Level Up: Learning to Moodle with games

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Presented at Learn11 conference in Perth, 25 Nov 2011. A look at how the principles of game-based learning can be applied in Moodle training and ... and other.

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  • Does this thing have chat?\n
  • Does this thing have chat?\n
  • This one demonstrates a similar idea - that a fairly dry instruction can be redesigned as a quest (uses the last designer point as a basis for this quest)\n
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  • MOTIVATION\nUser question: "What will be the main motivation for people to play this?" (Curiosity? Enjoyment? Requirement? Practice? ...) \n\nWhat is this for? For whom? What and whose need are we satisfying here? \n \nVaried aims, is there/which one will all (most) users will understand/share?\n\nCHOICE\nHow (much) will the players be able to choose what/when they do?\n(Lack of) deciding on the path and/or picking activities is an essential 'hook' and may add or detract well to motivation.\n \nMASTERY\nWhat are the explicit stages of achievement players can strive for? \n \nnot failure, just 'not succeded yet' \nFEEDBACK\nThe more instant the better. Automated? Personal? Direct ?\n \n  \n \n
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  • The point of this slide and the following one is to demonstrate how applying game concepts and alternative language can turn something very dry and hard to swallow into something worth engaging in - designer dos and don'ts are rewritten as a list of achievements that can be unlocked.\n
  • The point of this slide and the following one is to demonstrate how applying game concepts and alternative language can turn something very dry and hard to swallow into something worth engaging in - designer dos and don'ts are rewritten as a list of achievements that can be unlocked.\n
  • This one demonstrates a similar idea - that a fairly dry instruction can be redesigned as a quest (uses the last designer point as a basis for this quest)\n
  • This one demonstrates a similar idea - that a fairly dry instruction can be redesigned as a quest (uses the last designer point as a basis for this quest)\n
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  • Level Up: Learning to Moodle with games

    1. 1. Level Up:Learning Moodle through game playTomaz Lasic 
    2. 2. Let’s ask a 6 year old ...
    3. 3. Game“Unnecessary obstacles  we volunteer to tackle."
    4. 4. “One of the most profoundtransformations we can learn fromgames...is how to turn the sense thatsomeone has ‘failed’ into the sensethat they ‘haven’t succeeded yet’.”Tierney, J (2010)http://nyti.ms/jaHKCv
    5. 5. Main principles of game-based learningthrough four essential questions.Motivation What will be the main motivation for people playing? Choice How (much) will the players be able to choose what/when they do? Mastery What are the stages of achievement and how is failure handled? FeedbackHow/when will the players know how well they are doing? 
    6. 6. Where do you start? Action Mapping   by @catmoore
    7. 7. 1. Identify a measurable goal. All staff learn about Moodle.  :(   All staff achieve 80 points in  MoodleGame.                        :)  
    8. 8. 2. Define what will people be able to DO as a result of playing. Navigate in Moodle Use a forum Enrol users Customise blocks ...
    9. 9. 3. Design and map activities that will help them practice, including feedback. Find the treasure  (navigation)   Show and tell  (forum)    Pick me (enrolment)  
    10. 10. 4. Locate essential (only!) information to help completing activities. Tutorials Clips Hints Clues ...
    11. 11. 5. Check against GBL principles (and adjust design if needed) Motivation ? Choice ?  Mastery ?  Feedback?
    12. 12. Steps again ... 1. Identify a measurable goal.     "All staff achieve 80 points in MoodleGame." 2. Define what will people be able to DO as a result of playing.    Navigate in Moodle, use a forum, enrol users, customise blocks ... 3. Design and map activities that will help them practice, including feedback.    Find the treasure (navigation), Show and tell (forum), Pick me (enrolment) ... 4. Locate essential (only!) information to help completing activities.   Tutorials, videos, hints, clues ...  5. Check against GBL principles (and adjust design if needed)   Motivation, Choice, Mastery, Feedback
    13. 13. DO• Plan. Plan.• Design for multiple devices• Test regularly• Use linkable repository for graphics• Name labels logically• Keep it simple (accessibility, longevity ...)• Use linking to avoid scroll of death DONT• As above ... but opposite• Forget the principles of GBL
    14. 14. Breadnbutter Moodle tools ...• Conditional activities  o Completion o Time o Score o Grade• Activity completion  o Self o Pre-set Example Fancy !• Linking all to Quiz• Use of Gradebook (eg. as reputation engine)
    15. 15. Look at a real example ??Author:Sarah ThorneycroftUNE@sthcrft
    16. 16. You?
    17. 17. @lasic @sthcrftSpecial thanks to Sarah Thorneycroft (@sthcrft), UNE.
    18. 18. Image credit:Snegidhi.com -Twister  http://www.snegidhi.com/2010/114-25-09/twister_game_05.jpg

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