Scent world final_presentation

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Kathryn Goetzke, CEO of the Mood Factory, presented her findings on color aromatherapy at ScentWorld 2014!

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  • Aroma-Chology® is the term coined by the Sense of Smell Institute (formerly known as the Olfactory Research Fund) in 1989 to describe the concept which was developed to scientifically study the interrelationship of psychology and fragrance technology.
    Studies sponsored by the Institute at colleges and universities around the world are designed to investigate a variety of specific feelings (such as relaxation, exhilaration, sensuality, happiness and self-confidence) which are elicited through odors via stimulation of the olfactory pathways to the limbic system or "pleasure center" of the brain..-
    www.senseofsmell.com
    Physiological changes in the brain associated with the sense of smell are being identified. Researchers are working on scents to alleviate anxiety, scents to aid in sustaining attention, improve interpersonal relationships, and those that may make repetitive or dull tasks more pleasant.
  • The olfactory system is comprised of neurons called olfactory sensors, which recognize odor molecules and then send signals to the olfactory bulb, located above the eyes.
    Signals from different sensors are targeted to different spots that form a sensory map. From there the signals reach the olfactory area of the cortex, the area of conscious thought. In addition, the information travels to the limbic system, which is the primitive part of the brain that include areas that control emotions, memory and behavior. Memories of smells are stored in the hippocampus, and through relational memory certain smells trigger certain memories. Researchers continue to use brain-mapping to determine how the olfactory system works.
    Because olfactory information goes to both the primitive and complex parts of the brain it affects our actions in more ways than we think. The connections between odors and emotions have an obvious survival value for our species. The smell of good food is appealing, while the smell of rotten food is not. We recognize either the “yecchh” or the attraction of smells, without cognitive awareness of the actual source of the aroma. Aromachologists use these emotional ties, as well as scientific studies to substantiate hypothetical effects of scents, when formulating aromas to foster moods.
  • i.e. Researchers have found that strawberry flavored drinks smell more pleasant and have a more intense odor when colored red than green (Zellner et al., 1991).
    A study was also conducted using an MRI to map brain activity during the presentation of odors alone, colors alone, colors paired with associated odors (lemon-yellow, strawberry-red, spearmint-green, caramel-brown), and odors paired with non–associated colors (strawberry-blue, etc.). The researchers (Calvert et al) identified the areas of the brain where activity was noted during the presence of smells alone, and found, that when the stimulus included odors and associated colors, activity in these regions was enhanced above that observed to only the smell. Incongruent parings, which did not have previous associations, suppressed brain activity to a level below that observed to odors in isolation. Associated color-odors (lemon-yellow) produced more intense activity; non-associated (strawberry-blue) produced less.
    i.e. White wine is perceived as having a different odor when it is artificially colored red. Morrot et al., 2001)
  • i.e. Researchers have found that strawberry flavored drinks smell more pleasant and have a more intense odor when colored red than green (Zellner et al., 1991).
    A study was also conducted using an MRI to map brain activity during the presentation of odors alone, colors alone, colors paired with associated odors (lemon-yellow, strawberry-red, spearmint-green, caramel-brown), and odors paired with non–associated colors (strawberry-blue, etc.). The researchers (Calvert et al) identified the areas of the brain where activity was noted during the presence of smells alone, and found, that when the stimulus included odors and associated colors, activity in these regions was enhanced above that observed to only the smell. Incongruent parings, which did not have previous associations, suppressed brain activity to a level below that observed to odors in isolation. Associated color-odors (lemon-yellow) produced more intense activity; non-associated (strawberry-blue) produced less.
    i.e. White wine is perceived as having a different odor when it is artificially colored red. Morrot et al., 2001)
  • Since odors are partly perceived in the limbic portion of the brain, which is also the seat of emotions, it would make sense that odors affect emotions on a level which is below our conscious awareness.
  • Promotes a sense of cleansing rejuvenation. Bergamot, Lemon, Lime, Geranium, and Orange
    Aids in calm and stillness. Bergamot, Vanilla, and Lavender
    Soothes and promotes relaxation. Bergamot, Lavender, Eucalyptus, and Fir Needle
    Elevates zeal, enthusiasm and sensuality. Bergamot, Vanilla, Jasmine, Orange, Rose, Ylang, and Petitgrain
    Helps to inspire creative thought. Cinnamon, Spearmint, and Sage Clary
    Adds warmth and positive vibes. Lemon, Orange, Rose, Grapefruit, and Peppermint
    Infuses vitality. Geranium and Spearmint
  • How does this picture make you feel? Take a minute to feel the sensations in the body.
  • Take a whiff of the scent card provided. How does the scent make you feel?
  • Now look at the photo, and bring the scent card up to your nose. While smelling the card, fully engage your sense of sight with the photo. How do you now feel? Is your reaction stronger?
  • Let’s try Serenity
  • Again, look at the photo. Notice how the light blue image makes you feel.
  • Now smell the Serenity Scent card. Notice what aromatic notes you can smell. How do they feel internally?
  • Now look at the image on the screen, and smell the scent card. How does the combination feel? Notice them together.
  • Aids in calm and stillness. Bergamot, Vanilla, and Lavender
    Soothes and promotes relaxation. Bergamot, Lavender, Eucalyptus, and Fir Needle
    Elevates zeal, enthusiasm and sensuality. Bergamot, Vanilla, Jasmine, Orange, Rose, Ylang, and Petitgrain
    Helps to inspire creative thought. Cinnamon, Spearmint, and Sage Clary
    Adds warmth and positive vibes. Lemon, Orange, Rose, Grapefruit, and Peppermint
    Infuses vitality. Geranium and Spearmint
  • Scent world final_presentation

    1. 1. The Mood Factory Overview • 2004 opened doors dba Innovative Analysis, Inc. • Manufactured and distributed our first product line, Mood- lites, based on how colors affect moods. Took a break from 2007-2010. • Launched a new line nationwide in Lowe’s Home Improvement. Over 4 million Mood-lites sold to date. • Our Mission: To Improve Moods through Sensory Engagement ©2014, The Mood Factory. www.themoodfactory.com @GetYourMoodOn #coloringlives #improvingmoods
    2. 2. Improving Moods: The Global Need • Over 350 around the world have Major Depressive Disorder. (World Health Organization, 2014). • 1 in 4 Women in the US are on antidepressants, and 1 in 9 men. (Medco Health Survey, 2012) • Abuse of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs is costly to our nation, exacting over $600 billion annually in costs related to crime, lost work productivity and healthcare not to mention cost of family disintegration, loss of employment, failure in school, domestic violence, and child abuse. (National Institute of Drug Abuse, 2014) • Every year, abuse of illicit drugs and alcohol contributes to the death of more than 100,000 Americans, while tobacco is linked to an estimated 440,000 deaths per year. (National Institute of Drug Abuse, 2014) • We escape the now, or being present, through alcoholism, compulsive gambling or shopping, dependency on illicit or licit drugs, eating disorders, sexual addictions, and/or workaholism. • Being in the here and now has the greatest potential to impact positive change, and one of the easiest ways to get present is by engaging the senses. (Stern, 2004). ©2014, The Mood Factory. www.themoodfactory.com @GetYourMoodOn #coloringlives #improvingmoods
    3. 3. Improving Moods: The Impact • When we are happy and engaged, dopamine in the brain is increased and our brains work better. We are then more likely to: • Collaborate • Be productive and creative • Help others • Solve problems • Engage in physical activities. (Diamond, 2009) • When we get pleasure from activities that generate positive feelings, we are less likely to seek it from high-risk activities such as drug or alcohol use or other additions. (Galván A et al, 2006) ©2014, The Mood Factory. www.themoodfactory.com @GetYourMoodOn #coloringlives #improvingmoods
    4. 4. Colouromatherapy: Overview • Research suggests the more senses you engage to achieve a desired result, the more profound the experience. (Gottfried and Dolan, 2003). • It is not a strict science. There are many generalities, but obvious differences occurs in colors and scents for individuals based on culture, past experiences, and personal preferences. • We look at research available, and create products based on that research. It is taking what we DO know and teaching consumers how to apply it to their life to feel positive and present, naturally. • We plan to take you through colors, scents, and then show you experientially how those two work together and have a greater impact than either two would alone. ©2014, The Mood Factory. www.themoodfactory.com @GetYourMoodOn #coloringlives #improvingmoods
    5. 5. The Power of Color ©2014, The Mood Factory. www.themoodfactory.com @GetYourMoodOn #coloringlives #improvingmoods
    6. 6. The Brain on Color •The neocortex is a part of the brain of mammals that is involved in higher functions such as sensory perception, generation of motor commands, spatial reasoning, conscious thought, and in humans, language. •In humans it accounts for about 76% of the brain's volume. •The neocortex is activated by visual cues. •One of our primary visual cues is color. Color is made up of 1.Hue (red vs. blue) 2.Saturation (intense vs. dull via gray) 3.Brightness (Light vs. dark via white or black) It takes 45 milliseconds for the brain to detect a visual object. (Krishna, 2010) ©2014, The Mood Factory. www.themoodfactory.com @GetYourMoodOn #coloringlives #improvingmoods
    7. 7. The Impact of Color • Research suggests colors impact our moods. Leatrice Eiseman, Director of Pantone Institute, “Color choice is scientific, psychological and emotional." • Eiseman also states the human reaction to color is usually based on what we see in nature. (Eiseman, 2000) • Actual hues of colors matter. A dark pink has a much different impact on our experience of that color than light pink. • Much of current research is based on consumer surveys and word associations. Colorcom has a global database of with input from over 120k individuals around the world. • Mood Factory products were created based on 8 common colors and their most closely associated moods. ©2014, The Mood Factory. www.themoodfactory.com @GetYourMoodOn #coloringlives #improvingmoods
    8. 8. Mood Renewal Definition: To make (something) new, fresh, or strong again; to begin (something) again with more force or enthusiasm; to make like new; restore to freshness, vigor, or perfection. Green: Found in trees and grass, is associated with growth, freshness and renewal. Intention: Refreshes and Rejuvenates.
    9. 9. Mood Passion Definition: a strong feeling of enthusiasm or excitement for something or about doing something; a strong liking or desire for or devotion to some activity, object, or concept; an object of desire or deep interest; intense, driving, or overmastering feeling or conviction. Red: Found in hearts and roses, is associated with warmth, love and passion. Intention: Shows zeal and enthusiasm.
    10. 10. Mood Tranquility Definition: Quiet, restful and peaceful; free from agitation of mind or spirit; free from disturbance or turmoil; unvarying in aspect. Sapphire Blue: Dark Blue, found in skies and lakes, is associated with sleep and tranquility. Intention: Invites quiet and stillness.
    11. 11. Mood Serenity Definition: Calm and peaceful; clear and free of storms or unpleasant change ; steady. Aqua Blue: Aqua Blue, found in seas and tropics, is associated with peace, calming, and serenity. Intention: Initiates calm and peace.
    12. 12. Mood Happiness Definition: The state of being happy; a state of well-being and contentment; a pleasurable or satisfying experience. Yellow: Found in flowers and the sun, is associated with hope, vitality and happiness. Intention: Provides Joy and Cheer. © 2014, The Mood Factory www.themoodfactory.com
    13. 13. Mood Energy Definition: The ability to be active; the physical or mental strength that allows you to do things; natural enthusiasm and effort; usable power; dynamic quality; the capacity of acting or being active; a usually positive spiritual force; vigorous exertion of power. Orange: Found in sunrises and fires, is associated with awakening, vibrance, and energy. Intention: Bring Zest and Zeal. © 2014, The Mood Factory www.themoodfactory.com
    14. 14. Mood Creativity Definition: Having or showing an ability to make new things or think of new ideas; done in an unusual way; marked by the ability or power to create; having the quality of something created rather than imitated. Purple: Rarely occurs in nature, is associated with spirituality, royalty and creativity. Intention: Encourages imagination and ideas. © 2014, The Mood Factory www.themoodfactory.com
    15. 15. Mood Sassy Definition: Distinctively smart and stylish; confident and energetic; vigorous, lively. Hot Pink: Found in fruits, is associated with playfulness, excitement, and sass. Intention: Inspires Confidence and Play. © 2014, The Mood Factory www.themoodfactory.com
    16. 16. The Power of Scent ©2014, The Mood Factory. www.themoodfactory.com @GetYourMoodOn #coloringlives #improvingmoods
    17. 17. The Sense of Smell • The connections between odors and emotions have an obvious survival value for our species. The smell of good food is appealing, while the smell of rotten food is not. We recognize either the “yech” or the attraction of smells, without cognitive awareness of the actual source of the aroma. • Studies sponsored by the Institute at colleges and universities around the world are designed to investigate a variety of specific feelings (such as relaxation, exhilaration, sensuality, happiness and self-confidence) which are elicited through odors via stimulation of the olfactory the limbic system or "pleasure center" of the brain. • Scent is the only sense that is routed directly to the limbic system on the right side of the brain. “This system contains the keys to our emotions…When we smell we feel.” (Whiff, 2008) • It takes us 450 milliseconds for the brain to recognize a scent (10x as long as visual cue). (Krishna, 2010) • A number of researchers are even using scents to alleviate pain, insomnia and the side effects of chemotherapy. No one in medicine claims that scent alone will cure the sick, conquer depression or get your kids to go to bed on time. What they are saying is that a fragrance can play a powerful role in your sense of well-being. • Aromachologists use these emotional ties, as well as scientific studies to substantiate hypothetical effects of scents, when formulating aromas to foster moods. ©2014, The Mood Factory. www.themoodfactory.com @GetYourMoodOn #coloringlives #improvingmoods
    18. 18. Scents and Moods Vanilla, bergamot and lavender have been found to produce a calming effect. Citrus family and geranium are considered purifying and energizing. Vanilla, jasmine, rose and ylang-ylang are warming notes. Sage clary, cinnamon, and spearmint are known to stimulate alertness. Rose, jasmine, and ylang-ylang are said to have aphrodisiac properties. Spearmint and petitgrain are felt to provide mental stimulation.
    19. 19. Mood Scent: Bergamot, Basil, Scotch Pine, Rosemary, Lemongrass, Grand Fir, and Eucalyptus. The great renewal of the world will perhaps consist in this, that man and maid, freed of all false feelings and reluctances, will seek each other not as opposites, but as brother and sister, as neighbors, and will come together as human beings. - Rainer Maria Rilke
    20. 20. Mood Scent: Rose, Ylang Ylang, Frankincense, Vanilla, Jasmine, and Geranium. Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world. -Harriet Tubman
    21. 21. Mood Scent: Vanilla, Peru Balsam, Lavender, Jasmine, and Chamomile. The real spiritual progress of the aspirant is measured by the extent to which he achieves inner tranquility. -Swami Sivananda
    22. 22. Mood Scent: Ylang Ylang, Ravensara, Vanilla, Juniper, and Geranium. The final wisdom of life requires not the annulment of incongruity but the achievement of serenity within and above it. -Reinhold Niebuhr
    23. 23. Mood Scent: Lemon, Mandarin, Grapefruit, Bergamot, and Lime. The purpose of our lives is to be happy. -Dalai Lama
    24. 24. Mood Scent: Peppermint, Orange, Mandarin, Rosemary, and Ginger. There is a vitality, a life force, an energy, a quickening, that is translated through you into action, and because there is only one of you in all time, this expression is unique. -Martha Graham
    25. 25. Mood Scent: Cinnamon, Spearmint, Clary Sage, Geranium, and Rosemary. Creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes. Art is knowing which ones to keep. -Scott Adams
    26. 26. Mood Scent: Grapefruit, Black Pepper, Cajeput, and Fennel. My personality is up and down, sassy and cheeky. -Katy Perry
    27. 27. When used in the same environment, colors and scents work together to stimulate our senses and restore balance to our body, mind and spirit. ©2014, The Mood Factory. www.themoodfactory.com @GetYourMoodOn #coloringlives #improvingmoods
    28. 28. The Power of Combining Colors & Scents Research supports the concept that colors and scents, combined, produce a more intense experience than either presented alone.
    29. 29. Associations - Colors and Scents Researchers have found that strawberry flavored drinks smell more pleasant and have a more intense odor when colored red than green (Zellner et al., 1991).
    30. 30. Associations - Colors and Scents
    31. 31. Colors and Scents and Moods By pairing color with associated odor, the combined stimulus would provide a more intense emotional response than either one individually.
    32. 32. Color and Scent Experiment
    33. 33. Smell the ‘Happiness’ Scent
    34. 34. © 2014, The Mood Factory www.themoodfactory.com
    35. 35. Smell the ‘Serenity’ Scent
    36. 36. • Do Yoga with Renewal™ • Use Sassy™ in a Teen Room • Uplift your workout with Energy™ • Be inspired with Creativity™ • Host a Happiness™ party • Create Passion™ in the bedroom • De-stress after work with Serenity™ • Bask in Tranquility™ before bed • Paint with Creativity™ • Inject Energy™ at the office • Be inspired with Creativity™ in your brainstorm sessions Applying ColouromaTherapy to Your Life © 2014, The Mood Factory www.themoodfactory.com
    37. 37. Mood Factory New Product Applications ©2014, The Mood Factory. www.themoodfactory.com @GetYourMoodOn #coloringlives #improvingmoods
    38. 38. "In"In the right light, at the right time, everything is extraordinary. "the right light, at the right time, everything is extraordinary. " –– Aaron RoseAaron Rose Nearly two-thirds (62 percent) feel that it is no longer enough for corporations to simply give money away to good causes, they need to integrate them into their day-to-day business. (Edelman Good purpose Study, 2010) Initially, sale of Mood-lites supported iFred (International Foundation for Research and Education on Depression helping to launch the first ever Schools for Hope program. This program is targeted in teaching 5th graders skills for hope. iFred is working to rebrand the disease using the color yellow, the symbol the sunflower, educating on brain biology, and engaging with celebrities. The Mood Factory is expanding partnerships for all moods, so that each color will associate with a specific mood. Coloring Lives © 2014, The Mood Factory www.themoodfactory.com
    39. 39. Key Takeaways • Everything you do with consumers matters. Engage them in the right way, with the right senses, to improve their moods. • Engaging multiple senses is not just good for the consumer, it is good for your business. Research suggests the more senses you engage, the more likely they are to remember your product or service in the future. • It is important to pair the right stimulus with the desired impact. Random colors, smells, sounds and tastes are less effective and can even have a negative impact on overall experience for the consumer. • It is more important than ever in business to integrate what you do with doing good, so make working with a ‘cause’ or ‘charity’ a part of everyday business practice. The Mood Factory 820 West Jackson, Suite #805 Chicago, IL 60607 Toll-free: 1-866-353-MOOD www.themoodfactory.com kathryn@themoodfactory.com ©2014, The Mood Factory. www.themoodfactory.com @GetYourMoodOn #coloringlives #improvingmoods #coloringlives #improvingmoods @GetYourMoodOn

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