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Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
Biocultural sovereignty   ifip 2013
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Biocultural sovereignty ifip 2013

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Jeff Campbells presentation at IFIP Regional Mtg, Jan. 22nd, 2013

Jeff Campbells presentation at IFIP Regional Mtg, Jan. 22nd, 2013

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  • 1. Keeping the Future Delicious!Biocultural Sovereignty +Agro-Ecosystem Diversity =Resilience
  • 2. Agro-biodiversity and IndigenousPeoples Have Co-evolved
  • 3. Christensen Fund Strategic Framework – Mission,Themes, Shared Outcomes and Cross Cutting Emphasis Mission –backing the stewards of cultural and biological diversity Ensuring Sustaining Celebrating & Promoting Socio-Ecological Foodways & Revitalizing Cultural Knowledge Systems & Resilience Livelihoods Expression Biocultural Education Active community Blossoming traditions, Formal education Capable and vibrantadaptation to climate and cultural expression & incorporates biocultural traditional owners and other changes ceremonies knowledge. community associationsEcosystem monitoring and at land/seascapes scalesassessments at community Local voices & bioculturaland biocultural landscapes Expanding relationships diversity respected & Engaged young people influencing decision making. in biocultural identity and networks of Improved diversity & stewards and others, and landscapes and productivity in within, between and Festival and ceremonies blending new ideas withgardens, orchards, pasture beyond land/seascapes celebrate biocultural traditional knowledge s and fisheries diversity. Increased biocultural and strong livelihoods options Confident biocultural creative intergenerational Valued rare varieties & practitioners bonds. thriving complex Improved tenure security landscape mosaic for sea/landscapes and Widespread reframing maintained sacred sites and recognition of Sacred sites spiritually Functioning ecological relevance of indigenous vibrant process and diversity rights & leadership. Cross-cutting Emphasis Rights & Representation ~ Gender Equality ~ Leadership Development ~ Creative Practitioners
  • 4. Food Sovereignty part of BioculturalSovereignty– “Food sovereignty is the right of Peoples to define their own policies and strategies for sustainable production, distribution, and consumption of food, with respect for their own cultures and their own systems of managing natural resources and rural areas, and is considered to be a precondition for Food Security.”– “The rights to land, water, and territory, as well as the right to self determination, are essential for the full realization of our Food Security and Food Sovereignty.”The “Declaration of Atitlan”, from the 1st Indigenous Peoples’ GlobalConsultation on the Right to Food and Food Sovereignty, Guatemala, 2002
  • 5. Enset Landscapes of SW Ethiopia
  • 6. What is Enset? • A cousin of the Banana • Big, Green & Beautiful • Locally domesticated; farmers manage gene flow between wild and cultivated • Corm and pseudostem are starch-rich it’s NOT a fruit • Great source of fiber • Takes 4-7 yrs to mature: no tillage, deep mulch • Intensely managed: in nutrient cycles, spatially in home & agroecosystem & aesthetics • Often losing out in agricultural modernization • Very culturally luminous
  • 7. Dawro, Gamo Beehive hut built fromenset
  • 8. Processing Enset Processing enset
  • 9. Grant Making Strategies• Supporting associations of communities in enset landscapes.• Connecting farmers and researchers with other communities and landscapes globally• Linking universities in a “consortium: to collaborate with farmers and community cultural associations to craft “Enset Parks”• Re-valuing “kocho” culturally: food festivals, restaurants, schools• Restoring long-term agro-ecosystem processes: water, carbon, nutrients
  • 10. Indigenous Partnership forAgrobidiversity and Food Sovereignty
  • 11. • Amplifying Agro-ecological Solutions
  • 12. Sharing Traditional Knowledge
  • 13. • Indigenous Peoples’ Climate Change• Assesment
  • 14. Keeping the Future More Delicious

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