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Counselor Stress Management Workshop presented professionally at the Virginia Counselor\'s Association Conference in the Fall of 2009

Counselor Stress Management Workshop presented professionally at the Virginia Counselor\'s Association Conference in the Fall of 2009

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  • 1. Counselor Stress Management Workshop
    Presented at Virginia Counselor’s Association Fall 2009 Conference
    “Stress is nothing more than a socially acceptable form of mental illness”
    -Richard Carlson
  • 2. DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
    WHAT IS IT MEANT BY COUNSELOR WELLNESS?
    WHY IS IT ESSENTIAL FOR US AS COUNSELORS TO PRIORITIZE OUR OWN WELLNESS?
  • 3. WHY IS STRESS MANAGEMENT IMPORTANT FOR SCHOOL COUNSELORS?
    Considered a vulnerable profession due to the nature of work in dealing with intimate exposure of student’s struggles and suffering.
    Also exposure to “high touch hazards”
    Unsolvable problems that have to be solved
    Students not having resources or skills to meet goals
    Inability to say “no”
    Constant empathy and interpersonal sensitivity
    What are High Touch Hazards?*
    characteristics of professionals in the helping fields which make them more susceptible to burnout
    *From Preventing Counselor Impairment (2003)
  • 4. CURRENT STATISTICS
    From www.counselorwellness.com, 2008
  • 5. % OF HIGH RISK CASELOADS
    From www.counselorwellness.com, 2008
  • 6. BURNOUT
    JOB SATISFACTION
    STRESS
    WHAT THE STUDIES SHOW
  • 7. WHAT THE STUDIES SHOW
    School counselors endorsed the highest role ambiguity and role conflict scores and the second highest negative mental health scores (Pierson-Hubeny & Archambault 1987)
    School counselors ranked highest in scores for emotional exhaustion, reduced personal accomplishment, and depersonalization (Butler & Constantine 2005)
    High levels of burnout are associated with low levels of job satisfaction, little organizational commitment, attrition , and professionals wanting to quit the counseling field (Lambie 2007)
  • 8. WHAT THE STUDIES SHOW
    • Undefined job boundaries can lead to taking on a large amount of responsibilities and can lead to burnout (Butler & Constantine 2006)
    • 9. Burnout is related to three characteristics: personality, demographic, and environmental/organizational factors (Brewer & Clippard 2002)
    PERSONALITY
    Introversion
    Sensitivity
    Trouble with appropriate boundaries
    Taking home work issues and burdens
    DEMOGRAPHIC
    Gender
    Race
    Marital Status
    Age
    Years of Experience
    ENVIRONMENTAL
    Workload
    Work environment
    Peer & Supervisor Support
  • 10. WHAT PROFESSIONAL RESOURCES DO COUNSELORS HAVE?
  • 11. ACA TASKFORCE ON COUNSELOR WELLNESS & IMPAIRMENT
    Established in 2003 by Governing Council of the American Counseling Association
    • Goal is to educate counselors on:
    • 12. Impairment
    • 13. Securing quality resources
    • 14. Intervention & treatment of the impaired
    • 15. Advocacy on state and national levels
    • 16. Education serves to remind counselors of their knowledge on stress and self-care and help them find their vulnerabilities and offer strategies to self improve
    From www.counseling.org/wellness_taskforce
  • 17. ACA TASKFORCE ON WELLNESS & IMPAIRMENT
    Compassion fatigue: A feeling of deep sympathy and sorrow for another who is stricken by suffering or misfortune
    Vicarious traumatization: A cumulative process of change in the helpers' inner experience that happens through empathic connection with clients
    Burn-out:A state of physical, emotional, and mental exhaustion caused by long-term involvement in emotionally demanding situations
    10% of counselors, or roughly 6,000 members that are impaired at any given time
    Manifestations of impairment include:
    Burnout
    Compassion fatigue
    Vicarious traumatization
    Depression, anxiety, other mental health conditions
    Over-involvement and overwork
    From www.counseling.org/wellness_taskforce
  • 18. STRESS TECHNIQUES
  • 19. PHYSICAL SYMPTOMS OF STRESS
  • SHORT RELAXATION
    • Correct Breathing: Learn to always breath using the diaphragm. Let the breath reach the bottom of the lungs and let the chest and shoulders relax. High, shallow chest breathing is stressful and gives messages of stress to the brain.
    • 29. Stretching: Gently roll your head and shoulders many times a day. Also, gently stretch other areas of the body that may need it.
    • 30. Tense-relax Muscles:Tighten the muscles you want to relax and feel the tension. Let the muscles become loose and limp and feel the relaxation.
    • 31. Jaw Drop: Be aware of any tightness in your jaw. Allow your jaw to loosen by separating your teeth.
    From http://www.counseling.colostate.edu/mental-health/stress-management/documents/Short%20Relaxation%20Techniques.pdf
  • 32. PROGRESSIVE MUSCLE RELAXATION
    Loosen your clothing, take off your shoes, and get comfortable.
    Take a few minutes to relax, breathing in and out in slow, deep breaths.
    When you’re relaxed and ready to start, shift your attention to your right foot. Take a moment to focus on the way it feels.
    Slowly tense the muscles in your right foot, squeezing as tightly as you can. Hold for a count of 10.
    Relax your right foot. Focus on the tension flowing away and the way your foot feels as it becomes limp and loose.
    Stay in this relaxed state for a moment, breathing deeply and slowly.
    When you’re ready, shift your attention to your left foot.
    Follow the same sequence of muscle tension and release. Move slowly up through your body — legs, abdomen, back, neck, face — contracting and relaxing the muscle groups as you go
    Right foot
    Left foot
    Right calf
    Left calf
    Right thigh Left thigh
    Hips and buttocks Stomach
    Chest
    Back
    Right arm and hand
    Left arm and hand
    Neck and shoulders
    Face
    http://www.helpguide.org/mental/stress_relief_meditation_yoga_relaxation.htm
  • 33. NUTRITION & STRESS
  • 34. BE SMART FROM THE START, MAKE WISE CHOICES WHEN IT COMES TO NUTRITION
    PERKY
    SLUGGISH
    EAT YOUR WAY TO STRESS-FREE
    • Complex Carbs
    (bread, pasta, broccoli, potatoes, corn, bananas)
    • Magnesium
    (leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds, whole grains)
    • Vitamin B6
    (salmon, light meat chicken, avocado)
    • Vitamin C
    (sweet red peppers, oranges, brussels sprouts)
    • Calcium
    (spinach, kale, white and pinto beans)
    AVOID FOODS THAT ARE HIGH IN
    Sugar
    (causes blood sugar level to spike then crash)
    Caffeine
    (raises stress hormone and can lead to insomnia & dehydration)
    Sodium
    (affects blood pressure)
    The Stress Watchers Diet; www.associatecontent.com
  • 35. “It is not possible to give to others what you do not possess” Gerald Corey
    HOW TO IMPLEMENT A SELF-CARE PROGRAM
    a holistic approach
  • 36. DEVELOPING A
    “CULTURE OF WELLNESS”
    • Ongoing assessment of personal wellness
    • 37. Assessment of workplace wellness
    • 38. Developing concrete plan
    • 39. Building Supportive professional networks
    • 40. Sharing wellness information
    From www.counselorwellness.com/resources
  • 41. HANDOUTS
    • STRESS REACTION INVENTORY*
    • 42. SELF-CARE ASSESSMENT*
    • 43. assessment focuses on the wellness activities in which counselors may participate across several domains of wellness (physical, psychological, spiritual, and professional)
    • 44. PROFESSIONAL QUALITY OF LIFE*
    • 45. assessment measures compassion fatigue, compassion satisfaction, vicarious traumatization, and potential for burnout in counselors
    • 46. LIFE PIE EXERCISE*
    *http://www.counseling.org/wellness_taskforce/tf_history.htm
  • 47. TEN MOST HELPFUL ACTIVITES THAT PROMOTE WELLNESS
    • 1) Discussing cases with colleagues
    • 48. 2) Attending workshops
    • 49. 3) Spending time with family or friends
    • 50. 4) Travel, vacations, hobbies, and movies
    • 51. 5) Talking with colleagues between sessions
    • 52. 6) Socializing
    From www.counseling.org/wellness_taskforce/tf_wellness_strategies
  • 53. TEN MOST HELPFUL ACTIVITES THAT PROMOTE WELLNESS
    • 7) Exercise
    • 54. 8) Limiting case load
    • 55. 9) Developing spiritual life
    • 56. 10) Receiving supervision
    From www.counseling.org/wellness_taskforce/tf_wellness_strategies
  • 57. WELLNESS ACTIVITIES
    MEDITATION
    JOURNALING
    HOBBIES
    VOLUNTEERING
    SEEING A MOVIE
    LAUGHING
    TALKING TO FRIENDS
    SEEING A COUNSELOR
    GIVING SELF PERMISSION TO CRY
    COGNITIVE ACTIVITIES
    EMOTIONAL ACTIVITIES
    From www.counseling.org/wellness_taskforce/tf_wellness_strategies
  • 58. WELLNESS ACTIVITIES
    DRINK LOTS OF WATER
    EAT REGULAR MEALS
    GET A MASSAGE
    TURN OFF CELL PHONE
    RELFECTION
    GARDENING
    SPEND TIME OUTDOORS
    CONNECT WITH SPIRITUAL COMMUNITY
    PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES
    SPIRITUAL ACTIVITIES
    From www.counseling.org/wellness_taskforce/tf_wellness_strategies
  • 59. IN CONCLUSION
    • MONITOR YOUR “SHOULD” STATEMENTS
    • 60. REFRAME NEGATIVE THOUGHTS
    • 61. TAKE TIME FOR YOURSELF
    • 62. MAKE YOURSELF A STRESS RELIEF KIT
    • 63. SEEK SOCIAL SUPPORT TO KEEP YOUR MENTAL HEALTH ON TRACK
    • 64. TAKE CARE OF YOUR MOST IMPORTANT INSTRUMENT….YOU!
  • SOURCES
    American Counseling Association. (2009). Taking steps for a mentally
    healthier you. Counseling Corner. Alexandria, VA: Author
    American Counseling Association. (2008). ACA’s Taskforce on Counselor Impairment and Wellness. Retrieved April 14, 2009. www.counseling.org/wellness_taskforce/index.htm
    American Counseling Association. (2008). Replenish the Well: An Experience in Self-Care.Retrieved April 14, 2009. www.counseling.org/wellness_taskforce/PDF/ACA_taskforce_lifepie.pdf
    American School Counseling Association. (2004). Ethical standards for school counselors. Retrieved April 15, 2009. http://www.schoolcounselor.org/content.asp?contentid=173
    Brewer, E.W., Clippart, L.F. (2002) Burnout and job satisfaction among student support services personnel. Human Resource Development Quarterly, 13(2), 169-186.
    Bryant, R.M., Constantine, M.G (2006). Multiple role balance, job satisfaction, and life satisfaction in women school counselors [Electronic version]. Professional School Counseling Journal.
    Butler, S.K., Constantine, M.G. (2005) Collective self-esteem and burnout in professional school counselors. Professional School Counseling, 9 (1), 55-62.
    Creating Counselor Wellness. (2008). Retrieved October 20, 2009. www.counselorwellness.com
    Lambie. G.W. (2007) The contribution of ego development level to burnout in school counselors: Implications for professional school counseling. Journal of Counseling and Development, 85, 82-88
    Lawson, G., Venart, B., (2003). Preventing counselor impairment: vulnerability, wellness, and resilience. American Counselor Association’s Task Force.

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