade social studies teacher who was offended bythe advisory article. When arrived to her class, I asked the teacher to give her thoughts about why she feltthe way she did about the article. I never attempted to justify what was or was not in the article or attemptto make it seem like it was all one big misunderstanding. However, I did ask her how we can bettercommunicate with each other as a school to ensure that another culturally sensitive article is not placedbefore the staff and student body in the future? I wanted the teacher to feel like her feelings and opinionswere being heard and that she was also going to be a part of the solution to make sure something like thiswould not happen again. At the conclusion of our meeting, I apologized for the controversial andoffensive nature of the article and ensured her that the advisory reading selection team will take a closerlook at articles in the future before they are selected. The issue was resolved to the satisfaction of theteacher without involving the Principal or other school level administrators. 47
  50. 50. Artifact for Standard 6: The Political, Social, Economic, Legal and Cultural ContextNames of Artifact(s): Co-Teaching Model Job Responsibilities Checklist, Special EducationAccessibility Planner, and Special Education Accommodation Quick Reference GuideDate: December 20, 2010Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolMontgomery County Public SchoolsArtifactsThe artifacts listed above illustrate my role as department chair of the Social Studies Department thatrequires me toevaluate the instructional practices of teachers who are responsible for meeting theeducational needs of all students. The Co-Teaching Model Job Responsibilities Checklist, SpecialEducation Accessibility Planner, and Special Education Accommodation Quick Reference Guide wasdeveloped to assist regular classroom teachers and co-teachers, in the Social Studies Department, withmeeting the educational needs of Special Education students placed in their classes as a result of full-inclusion state laws.Reflection NarrativePrior to the start of the 2010 – 2011 school year, the Social Studies Department at Benjamin BannekerMiddle School was one of two departments school-wide that had not participated in full-inclusionclassrooms. However, new Special Education laws for the state of Maryland required all schools toeventually move toward full-inclusion classes. The Principal and his staff decided to move forward withthe full-inclusion model school-wide for the 2010 – 2011 school year. At the start of the school year,many teachers in the Social Studies Department were feeling a great deal of anxiety about teaching undera co-taught model of instruction. After a month into the school year, teachers in the department werefrustrated with the lack of academic production of the Special Education students and did not know howto address the problem in the classroom. In addition, teachers were also frustrated with the lack ofinstructional knowledge of their co-teachers and work production. During the month of Novemberdepartment meeting, following the conclusion of the first marking period, the teachers and I developedsome strategies to assist the Special Education students with improving academically and I developed aRoles and Responsibilities worksheet for the general education teacher and para-educator to agree uponsome assigned classroom tasks.Three weeks into the second quarter, teachers in the department were beginning to have more successwith providing the proper academic support for special education students in their classes. Teachers wereusing the Accessibility Planner more often when planning instruction and were using theAccommodations Quick Reference Guide to gather strategies for simplifying instructional concepts,identifying appropriate instructional resources, and modifying testing documents. As a result ofpromoting the importance that all students can learn, teachers began to see a vast improvement in theacademic grades of their special education students and began to build better working relationships withthem. Although moving to a co-taught model of instruction was somewhat difficult for teachers in thebeginning, they eventually realized that all children have the same right to a ―free and appropriateeducation‖ no matter what their intellectual limitations are they posses. 48
  51. 51. ISLLC Standard I: An education leader promotes the success of every student by facilitating thedevelopment, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning that is sharedand supported by the community. The Opportunity Joe was ready and anxious to find a principalship. He had taught in public schools for ten years.During that time, he had distinguished himself as a classroom teacher, curriculum innovator, and campusleader. During the last three years, Joe had completed his master’s degree and principal certification. Joe was recommended by his university professors for a high school principalship, and thesuperintendent of the school district needing a principal asked Joe to come to interview with him and theschool board. Although the school district was over 200 miles from his present home, Joe knew that thehigh school had a good reputation in academics and student activities. The school was not too big, norwas it too small. It was an ideal setting for a new principal to gain experience. Joe knew that in two years the principal of his present high school (a truly outstanding and high-paying high school and community) was planning to retire. Joe’s principal had already talked to Joe abouttaking his position when he retired, but he emphasized how important it was for Joe to obtain someexperience at a smaller school. The principal, and Joe, too, felt that the superintendent, school board, andsite-based management committee would have a much easier time accepting Joe as a principal if he had―proven‖ himself elsewhere. In fact, Joe’s principal had already been talking with the superintendent andschool board about bringing Joe back as principal after he had gained experience elsewhere. Everybodyseemed to think that Joe’s chances we’re good to be named principal of his current school after gainingexperience and showing his ability elsewhere. Upon learning of his selection for an interview, Joe decided that he would call the superintendent.To his surprise, the superintendent invited Joe to come over for a visit. Joe left early one morning andplanned to spend all day at the school. The superintendent and Joe hit it off immediately. It was as if theyhad known each other for years. Joe knew that this was the job he wanted. As the day wore on, the superintendent called Joe into his office and shut the door. ―Joe, he said,―I think that I can work well with you. The Board will listen to my recommendation. However, I cannotanswer the questions the Board will ask you. I know that one of the major issues in the selection of acandidate will be whether they are considering this a long-term commitment or just a steppingstone. The other two candidates have both stated that they want to come into our community and make ittheir home. You need to think long and hard how you want to answer the question when it comes up. Ican honestly say that someone who does not consider this a long-term commitment will have a slimchance of getting the job‖. 49
  52. 52. Questions for Consideration/DiscussionA. What answer would you give to the “big question” from the Board? Why? I would accept the position and state that I would agree to join the community long-term. Nothing in life is guaranteed, so I would not put all of my marbles in one jar. The principalship that was being guaranteed to Joe might not ever be delivered on. Also, the community of a school plays an important role in choosing a school leader, so there is no guarantee that I would be granted the principalship at Joe’s current school. 1. What is your ultimate career goal? My ultimate career goal is to become Superintendent of a public school system and/or President of a university. 2. What are your plans to achieve this goal? First, I will complete my Masters of Arts Program in Administration and Supervision. Second, I will seek the position of an Assistant Principal in the county where I currently work, or another county that is looking for innovative leaders. Third, I will further my education by applying for admittance into a doctorial program for Educational Leadership. Finally, while I am finishing up my doctorial program in Educational Leadership, I will work toward achieving a principalship. 3. Does your career goal and plan to achieve it have any bearing ultimately on your ability to develop a shared mission/vision for your school? Yes. The ability to develop a shared mission / vision for my school is important because it will allow me and the people who work for me to be able to accomplish their professional goals. 50

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