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School administration practicum_portfolio2_-_fall_2010_-_spring_2011 (1) School administration practicum_portfolio2_-_fall_2010_-_spring_2011 (1) Document Transcript

  • School Administration and Supervision Practicum Portfolio Submitted by: Lorenzo R. Prillman Bowie State University School of Education/Department of Education LeadershipESAS 828/858 Seminar & Practicum in Education Leadership Instructor: Dr. Barbara Jackson Submission Date: May 05, 2011 0
  • Table of ContentsSite Practicum Description ........................................................................................................................... 1Professional Resume………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……...2 - 3College Transcripts…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….….…..4 - 5Teacher Certification .................................................................................................................................... 6Philosophy of Education Leadership……………………………………………………………………………………………….7 - 8Professional Internship Project #1…………………………………………………………………………………………….….9 - 28Professional Internship Project #2…………………………………………………………………………………………………29 - 41ISLLC Activities: Standards 1 – 6………………………………………………………………………………………….…………42 - 48Vignette Activities: Standards 1 –6……………………………………………………………………..…………………………49 - 63Novice Principal Professional DevelopmentPlan…………………………………………….…………….………………64 - 75Novice Principal Work Entry Plan…………………………………………………………………………..………………………76 - 81Six School Administrators Responsibilities………………………………………………………………….…………………82 - 84Practicum Reflections Log………………………………………………………………………………………………………………85 - 92Certificates/Awards……………………………………………………………………………………….…………………………….93 - 103Site Supervisor’s Evaluation…………………………………………………………………………………………………..…..104 - 106 i
  • Description of Practicum SiteBenjamin Banneker Middle School is a public school located in the suburbs ofBurtonsville, Maryland. The school district in which BBMS resides isMontgomery County Public Schools. The Burtonsville community ispredominantly a blue-collar, working class community. Approximately fifty-onepercent of adults twenty-five years and older hold advanced degrees. The medianfamily income for this city is approximately one-hundred and five-thousanddollars. The demographics of the middle school are approximately 61% African-American, 15% Caucasian-American, 11% Hispanic-American, and 13% Asian-American. There are a total of approximately seven hundred and sixty kids thatattend BBMS. The students who attended this middle school range in age fromeleven to fourteen. The middle school provides educational services for students ingrades six through eight. Additional educational services are also offered to ESOL(English for Speakers of Other Languages) and Special Education students. Theannual academic goals for the school and school district are for students to achievea score of proficient or advanced on the reading/math portion of the MarylandState Assessment exam, and to have students take more rigorous course work(e.g., advanced English, Social Studies, Science, and Math). Benjamin Banneker Middle School 14800 Perrywood Drive Burtonsville, Maryland 20866 1
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  • Philosophy of Education Leadership My philosophy of education leadership stems from the beliefs of presidential biographerand professor James MacGregor Burns. Transformational leadership was a concept establishedby Burns in his research on prominent political leaders. Transformational leadership is defined asa leadership approach that causes change in individuals and social systems. Leaders who adopt atransformational leadership style develop followers into leaders. According to Burns, thetransformational leadership approach creates significant change in the lives of people andorganizations (Burns, 1978). Transformational leaders develop the ability to create positivechange through modeling expected behavior for individuals, team members, the organization,and/or community. Therefore, my philosophy of education leadership focuses on developingpeople into leaders who facilitate decision making and promote change. Burns states ―followersof transformational leaders feel trust, admiration, loyalty, and respect for the leader because oftheir willingness to work harder than originally expected.‖ I believe transformational leaders appeal to the heart of individuals because they are self-motivated as well as motivate the people around them. According to Thomas Sergiovanni, theheart of leadership deals with a person’s beliefs, values, dreams, and their commitment toanother person’s vision (Sergiovanni, 2009). Transformational leadership allows for a schoolleader to develop and shape school culture through dedication and hard work of investedstakeholders. As a transformational leader, I will ensure students, teachers, and parents areinvolved in the decision making process regarding educational issues like school curriculum,new technology, diversity training, and school-based management. Finally, it is important to notethat transformational leaders are not afraid to take risks in order to improve student achievementand/or school culture. 7
  • BibliographyBurns, J.M. (1978). Leadership. New York, New York: Harper & Row.Sergiovanni, T. J. A (2009). The Principalship: A Reflective Practice Perspective. Boston, Massachusetts: Allyn and Bacon. 8
  • Internship Project #1: Co-Teaching Analysis Study 2010 - 2011Artifact for Standard 2: Social Studies Department Co-Teaching Model Study ResultsNames of Artifact(s): Co-Teaching Model Analysis Data Collection Excel Sheets and Co-Teaching Model Study ResultsDate: May 05, 2011Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolMontgomery County Public SchoolsArtifactsThe artifacts listed above illustrate my role as department chair of the Social Studies Departmentwhich requires me to evaluate the co-taught (inclusion) instructional model. The quantitativeresearch study was supported by teachers in the Social Studies Department who assisted withcollecting Special Education students’ achievement data over the course of three markingperiods. Student achievement data was collected on Excel spread sheets and analyzed usingSPSS software. A data analysis report was completed on student achievement results of SpecialEducation students in Social Studies classes. The Social Studies Department Co-TeachingAnalysis Study was conducted as a result of the need to give meaningful and timely feedback onthe progression of our Special Education population within the full inclusion instructional model.In addition, the study wanted to show whether or not the co-taught instructional model was morebeneficial for male or female students. The results of the study were used to make decisionsabout teacher instructional practices under the co-teaching model, and the structure of classes forSpecial Education students for next school year.Reflection NarrativeFollowing the end of the first marking period, the Special Education department chair,administration, and the Social Studies department chair held a meeting to discuss ways toimprove the co-teaching instructional model. Banneker Middle School is currently in the secondyear of implementing the co-taught instructional model for full inclusion of Special Educationstudents. During the meeting, leaders discussed ways in which the school could improve theacademic performance of Special Education students under the co-taught model. As chair of theSocial Studies department, I gave the suggestion of collecting student performance data onSpecial Education students receiving instruction within the full inclusion model. Although thiswas the first year for the Social Studies department participating in the full inclusion model, Iwanted to ensure teachers in my department that the proper steps would be taken to improve theacademic performance of Special Education students for the following school year. Therefore, Ivolunteered to have the Social Studies department collect summative assessment data of SpecialEducation students in their co-taught classrooms. 9
  • During the first three marking periods, teachers collected end of unit assessment exam scores ofstudents which were later used to measure the impact of the co-taught instructional model onmale and female Special Education achievement. Using SPSS software, student scores wereanalyzed to see if the co-taught instructional model had a greater impact on male or femalestudents. The scores of students were analyzed in this manner due to the lack of studentperformance data from year one implementation of the co-taught teaching model. In addition tocollecting and analyzing student test scores, students were also given a student questionnaire tocomplete which gathered information on their beliefs about the relevancy of the co-taughtinstructional model. The data analysis results for the student end of unit assessment scoresrevealed that the majority of Special Education students, across grade levels, were performing ata below average (66.6%) rate. Although students were performing at a below average rate, thestudent questionnaire revealed that the majority of students believed the co-taught instructionalmodel made a significant impact on their learning, believed the instructional pace of their classeswere fairly appropriate for their learning styles, and wanted to remain in the co-taughtinstructional model in the future. Despite the positive feedback of students thoughts about therelevancy of the co-taught instructional model, the below average student test scores of studentswas a cause for concern.The co-taught instructional model data analysis report made a few recommendations on how toenhance the academic performance of Special Education students’ in the future. First, it wasagreed upon by the Social Studies Department and Special Education Department teachers thatmore frequent checks for student understanding was needed. Second, alternative ways toassessing student mastery of concepts such as product-based assessments was also needed. Thetwo recommendations that were made to improve the academic performance of studentachievement led to the development of my second internship project which involved all sixmembers of the Social Studies department collaborating on writing goals and objectives for theirProfessional Development Plans which related to the instructional needs of Special Educationstudents. Overall, the report raised the questions about whether the placing of Special Educationstudents in advanced courses, which usually move at a faster instructional pace, is appropriate forthe learning challenges they endure. A follow up study was recommended to be conducted on theimpact of the co-taught instructional model on male and female Special Education student’sacademic achievement which would encompass all four core academic subject areas (English,Social Studies, Math and Science). 10
  • Impact of Co-Teaching Model on Male and Female Student AchievementProfessional Internship Project 1 - Social Studies Department Co-Teaching Model Study Results 2010 - 2011 Research Conducted by: Lorenzo R. Prillman Research Assistants: Tiffany McEwan, Adrienne D’Orazio, Cari Huffman & Sabrina Khan Bowie State University School of Education Department of Elementary and Secondary Education Leadership ESAS 828/858, Practicum/Seminar in School Administration and Supervision Dr. Barbara Jackson May 05, 2011 11
  • Analysis of the Data This academic study examined the impact of the co-teaching model on student achievement forspecial education students. The Null Hypothesis for this study stated there was no significant differencebetweenacademic performance of male and female special education students receiving regular classroominstruction under the co-teaching model. The significance level for this study was set at .05. The researchstudy explored one essential question pertaining to the importance of the co-teaching model: 1. Did the co-teaching model impact male and female special education student’sacademic achievement differently? The study also observed the level of student interest with attending classes under the co-teachingmodel, and their conviction about the impact of the co-taught instructional model on their learning. Thefour student questionnaire questions analyzed for this portion of the study were as follows: 1. Did special education students enjoy attending instructional classes under the co-teaching model? 2. If given a choice of remaining in the co-taught instructional model or transitioning back into small instructional classes, which instructional model would they choose? 3. Did special education students believe the co-taught instructional model had a significant (major) impact on their learning (improved reading, writing, and communication skills)? 4. Did the instructional pace of the class allow for special education students to learn and retain information (educational concepts) long enough to consistently perform successfully on formative and summative assessments? 12
  • Results Independent Samples Test Levenes Test for Equality of Variances t-test for Equality of Means 95% Confidence Interval of the Sig. (2- Mean Std. Error Difference F Sig. t df tailed) Difference Difference Lower UpperUnit1 Equal variances .346 .560 1.105 44 .275 4.46857 4.04537 -3.68434 12.62149 assumed Equal variances 1.112 43.532 .272 4.46857 4.01859 -3.63283 12.56997 not assumedUnit2 Equal variances .000 .998 1.071 43 .290 4.35119 4.06427 -3.84518 12.54757 assumed Equal variances 1.072 42.436 .290 4.35119 4.05832 -3.83634 12.53872 not assumedUnit3 Equal variances 2.169 .148 .903 43 .372 4.11310 4.55443 -5.07180 13.29799 assumed Equal variances .926 40.617 .360 4.11310 4.44085 -4.85794 13.08413 not assumed The Independent Samples T- Test was utilized to determine if the variance in scores between male and female special education students were equal. The variance in student scores for each end of unit assessment, reflected the null hypothesis which stated there was no difference in the variance of scores between male and female special education students because P = .275 > .05 (Unit1), P = .290 > .05 (Unit 2), and P = .372 > .05 (Unit 3). Due to the critical value (t) of 1.105 (Unit 1), 1.071 (Unit 2), and .903 (Unit 3) falling inside the acceptance region of the interval scale, the variance in student assessment scores were not considered statistically significant. The results of the test supported the generalization that majority of the male and female students who participated in the co-taught instructional model would benefit academically in similar ways. 13
  • Table 2Expected Frequency Counts for Question 3 of Student Questionnaire Chi-Square Tests Asymp. Sig. (2- Exact Sig. (2- Exact Sig. (1- Value df sided) sided) sided) aPearson Chi-Square .621 1 .431 bContinuity Correction .194 1 .660Likelihood Ratio .628 1 .428Fishers Exact Test .503 .332Linear-by-Linear Association .607 1 .436N of Valid Cases 45a. 0 cells (.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum expected count is 5.13.b. Computed only for a 2x2 table In the Pearson Chi-Square test for independence, the frequency of student responses tofour questionnaire questions were analyzed to determine student preference for attendinginstructional classes, under the co-teaching model, was directly related to gender. Results of theChi-Square data analysis for question three of the student questionnaire reflected the nullhypothesis which stated there was no significant difference between special education students’gender and their preference for attending instructional classes under the co-teaching modelbecause P = .431 > .05. Due to the critical value (a) of .621 falling within the acceptance regionof the interval scale, frequency results for question three of the student questionnaire was notconsidered statistically significant. The Results of the test supported the generalization thatmajority of male and female students who participated in the co-taught instructional model hadsimilar views regarding their preference for attending class. Out of forty-five special educationstudents surveyed, seventeen boys and seventeen girls stated they liked attending classes underthe co-teaching model. Nonetheless, seven boys and four girls stated they did not like attendingclasses under the co-teaching model (See Appendix D). 14
  • Table 3Expected Frequency Counts for Question 4 of Student Questionnaire Chi-Square Tests Asymp. Sig. (2- Value df sided) aPearson Chi-Square 1.503 2 .472Likelihood Ratio 1.545 2 .462Linear-by-Linear Association .001 1 .975N of Valid Cases 45a. 2 cells (33.3%) have expected count less than 5. The minimumexpected count is 1.87. The results of the Chi-Square data analysis for question four of the studentquestionnaire reflected the null hypothesis which stated there was no significant differencebetween male and female special education students’ beliefs about academic achievement due tothem attending classes under the co-teaching model because P = .472 > .05. Due to the criticalvalue (a) of 1.503 falling inside the acceptance region of the interval scale, frequency results forquestion four of the student questionnaire were not considered statistically significant. Results ofthe test supported the generalization that majority of male and female students who participatedin the co-taught instructional model had similar views about whether or not the co-taught modelhad a significant impact on their learning. Out of forty-five special education students surveyed,ten boys and seven girls believed the co-teaching model had a significant impact on theirlearning. Eleven boys and thirteen girls believed the co-teaching model somewhat impacted theirlearning. Three boys and one girl believed the co-teaching model did not have a significantimpact on their learning (See Appendix E). 15
  • Table 4Expected Frequency Counts for Question 5 of Student Questionnaire Chi-Square Tests Asymp. Sig. (2- Exact Sig. (2- Exact Sig. (1- Value df sided) sided) sided) aPearson Chi-Square .379 1 .538 bContinuity Correction .082 1 .775Likelihood Ratio .378 1 .539Fishers Exact Test .743 .387Linear-by-Linear Association .370 1 .543N of Valid Cases 45a. 0 cells (.0%) have expected count less than 5. The minimum expected count is 6.07.b. Computed only for a 2x2 table The results of the Chi-Square data analysis for question five of the studentquestionnaire reflected the null hypothesis which stated there was no significant differencebetween male and female special education students academic performance on formative andsummative assessments due to the instructional pace of co-taught classes because P = .538 >.05. Due to the critical value (a) of .379 falling inside the acceptance region of the interval scale,frequency results for question five of the student questionnaire were not considered statisticallysignificant. Results of the test supported the generalization that majority of male and femalespecial education students, who received instruction under the co-teaching model, had similarviews as to whether or not the instructional pace of the class enhanced or did not enhance theirperformance on formative and summative assessments. Out of forty-five special educationstudents surveyed, eighteen boys and fourteen girls stated they believed the instructional pace ofthe co-taught class provided them the ability to perform successfully on formative andsummative assessments. Six boys and seven girls stated they did not believe the instructionalpace of the co-taught classes provided for them the ability to perform successfully on formativeand summative assessments (See Appendix F). 16
  • Table 5Expected Frequency Counts for Question 6 of Student Questionnaire Chi-Square Tests Asymp. Sig. (2- Value df sided) aPearson Chi-Square .621 2 .733Likelihood Ratio .628 2 .730Linear-by-Linear Association .029 1 .865N of Valid Cases 45a. 1 cells (16.7%) have expected count less than 5. The minimumexpected count is 4.67. The results of the Chi-Square data analysis for question six of the student questionnairereflected the null hypothesis which stated there was no significant difference between male andfemale special education student’s preference for attending classes under the co-teaching modelor returning to small instructional classes because P = .733 > .05. Due to the critical value (a) of.621 falling inside the acceptance region of the interval scale, frequency results for question sixof the student questionnaire were not considered statistically significant. Results of the testsupported the generalization that majority of male and female students who participated in theco-taught instructional model had similar views as to whether or not they remained in the co-taught instructional model or return to smaller instructional classes. Out of forty-five specialeducation students surveyed, twelve boys and twelve girls stated they wanted to continueattending classes under the co-taught instructional model. Seven boys and four girls stated theywanted to return to smaller instructional classes. Five boys and five girls stated the instructionalmodel in which they attended classes did not have any relevance (See Appendix G). 17
  • Summary and Conclusions Data results for the essential question of this academic study failed to reject the NullHypothesis which stated there was no significant difference between the academic performance of maleand female special education students receiving regular classroom instruction under the co-teachingmodel, due to the variance in student end of unit assessment scores not being consideredstatistically significant. The small variance in special education students’ end of unit assessmentscores from the mean score of each assessment revealed the majority of students, male or female,were consistently performing academically on the same level. Special education studentscombined average mean scores for all three end of unit exams was sixty-six percent, a belowaverage assessment score. Data results for questions three, four, five, and six of the student questionnaire failed toreject the Null Hypothesis for each question due to the frequency results of student responses notbeing considered statistically significant. The Null Hypothesis for each question stated thefollowing: Question 3 – there was no significant difference between special education students’gender and their preference for attending instructional classes under the co-teaching model. Question 4 – there was no significant difference between male and female specialeducation students’ beliefs regarding academic achievement due to them attending classes underthe co-teaching model. Question 5 – there was no significant difference between male and female specialeducation students academic performance on formative and summative assessments due to theinstructional pace of co-taught classes. 18
  • Question 6 – there was no significant difference between male and female specialeducation students’ preference for attending classes under the co-teaching model or returning tosmall instructional classes. Overall results of male and female student responses for each question on thequestionnaire revealed the majority of special education students enjoyed attending class underthe co-taught instructional model, believed the co-taught instructional model made a significantimpact on their learning, believed the instructional pace of their classes were fairly appropriatefor their learning styles, and wanted to remain in the co-taught instructional model in the future. Recommendations First, due to the end of unit assessment scores for special education students in SocialStudies averaging sixty-six percent across all three grade levels, an instructional strategy ofproviding more frequent checks for student understanding, during the course of a lesson, needs tobe implemented. Second, teachers need to develop alternative ways such as product-basedassessments to measure special education students’ mastery of content learning indicators. Third,results from the student questionnaire showed how majority of special education studentsenjoyed spending their class time learning under the co-taught instructional model. The belowaverage end of unit scores, across grade levels, in Social Studies raised concerns about whetherthe placing of special education students in advanced courses, which usually move at a fasterinstructional pace, is appropriate for the learning challenges they endure. Finally, based onoverall results of the data, I recommend a follow-up study be conducted on the impact of the co-taught instructional model on male and female special education student’s academic achievementthat would encompass all four core academic subject areas (English, Social Studies, Math andScience). 19
  • Appendices Appendix ASpecial Education Special Education is the educating of students with special needs in a way that addresses the students individual differences and needs. Ideally, this process involves individually planned and systematically monitored arrangements of teaching procedures, adapted equipment and materials, accessible settings, and other interventions designed to help learners with special needs achieve a higher level of personal self-sufficiency and success in school and community than would be available if the student were only given access to a typical classroom education.Co-Teaching Model of Inclusion Inclusion in education is an approach to educating students with special educational needs. Under the inclusion model, students with special needs spend most or all of their time with non-disabled students. Fully inclusive schools, which are rare, no longer distinguish between "general education" and "special education" programs; instead, the school is restructured so that all students learn together.Sample Group/Population A number of individuals, items or events selected from a population for a study, preferably in such a way that represents the larger group from which they were selected.Null Hypothesis States there is no significant relation or difference between variables (independent and dependent).Alternative Hypothesis States there is a significant relation between variables (independent and dependent).P Value The p-value is the probability that a research study sample could have been drawn from the population(s) being tested (or that a more improbable sample could be drawn) given the assumption that the null hypothesis is true.Statistical Significance The conclusion of a research study that states the results are unlikely to have occurred by chance— that is the observed relation or difference is probably 1.0 or less. 20
  • Dependent Variable The change or difference in a behavior or characteristic that occurs as a result of the independent or grouping variable. Also called effect, outcome or posttest variable.Independent Variable A behavior or characteristic under the control of the researcher and believed to influence some other behavior or characteristic. Also called experimental variable, manipulated variable, cause variable or treatment variableStatistical Mean The most common expression for the mean of a statistical distribution with a discrete random variable is the mathematical average of all the terms. To calculate, add the values of all the terms and divide by the number of terms.Independent Sample t-test A parametric test of significance used to determine whether, at a selected probability level, the means of two independent samples are significantly different.Chi Square Test Chi-square is a statistical test commonly used to compare observed data with data we would expect to obtain according to a specific hypothesis. The chi-square test for independence always tests what scientists call the null hypothesis, which state there is no significant difference between the expected and observed result.Variance Variance is defined as the amount of spread among scores. If the variance is small, the scores are close together. If it is large, the scores are more spread out. Calculation of the variance shows how far each score is from the mean.Reliability The degree to which a test (or qualitative research data) consistently measures whatever it measures.SPSS Data Software SPSS Inc. is a leading worldwide provider of predictive analytics software and solutions. SPSS software assists researchers with computing statistical data gathered during research. 21
  • Appendix BFigure 1.1Average End of Unit Assessment Scores for Special Education Students Group Statistics Gender N Mean Std. Deviation Std. Error MeanUnit1 1.00 25 66.0400 14.11996 2.82399 2.00 21 61.5714 13.10180 2.85905Unit2 1.00 24 73.5417 13.73659 2.80397 2.00 21 69.1905 13.44477 2.93389Unit3 1.00 24 67.2083 17.61664 3.59598 2.00 21 63.0952 11.94113 2.60577 74 72 70 68 66 Unit 1 64 Unit 2 Unit 3 62 60 58 56 Male FemaleAverage Social Studies End of Unit Assessment Scores for Sixth, Seventh and Eighth GradeSpecial Education Students 22
  • Appendix CIn this questionnaire, you will find questions about yourself. Some questions askfor facts while other questions ask for your opinions.Read each question carefully and answer as accurately as possible. You may askfor help if you do not understand something, or are not sure how to respond. 1. Are you a girl or a boy? Check one box onlyGirl--------------------------------------------------------------------Boy-------------------------------------------------------------------- 2. Which of the following best describes you? Check one or more boxesWhite--------------------------------------------------------------Black or African American-------------------------------------Asian---------------------------------------------------------------Hispanic or Latino------------------------------------------------American Indian or Alaska Native-----------------------------Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander--------------------Mixed Heritage---------------------------------------------------- 3. Do you like attending instructional classes under the co-teaching model? Check one box onlyYES---------------------------------------------------------------NO---------------------------------------------------------------- 23
  • 4. Do you believe the co-teaching model has had a significant (major) impact on your learning (improved reading, writing, and communication skills)? Check one box only1 – Significant ------------------------------------------------2 – Somewhat Significant-----------------------------------3 – Not Significant------------------------------------------- 5. Did the instructional pace of the class allow for you to learn and retain (hold on to) information long enough to consistently perform successfully on formative and summative assessments?Check one box onlyYES--------------------------------------------------------------NO--------------------------------------------------------------- 6. If you had a choice of remaining in the co-taught instructional model or moving back to small instructional classes, which one would you choose?Check one box only 1 - Remain in current co-taught instructional model-------------- 2 - Return to small instructional classes--------------------------- 3 - Instructional model does not matter to me-------------------- 24
  • Appendix DFigure 1.2Frequency Count Results for Question 3 of Student Questionnaire CrosstabCount Gender 1.00 2.00 TotalSQQ3R 1.00 17 17 34 2.00 7 4 11Total 24 21 45 18 16 14 12 10 Yes 8 No 6 4 2 0 Male FemaleQuestion 3: Did special education students like attending instructional classes under the co-teaching model? 25
  • Appendix EFigure 1.3Frequency Count Results for Question 4 of Student Questionnaire CrosstabCount Gender 1.00 2.00 TotalSQQR4 1.00 10 7 17 2.00 11 13 24 3.00 3 1 4Total 24 21 45 14 12 10 8 Significant 6 Somewhat Signficant Not Significant 4 2 0 Male FemaleQuestion 4: Did special education students believe the co-taught instructional model had a significant(major) impact on their learning (improved reading, writing, and communication skills)? 26
  • Appendix FFigure 1.4Frequency Count Results for Question 5 of Student Questionnaire CrosstabCount Gender 1.00 2.00 TotalSQQ5R 3.00 18 14 32 4.00 6 7 13Total 24 21 45 20 18 16 14 12 10 Yes 8 No 6 4 2 0 Male FemaleQuestion 5: Did the instructional pace of the class allow for special education students to learn and retaininformation (educational concepts) long enough to consistently perform successfully on formative andsummative assessments? 27
  • Appendix GFigure 1.5Frequency Count Results for Question 6 of Student Questionnaire CrosstabCount Gender 1.00 2.00 TotalSQQR6 1.00 12 12 24 2.00 7 4 11 3.00 5 5 10Total 24 21 45 14 12 10 Remain in Co-Taught Classes 8 Return to Small Classes 6 Instructional Model Does Not 4 Matter 2 0 Male FemaleQuestion 6: If given a choice of remaining in the co-taught instructional model or transitioning back intosmall instructional classes, which instructional model would they choose? 28
  • Artifact for Standard 2: Teacher Professional Development Plans, Montgomery County PublicSchools Standards for Teachers, and Co-Taught Analysis Study RecommendationsNames of Artifact(s): Sample Teacher Professional Development Plans (Department Goals andObjectives are Related to Internship Project #1)Date: May 05, 2011Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolMontgomery County Public SchoolsArtifactsThe artifacts listed above were used by members of the Social Studies Department, in acollaborative way, to improve student achievement for Special Education students and lowachieving comprehensive students. Teachers in the Social Studies department reviewed theresults of the co-taught analysis study to get an idea of what instructional improvements neededto be made in order to improve student achievement. After reviewing the co-taught analysisstudy recommendations, teachers in the Social Studies Department utilized the MontgomeryCounty Public Schools Teaching Standards Guide to draft preliminary professional developmentgoals and objectives.Reflection NarrativeFollowing the end of the third marking period, teachers in the Social Studies Department cametogether to discuss ways of how to improve student achievement for Special Education studentsand low achieving comprehensive students. As a collaborative group, the department decidedthat there was a need to put an instructional plan together in order to meet the many instructionalchallenges faced by teachers in co-taught classes. During the April department meeting, teacherscollaborated together to produce a universal professional development plan which incorporateddepartment/teacher instructional goals and objectives. Goal one of the Social Studies Departmentprofessional development plan was a shared goal/objectives to be implemented by the entiredepartment in grades six, seven and eight. Goal one of the Social Studies Departmentprofessional development plan was created to improve the formative and summative assessmentscores of Special Education students. Department members developed a system to consistentlycheck for student understanding, during the course of a lesson, and a way to develop multipleproduct-based assessments. Goal two of the PDP allowed for teachers in the Social Studiesdepartment to address one other professional development need. Teachers used the MCPSprofessional growth handbook to choose a teaching standard to address for goal two of theirprofessional development plans. After department members completed their professionaldevelopment plans, they submitted them to their principal and department chair for approval.The Social Studies Department instructional program has significantly improved as a result ofsteps taken to improve the academic outcomes for Special Education students and low achievingcomprehensive students. 29
  • Professional Development PlanName: Lorenzo R. Prillman Date: 04/29/2011Educator’s School District: Montgomery County Public SchoolsEducator’s Employee ID#: 000069337Educator’s Current Educational Assignment: Content Specialist, Social Studies DepartmentNumber of Year(s) in Current Assignment: 02Years of Educational Experience: 15School: Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolLength of Professional Growth Cycle: ___X_ 3-years ____ 4-years ____5 years (check one)Duration of Plan: May 01, 2011 through May 01, 2014Check – In Dates: December 2011, May 2012, December 2012, May 2013, December 2013 and May 2014End of PDP Cycle Review: May 2014Year in Professional Development Cycle: Year 1Key Note: Prior to developing a Professional Development Plan, teachers should spend sometime reviewing their school district’s goals (School District Improvement Plan), their school’sgoals (School Improvement Plan), and keeping a reflective educational journal that documentsthe many challenges faced by the educator during his/her tenure in the present school. Reviewingboth plans will ensure that the Professional Development Plan is aligned with the district’s andschool’s goals for professional development and accountability. Teachers PDP goal(s),objective(s), and activities(s) must address two or more of the Montgomery County PublicSchools (MCPS) standards for school teachers.Step 1: Preparing to Write the Plan: Self Reflection(Not required to be included in the PDP) 30
  • In reflecting upon this past year as an educator at Benjamin Banneker Middle School, whichmajority was spent analyzing student academic performance data, I was able to identify twoMontgomery County Public Schools Teaching Standards (MCPSTS) that needed to be addressedin order to improve student achievement. Improving Co-Taught student performance onformative and summative assessments (Standard 2) at BBMS was important in order to addressissues of students failing to master the indicators of learning for the Advanced Social Studiescurriculum. In addition, improving student achievement for all ethnic subgroups as defined bythe Maryland State Assessment (Standard 3) was needed in order to facilitate better workingrelationships with students and parents that will lead to positive academic outcomes for students.Step 2: Writing the Plan: Components (At least two professional development goals areincluded in the plan) A. Contextual Description of Job Site: Teacher SituationI am moving into my second year as the Social Studies Department Content Specialist atBenjamin Banneker Middle School which is located in the suburbs of Burtonsville, Maryland.The community in which the school resides is predominantly a blue-collar, working classcommunity. The demographics of the middle school are approximately 65% African-American,20% Caucasian-American, 10% Hispanic-American, and 5% Asian-American. The annualacademic goals for the school and district are for students to achieve a score of proficient oradvanced on the reading/math portion of the Maryland State Assessment exam and to havestudents take more rigorous course work (e.g., advanced English, Social Studies, Science, andMath). o Did you include a description of your teaching position? o Did you include the number of years you have been a teacher? o Did you include whether the school is located in an urban, suburban, or rural setting? o Did you include the ethnic, cultural, special needs, and socioeconomic makeup of the school population? o Did you include your school building and/or district goals? (Optional) B. Description of the Goal(s) to be Addressed: 31
  • (It is recommended that you use this stem: I will . . . [research, study, learn, apply, etc.] So that . . .[describe what you want to see happening differently with student learning].)I will improve Co-Taught student performance on Formative and Summative Assessments (Goal1) by developing a system to frequently check for student understanding and developing product-based assessments, so students will have greater success meeting the Social Studies Curriculumindicators of learning. In addition, I will improve student achievement for all ethnic subgroupsdefine by MSA (Goal 2) through developing a positive classroom climate for all students andproviding on-going student achievement feedback to parents, so students will be able tomaximize their learning and achieve high levels of academic success. 1. What is my desired outcome for professional growth? o Will your goal(s) impact your professional growth? o Will the professional growth you identified have an effect on student learning? C. Rationale for Your Goal(s) and Link to Self-Reflection, Educational Situation, and Educational Standards (Relate how your goal(s) is linked to your school district’s goals, your school’s goals, your self-reflection, educational situation, and list the educational standards that you will focus on for your professional growth cycle.)My two professional development goals are linked to my school district and school’s goals bythey both focusing on developing, implementing and assessing activities which will lead toenhanced student academic achievement. As one of the many educators responsible fordelivering instruction to students at BBMS, my first and foremost priority in the building is toimprove student achievement. The MCPS teaching standards I will be focusing on during theimplementation of this professional development plan will be standard 2 and standard 3. 1. How does the outcome relate to the school district’s goals and my school’s goals (SIP) o Does the rationale include how you related your self-reflection to your goal(s)? o Does the rationale tell how your goal(s) connects to your district/school/teacher position? o Did you list the MCPS standards that will promote your professional growth (must select two or more standards)? 32
  • D. Plan for Assessing and Documenting Your Goal(s):Goal 1: Improve Co-Taught Student Performance on Formative and Summative AssessmentsData sources used to establish outcome Co-Taught Students Formative Assessment Data Co-Taught Students Summative Assessment Data (Unit Exam Scores) Co-Taught Students Instructional Survey ResponsesData sources used to assess achievement of outcome Student Opening, Mid-Point, and Closing Instructional Exit Card Data Student Produced Vocabulary Booklets Student Produced End of Unit Movie Posters Student Produced Visual Representations of Instructional ConceptsGoal 2:Improve Student Achievement for all Ethnic Subgroups Defined by the MSAData sources used to establish outcome School Climate Survey Results (Previous School Year) School Ineligibility Data (Previous and Current School Year)Data sources used to assess achievement of outcome ESOL Student Performance Data on Formative and Summative Assessments (Current School Year) Student Ineligibility Data (Current School Year) Student Classroom Climate Survey Results (Current School Year) Parent Classroom Climate Survey Results (Current School Year) School Communication Log Records with Parents (Current School Year) Teacher-Student Produced Theoretical Framework Models for Student Achievement (Current School Year) 1. What data sources did I use to establish my outcome? What data will I use to assess achievement of my outcome? o Did you include methods to assess your professional growth? o Did you include methods to assess the effect of your growth on student learning? 33
  • E. Plan to Meet Your Goal(s): Objectives, Activities and Timelines, and Collaboration: 1. Which of the professional development options/strategies/techniques listed below will I use? Collaborative Options Independent Options__X__ Peer Reflective Conversations __X__ Audio/Videotape Analysis__X__ Peer Visits with Reflection (*) _____ Delivery of Workshops/Courses_____ Committee or Task Force Participation __X__ Action Research_____ Delivery of Workshops/Courses _____ Professional School Site Visits__X__ Development of Instructional Materials __X__ Review of Professional Literature__X__ Action Research Study Groups _____ Professional Training_____ Principal Networking Group _____ school-based workshops_____ New Curriculum Development ____ Out of school workshops_____ Professional School Site Visits ____ conference(s)_____ Other (be specific) __X__ Writing of an reflective journal(*) Required one year of each evaluation cycle _____ Other (be specific) 2. PDP Support Team (Resource Teacher, Principal, Assistant Principal(s), Staff Development Teacher, Technology Specialist, etc.)_______Grade Level Cohort Teacher___________ English Resource Teacher_______ Reading Specialist Resource Teacher____ ______ Data Specialist___________ Computer Technology Teacher______ ___________Media Specialist_________ 34
  • 3. List Anticipated Resources Needed for Accomplishing the Goal(s) of Your Professional Development Plan.Goal 1 Resources: Professional literature on developing formative assessments Co-teacher planning time to develop Opening, Mid-Point, and Closing exit card assessments Co-teacher planning time to develop multiple instructional delivery models to support the learning style needs of co-taught students Co-teacher planning time to develop templates for student Vocabulary Books, End of Unit Movie Posters, and Closed Activities Grant to fund additional planning time for teachers outside the regular classroomGoal 2 Resources: Professional literature on developing classroom learning stations Co-teacher planning time to develop learning station activities for students Co-teacher planning time to develop student and parent surveys Continued professional development on the use of the MCPS communication log Professional literature on developing theoretical framework models Co-teacher planning time to develop Parent Contracts and Report Card templates to upload on departmental website Co-teacher planning time to communicate with parents about social and academic issues concerning students 4. Devise a tentative timeline for the implementation of your plan with periodic benchmarks to judge your progress (Note: Completion date will be filled in as each objective/activity is completed – refer to next page for action plan guide). 35
  • Goal 1: Improve Co-Taught Student Performance on Formative and Summative Assessments Date Initiated: August 2011Objective 1: Develop A System to Frequently Check for Student Understanding Date Completed: June 2014 Activities Timeline Collaboration Date Completed Assess student August 2011 Social Studies Department Grade Level Cohorts June 2014understanding of key Through will meet on multiple occasions, during theinstructional concepts, from June 2014 regular school year, to plan the format andthe previous lesson, through (On-going) frequency of use of the OPENING EXIT CARDactivating student prior assessment during regular instruction. The collaborative process used will lead to greaterknowledge using OPENING student success on formative and summativeEXIT CARDS to begin assessments through mastering essentialdaily instruction. instructional concepts. Assess student August 2011 Social Studies Department Grade Level Cohorts June 2014understanding of key Through will meet on multiple occasions, during theinstructional concepts, June 2014 regular school year, to plan the format andlearned daily, by requiring (On-going) frequency of use of the MID-POINT LESSONstudents to give a 1 or 2 STUDENT LECTURE assessment during regular instruction. The collaborative processminute lecture at the MID- used will lead to greater student success onPOINT of the lesson using a formative and summative assessments throughholistic scoring scale. mastering essential instructional concepts.Assess student understanding August 2011 Social Studies Department Grade Level Cohorts will June 2014of key instructional concepts, Through meet on multiple occasions, during the regular June 2014 school year, to plan the format and frequency of usefrom the current lesson, of the CLOSING EXIT CARD assessment duringthrough activating student (On-going) regular instruction. The collaborative process usedknowledge using CLOSING will lead to greater student success on formative andEXIT CARDS to end daily summative assessments through mastering essentialinstruction. instructional concepts. 36
  • Objective 2: Develop Product-Based Assessments for Student Portfolios Date Completed: June 2014 Activities Timeline Collaboration Date CompletedDevelop, implement, and August 2011 Social Studies Content Specialist, English June 2014assess Student Produced Through Content Specialist, Reading Specialist, andVocabulary Books using a June 2014 Social Studies Grade Level Cohorts will meetholistic scoring scale (On-going) once per quarter, during the regular school year,(Vocabulary Assessments) to plan the format and frequency of use of the student-produced vocabulary books during regular instruction. The collaborative process used will lead to greater student success on formative and summative assessments through mastering essential vocabulary concepts.Develop, implement, and August 2011 Social Studies Content Specialist, Computer June 2014assess Student Produced Through Technology Specialist, Media Specialist, andEnd of Unit Movie Posters June 2014 Social Studies Grade Level Cohorts will meetusing a holistic scoring scale (On-going) once per quarter to plan/review the format and(Summative Assessments) computer guidelines to complete the student produced assessment. The collaborative process used will lead to greater student success on summative assessments through mastering multiple learning indicators in a creative way.Develop, implement and August 2011 Social Studies Department Grade Level Cohorts June 2014assess student understanding Through will meet on multiple occasions, during theof lesson concept(s) through June 2014 regular school year, to plan Closed Activitiesusing a CLOSED (On-going) for Co-Taught students which requires them toACTIVITY with visual explain their level of understanding of a concept through visual representation. The collaborativerepresentation. A holistic planning process used to develop Closedscore scale will be used to Activities will lead to greater student success onassess student work. formative and summative assessments. 37
  • Goal 2: Improve Student Achievement for all Ethnic Subgroups defined by the MSA Date Initiated: August 2011Objective 1: Develop a Positive Classroom Climate for all Students Date Completed: June 2014 Activities Timeline Collaboration Date Completed Develop and implement August 2011 Social Studies Department Grade Level June 2014 learning stations for ESOL Through Cohorts will meet on multiple occasions, students to support student June 2014 during the regular school year, to plan vocabulary and writing (On-going) Learning Station Activities for ESOL skills. students which support the instructional concepts of daily classroom lessons. The collaborative planning process used to develop ESOL student learning station activities will lead to greater student success on formative and summative assessments. Develop, implement, and August 2011 Social Studies Department Grade Level June 2014 analyze quarterly student Through Cohorts will meet once per quarter, during the survey results regarding June 2014 regular school year, to planthe format and classroom climate and (On-going) content of Student Quarterly Surveys. The academic instruction. collaborative planning process used to develop student quarterly surveys will allow teachers to make the proper classroom adjustments to make the educational environment more conducive to learning for all students. Develop, implement, and August 2011 Social Studies Department Grade Level June 2014 revisit quarterly a teacher- Through Cohorts will meet once per quarter to plan the student produced theoretical June 2014 type of theoretical model that will be used to framework for improving (On-going) chart a collaborative path, between student and student achievement. teacher, to reach a level of Academic Self- Actualization bythestudent and teacher. 38
  • Objective 2: Provide On-going Student Achievement Feedback to Parents Date Completed: June 2014 Activities Timeline Collaboration Date CompletedDevelop and implement the August 2011 Teacher will collaborate with parents to June 2014use of Parent Quarterly Through ensure the academic success of students bySurveys, Parent Academic June 2014 administering Parent Quarterly Surveys,Quarterly Contracts and (On-going) Academic Quarterly Parent Contracts andReport Cards issuing Quarterly Parent Report Cards. The (Parent access through collaborative process used between the teacherdepartmental website). and parents will lead to the lowering of Benjamin Banneker Middle School Ineligibility Rate.Develop and implement the August 2011 Teacher will collaborate with parents to June 2014use of Student Academic Through ensure the academic success of students byGoal Reflection Sheets. June 2014 sharing with them the quarterly academic(Parent access through (On-going) achievement results of their son/daughterdepartmental website). through the use of Student Academic Goal Reflection Sheets.Communicate with parents August 2011 Teacher will collaborate with parents to June 2014on a consistent basis to Through ensure the academic success of students byinform them of academic June 2014 contacting them by phone or e-mail toand/or behavioral concerns. (On-going) inform them of academic and/or behavioral concerns of their son/daughter. Collaborative dialogue records between the teacher and parent will be kept in the school’s Communication Log operated by Montgomery County Public Schools. 39
  • Review Checklist for Objectives, Activities and Timelines, and Collaboration:1. Objectiveso Do the objectives directly address the goal(s)?o Are the objectives observable and verifiable?2. Description of Activities and Timelineso Do the activities align with the goal(s) and objective(s)?o Do the activities extend throughout the professional development cycle?o Is the timeline stated?3. Plan for Collaborationo Does the plan include collaboration with others? Examples of collaboration may include the following:A. Collaboration with colleaguesB. Collaboration with higher educationC. Collaboration with a professional learning communityD. Collaboration with a mentor 40
  • Professional Development Plan Evaluation Team Beginning of Year 1 – Professional Development CycleName: Lorenzo R. Prillman Date: 04/29/2011Educator’s School District: Montgomery County Public SchoolsEducator’s Employee ID#: 000069337Educator’s Current Educational Assignment: Social Studies TeacherNumber of Year(s) in Current Assignment: 02Years of Educational Experience: 15School: Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolLength of Professional Growth Cycle: ___X_ 3-years ____ 4-years ____5 years (check one)Duration of Plan: May 01, 2011 through May 01, 2014Check – In Dates: December 2011, May 2012, December 2012, May 2013, December 2013 and May 2014End of PDP Cycle Review: May 2014Year in Professional Development Cycle: Year 1Social Studies Teacher: _________________________________ _______ (Teacher Signature) (Date)Department Chair: ____________________________________ _______ (Department Chair Signature) (Date)Approved by Principal: ________________________________ ________ (Principal Signature) (Date) 41
  • Artifact for Standard 1: A Vision of LearningNames of Artifact(s): Benjamin Banneker Middle School Social Studies Department: MonthlyInstructional Focus Matrix, Monthly Lesson Plan Submission Template, and Lesson PlanReview and Follow-Up Matrix.Date: November 08, 2010Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolMontgomery County Public SchoolsArtifactsThe artifacts listed above illustrate my role as department chair of the Social Studies Department withdeveloping a systematic plan to promote a monthly departmental instructional focus and teacherconsistency with developing and delivering rigorous and meaningful instruction.The Monthly Instructional Focus Matrix, Monthly Lesson Plan Lesson Plan Template, and Lesson PlanReview and Follow-Up Matrix was developed as a result of a meeting between members of theInstructional Leadership Team, on Tuesday, September 07, 2010, who were discussing ways to create amore rigorous instructional program for students during the 2010 – 2011 school year.Reflection NarrativeAfter making Annual Yearly Progress (AYP) for the previous physical school year, the CommunitySuperintendent of Schools wanted the Instructional Leadership Team at Banneker to focus on improvingteacher instruction. The Community Superintendent thought this would be the best course of action toensure the school would make AYP for the second straight year, and be removed from the Maryland StateDepartment of Education school improvement list. All department chairs were given the task ofdeveloping an instructional focus plan for teachers in their department. At the conclusion of the meeting,the leadership team agreed to assess the progress of teacher instruction by reviewing their monthly lessonplans.On Monday, September 13, 2010 the Social Studies department held its monthly staff meeting. Theagenda for the meeting focused on developing an instructional focus for the department. Departmentmembers shared their thoughts on what areas of instruction needed to be improved across all grade levels.After the meeting, I used the information provided by the teachers and my own ideas (shared vision) todevelop a monthly instructional focus, lesson plan template, and a form to assess the implementation ofkey areas of the department instructional program. The department monthly instructional focus and lessonplan format was reviewed with teachers the following Monday, prior to the start of the regular school day.Following the implementation of the monthly instructional focus plan and lesson plan template, the SocialStudies Department instructional walk-through team began to see greater consistency from teachers withdemonstrating planning for rigorous instructional practices. In addition, the review of departmental lessonplans by the Instructional Leadership Team showed that teachers were making progress with supportingthe instructional vision of the department and school. 42
  • Artifact for Standard 2: School Culture and Instructional ProgramNames of Artifact(s): Informal Teacher Observation Write-Up and Social Studies DepartmentInstructional Walk-Through Capture SheetDate: November 03, 2010Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolMontgomery County Public SchoolsArtifactsThe artifacts listed above illustrate my role as department chair of the Social Studies Department thatrequires me toevaluate the instructional practices of teachers in which I supervise. The format of theinformal teacher observation write-up is derived from the Montgomery County Public Schools handbookon the six standards of teaching. The Social Studies Department Instructional Walk-Through CaptureSheet was developed as a result of the need to give meaningful and immediate feedback to teachers ontheir instructional practices. In addition, the instructional walk-through form was developed to follow-upwith teachers on improving certain aspects of their instruction following an informal or formalobservation.Reflection NarrativeOn Wednesday, October 20, 2010 I conducted an informal observation of Ms. Sabrina Khan who is a newteacher in the Social Studies Department at Banneker Middle School. On this day, I observed Ms. Khan’ssixth period world studies class. While observing Ms. Khan’s world studies class, there seem to be anarea of instructional concern regarding her ability to plan ―purposefully‖ for instruction. Ms. Khan’sinability to give students the opportunity to summarize their learning of the lesson objectives led to hernot meeting standard three (teachers know the subjects they teach and how to teach those subjects tostudents) of the MCPS handbook on the six standards of teaching. When Ms. Khan and I convened at thepost-observation conference, it was brought to her attention that she needed to put more emphasis onpurposely planning each activity she wants students to complete during the lesson. I offered to assist Ms.Khan with improving her instructional practices in this area. However, she ensured me that she knew howto correct the error in her instruction and would like for me to revisit her class on another occasion. Iagreed to revisit her class on another occasion, unannounced, to conduct an instructional walk-through tolook for purposeful planning in her instruction.On Wednesday, November 03, 2010 I conducted the follow-up instructional walk-through of Ms. Khan’ssixth period world studies class. Ms. Khan was well provisioned for the class. Ms. Khan used flexiblegrouping to seat students for the lesson activity. Ms. Khan’s lesson objective was reviewed with studentsand she explained the importance of the mastery objective. Ms. Khan also used ―calling sticks‖ topurposely call on students who were Maryland State Assessment (MSA) focus kids who neededadditional opportunities to practice responding to critical thinking questions. When Ms. Khan and Ireconvened the following day to review my notes from the instructional walk-through, using theinstructional walk-through capture sheet, she was presently surprised to see that she had made the properadjustments to her instruction to meet standard three of the MCPS handbook on teacher instructionalpractices. Following our meeting, I continued my monthly instructional walk-through of her classes andclasses of other teachers in the Social Studies Department. The instructional program of the Social StudiesDepartment has significantly improved as a result of the evaluation process implemented this school year. 43
  • Artifact for Standard 3: ManagementNames of Artifact(s): Benjamin Banneker Middle School Social Studies Department: Gradingand Reporting ProtocolsMonitoring Tool; Benjamin Banneker Middle School Social StudiesDepartment: Grading and Reporting Consistency ChecklistEvaluative ToolDate: October 29, 2010Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolMontgomery County Public SchoolsArtifactsThe artifacts listed above illustrate my role as department chair of the Social Studies Departmentwith developing a systematic plan to promote grading and reporting consistency across gradelevels. The grading and reporting protocols and grading and reporting consistency checklist wasdeveloped as a result of a meeting between my staff development coordinator and theadministrator assigned to my department. The artifacts were developed as a result of thecollaborative meeting held on Friday, October 01, 2010.Reflection NarrativeAfter reviewing teacher midterm grade books, for the first quarter, with the staff developmentteacher and subject area supervisor, there appeared to be some concern regarding teacher gradingand reporting consistency within the Social Studies Department. As a result of the meeting, thethree of us came to an agreement on some protocols that teachers needed to follow in the futurewhen assigning student grades. I was given the responsibility of developing a monitoring tooland evaluative tool for my department. At the conclusion of our meeting, we agreed to revisitteacher grade books near the end of the first marking period to see if grade level cohorts gradingand reporting would be more consistent by the end of the first marking period.On Monday, October 04, 2010 the department held its monthly staff meeting. A good portion ofthe meeting agenda involved the discussion around grading and reporting consistency. Teacherswere given a chance to review their grades for the midterm reports and given feedback on how tobe more consistent with grading and reporting among grade level cohorts. I presented themonitoring tool and evaluative tool for grading and reporting which teachers needed to use forthe remainder of the first quarter. Teachers were made aware that they needed to submit a copyof their Grading and Reporting Consistency Monitoring Tool to the department chair every twoweeks.On Thursday, October 28, 2010 a meeting was held to take a second look at the grading andreporting consistency results, for the first quarter, within my department. I attended the meetingalong with the staff development teacher and my subject area administrative supervisor. I openedthe meeting by explaining the steps I had taken to address the problem of grading and reportinginconsistency within my department. After given a brief overview of the course of action I tookto address the problem, the staff development teacher opened up grade books of teachers whoteach the same subject to see if there had been any improvement since the midterm reports. 44
  • After reviewing teacher grade books for a second time, following the implementation of thegrading and reporting monitoring tool and evaluative tool, we were able to observe greaterconsistency with the reporting of grades among grade level cohorts. Everyone in attendance atthe meeting agreed that the department needs to continue with full implementation of the gradingand reporting monitoring tool and evaluative tool. The grading and reporting consistency toolswill be utilized for the remainder of the 2010 – 2011 school year. After the final marking periodhas ended, the staff development teacher, subject area supervisor and I will assess how effectivethe tools were with promoting grading and reporting consistency within the department.Finally, due to the vast improvement with grading and reporting consistency among thedepartment, administration is considering adopting the monitoring tool and evaluative tool modelto implement school-wide. 45
  • Artifact for Standard 4: Collaboration with Families and the CommunityNames of Artifact(s): Benjamin Banneker Middle School: PTSA Staff MembershipRecruitment LetterDate: October 18, 2010Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolMontgomery County Public SchoolsArtifact(s)The artifact listed above illustrates my role as a liaison between parent members of the PTSAand staff members at Benjamin Banneker Middle School. In recent years at Banneker MiddleSchool, the lack of staff (teacher) membership in the PTSA has led to a negative relationshipamong teachers and parents within the community. At the last PTSA meeting held on Tuesday,October 12, 2010 the PTSA President discussed the need to have someone take on theresponsibility of getting staff members to join the PTSA. I accepted the responsibility andeventually decided to solicit teacher support for the PTSA by drafting a letter. The artifact wasdeveloped as a way to promote teacher involvement in the PTSA by having them first pay theirmembership dues for the 2010 – 2011 school year.Reflection NarrativeI have been teaching at Benjamin Banneker Middle School since August of 2003. When I firstjoined the Instructional Leadership Team in 2005, there was major concern around the issue ofparents and teachers not working together to improve communication between the two stake-holder groups. In fact, on many occasions parents and teachers would hardly ever be seenworking together at Back-To-School Night, School Dances, or PTSA meetings.Over the past few years, I have been contemplating on how to go about improving thecommunication between staff members and parents. During this current school year I decided tobecome an active member of the PTSA at Benajmin Banneker Middle School. One of the firstassignments the PTSA president gave me to work on was recruiting new members (teachers) into the association. I knew this would be a difficult job based on the history between the twogroups (parents and teachers). I started the task by thinking of a way to reach the majority of thestaff without having to meet with each staff member directly. This process eventually led to medrafting a general letter to staff members at Banneker.The staff letter sent out to teachers made a general request for staff members to support thePTSA through helping to provide funds for social events, community outreach programs, andeducational opportunities for students and teachers. The staff letter generated a large responsefrom the staff that was not really sure how to support the PTSA since the school did not have apresident at the beginning of the school year. I will continue collecting staff membership duesthrough next week. I will report out to PTSA board members on Tuesday, November 9, 2010 onmy efforts to raise revenue for the association. 46
  • Artifact for Standard 5: Acting with Integrity and Fairness, and in an Ethical MannerNames of Artifact(s): Controversial Advisory Reading on Pakistan’s Staggering DisasterDate: September 23, 2010Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolMontgomery County Public SchoolsArtifactsThe artifact listed above illustrates my role as a member of the school leadership team who is responsiblefor treating all staff members with integrity, fairness, and always acting in an ethical manner. The artifactis an article which was used as a school-wide reading exercise for students during advisory (MarylandState Assessment prep class). The reading itself discussed some recent economic/environmental problemsthe people and government of Pakistan were currently facing. However, the reading questions studentsneeded to answer, following the reading, were not a direct match to the article. In fact, the questionscreated some animosity between a Muslim teacher in my department (Social Studies)and the Englishdepartment chair that was responsible for selecting the reading for student advisory classes.Reflection NarrativeThe day after students read an article on Pakistan, the English department chair approached me to discusswhat he was hearing from another teacher in his department about one of the Social Studies teachersbeing upset with the advisory reading article. The teacher was Muslim and apparently she took offense tothe racial undertone of the reading questions at the end of the article. A few of the questions asked thefollowing: What is the nature of the ―extremist groups‖ in Pakistan? What is the relationship between the U.S. and Pakistan? How do Pakistanis view the U.S.? How does the Afghanistan war affect Pakistan?The English department chair asked me if I could talk with the teacher in order to de-escalate the issuebetween both of them over the advisory reading article. I told the English department chair that I wouldbe willing to assist him in helping to solve the problem. However, I also stated to the English departmentchair that he needs to look at the issue from both sides of the lens. Although the issue could have been amisinterpretation on both parts, the offended teacher’s reality is her reality. Once we concluded ourconversation about the issue, I went to visit the seventh grade social studies teacher who was offended bythe advisory article. When arrived to her class, I asked the teacher to give her thoughts about why she feltthe way she did about the article. I never attempted to justify what was or was not in the article or attemptto make it seem like it was all one big misunderstanding. However, I did ask her how we can bettercommunicate with each other as a school to ensure that another culturally sensitive article is not placedbefore the staff and student body in the future? I wanted the teacher to feel like her feelings and opinionswere being heard and that she was also going to be a part of the solution to make sure something like thiswould not happen again. At the conclusion of our meeting, I apologized for the controversial andoffensive nature of the article and ensured her that the advisory reading selection team will take a closerlook at articles in the future before they are selected. The issue was resolved to the satisfaction of theteacher without involving the Principal or other school level administrators. 47
  • Artifact for Standard 6: The Political, Social, Economic, Legal and Cultural ContextNames of Artifact(s): Co-Teaching Model Job Responsibilities Checklist, Special EducationAccessibility Planner, and Special Education Accommodation Quick Reference GuideDate: December 20, 2010Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolMontgomery County Public SchoolsArtifactsThe artifacts listed above illustrate my role as department chair of the Social Studies Department thatrequires me toevaluate the instructional practices of teachers who are responsible for meeting theeducational needs of all students. The Co-Teaching Model Job Responsibilities Checklist, SpecialEducation Accessibility Planner, and Special Education Accommodation Quick Reference Guide wasdeveloped to assist regular classroom teachers and co-teachers, in the Social Studies Department, withmeeting the educational needs of Special Education students placed in their classes as a result of full-inclusion state laws.Reflection NarrativePrior to the start of the 2010 – 2011 school year, the Social Studies Department at Benjamin BannekerMiddle School was one of two departments school-wide that had not participated in full-inclusionclassrooms. However, new Special Education laws for the state of Maryland required all schools toeventually move toward full-inclusion classes. The Principal and his staff decided to move forward withthe full-inclusion model school-wide for the 2010 – 2011 school year. At the start of the school year,many teachers in the Social Studies Department were feeling a great deal of anxiety about teaching undera co-taught model of instruction. After a month into the school year, teachers in the department werefrustrated with the lack of academic production of the Special Education students and did not know howto address the problem in the classroom. In addition, teachers were also frustrated with the lack ofinstructional knowledge of their co-teachers and work production. During the month of Novemberdepartment meeting, following the conclusion of the first marking period, the teachers and I developedsome strategies to assist the Special Education students with improving academically and I developed aRoles and Responsibilities worksheet for the general education teacher and para-educator to agree uponsome assigned classroom tasks.Three weeks into the second quarter, teachers in the department were beginning to have more successwith providing the proper academic support for special education students in their classes. Teachers wereusing the Accessibility Planner more often when planning instruction and were using theAccommodations Quick Reference Guide to gather strategies for simplifying instructional concepts,identifying appropriate instructional resources, and modifying testing documents. As a result ofpromoting the importance that all students can learn, teachers began to see a vast improvement in theacademic grades of their special education students and began to build better working relationships withthem. Although moving to a co-taught model of instruction was somewhat difficult for teachers in thebeginning, they eventually realized that all children have the same right to a ―free and appropriateeducation‖ no matter what their intellectual limitations are they posses. 48
  • ISLLC Standard I: An education leader promotes the success of every student by facilitating thedevelopment, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning that is sharedand supported by the community. The Opportunity Joe was ready and anxious to find a principalship. He had taught in public schools for ten years.During that time, he had distinguished himself as a classroom teacher, curriculum innovator, and campusleader. During the last three years, Joe had completed his master’s degree and principal certification. Joe was recommended by his university professors for a high school principalship, and thesuperintendent of the school district needing a principal asked Joe to come to interview with him and theschool board. Although the school district was over 200 miles from his present home, Joe knew that thehigh school had a good reputation in academics and student activities. The school was not too big, norwas it too small. It was an ideal setting for a new principal to gain experience. Joe knew that in two years the principal of his present high school (a truly outstanding and high-paying high school and community) was planning to retire. Joe’s principal had already talked to Joe abouttaking his position when he retired, but he emphasized how important it was for Joe to obtain someexperience at a smaller school. The principal, and Joe, too, felt that the superintendent, school board, andsite-based management committee would have a much easier time accepting Joe as a principal if he had―proven‖ himself elsewhere. In fact, Joe’s principal had already been talking with the superintendent andschool board about bringing Joe back as principal after he had gained experience elsewhere. Everybodyseemed to think that Joe’s chances we’re good to be named principal of his current school after gainingexperience and showing his ability elsewhere. Upon learning of his selection for an interview, Joe decided that he would call the superintendent.To his surprise, the superintendent invited Joe to come over for a visit. Joe left early one morning andplanned to spend all day at the school. The superintendent and Joe hit it off immediately. It was as if theyhad known each other for years. Joe knew that this was the job he wanted. As the day wore on, the superintendent called Joe into his office and shut the door. ―Joe, he said,―I think that I can work well with you. The Board will listen to my recommendation. However, I cannotanswer the questions the Board will ask you. I know that one of the major issues in the selection of acandidate will be whether they are considering this a long-term commitment or just a steppingstone. The other two candidates have both stated that they want to come into our community and make ittheir home. You need to think long and hard how you want to answer the question when it comes up. Ican honestly say that someone who does not consider this a long-term commitment will have a slimchance of getting the job‖. 49
  • Questions for Consideration/DiscussionA. What answer would you give to the “big question” from the Board? Why? I would accept the position and state that I would agree to join the community long-term. Nothing in life is guaranteed, so I would not put all of my marbles in one jar. The principalship that was being guaranteed to Joe might not ever be delivered on. Also, the community of a school plays an important role in choosing a school leader, so there is no guarantee that I would be granted the principalship at Joe’s current school. 1. What is your ultimate career goal? My ultimate career goal is to become Superintendent of a public school system and/or President of a university. 2. What are your plans to achieve this goal? First, I will complete my Masters of Arts Program in Administration and Supervision. Second, I will seek the position of an Assistant Principal in the county where I currently work, or another county that is looking for innovative leaders. Third, I will further my education by applying for admittance into a doctorial program for Educational Leadership. Finally, while I am finishing up my doctorial program in Educational Leadership, I will work toward achieving a principalship. 3. Does your career goal and plan to achieve it have any bearing ultimately on your ability to develop a shared mission/vision for your school? Yes. The ability to develop a shared mission / vision for my school is important because it will allow me and the people who work for me to be able to accomplish their professional goals. 50
  • B. What ethical questions are raised by this case? Should personal gain be put before the needs of the people you’re serving within a community? Can a leader truly develop a school mission / vision in which they’re not fully invested in the lives of the staff, children and the community? 1. Is the popular notion “You should tell the truth, but you don’t have to tell all the truth” ethical in this kind of a situation? I believe it is ethical to not divulge too much information that will hurt someone’s chances of moving forward with achieving their professional goals. Was it ethical for the superintendent and Joe’s current principal to guarantee Joe a principalship without interviewing other candidates or speaking with teachers and parents? 2. Is it fair for the school board seeking a new principal to expect that the person employed commit to staying a long time? I believe it is fair to have a principal candidate agree to a set time period in which they would take on the responsibility of turning around a failing school or enhancing the academic performance of a school that was already excelling academically. However, personnel changes are made all the time by school boards and Superintendents without the consent of the administrator, teachers, students or the community.C. Briefly describe a similar ethical dilemma between your interests and those of youremployer you have experienced, and how you resolved it: There was a situation two years ago when I was interviewing for my current school position asSocial Studies content specialist. During the interview, I was asked by my principal if I was planning totake on the position for an extended period of time. I told my principal that I would serve in the positionuntil I was called upon by the community superintendent to take a job as an administrator, once Icompleted my administrative and supervision program. I did not commit to taking on the role of SocialStudies Content Specialist long-term because I believed my previous work performance would bejustification for why I was the best candidate for the job. Stability is important in education but it does notguarantee that a department or school will be governed efficiently. 51
  • ISLLC Standard II: An education leader promotes the success of every student by advocating,nurturing and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learningand staff professional growth. Alternative Lifestyle Ms. Jones is a teacher and coach in Troublesome I.S.D. Although she is relatively new to thedistrict, she has proven herself to be both competent and dedicated to her students. She is well-respectedamong her colleagues, and the students think highly of her as well. However, Ms. Jones is not like mostother teachers; she is gay, and she has a female friend with whom she lives. As word begins to spread that Ms. Jones is ―different‖, her colleagues pay no mind simplybecause they indicate ―they knew all along…now it’s just confirmed.‖ However, the students aren’t quitesure what to think of this. In fact, many students begin to find humor in ridiculing and harassing theteacher, both verbally and in writing. Parents begin calling the school requesting to have their childremoved from Ms. Jones’s class simply because they do not agree with her choice of lifestyle. Mr. Jackson, the school, principal, is once again feeling pressure. While Ms. Jones is a goodteacher, the fact that she is different is causing problems among students and parents, and many of themwant her out. On the other hand, Ms. Jones maintains that she has rights, too; she has the right to work inan environment where she is not harassed and ridiculed, especially since she is very careful to keep herprivate life separate from her professional life. Questions for Consideration/DiscussionA. Does Ms. Jones have the right to maintain her preferred lifestyle without harassment or dangerto her teaching career?Yes. Ms. Jones has the right to publicly make know her preferred lifestyle without harassment or dangerto her teaching career. Ms. Jones advocacy rights are protected by the First Amendment as long as herpersonal conduct does not incite imminent lawlessness. 1. Does your response or position on the above question impact your ability to “nurture andsustain a culture of trust, learning and high expectations” for your school? Why or why not?No. All school personnel decisions that are based upon ethical issues have to be in compliance withfederal, state, and/or local laws. Laws are put in place to protect the civil rights of students, parents andteachers. Using legislation to create a nurturing environment for all stake-holders would be useful inprompting all school personnel to get on board with supporting and developing a positive school culture. 2. How would you justify Ms. Jones’s right to privacy in her personal lifestyle?Ms. Jones advocacy rights are protected by the First Amendment as long as her personal conduct does notincite imminent lawlessness. 52
  • B. Do parents have the right to choose who will teach their children?No. Parents do not have the right to choose the teacher of their children. However, as the leadadministrator of a building it might be necessary from time to time to make concessions to parents if thestudent – teacher match will create the best academic outcome for children. 1. What is the role of parents with regard to school instructional matters? The role of parents in a school community is to support the instructional vision and mission of the school. All stakeholders, including parents, should have a say in the type of curriculum they would like their children exposed to at school, but parents should not have the right to pick and choose their children’s teachers. 2. How would you achieve an understanding of the parent role in the school? I would incorporate and understanding of the parent role in the school where I work by highlighting their role in the school mission statement, school improvement plan, and consistently reinforcing their partnership in the school at Parent-Teacher-Student-Association (PTSA) meetings. 3. Does your view on this question have an impact on your ability to :( why or why not?) a. Create a rigorous and aligned curricular program? No. The goal of any educational program is to meet the educational needs of all students. Parents, staff and students input into school instructional issues are always welcome and are taken into consideration when developing any educational program. However, the final decision made about a school’s educational program will be based on the needs of its most important clients, children. Parent’s instructional needs and/or wants do not come first because not all children have parents advocating for what they believe is best for their learning. b. Create a personalized and motivating learning environment for students? No. Again, the overall instructional goal of a school is to meet the needs of all students. The call for addressing the instructional needs of high academic achievers at the school where I work would receive the same attention as when attempting address the needs of low academic achievers.C. Is the school principal responsible for maintaining standards of conduct for teachers, or shouldthis be left to the school board and/or legal authorities?The principal is responsible for establishing and maintaining a school culture of tolerance towardindividuals who are somewhat different from the majority of people in the school building. Thosedifferences could be classified by race, gender and/or sexuality. The principal has to model the culturalexpectations of the school so that staff and students will fall in line with emulating those sameexpectations. 53
  • 1. Does your response impact your ability as principal to: (explain why or why not?) a. Supervise and evaluate instructionNo. Holding all members of the school community to the same academic standards and socialexpectations should make it easier to evaluate instruction in a school building. b. Develop instruction capacity of staffNo. The ability of a principal to develop the instructional capacity of his/her staff should be easierto develop if all school personnel understand the academic expectations for the school. c. Maximize time spent on quality instructionNo. If school personnel (teachers) understand the academic expectations for student learning thenthe ability of the principal to maximize teacher time spent on developing and delivering qualityinstruction to students will become part of the school culture. 54
  • Vignette III: Question of DutyISLLC Standard III: An education leader promotes the success of every student byensuring management of the organization, operation, and resources for a safe, efficient,and effective learning environment. A Question of Duty Metropolitan Independent School District is an urban school district facing thechallenges of many urban districts-crumbling facilities, budget cutbacks of favorite studentprograms, a large number of teacher vacancies and uncertified teachers, a high dropout rate,poor teacher morale, and numerous cases of student violence…not unlike some in theWashington/Baltimore metropolitan area. You are the principal of Martin Luther King, Jr., High School, and you know that theschool has had the reputation of being one of the ―worst‖ schools in a less-than-good schooldistrict. In fact, you have been unsuccessful in filling twelve permanent teaching positionssince you arrived at the school three years ago. However, you and a few dedicated teachershave been diligently working to change the culture of the school into a ―safe haven ofexcellence‖ where students can be successful. One of the dedicated teachers who have helped to spearhead this effort has been Mrs.Queno, the physics teacher. When Mrs. Queno first came to the school two years ago, sheonly had one physics class, because students were simply terrified of the word ―physics.‖ Butshe has single-handedly turned this program around. She has given up her weekends andevenings to tutor her students on their assignments, coached teams in academic competitions,and even helped her students design their first robot for a state robotics competition. Thestudents love her and are now excited about learning physics. During the last month, however, you have noticed that Mrs. Queno has beendistracted. She has missed several faculty meetings and has not been available for tutoring inover two weeks. Her students have come to you asking why Mrs. Queno has not had meetingswith the Robotics Club, and you have even seen her crying softly in the teacher workroom.When you tried to question her, Mrs. Queno mumbles something and quickly left the room. You decided to talk to Mrs. Queno and went to her room after school. She was talkingto another teacher in the hall when you arrived, so you went in her room to wait. Whilestanding near her desk, you noticed an official notice on her desk saying that her five-yearvisitor’s visa had expired two years ago. You then decided to leave the room and investigatefurther before talking to Mrs. Queno, telling her that you needed to go back to the office. Upon checking with immigration officials and the social security office inWashington, you found that the social security number Mrs. Queno has been giving to theschool district does not exist and that, indeed, her visitor’s visa has expired. The immigrationoffice had lost contact with Mrs. Queno and assumed that she had left the country. She hasbeen giving a false social security number to the school district in order to keep her teachingposition and stay in the United States. You now know that Mrs. Queno has forged a socialsecurity number and is an undocumented immigrant working in your school. It isunlikely that she will be able to stay in the country legally while trying to get a permanentvisa. 55
  • Questions for Consideration/DiscussionA. How would you handle this matter?I would first hold a private conversation with Mrs. Queno to see if there had been some kind ofmisunderstanding about the status of her visa. If there was no misunderstanding about the statusof her visa, I would then ask Mrs. Queno if she had taken any action to correct the matter. If not,I would then explain to Mrs. Queno that although she is a great asset to the school I must complywith federal law and release her from her current teaching position she has been assigned at theschool. In addition to releasing Mrs. Queno from her assigned teaching position, I would alsoneed to inform the school district’s human resource office about the dismissal of Mrs. Queno onthe grounds of being an undocumented worker (illegal immigrant). 1. Is it your duty, (as part of your responsibility “to manage, monitor and evaluate”school operations) to report Ms. Q to the authorities?It is not my duty to report Mrs. Queno to the authorities but it is my duty as leader of the buildingto notify the proper school system officials and to provide teachers and students with a safe andorderly learning environment.B. Since no one has asked you about Mrs. Queno’s immigration status and you firstlearned about the situation by inadvertently reading her private correspondence, does thisalter your obligation to your duty to “promote and protect the welfare and safety” ofstudents and staff?No. The safety of staff and students is of supreme importance and must be consistently sustainedby the school building leader. Mrs. Queno’s immigration status should not be looked upon as aprivate matter due to the fact that the school leader is responsible for the well being of allpersonnel working within the school building. Also, due to the fact that Mrs. Queno’s had givena false social security number to the school district, it is very possible that her true identity isunknown to school officials. Mrs. Queno might be the best teacher at Martin Luther King, Jr.High School, but she also might have a criminal past. The responsibility to maintain the safety ofstudents and staff members would lead me to informing Mrs. Queno that she would be removedfrom her position effective immediately and central office would be informed about her givingfalse information regarding her identity and immigration status. 56
  • C. Is failing to report an unlawful act the same as lying about it? Can you justify“forgetting” about the matter as: (explain why or why not?)No. Failing to report an unlawful act is not the same as lying about it. However, there is nojustification which can be used to explain why someone intentionally failed to report an illegalact.1. Doing what’s best for her students?Knowing that Mrs. Queno’s immigration status could have severe instructional implications forher students, it would be best for her students to begin the process of moving on with a newinstructor instead of being taken on an emotional roller-coaster ride waiting to see what theoutcome would be regarding Ms. Queno’s visa status.2. Protecting teacher and organization time and focus to support instruction?Allowing the issue of Mrs. Queno’s immigration status to drag-on without resolutionwouldimpact student learning in a negative way. In addition, the uncertainty of Mrs. Queno’simmigration status could also have a negative impact on the culture of the school building aswell. 57
  • ISLLC Standard IV: An education leader promotes the success of every student bycollaborating with faculty and community members, responding to diverse communityinterests and needs, and mobilizing community resources. A Parent Complaint You are the principal of a K-8 school, and you have been working to develop harmoniousrelations between the school and the community. Thus, you were dismayed when several parentsdropped by your office, ostensibly to talk about parents’ night but actually to complain about Mr.Jones. All three claimed that their children are terrorized by his loud manner and aggressivetactics. Mr. Jones has taught in the district for five years and has always been respected andadmired by kids and teachers alike. In the past, Mr. Jones has taught sixth and seventh grade and coached the soccer team.Jones, who lettered in two sports in college, was a physical education minor. He is one of onlyfive men in this elementary school of twenty-six teachers. This year he was assigned to thirdgrade, which he welcomed. You thought it would be useful to introduce a male role model earlierin the school program. Jones agreed; he likes kids. You have observed him in the classroommore than a dozen times during his tenure and there is no question in your mind that he is aknowledgeable and skillful elementary teacher. The kids learn in his classroom. As part of a school based management project started in the district this year, the teachersin your school have elected a supervisory council to improve the instructional performance of thefaculty. The council is strictly a teachers’ group; the principal is not a member. This is thecouncil’s first foray into faculty management; the faculty is eager and well-meaning, but a bithesitant. On the one hand, it might be best to handle this matter informally and discreetly. Jones isa popular and easygoing teacher with whom you have good personal and professional relations.On the other hand, you do have a supervisory council to deal with such matters. Your teachersare professionals. They claim they want to be much more involved in the management of theschool. 58
  • Questions for Consideration/DiscussionA. Is this a case in which you initiate teachers in the management of the school? Why orwhy not?My first response to the scenario presented within this vignette is that the school basedmanagement supervisory council should not be able to exclude the instructional leader of theschool, the principal, from being able to attend council meetings. The number one responsibilityof the instructional leader of the building is to improve instructional practices of teachers.Second, the issues involving Mr. Jones goes beyond that of just addressing instructional concernsof parents. The concerns of parents seem to involve more personal issues surroundingrelationship building with students in which the intimate details of the parent’s complaintsshould be discussed between the principal and Mr. Jones.B. Should you talk to Jones about this matter before making any decisions?The principal should always listen to both sides of the story, parent and teacher, before makingany instructional decisions. In fact, the principal might also want to interview a few students toget their take on the atmosphere of Mr. Jones classroom. This is important because elementaryand middle school students experience fewer male teachers than what they would experience inhigh school which can lead to young students sometimes having trouble adjusting to malepersonality traits.C. Is this an issue simply among you, Jones, and the parents?No. The issue involves the principal, Mr. Jones, parents, and students. The school basedmanagement supervisory council would be excluded from the meetings held to resolve this issue.D. Under what conditions should the teachers of the supervisory council be involved?If the principal concluded that the complaints of parents did not warrant corrective action, aftermeeting with Mr. Jones and a few of his students, he could assign members of the supervisorycouncil to work with Mr. Jones on developing instructional strategies for working with youngerstudents. Mr. Jones instructional techniques in the classroom may need fine tuning in order tomeet the learning styles and emotional needs of his third graders. 59
  • ISLLC Standard V: An education leader promotes the success of every student by actingwith integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner. A Teacher Becomes Ill One of the best and most dedicated teachers in the middle school of which you areprincipal becomes very ill one day during school and has to be taken home. You then realize thatthis teacher has not looked well or shown her usual vitality lately. The next day her husband callsto say that she will need a few days to recover from an illness so you obtain a substitute teacher.You learn through a mutual friend that the teacher has been hospitalized, and you call thehusband to inquire about her situation. The husband assures you that the teacher will be returning. However, he states that a fewdays will be needed for her recovery and that the teacher will return to work in two weeks. Youlearn from other sources that the illness was major, that the teacher underwent emergencysurgery, and it was determined that she had inoperable brain cancer. The teacher returns to work; however, she looks tired and frail. When you go to her roomafter school and ask about her health, the teacher admits that the doctors have diagnosed a braintumor, but that it does not appear that surgery will be advisable, due to the location of the tumor.The long-term prognosis is not good, although she has been told that continuing to teach will nothasten the spread of the cancer. Indeed, the doctors advise her to continue to be as active aspossible for as long as possible. During the next few months, the teacher’s vitality and effectiveness gradually decrease,and it begins to be obvious that student progress is being negatively affected. However, studentsdo seem to be learning some valuable lessons about life, about helping those in need, and aboutcooperation as they assist the teacher with daily tasks and help each other with their lessons. You discuss the situation with the teacher and suggest that she take disability leave,followed by early retirement. Becoming very emotional, she reiterates the advice of her doctorsto remain as active as possible for as long as possible, stating that her continuing to work withher students is all that keeps her going. Teaching has been her life’s work, and to force her toquit before it is absolutely necessary will make it increasingly difficult for her and her family todeal with her illness and probable early death. 60
  • Questions for Consideration/Discussion A. As principal, what should you do to balance the needs of the teacher, her family, and her students, and to see that students get the best possible results from their school experiences?What the principal is allowed to do about the ill teacher’s professional teaching status at theschool is partially dependent upon what the teacher contract laws state regarding the continualemployment of physically and/or mentally impaired teachers. 1. Are there sources of information relative to this case that you should consultbefore making any decisions about it?Yes. The principal should consult the school district’s teacher union representative in order to getan idea of what the labor rights are of the ill teacher. Also, the principal should contact the schooldistrict’s Employee Assistance Program to get advice on how to support the mental health needsof the ill teacher. 2. Are there additional options that you should consider, other than allowing theteacher to work full-time or not at all?The teacher has the right to fulfill the obligation of her teaching contract if she is physically ableto do so. However, the principal can suggest to the teacher of possibly going to part-time statusto relieve some of the stress placed upon him/her by way of teaching. Regardless of whatalternative employment option is presented to the teacher, the idea must be presented to theteacher in a sensitive and professional manner.B. What school board policies or laws might apply to this situation?Before the principal holds a conversation with the ill teacher, he/she should become familiar withthe Family Medical Leave act of 1993 which allows for a teacher to take a leave of absence up tosixty days due to personal or family illness. Second, the principal should also be familiar with theAmerican Disability Act of 1990 which prevents individuals from being discriminated against ontheir job due to a physical and/or mental impairment.C. If what is best for the teacher conflicts with what is best for the students, which shouldprevail? Why?The educational and emotional needs of the students always come first in the educationprofession. The desire of the ill teacher to remain in the classroom while her health and teachingability is declining is commendable, but if teaching and learning is not happening in theclassroom at a high level then the principal needs to do what is best for the students. Doing whatis best for the students could mean asking the teacher to step down if they are no longer able toperform their teaching duties stated within the teaching contract. 61
  • ISLLC Standard VI: An education leader promotes the success of every student byunderstanding, responding to, and influencing the political, social, economic, legal, andcultural context. *Fines and firing for test cheatsCarroll county teacher’s face a wide range of penalties after two teachers said to copyMSA…Two Carroll elementary teachers allegedly reproduced worksheets based on previousMSA Tests and shared with their colleagues…As their principal, how would you respond? Questions for Consideration/DiscussionA. What would be your first steps, following disclosure, before acting?I would speak with the person who made school officials aware of the testing violations to makesure that testing irregularities had in fact been made by employees of the school. 1. What issues would you consider before acting?A few issues I would consider before acting is whether or not the allegations are true, and whoare the people involved in the testing violation incident? I would want to speak with the accusedparty before notifying school board officials. 2. Who would you consult and why?As the principal of the elementary school, I would first consult with the CommunitySuperintendent or Superintendent of the school district. The Community Superintendent and/orSuperintendent are responsible for making sure teacher and administrative duties are beingcarried out, at each school, under their supervisory domain. The Superintendent of the schooldistrict would then notify the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE). 3. What immediate action do you take?There would be no immediate action I could take to discipline the accused teachers. UnderMaryland law, a school district is required by law to conduct a thorough and impartialinvestigation of any allegations of testing irregularities. If the allegations are proved as beingtrue, the elementary school and the school district could face sanctions that include removal ofthe accused party from teaching in Maryland, invalidation of test scores at the elementary school,and Carroll County school district not meeting Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) at theelementary school level. 62
  • B. Considering the larger political, social, economic and legal aspects of this incident: 1. What are the rights of the accused teachers?Under the American judicial system, the accused is considered innocent until proven guilty. Therefore,teachers cannot be removed from their teaching position until a full investigation has taken place.However, depending upon certain teacher contract laws a school system might be able to suspend theaccused party with pay until the investigation is complete. 2. What is your role as principal in managing this incident?My role as principal in managing the event is to protect the rights of the accused and organize a wellconstructed response to teachers, students, and parents regarding the implications of the testingallegations. 3. What do you communicate about the incident to the remaining staff, superintendent, Board of Education, and community?I would keep the staff and community informed about the present allegations and what steps are beingtaken by the school district and the Maryland State Department of Education to resolve the issue.C. What steps do you take to ensure future test security?As the principal of the school, I would take the following steps to ensure future test security: Assign an administrator to be responsible for reviewing testing procedures and violations with teachers; it should be made clear that teachers can lose their teaching certificates for minor and major violations Develop a system of having teachers sign-in for pick-up of testing materials and sign-in for drop- off of testing materials Make sure all MSA testing materials are in a secured place where only the principal and assistant principals have accessD. Briefly describe a situation you have recently encountered in your work as a teacher oradministrator intern that illustrates an ethical dilemma…and how you acted to resolve it:About two years ago there was a situation involving a teacher in my department who was mishandlingfield trip funds. The teacher was using funds she collected from students, for the field trip, to purchasepizza for her classes that were doing well academically. Although the teacher stated she planned to submitto the financial secretary funds she ―borrowed‖ from the students at the end of the week, as the field tripsponsor I felt it was necessary to inform the school financial secretary of the issue. As the school field tripsponsor, any issues that came to light about the misuse of student field trip funds would have fell upon meif I neglected to inform the appropriate school officials. 63
  • Professional Development Plan End of Year 1 – Leadership PracticeName: Lorenzo R. Prillman Date: July 01, 2011Educator’s School District: Montgomery County Public SchoolsEducator’s Employee ID#: 000069337Educator’s Current Educational Assignment: PrincipalNumber of Year(s) in Current Assignment: 02Years of Educational Experience: 17School: Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolLength of Professional Growth Cycle: ___X_ 3-years ____ 4-years ____5 years (check one)Duration of Plan: From July 01, 2011 to July 01, 2014Check – In Dates: January 2012, July 2012, January 2013, July 2013 and January 2014End of PDP Cycle Review: July 2014Year in Professional Development Cycle: Year 1Key Note: Prior to developing a professional development leadership plan, principals shouldspend their first year on the job reviewing their school district’s goals (School DistrictImprovement Plan), their school’s goals (School Improvement Plan), and keeping a reflectiveleadership journal that documents the many challenges faced by the novice principal duringhis/her first year in practice. Reviewing both plans will ensure that the professional developmentleadership plan is aligned with the district’s and school’s goals for professional development andaccountability. Principals PDP goal(s), objective(s), and activities(s) must address two ormore of the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) standards for schoolleaders. 64
  • Step 1: Preparing to Write the Plan: Self Reflection(Not required to be included in the PDP)In reflecting upon my first year as principal of Benjamin Banneker Middle School, whichmajority was spent conducting a needs assessment of the educational program, I was able toidentify two Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium Standards (ISLLCS) that needed tobe addressed in order to move the school forward. Improving the instructional program (Standard2) at BBMS was important in order to address issues of mediocre teaching and the absence ofcontinued professional development for all staff members. In addition, improving communityand school relations (standard 4) was needed in order to receive community assistance withimproving the physical appearance of the building along with getting news out about the positivethings (academics and non-academics) happening at the school.Step 2: Writing the Plan: Components (At least two professional development goals areincluded in the plan) F. Contextual Description of Job Site: Administrative SituationI am moving into my second year as principal of Benjamin Banneker Middle School which islocated in the suburbs of Burtonsville, Maryland. The community in which the school resides ispredominantly a blue-collar, working class community. The demographics of the middle schoolare approximately 65% African-American, 20% Caucasian-American, 10% Hispanic-American,and 5% Asian-American. The annual academic goals for the school and district are for studentsto achieve a score of proficient or advanced on the reading/math portion of the Maryland StateAssessment exam and to have students take more rigorous course work (e.g., advanced English,Social Studies, Science, and Math). o Did you include a description of your administrative position? o Did you include the number of years you have been an administrator? o Did you include whether the school is located in an urban, suburban, or rural setting? o Did you include the ethnic, cultural, special needs, and socioeconomic makeup of the school population? o Did you include your school building and/or district goals? (Optional) G. Description of the Goal(s) to be Addressed: (It is recommended that you use this stem: I will . . . [research, study, learn, apply, etc.] So that . . .[describe what you want to see happening differently with student learning].)I will improve the instructional program of the school (Goal 1) by providing clinical supervisionto underperforming teachers and on-going professional development to all staff members, so thatstudents will academically perform at a high level. In addition, I will improve school andcommunity relations (Goal 2) by developing school and business community partnerships anddeveloping/facilitating student and staff recognition programs, so that teachers will beencouraged to continue to grow professional and students continue to perform at high levels. 65
  • 1. What is my desired outcome for professional growth? o Will your goal(s) impact your professional growth? o Will the professional growth you identified have an effect on student learning? H. Rationale for Your Goal(s) and Link to Self-Reflection, Educational Situation, and Educational Standards (Relate how your goal(s) is linked to your school district’s goals, your school’s goals, your self-reflection, educational situation, and list the educational standards that you will focus on for your professional growth cycle.)My two professional development goals are linked to my school district and school’s goals bythey both focusing on developing, implementing and assessing activities which will lead toenhanced student academic achievement. As the leader of the building, my first and foremostpriority in the building is to improve student achievement. The educational leadership ISLLCstandards I will be focusing on during the implementation of this professional development planwill be standard 2 and standard 4. 2. How does the outcome relate to the school district’s goals and my school’s goals (SIP) o Does the rationale include how you related your self-reflection (Step I) to your goal(s)? o Does the rationale tell how your goal(s) connects to your district/school/leadership position/? o Did you list the ISLLC Standards that will promote your professional growth (must select two or more standards)? 66
  • D. Plan for Assessing and Documenting Your Goal(s):Goal 1: Improve Instructional Program of SchoolData sources used to establish outcome Review of school-wide needs assessment results Walk-through data results from academic departments Review of informal and formal evaluation write-ups of instructional staffData sources used to assess achievement of outcome Teacher surveys on the impact of professional learning communities Collection and evaluation of professional portfolios of teachers showing how they have used data to drive instruction in the classroom Collection and evaluation of sample lesson plans and/or video-taped lessons on researched-based instructional practicesGoal 2: Improve School and Community RelationsData sources used to establish outcome Reading and Math State Assessment Scores (Previous School Year) Student, Teacher and Staff Climate Survey Results (Previous School Year) Student Suspension Data (Previous School Year)Data sources used to assess achievement of outcome Reading and Math State Assessment Scores (Current School Year) Student, Teacher and Staff Climate Survey Results (Current School Year) Student Suspension Data (Current School Year) 1. What data sources did I use to establish my outcome? What data will I use to assess achievement of my outcome? o Did you include methods to assess your professional growth? o Did you include methods to assess the effect of your growth on student learning? 67
  • E. Plan to Meet Your Goal(s): Objectives, Activities and Timelines, and Collaboration: 1. Which of the professional development options/strategies/techniques listed below will I use? Collaborative Options Independent Options__X__ Peer Reflective Conversations _____ Audio/Videotape Analysis__X__ Peer Visits with Reflection (*) __X__ Delivery of Workshops/Courses_____ Committee or Task Force Participation _____ Action Research_____ Delivery of Workshops/Courses _____ Professional School Site Visits__X__ Development of Instructional Materials __X__ Review of Professional Literature__X__ Action Research Study Groups __X__ Professional Training__X__ Principal Networking Group _____ school-based workshops_____ New Curriculum Development __X_ Out of school workshops__X__ Professional School Site Visits __X_ conference(s)_____ Other (be specific) _____ Writing of an reflective journal(*) Required one year of each evaluation cycle _____ Other (be specific) 2. PDP Support Team (Community Superintendent, Consortium Principal Cohort, Assistant Principal(s), Staff Development Teacher, Technology Specialist, etc.)______Community Superintendent ______Staff Development Teacher____________Consortium Principal Cohort________ ______School Technology Specialist______________Assistant Principal(s)____________ __________Department Chairs__________ 68
  • 3. List Anticipated Resources Needed for Accomplishing the Goal(s) of Your Professional Development Plan.Goal 1 Resources: Professional literature on developing vision and mission statements Revised informal instructional data collection forms Teacher copies of county professional development standards Professional development plan template and PDP teacher samples Professional Learning Communities literature School district data specialist workshops Professional instructional organization (Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) teacher workshops Library Media Specialist (videotaping of teacher best practices)Goal 2 Resources: Professional literature on developing after school programs for at-risk students Contact information for local area university education departments PBIS Program action plan to present to local business community Editor of school newspaper Media liaison with local area newspaper Student Recognition Committee PBIS Committee PTSA 4. Devise a tentative timeline for the implementation of your plan with periodic benchmarks to judge your progress (Note: Completion date will be filled in as each objective/activity is completed – refer to next page for action plan guide). 69
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  • Goal 1: Improve Instructional Program of School Date Initiated: August 2011Objective 1: Provide Clinical Supervision to Underperforming Teachers Date Completed: June 2014 Activities Timeline Collaboration Date CompletedDeveloping a clear Vision and July 04 – 2011 Team leaders, Content Specialists, July 08, 2011Mission statement and gaining Through Administrators, Community Superintendent, (Mission statement will becommitment for the statement July 08 – 2011 Student Leaders, and Parents will meet for one reviewed on an annual basis)from all stakeholders (teachers, week, during the summer, to review the needsstudents, administrators, and assessment data results, school improvementparents). plan, and current vision and mission statement. The collaborative process used will lead to a more student focused vision and mission statement.Collect monthly instructional June 2011 Administrators and Content Specialists will June 2014walk-through data on teacher Through meet monthly to review the results of theinstructional practices by June 2014 instructional walk-through data. Teachers willdepartment. (Annual) be given a monthly instructional focus to include in their planning and delivering of instruction to students based upon department walk-through instructional results.Conduct on-going informal and June 2011 Administrators will work closely with novice June 2014formal evaluations of Through and veteran teachers who are underperforminginstructional personnel. Pre and June 2014 in the classroom. Administrators will ensure thatPost Observation Conferences (Annual) these teachers have a professional developmentwill be used to discuss teacher plan in place to make the proper adjustments toinstructional practices and their instruction that will lead to positive studentdevelop an improvement plan achievement results.for mediocre teachers who areunderperforming 71
  • Objective 2: Provide On-going Professional Development to all Staff Members Date Completed: June 2014 Activities Timeline Collaboration Date CompletedDevelop, implement, and assess August 2011 Principal will train school leadership on how to June 2014professional learning Through implement professional learning communitiescommunities (PLC) June 2014 throughout the school. School leadership will be (Annual) responsible for implementing PLCs at the school level and administration will be responsible for assessing the implementation and structure of PLCs.Train teachers on how to use August 2011 Monthly professional development sessions June 2014quantitative data to drive Through held with teachers, on grade-level teams, oninstruction in the classroom June 2014 how to use formative, summative, and county- (Annual) wide data systems to make instructional decisions in the classroom. After initial training, teachers will be asked to share at monthly meetings of how they have used data to drive instructional practices in the classroom to improve student achievement.Train teachers on latest August 2011 Monthly professional development sessions June 2014researched-based instructional Through held with teachers, on grade-level teams,practices that will improve June 2014 regarding researched-based instructionalstudent achievement (Annual) practices. Teachers will be asked to share/demonstrate best practices at monthly professional development meetings of how they have incorporated the researched literature into their class instruction. 72
  • Goal 2: Improve School and Community Relations Date Initiated: July 2011Objective 1: Develop School and Business Community Partnerships Date Completed: June 2014 Activities Timeline Collaboration Date Completed Develop Parent/Business August 2011 Administrators will collaborate with June 2014 Community Mentor Through parents and business community leaders to Program for At-Risk June 2014 develop, implement, and assess an Students. (Annual) afterschool mentor program for at-risk students. Develop a reading and math August 2011 Administrators will collaborate with local June 2014 intervention program Through school personnel of higher education in utilizing education majors at June 2014 order to seek out education majors, who local universities. (Annual) specialize in Reading and Math, to tutor students who are performing below grade level in reading and math. Seek out educational August 2011 Administrators and the PBIS team June 2014 business partnership to Through (teachers, parents and students) will seek advance the Positive June 2014 out a business partnership(s) that will assist Behavior Intervention and (Annual) with financially supporting the goals and Supports Program (PBIS) objectives of the PBIS Program. 73
  • Objective 2: Develop and Facilitate Student and Staff Recognition Programs Date Completed: June 2014 Activities Timeline Collaboration Date CompletedFour (4) teacher August 2011 Parent-Student-Teacher Association will June 2014appreciation activities will Through collaborate with school administration tobe planned each year to June 2014 plan teacher appreciation activities.recognize the hard work of (Annual)the teaching staff.Quarterly, four times per August 2011 Administration and the School Recognition June 2014year, student awards Through Committee will work together to planassemblies will be held to June 2014 student recognition assemblies.recognize the academic (Annual)achievements of the studentbody.Community, county and August 2011 Administrators will work with the PTSA, June 2014school recognition of school Through through utilization of the local schoolpersonnel. June 2014 newspaper, school district newsletter, and (Annual) the school newsletter, to highlight inspiring accomplishments of all school personnel. 74
  • Review Checklist for Objectives, Activities and Timelines, and Collaboration:2. Objectiveso Do the objectives directly address the goal(s)?o Are the objectives observable and verifiable?4. Description of Activities and Timelineso Do the activities align with the goal(s) and objective(s)?o Do the activities extend throughout the professional development cycle?o Is the timeline stated?5. Plan for Collaborationo Does the plan include collaboration with others? Examples of collaboration may include the following:E. Collaboration with colleaguesF. Collaboration with higher educationG. Collaboration with a professional learning communityH. Collaboration with a mentor (initial educator only) 75
  • Professional Development Plan Evaluation Team Beginning of Year 1 – Professional Development CycleName: Lorenzo R. Prillman Date:Educator’s School District: Montgomery County Public SchoolsEducator’s Employee ID#: 000069337Educator’s Current Educational Assignment: PrincipalNumber of Year(s) in Current Assignment: 02Years of Educational Experience: 17School: Benjamin Banneker Middle SchoolLength of Professional Growth Cycle: ___X_ 3-years ____ 4-years ____5 years (check one)Duration of Plan: From July 01, 2011 to July 01, 2014Check – In Dates: January 2012, July 2012, January 2013, July 2013 and January 2014End of PDP Cycle Review: July 2014Year in Professional Development Cycle: Year 1Principal: _________________________________ _______ (Principal Signature) (Date)Consortium Principal Cohort Member: ________________________________ _______ (Principal Cohort Member Signature) (Date)Approved by Community Superintendent: ______________________________ ________ (Superintendent Signature) (Date) 76
  • Lincoln Middle School Novice Principal Work Entry Plan 2011 - 2012Principal: Lorenzo R. PrillmanSchool District: Montgomery CountyPublic SchoolsSchool Assignment: Lincoln MiddleSchoolSchool Year: 2011 – 2012Community Superintendent: Dr.Barbara JacksonISLLCS Standards Addressed: I, II,II, IV & V Novice Principal Work Entry Plan Administrative Goal(s)Standard 1 – A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of allstudents by facilitating the development, articulation, implementation, and stewardship of avision of learning that is shared and supported by the school community. Goal 1 – Work with school leadership team, teachers, students and parents to revise the school core values, mission and vision statement.Standard 2 – A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of allstudents by advocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and instructional programconducive to student and staff professional growth. Goal 2 – Work with school leadership team, teachers, students and parents to address school climate concerns. Goal 3 – Work with the school leadership team to development of a highly effective professional development program.Standard 3 – A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of allstudents by ensuring management of the organization, operations, and resources for a safe,efficient, and effective learning environment. Goal 4- Work with school leadership team to fill vacant teaching positions with educators who can support the vision and mission of the school.Standard 4 – A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of allstudents by collaborating with families and community members, responding to diversecommunity interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources.Standard 5 – A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of allstudents by acting with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner. Goal 5 – Work with school leadership team, teachers, students and parents to address the social and academic needs of a diverse community of learners. 77
  • Lincoln Middle School: Novice Principal Work Entry PlanStandard 1 – A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by facilitating the development, articulation,implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning that is shared and supported by the school community.Goal 1 – Work with school leadership team, teachers, students and parents to revise the school core values, mission and vision statement.Action Steps Timeline Person(s) Responsible Resources Needed Monitoring Tools Results Next Steps(Activities) (Start and End Date) (Who will be (What resources are (What data and/or (What are the results (What are the next responsible for carrying needed to carry out the evidenceof of the implementation steps that need to take out the school-wide school-wide implementation will be of the school-wide place in order to initiative?) initiative?) used to Monitor initiative?) maintain or move the outcome(s) of Goal?) initiative forward?)Stakeholder Exercise Start Date: School Stakeholders Resources Monitoring1.Developing CORE July 11, 2011 1. Principal 1.School Improvement 1.School ClimateVALUES Activity (Leadership Week) 2. Assistant Plan (Previous School Survey (Quarterly) – Principal(s) Year) Staff Members Completion Date: 3. Staff July 12, 2011 Development 2.School Climate 2. School Climate2.Building Upon (Leadership Week) Teacher Survey Results Survey (Quarterly) –CORE VALUES 4. Department (Previous School StudentsActivity – Mission Chairs Year)Statement Activity 5. Team Leaders 3. School Climate 6. Teachers 3.Two Summer Work Survey (Quarterly) – 7. Students Days for Revising the Parents 8. Parents school Core Values,3.Building Upon Mission and Vision 4.No Child LeftMission Statement Statement Behind State-WideActivity – Vision Assessment DataStatement Activity 4.Professional (Reading and Math) literature on developing vision and 5.Student Eligibility mission statements Data - Quarterly 6. Student Suspension Data - Quarterly 7.Instructional Walk- Through Data – Bi-QuarterlyRationale for Addressing Goal 1:Standard IThe need to address Goal one at Lincoln Middle school is based on the fact that the school has been under the leadership of three separate Principalsover the last five years. The need to develop a common language and belief system is necessary in order to move the school and community in apositive direction. 78
  • Lincoln Middle School: Novice Principal Work Entry PlanStandard 2 – A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by advocating, nurturing, and sustaining aschool culture and instructional program conducive to student and staff professional growth.Goal 2 – Work with school leadership team, teachers, students and parents to address school climate concerns.Action Steps Timeline Person(s) Responsible Resources Needed Monitoring Tools Results Next Steps(Activities) (Start and End Date) (Who will be responsible (What resources are (What data and/or (What are the results (What are the next for carrying out the needed to carry out the evidenceof of the implementation steps that need to take school-wide initiative?) school-wide implementation will be of the school-wide place in order to initiative?) used to Monitor initiative?) maintain or move the outcome(s) of Goal?) initiative forward?)Stakeholder Activities Start Date: School Stakeholders Resources Monitoring1.Creation of School August 22, 2011 1. Principal 1.School Improvement 1.School ClimateClimate Committee (Pre-Service Week) 2. Instructional Plan (Previous School Survey (Quarterly) –(Develop School Support Year) Staff & Students Completion Date: CommitteeClimate Initiatives) 3. Staff On-Going 2.School Climate 2.PBIS Survey Development Survey Results (Quarterly) – Staff &2.Implementation of Teacher (Previous School StudentsPositive Intervention 4. Assistant Year)and Supports (PBIS) Principal 3.Staff DevelopmentProgram 5. School Climate 3. Staff Development Survey (Quarterly) for Committee Needs Assessment New Teachers to the 6. PBIS Committee Survey Results Building3.Provide 7. PTSA PresidentInstructional 4.Student EligibilitySupport for New Data – QuarterlyTeachers to theBuilding (teacher 5. Student Suspensionretention) Data - QuarterlyRationale for Addressing Goal 2:Standard IIThe need to address Goal two at Lincoln Middle school is based on the fact that the school, which has been under the leadership of three separatePrincipals over the last five years, does not have a clear plan to improve the working relationships between students, teachers, parents andadministration. The need to develop a community where all stakeholders’ views and opinions are welcome is necessary in order to move the schooland community in a positive direction. 79
  • Lincoln Middle School: Novice Principal Work Entry PlanStandard 2 – A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by advocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and instructionalprogram conducive to student and staff professional growth.Goal 3 – Work with the school leadership team to development of a highly effective professional development program.Action Steps Timeline Person(s) Responsible Resources Needed Monitoring Tools Results Next Steps(Activities) (Start and End Date) (Who will be (What resources are (What data and/or (What are the results (What are the next responsible for carrying needed to carry out the evidence of of the implementation steps that need to take out the school-wide school-wide implementation will be of the school-wide place in order to initiative?) initiative?) used to Monitor initiative?) maintain or move the outcome(s) of Goal?) initiative forward?)Stakeholder Start Date: School Stakeholders Resources MonitoringActivities August 22, 2011 1. Principal 1.Professional 1.Teacher Professional1.Develop (Pre-Service Week) 2. Assistant Learning Communities Development SurveysProfessional Learning Principal(s) Literature (professionalCommunities Completion Date: 3. Staff learning communities On-Going Development 2.Association for & teacher2.Training of Teachers Teacher Supervision and instructional beston how to use 4. Department Curriculum practices)Quantitative Data to Chairs DevelopmentDrive Classroom 5. Team Leaders Teacher Workshops 2.Student InstructionalInstruction Feedback Surveys 3. Video Taping of3.Train Teachers on Teacher Best Practices 3.Review of TeacherLatest Researched- ProfessionalBased Instructional 4.School District Data Development PlansPractices that will Specialist WorkshopsImprove Student (teacher instructional 4.Review of TeacherAchievement training on using Professional Portfolios data in the (use of data to drive4.Creation of Teacher classroom) classroomProfessional instructionalDevelopment Plans 5. Teacher Copies of practices) County Professional Development 5.Collection of and Standards Evaluation of Lesson Plans and Video- 5.PDP Templates Taped Lessons on Researched-Based Instructional PracticesRationale for Addressing Goal 3: Standard IIThe need to address Goal three at Lincoln Middle school is based on the fact that the school, which has been under the leadership of three separate Principals over the last fiveyears, does not have a clear plan to improve the instruction of mediocre teaching in the school building which is resulting in student achievement levels, in all core subjects, fallingbelow state and national standards. The need to develop a highly effective professional development program is paramount to improving student achievement. 80
  • Lincoln Middle School: Novice Principal Work Entry PlanStandard 3 – A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by ensuring management of the organization,operations, and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.Goal 4 – Work with school leadership team to fill vacant teaching positions with educators who can support the vision and mission of the school.Action Steps Timeline Person(s) Responsible Resources Needed Monitoring Tools Results Next Steps(Activities) (Start and End Date) (Who will be (What resources are (What data and/or (What are the results (What are the next responsible for carrying needed to carry out the evidenceof of the implementation steps that need to take out the school-wide school-wide implementation will be of the school-wide place in order to initiative?) initiative?) used to Monitor initiative?) maintain or move the outcome(s) of Goal?) initiative forward?)Stakeholder Activities Start Date: School Stakeholders Resources Monitoring1.Interview July 19, 2011 1. Principal 1.Professional 1.Review of TeacherProspective Teacher 2. Assistant development activities ProfessionalCandidates to Fill Completion Date: Principal(s) associated with the Development Plans August 19, 2011 3. Staff schools vision andTeaching Vacancies Development mission statement 2.Review of Teacher Monitoring of All Teacher ( monthly activity) Professional Portfolios2. Assess the Work Educators Support 4. Department (use of data to driveof New and Current of School Vision and Chairs 2.Professional classroomTeachers Around Mission Statement: 5. Team Leaders development sessions instructionalSupporting the On-Going reviewing teacher practices) portfolio entriesSchool Vision and (Quarterly) that 3.Collection of andMission Statement support the schools Evaluation of Lesson vision and mission Plans and Video- statement Taped Lessons on Researched-Based Instructional PracticesRationale for Addressing Goal 4:Standard IIIThe need to address Goal four at Lincoln Middle school is based on the fact that the school, which has been under the leadership of three separatePrincipals over the last five years, was unable to sustain a school vision that would attract and retain quality school teachers. The need to hire qualityinstructional personnel is vital to promoting the beliefs and values of the schools vision and mission statement. 81
  • Lincoln Middle School: Novice Principal Work Entry PlanStandard 4 – A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by collaborating with families and communitymembers, responding to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilizing community resources.Standard 5 – A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by acting with integrity, fairness, and in anethical manner.Goal 5 – Work with school leadership team, teachers, students and parents to address the social and academic needs of a diverse community oflearners.Action Steps Timeline Person(s) Responsible Resources Needed Monitoring Tools Results Next Steps(Activities) (Start and End Date) (Who will be (What resources are (What data and/or (What are the results (What are the next responsible for carrying needed to carry out the evidenceof of the implementation steps that need to take out the school-wide school-wide implementation will be of the school-wide place in order to initiative?) initiative?) used to Monitor initiative?) maintain or move the outcome(s) of Goal?) initiative forward?)Stakeholder Activities Start Date: School Stakeholders Resources Monitoring1.Professional July 13, 2011 1. Principal 1.Professional 1.ESOL StudentsDevelopment (Leadership Week) 2. Assistant Development Instructional FeedbackInstructional Principal(s) Literature on Working Surveys – Quarterly Completion Date: 3. Staff with ESOL StudentsPractices for ESOL Development 2.ESOL Parents On-GoingStudents (Monthly) Teacher 2.Professional School Survey 4. Department Literature on Feedback - Quarterly2.Development of Chairs Developing ParentESOL Parent 5. Team Leaders Academies 2.ESOL StudentsAcademy (Monthly 6. PTSA President Eligibility Data 7. ESOL 3.ProfessionalMeetings) Committee Literature on 3.No Child Left 8. Foreign Developing Mentor Behind State-Wide3.ESOL Parent Language Programs Assessment DataCommunication in Department (Reading and Math)Native Language 4.Central Office Parent(School Newsletter, Communication Division (TranslationSchool Flyers, etc.) of School Literature into Native Languages4.ESOL Student of ESOL Students)Mentor ClubRationale for Addressing Goal 5:Standard IV & VThe need to address Goal five at Lincoln Middle school is based on the fact that the school in recent years has received into the school community a large numberof families from Somalia, Mexico and Cambodia. The need to train teachers in providing highly quality instruction to ESOL students and developing effectiveways for the school to communicate with parents of ESOL students is critical to meeting the academic and social needs of a community of diverse learners. 82
  • PREPARING FOR SPECIFIC EXPERIENCES Experiences to be performed during the practicum experience should be based upon theindividual needs of the Candidates; should be directed at improving skills, techniques andbehaviors which have shown to be related to effective principals and supervisors; and should beapproved by the Supervising Administrator and University instructor. The experiences should inno way interfere with the regular responsibilities of the candidates in their capacity as a teacheror staff member within a building. After specific experiences have been formulated, they shouldbe recorded on the Specific Responsibilities Form. The Supervising Administrator and thecandidates will sign this form which is returned to the University instructor. Although suchexperiences willnormally be performed by the candidates during the practicum experience, someexperiences may have to be canceled and/or additional experiences may be required due to thespecific needs of the student, school, supervising administrator or University instructor. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE SUPERVISING ADMINISTRATORA. Participate in the University’s Mentor Preparation process.B. Complete the Letter of Agreement which indicates your willingness to assume the duties of supervising the Candidate.C. Explain relevant factors related to the operation of the school to delineate specific perimeters within which the candidates will work.D. Acquaint the candidates with situations that might cause a deviation from the planned program.E. Become familiar with the expectations and objectives of the University relative to the practicum participant. (These are included in this Handbook)F. Evaluate all activities and guide the candidate into the type of self-evaluation that resultsfrom such an experience. (The evaluation forms are included in the Handbook)G. Alert the candidates about areas of weaknesses and provide needed assistance for overcoming the weaknesses.H. Discuss all evaluations with the practicum participant/candidate.I. Alert the University Instructor of any problems which arise which might jeopardize the candidates’ completion of the specific objectives of the practicum. 83
  • CANDIDATE PROCEDURES AND RESPONSIBILITIES 1. Meet with the supervising administrator/mentor to review the Practicum Handbook. 2. Provide the mentor a copy of your biographical sketch or resume. 3. Complete the Specific Responsibilities Form and the Six Cell Grid on Administration and Supervision Functions. 4. Make an appointment with your mentor to discuss how and when the required activities will be implemented. 5. Develop a written plan to accomplish your tasks/experiences. 6. Plan cooperatively with your mentor the dates for site visits by the University Supervisor (give optional dates as well). 7. Discuss with the University Supervisor, prior to the visit, the expected administrative experience in which you will be engaged on the day of the visit. 8. Maintain a journal of your experiences for inclusion in your portfolio submission. 9. Meet with your mentor to discuss his/her evaluation of your performance. 10. Submit, at the conclusion of the practicum/internship experience, a self evaluation. REQUIRED PRACTICUM EXPERIENCESA. Instructional Maintenance and Improvement 1. Participate in the evaluation and requisition of instructional materials/textbooks. 2. Observe and Critique three (3) lessons – Reading/English, Math, Science. 3. Conduct a mock evaluation while shadowing the principal 4. Participate in test analysis. 5. Develop a support program for underachievers. 6. Plan enrichment activities for accelerated learners. 7. Participate on the Local School Planning Team.B. Professional Development and Services 1. Design and Conduct a needs assessment for Professional Development. 2. Conduct two (2) Staff Development Activities. 3. Attend two professional development activities. 4. Facilitate the implementation of the Needs Assessment Results. 5. Identifiy and Implement an activity to promote positive School Climate. 84
  • C. Pupil Development and Services 1. Visit three (3) agencies in the community that support student Development. 2. Design and Implement a program for Student Leadership Development. 3. Participate as an observer of a Student Evaluation Conference and/IEP Conference. 4. Shadow the counselor for two (2) days and substitute for one day. 5. Conduct one (1) case study per semester.D. School and Community Relations 1. Coordinate field trip experiences. 2. Participate in Parent Teacher Meetings. 3. Participate in two (2) School-Community events. 4. Collaborate with the community leaders in developing a School and Community Relations event i.e. – Fun Fair, Book Fair. 5. Plan a media event to highlight the school.E. Administration of Facilities and Finances 1. Shadow for (1) day: Administrative Aide, Engineer, Cafeteria Manager. 2. Review with the principal the tracking of the school budget from the state house to the school house. 3. Participate in the budget planning process of your school. 4. Monitor cafeteria, playground and bus duties. 5. Participate in the development and implementation of the Crisis Plan.F. Organizational Relationship and Responsibilites 1. Develop and implement a school community relationship plan that addresses one of the school’s top three (3) priorities. 2. Become a member of at least on professional organization other than the organization that represents teachers. 3. Attend two (2) professional development activities. 4. Attend two (2) School-Community Organization Meetings. 5. Participate as a member of the principal’s team to organize the school for the ensuing school year. 85
  • Standard 1 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 3 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 5 – A school administrator is an educationalleader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by actingfacilitating the development, articulation, ensuring management of the organization, operations, and with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner.implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learningthat is shared and supported by the school community. environment.Standard 2 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 4 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 6 – A school administrator is an educationalleader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students byadvocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and collaborating with families and community members, understanding, responding to, and influencing the largerinstructional program conducive to student and staff responding to diverse community interests and needs, and political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.professional growth. mobilizing community resources. Bowie State University Administrative Practicum Reflections LogISLLC Standard: 1 Today, the school leadership team held its weekly meeting to discuss ways to create a more rigorous instructionalIssue/Topic: Rigorous Instruction program. A few of the ideas on improving instruction, presented at the meeting, focused on the collection ofMonth: September 2010 monthly lesson plans from teachers and the development of a monthly instructional focus. Following the meeting, IWeek: September 06 – September 10, 2010 met with teachers in my department to disucss ways to develop and implement a monthly instructional focus. As aDate: September 07, 2010 collaborative group we came to the realization that the department instructional focus needed to be linked to the school’s vision and mission statement. Student achievement depends on the quality of teacher instruction.ISLLC Standard: 1 & 2 Today, the Instructional Leadership Team met with the Community Superintendent and her staff to map out a planIssue/Topic: Annual Steering Committee to improve student achievement in the area of reading and math. The committee analyzed MSA reading and mathMonth: September 2010 data from last year and made suggestions on how to improve scores for the 2011 MSA reading and math test. AfterWeek: September 20 – September 24, 2010 serving on the committee for one year, I have gained a great deal of knowledge about how to move strugglingDate: schools forward and the resources needed to improve student achievement.ISLLC Standard: 5 This week involved taking on the role of mediator at my school. A controversial reading was issued, by the EnglishIssue/Topic: Problem Solving deparment chair, to MSA advisory prep classes which offended one of the Muslim teachers in my department. TheMonth: September 2010 English teacher who issued the reading to the advisory classes asked me to discuss the issue with the teacher. AfterWeek: September 20 – September 24, 2010 conversing with the teacher for about thirty minutes, I was able to get her to see that there had been aDate: September 23, 2010 misinterpretation of the articles message and the situation was resolved. What I realized from this incident is that a Principal of a school often finds him or her self in the role of mediator or consultant as a school leader.ISLLC Standard: Today, I interivewed my site supervisor regarding his personal and professional feelings of serving in a position ofIssue/Topic: Practicum Planning leadership as a middle school assistant principal. I learned from Mr. Glaspie that leadership requires someone withMonth: September 2010 good communication skills, someone who asks the right questions, and making sure people have the right resourcesWeek: September 13 – September 17, 2010 to get the job done. Mr. Glaspie also stated that “being an administrator is like swimming with sharks because youDate: September 13, 2010 never know whey they will bite (parents, students, teachers, etc.).” It was an very informative interview. 86
  • Standard 1 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 3 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 5 – A school administrator is an educationalleader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by actingfacilitating the development, articulation, ensuring management of the organization, operations, and with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner.implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learningthat is shared and supported by the school community. environment.Standard 2 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 4 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 6 – A school administrator is an educationalleader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students byadvocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and collaborating with families and community members, understanding, responding to, and influencing the largerinstructional program conducive to student and staff responding to diverse community interests and needs, and political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.professional growth. mobilizing community resources. Bowie State University Administrative Practicum Reflections LogISLLC Standard: 2 This week was an extremely busy week at work. I conducted three informal walk-throughs and two formalIssue/Topic: Instructional Assessment observations. The opportunity to critique instructional practices of teachers and to provide clinical supervision toMonth: October 2010 them is a great feeling. However, teacher observations are very time consuming. It takes twice as long to write upWeek: October 11 – October 15, 2010 an obeservation report than it does to write out observation notes. I believe this is the most demanding part of theDate: October 13 – 14, 2010 job as an administrator. With all the other duties that an adminstrator has to deal with on a daily basis, it can become very easy for adminstrators to slack off in conducting teacher observations. I now know why a principal tends to lean on the Intructional Leadership Team to get the majority of teacher observations completed.ISLLC Standard: 3 This week in leadership focused on the lack of teacher grading consistency across all grade levels. In my department,Issue/Topic: Grading and Reporting there were some cohort teachers grade books that were not aligned with each other. After having a talk with theMonth: October 2010 administrator assigned to the Social Studies Department and the Staff Development Teacher, I held a meeting withWeek: October 04 – October 08, 2010 teachers in the department. The meeting focused on generating ideas on how to improve the consistency of gradingDate: October 08, 2010 and reporting. As a result of the meeting, a Grading and Reporting Consistency Checklist was created to eliminate teacher inconsistencies in grading. Managing people to get them to do what you want them to Is not an easy task!ISLLC Standard: 4 This evening I attended a PTSA meeting where the President discussed the need for someone to take on the task ofIssue/Topic: PTSA Staff Membership getting staff members to join the PTSA. I voulnteered to take on the task of getting staff members on board. As aMonth: October 2010 school leader it is very important to let the parents and community know that your willing to work with them toWeek: October 11 – October 15, 2010 improve the climate of the school. Establishing postive community and school relations is of supreme importance toDate: October 12, 2010 a principal and his or her staff.ISLLC Standard: 4 This evening I attended the annual school event known as “Literacy Night.” The evening involved students andIssue/Topic: Literacy Night parents gaining a greater appreciation for literacy through student and staff presentations. Attending and holdingMonth: October 2010 school events like literacy night tells the students that the schools are open to them and their families. PostiveWeek: October 25 – October 29, 2010 school and community relations begins when the schools open their doors to the community. A leader of a schoolDate: October 28, 2010 needs to develop creative ways to bring the community together to support the vision and mission of the school. 87
  • Standard 1 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 3 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 5 – A school administrator is an educationalleader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by actingfacilitating the development, articulation, ensuring management of the organization, operations, and with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner.implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learningthat is shared and supported by the school community. environment.Standard 2 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 4 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 6 – A school administrator is an educationalleader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students byadvocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and collaborating with families and community members, understanding, responding to, and influencing the largerinstructional program conducive to student and staff responding to diverse community interests and needs, and political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.professional growth. mobilizing community resources. Bowie State University Administrative Practicum Reflections LogISLLC Standard: 2 Today, I conducted a formal observation of a staff member. We held a pre-observation confernece yesterday inIssue/Topic: Formal Observation order to review what the lesson would be about. During the post-observation conference I will discuss with theMonth: November 2010 teacher some of the concerns I had about the lesson. Holding a post-observation conference with a teacher on aWeek: November 01 – November 05, 2010 lesson that did not go to well is a difficult task. A school leader needs to make sure that their literal notes are clearDate: November 05, 2010 and incorporates many data points. Post-observation conferences can run smooth as long as the leader is prepared to show the data.ISLLC Standard: Out of Work on Medical Leave Due to IllnessIssue/Topic:Month: November 2010Week: November 08 – November 12, 2010Date:ISLLC Standard: 2 Today, I met with my cluster cohorts from the Northeast Consortium to begin planning cluster academic goals. As aIssue/Topic: Cluster Resource Meeting school leader it is very important to collaborate with colleagues from other schools to see how they’re working toMonth: November 2010 improve student achievement. The goals we addressed at today’s cluster meeting related mostly to literacy andWeek: November 15 – November 19, 2010 writing needs of students. One of the cluster chohort members gave a brief presentation on how they attempted toDate: November 17, 2010 improve literacy and writing in their schools based off of similar ideas we developed in our cluster goal action plan.ISLLC Standard: 5 The past two weeks have been difficult for me due to an unknown sickness I came down with a few weeks ago.Issue/Topic: Two Long Weeks Although I returned to work, it is clear to me that my condition has not improved much. However, as a leader, thereMonth: November 2010 is usually not much time given to recover from an illness when the people you supervise need guidance. WhenWeek: November 22 – November 24, 2010 becoming a school leader, the most difficult part of the job is having to address multiple issues people are dealingDate: November 24, 2010 with the same time. You almost have to forget about your own personal issues to address the needs of your staff. 88
  • Standard 1 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 3 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 5 – A school administrator is an educationalleader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by actingfacilitating the development, articulation, ensuring management of the organization, operations, and with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner.implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learningthat is shared and supported by the school community. environment.Standard 2 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 4 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 6 – A school administrator is an educationalleader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students byadvocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and collaborating with families and community members, understanding, responding to, and influencing the largerinstructional program conducive to student and staff responding to diverse community interests and needs, and political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.professional growth. mobilizing community resources. Bowie State University Administrative Practicum Reflections LogISLLC Standard: Out of Work on Medical Leave Due to IllnessIssue/Topic:Month: December 2010Week: November 29 – December 03, 2010Date:ISLLC Standard: Out of Work on Medical Leave Due to IllnessIssue/Topic:Month: December 2010Week:December 06 – December 10, 2010Date:ISLLC Standard: 2 Today, I participated in the Annual Steering Committee meeting which looked at Maryland State Assessment (MSA)Issue/Topic: MSA Focus Students focus students performance on Quarter 1 formative and summative assessments in English and Math. During theMonth: December 2010 meeting, the school leadership team and the community superintendednt analyzed student achievement data toWeek: December 13 – December 17, 2010 make recommendations on how to improve student achievement through developing more effective instructionalDate: December 16, 2010 practies for teachers. Through participating in the meeting, I learned that effective schools consistently refer back to student achievement data in order to modify the instructional practices of teachers.ISLLC Standard: 6 During today’s department meeting, I required teachers to report out on whether or not the classroom interventionIssue/Topic: Special Education Students practices created for Special Education Students were having success. Many of the teachers talked about the areasMonth: December 2010 of student achievment obtained by Special Education Students as a result of teachers using the Student AccessibilityWeek: Decembe 20 – December 23, 2010 Planner and Accomodations Quick Reference Guide. After holding the meeting, I realized that leaders must ensureDate: 12/20/10 that all students have a right to a “free and appropriate” education. 89
  • Standard 1 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 3 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 5 – A school administrator is an educationalleader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by actingfacilitating the development, articulation, ensuring management of the organization, operations, and with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner.implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learningthat is shared and supported by the school community. environment.Standard 2 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 4 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 6 – A school administrator is an educationalleader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students byadvocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and collaborating with families and community members, understanding, responding to, and influencing the largerinstructional program conducive to student and staff responding to diverse community interests and needs, and political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.professional growth. mobilizing community resources. Bowie State University Administrative Practicum Reflections LogISLLC Standard: 2 Over the course of two days, I conducted a series of instructional walk-throughs in the Social Studies department toIssue/Topic: Instructional Walk-Through evaluate the level of teacher instruction in the areas of student discourse and checking for understanding. TheMonth: January 2011 instructional walk-throughs raised some instructional concerns that needed to be addressed immediately in order toWeek: January 03 – January 07, 2011 improve student achievement. After reviewing with individual teachers their walk-through report, the teachers and IDate: January 04 & 05, 2011 worked together on mini action plans to address the individual instructional problems in their classes. In addition, the entire department collaborated at the next department meeting to address the instructional concerns of the department. What resonated with me most following the facilitaing of the instructional walk-throughs and teacher follow-up sessions was that problem solving should be a shared responsibility.ISLLC Standard: 1 & 2 Today, I conducted an informal observation of a teacher in my department. As a leader, I believe it’s important toIssue/Topic: Informal Observation inform teachers of their strenghths and weaknesses after observing them in their natural teaching environment.Month: January 2011 After conducting the informal observation, I realized that In order for teachers to not see informal evaluations as aWeek: January 03 – January 07, 2011 threat to their job security, leaders have to model how informal evaluations our a part of the school culture and it’sDate: January 06, 2011 use is for improving instructional practices of teachers and student achievement.ISLLC Standard: 4 This week I reached out to the community of Benjamin Banneker Middle School to promote the annual school-wideIssue/Topic: Geography Bee geography bee competition. I developed National Geography Bee school literature to disseminate to parents,Month: January 2011 students, and staff. I promoted the event on the school website and informed parents through Connect Ed. As aWeek: January 10 – January 14, 2011 result of reaching out to the Benjamin Banneker community, we had a large number of students and parents thatDate: January 14, 2011 attended the school-wide Geography Bee Competition. Leaders must involve the community in school events.ISLLC Standard: 3 Today, I attended a workshop for department leaders who are in charge of overseeing the administering of countyIssue/Topic: Testing Materials wide exams . The meeting highlighted issues of testing security and testing violations that teachers, who will beMonth: January 2011 administering the exams, need to know in order to successfully administer the test to students. As a result ofWeek: January 17 – January 21, 2011 attending the meeting, I realized that the responsibility of school leaders not only falls under instructionalDate: January 18, 2011 leadership but also under management of the organziation. 90
  • Standard 1 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 3 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 5 – A school administrator is an educationalleader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by actingfacilitating the development, articulation, ensuring management of the organization, operations, and with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner.implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learningthat is shared and supported by the school community. environment.Standard 2 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 4 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 6 – A school administrator is an educationalleader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students byadvocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and collaborating with families and community members, understanding, responding to, and influencing the largerinstructional program conducive to student and staff responding to diverse community interests and needs, and political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.professional growth. mobilizing community resources. Bowie State University Administrative Practicum Reflections LogISLLC Standard: 2 Today, I participated in an instructional walk-through with the assistant principal. We utilized an instructional look-Issue/Topic: Instructional Walk-Through fors sheet to assess instructional practices of teachers in English, Math, Science, and Social Studies. Following theMonth: February 2011 walk-throughs we held a debriefing session to discuss what teaching strategies teachers were incorporating and notWeek: January 31 – February 04, 2011 incorporating based upon the School Improvement Plan. The instructional walk-through session was an awakeningDate: February 01, 2011 to the larger instructional problems a leader of a school may face as compared to a leader of a department.ISLLC Standard: 2 & 6 Today, I participated in a county-wide meeting for the Social Studies department which focused on improvingIssue/Topic: Improving Student Reading student reading. Working with colleagues from around the county, we analyzed instructional survey data fromMonth: February 2011 teachers on how they infused reading activites into their lessons. After reviewing the data, departmental leadersWeek: February 07 – 11, 2011 developed action plans to address content reading issues. Through attending the county-wide meeting, I realizedDate: February 09, 2011 that the answers to instructional problems within a school can be resolved through collaborative leadership.ISLLC Standard: 2 Today, I participated in the Annual Steering Committee meeting which looked at Maryland State Assessment (MSA)Issue/Topic: MSA Focus Students focus students performance on formative and summative assessments in English and Math. During the meeting, theMonth: February 2011 school leadership team and the community superintendednt analyzed student achievement data to see if all focusWeek: February 14 – 18, 2011 student subgroups, defined by the Maryland State Department of Education, were on track for making AnnualDate: February 14, 2011 Yearly Progress (AYP) in Reading and Math. Through participating in the meeting, I learned that effective schools consistently refer back to student achievement data in order to move the school forward in the right direction.ISLLC Standard: 2 Today, I held a pre-observation conference for one of the teachers in my department. The teacher was required toIssue/Topic: Pre-Observation Conference bring with her a lesson plan that included multiple ways students would be assessed during the course of the lesson.Month: February 2011 After conducting the pre-observation conference, I realized that school leaders cannot just be managers they alsoWeek: February 21 – 25, 2011 must have the ability to provide clinical supervion to teachers. During the course of the twenty minute pre-Date: February 25, 2011 observation conference, the teacher asked me on a few occasions how I could make the lesson plan better to meet the needs of all students. An effective school leader needs to have knowledge on managing people and instruction. 91
  • Standard 1 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 3 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 5 – A school administrator is an educationalleader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by actingfacilitating the development, articulation, ensuring management of the organization, operations, and with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner.implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learningthat is shared and supported by the school community. environment.Standard 2 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 4 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 6 – A school administrator is an educationalleader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students byadvocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and collaborating with families and community members, understanding, responding to, and influencing the largerinstructional program conducive to student and staff responding to diverse community interests and needs, and political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.professional growth. mobilizing community resources. Bowie State University Administrative Practicum Reflections LogISLLC Standard: 3 Today, I reviewed with a few teachers in my department what the expectations were for following through onIssue/Topic: MSA Blitz administering the Maryland State Assessment (MSA) blitz activities in their Social Studies classes. After conducting aMonth: March 2011 series of walk-throughs, I found that two teachers were not administerng the blitz activities on a consistent basis.Week: February 28 – March 04, 2011 Therefore, I spoke individually with the two teachers on why administering the MSA practice exercises to studentsDate: March 01, 2011 was crucial to student academic success on the MSA. After my meeting with both teachers, I conducted two follow- up visits to their classes to. In order to improve student achievement, Leaders cannot be afraid to address school issues which come in direct conflict with the school’s vision and mission statement.ISLLC Standard: 5 & 6 Today, I held a meeting with a teacher in my department who was not following some of the professional codes ofIssue/Topic: Honoring Codes of Ethics ethics described in the Montgomery County Professional Teacher Standards Guide. As a leader, it is not easy to holdMonth: March 2011 conversations with your colleagues which may not pertain directly to teaching. However, professional codes ofWeek: March 14 – March 18, 2011 ethics must be followed by all staff members and it’s the responsibility of leadership to promote and support thoseDate: March 16, 2011 ethics. Educational leaders must up-hold the rules and policies of the school and school system.ISLLC Standard: 2 Today, I held my monthly meeting with members of the Social Studies department to discuss developingIssue/Topic: Professional Development departmental and individual teacher professional development plans. Using the co-teaching analysis data of specialMonth: March 2011 education students, we created a professional development goal for the department and then decided that eachWeek: March 21 – March 25, 2011 teacher would develop another goal based upon their professional development needs. Leaders should alwaysDate: March 21, 2011 solicit the input of their staff when making decisions regarding teacher instructional needs and practices.ISLLC Standard: 5 Today, I held a meeting with two staff memebers in my department who are instructional cohorts. Both teachersIssue/Topic: Meeting the Common Good came to me with concerns regarding the ability to work with one another. After separately speaking with eachMonth: March 2011 individual, I brought both of them together to share their frustrations and then made a few recommendations onWeek: March 21 – March 25, 2011 how to resolve the issues between them. In the end, I reminded both teachers that their job is to help improve theDate: March 24, 2011 instruction of students. One thing I learned through many of the leadership experiences I have encountered this school year, similar to this situation, is that school leaders are managers, instructional leaders, and psychologists. 92
  • Standard 1 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 3 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 5 – A school administrator is an educationalleader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by actingfacilitating the development, articulation, ensuring management of the organization, operations, and with integrity, fairness, and in an ethical manner.implementation, and stewardship of a vision of learning resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learningthat is shared and supported by the school community. environment.Standard 2 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 4 – A school administrator is an educational Standard 6 – A school administrator is an educationalleader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students by leader who promotes the success of all students byadvocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and collaborating with families and community members, understanding, responding to, and influencing the largerinstructional program conducive to student and staff responding to diverse community interests and needs, and political, social, economic, legal and cultural context.professional growth. mobilizing community resources. Bowie State University Administrative Practicum Reflections LogISLLC Standard: 5 Today, I met with one of the teachers I supervise in the Social Studies department. I conversed with her about theIssue/Topic: Grading and Reporting high number of D’s and E’s students received in her class during the third marking period. We discussed why a largeMonth: April 2011 number of students were not being successful in her classes and what could be done to improve studentWeek: March 28 – April 01, 2011 achievement. After a thirty minute meeting, we were able to come up with an action plan to address the academicDate: April 01, 2011 needs of the students. As a leader, the principal has to be an advocate for the learning of all students.ISLLC Standard: 2 Today, I met with the teachers I supervise in the Social Studies department to check on their progress withIssue/Topic: Professional Development completing their professional development plans. This meeting was a follow-up session to see if everyone was onMonth: April 2011 track with writing their professional development goals and objectives. Inspiring others to see the need to evaluateWeek: April 03 – 08, 2011 and change their teaching practices is not an easy job. I did receive some push back from a few veteran teachers inDate: April 04, 2011 my department. However, I shared with them data of student performance in their classes and they began to see the relevance in developing PDP’s. A school leader has to believe in their own vision before sharing it with others.ISLLC Standard: 1 Today was an interesting day in leadership. I participated in the 2010-2011 Montgomery County Public School jobIssue/Topic: Hiring of Personnell fair which was held at Einsten High School, located in Kensington, Maryland. During the job fair, my principal put meMonth: April 2011 in charge of interviewing candidates for possible teaching vacancies that may come about as a result of teachersWeek: April 11 – 15, 2011 looking to transfer to other schools. This was the first time in which I interviewed possible teaching candidatesDate: April 13, 2011 outside of my department. This was a great experience for me as an aspiring leader.ISLLC Standard: 2 Today, I participated in a Root Cause Analysis collaborative work session with the school leadership team and theIssue/Topic: Student Achievement community superintendent. We looked at what may be the symptoms and causes of the school’s African-AmericanMonth: April 2011 population not meeting the AMO for the Maryland State Assessment. The Annual Steering Committee meeting wasWeek: April 11 – 15, 2011 helpful with preparing me for the type of work a principal will need to be educated upon in order to improveDate: April 14, 2011 student achievement. 93
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