A Peek Inside Agile: Understanding Scrum & Kanban

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Broadcasted: June 15th, 2012 by Jeff Howey, cPrime Agile Coach

To view this live webinar visit: http://cprime.eleapcourses.com/

For more information on Agile & cPrime visit: www.cprime.com

What have you heard about Agile? Trying to decide if Scrum or Kanban is a better approach for your particular team? Are you asking yourself if functions outside of Application Development, such as Marketing, Ux Design, Infrastructure, benefit from Agile techniques? Do you want to know some basic, but powerful, concepts to approaching your release cycle? Do you have complex dependencies or fit in a non-agile PMO environment but want to be agile?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, join us for a webinar walking through these key concepts:

· Agile is not just a framework for software development, it is a way of thinking that can span the business

· Agile gives a more clearly understood measure of progress than traditional Status Reports or Project Plans

· Agile can be done within structured, well-defined PMO processes

· Agile improves the ability to manage Customer and Stakeholder Expectations


We will also discuss some high-level similarities and differences between Scrum and Kanban along with recommendations to incorporate both into your overall strategy, even when your enterprise-at-large needs to continue some projects using a traditional plan-driven approach.

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  • When asked “Did your project succeed?” – of 50,000 projects, less than 1 in 3 were “successful” based on the criteria of “on time, on budget, with the requested functionality.” Nearly 1 in 5 were flat-out failures and were canceled/never implemented.Over ½ were “challenged” in some way. For those that were late in delivery, the median shows that they took twice as long as estimated (100% OVER the estimated time). For those that were over budget, the median shows they cost 1.5x as much as budgeted. Most projects fell into one or more of 4 reasons cited as resulting in projects not delivering “as expected:” Late, Over Budget, Lacking Functionality, Low Quality
  • ** Notebook Question 11-12Epicyclic:Consisting of nested cycles. Scrum, XP, and CBPM are epicyclic. These processes are used for environments where uncertainty about requirements and effort is high, and especially when useful production capabilities can be delivered incrementally.Summarize different phases and cycles.Inception: Includes startup work that must be done before the specified process can start. Inception occurs when starting a new product or service from scratch. It is not a part of the (iterative) work of creating multiple releases of a product over time. Vision: Define concept for product.Roadmap: Long term plan, for one to a few years. Includes major milestones at a summary level, and spans multiple Releases or Projects.Release or Project:A medium-term (weeks to months) span of time, at the end of which results are delivered to customers. Includes fine- to medium-grained specifications of product functionality.Iteration: A short term (1-6 weeks) period spent developing functionality, for which all requirements are fine-grained and directly implementable in this span of time without further decomposition.Day: A single day may have any activities, as required, and involves fluid and dynamic collaboration among Team members to get work done.Termination: This refers to all activities associated with shutting down a Project. It is the same thing as the PMI Closing Process Group.====Note: Inception and Termination are rare occurrences in agile / Scrum projects, because the default mode of working is to continue adding capabilities and deliverables to an existing set, not to start and finish distinct projects frequently.
  • ** Notebook Question 4Most agile processes include planning, but not all. The most popular agile process is Scrum, which is an iterative process that divides the calendar into short iterations called Sprints. In each Sprint, a Team starts and finishes implementation and testing of several small requirements. Scrum is not tied to any industry, and can be used for any project for which its characteristics are well-suited.Scrum is used in environments where plan-driven processes are inappropriate, because they have high uncertainty around requirements and effort which make plan-driven schedules unreliable. Instead of defining scope and estimating schedule, Scrum defines schedule (such as a Sprint) and estimates the scope that fits into it. Scrum optimizes risk mitigation (through completing work quickly) over efficiency.A Scrum process does not have planning and execution phases. Planning (for future Sprints) is done in parallel with implementation work (in the present Sprint).
  • Kanban omits planning, and focuses on prioritization, tracking, and optimizing throughput. It is commonly employed in production support, Information Technology departments, hospital Emergency Rooms (as “triage”), and in any environment where work items are not known in advance.Kanban originated in manufacturing, and was adapted for software development. “Kanban” is a Japanese word meaning “signboard,” and in manufacturing refers to a signal indicating that some action should be performed. The use of signals to request action is consistent with the “pull” nature of projects or processes in which Kanban is generally employed.A Kanban project has no phases associated with starting or ending a project. All work is handled the same way, as tasks that flow through states.
  • Story A2 depends on Milestone1, which occurs early in Sprint 1. A2 starts in Sprint 1, after Milestone1.Task1 depends on A1, starts in Sprint 2 after A2 completesMilestone2 depends on Task1, occurs in Sprint 2. B5 depends on Milestone2, but can’t start until Sprint 3.A3 depends on B2, starts in Sprint 2 after B2 is completeDependent pieces of projects are timed to release together at the end of Sprint 3.
  • A Peek Inside Agile: Understanding Scrum & Kanban

    1. 1. © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    2. 2. cPrime: Who We Are• Consulting and Transformation• Training and Coaching• Staffing © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    3. 3. Today’s Presenter • Jeff Howey, Agile Coach – Trains & coaches teams and companies in Agile processes • 7+ years practicing Agile • Certified Scrum Professional • 5 years mentoring, coaching & training • 18 years in QA, Business Analysis, Project Management and Business Architecture © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    4. 4. A Peek InsideAGILE © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    5. 5. Agile Values • Transparency • Collaboration • Self-organized teams • Response to change – Customer needs – Team growth – Process ImprovementA Way of Thinking! © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    6. 6. Agile is not © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    7. 7. Nor is it © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    8. 8. Agile is about Collaboration Project Software Management Development Product Management © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    9. 9. Progress is Visual & Predictive• How are we doing? Each Sprint Toward our Goals © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    10. 10. Progress is more than• % Complete – We are either Done or Not Done• Gantt Charts – Show us where we have been, do little to predict where we are going © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    11. 11. Agile Project Management• Integrates Corporate Project Governance – Plans, Reports, Resource Allocation, Budgets – Audit & Regulatory Requirements WITH – Real-time, honest, visual information radiators – Sufficient adherence to Governance requirements © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    12. 12. Agile Project Management• Emphasizes collaboration and conversation – Technology works based on agreement and understanding of requirements – Asking questions and offering solutions NOT – Blindly building to requirements that were “signed-off” – Taking orders without giving insight © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    13. 13. Agile Product Management• Controls the dialogue with Customers, Management, Stakeholders• Sets the direction of the Product – In turn driving the team’s goals• Is most successful when they are seen as a Team Member – Respectful of the process & knowledge required to deliver © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    14. 14. But! It’s not always easy to be a Product Owner © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    15. 15. Why Agile?WHY NOW? © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    16. 16. “The Way We Do It Now” is painful 2010 Project Success 21% Fail 37% Success Challenged • late (100% median) • over budget (50% median) 42% • lacking functionality Challenge • low quality Data from 50,000 projects 16 Copyright © by The Standish Group International, Inc. © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    17. 17. And if history is any indicator… Standish Chaos Reports: Project Success 60 50% 50,000 Projects 40 30 20 10 0 1994 1996 1998 2000 2004 2006 2009 2010 % Success 16 27 26 28 29 35 32 37 % Challenged 53 33 46 49 53 46 44 42 % Failed 31 40 28 23 18 19 24 21 © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    18. 18. Is Agile Helping?• “In 2002, agile projects made up less than 2% of overall projects and less than 5% of new application development projects. Today, agile projects account for almost 9% of all projects and 29% of new application development projects... The increase in project success rates can directly tie back to projects resolved through the agile process.” 2011 Chaos Manifesto Copyright © by The Standish Group International, Inc © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    19. 19. Wait! Is history an indicator? Standish Chaos Reports: Project Success 60 50% 50,000 Projects 40 30 20 10 0 1994 1996 1998 2000 2004 2006 2009 2010 % Success 16 27 26 28 29 35 32 37 % Challenged 53 33 46 49 53 46 44 42 % Failed 31 40 28 23 18 19 24 21 © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    20. 20. How much does Agile help? Agile 9% Waterfall 42% 14%29% 49% Successful Challenged Failed 57% Data from 2002—2010 Copyright © 2011 by The Standish Group International, City, CA. All Rights Reserved. © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster Inc.
    21. 21. Some Key Benefits of Agile84% Improvement in ability to respond to changing priorities77% Greater project visibility72% Improved team morale71% Improved speed-to-marketWhat were motivations of companies to adopt Agile thatdidn’t pan out?• Cost Savings• Better ability to manage distributed teams Copyright @2011. Version One, Inc. 2011 State of Agile Development Survey of© 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved. over 6000 Agile practitioners.
    22. 22. Where does Agile make sense?AGILE POSSIBILITIES © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    23. 23. 2 Distinct OptionsScrum Kanban• Iterative, cyclic, planned • Incremental, immediate response to change response to change• Manage on monthly, • Manage on “patch” or quarterly, annual Roadmap “continuous release” basis• Change in Priority • Change in Priority addressed between Sprints addressed continuously• Delivery Content limited by • Delivery Content limited by # of Resources and Release # of Resources Dates © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    24. 24. Scrum is Cyclic Work items are prioritized between cycles 24 © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    25. 25. Inner Scrum Cycles provide regular opportunity to adjust to reality • Priorities shift between Sprints – (no more than 30 days to respond to change, ideal is 2 weeks) • Tasks shift as quickly as possible – (respond to change no less than daily) • Issues addressed immediately – (respond to issues no less than daily) 25 © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    26. 26. Kanban is Steady Work items arrive in a steady stream, are prioritized daily, hourly or “regularly” 26 © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    27. 27. Fit with Project ManagementScrum Kanban• Budget Plan based on • Budget Plan based on Release Dates, Resources Development Estimates and Resources• Supports cross-platform and • Supports isolated or Program-level integration independent changes well well • Target Content-Driven• Target Date-Driven Releases! Releases! © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    28. 28. Progress is… VisualScrum Kanban• Sprint Burn-Down • Cumulative Flow – Work remaining – State of Work in Progress• Release Burn-Up • Cycle Time – Requirements delivered – From Request to Delivery toward the goal – Between each step in the process © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    29. 29. Agile Process SelectionConsideration Scrum KanbanHow long will customers wait ? Weeks, Months, Quarters Minutes, Hours, Days WeeksHow many dependencies or A few to many 0 to a few simpleintegration points? integration points or integration points complex integrationsHow often do changes in Rarely. Changes in Regularly. And ourpriority affect our plan? priority can be addressed business model does not in the next Sprint. allow us to say “no”How many resources are 5 or more with shared 3 or fewer (in total) oravailable to work on projects? technical expertise & each team member is a knowledge (generalists) “specialist” in their area © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    30. 30. Most Likely Agile Process• A Mix of Scrum and Kanban (and, admittedly, waterfall)• Scrum – New application development – Enhancement and defect resolution in complex/dependent systems• Kanban – Immediate response to Customer Production Issues – Independent/Low-complexity systems © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    31. 31. Real World Example• Scrum Application Development Team – Quarterly new feature releases for a mature product – Defect resolution, technical debt reduction, platform stability – Complex, complicated system with low-degree of regression testing automation• Kanban Response Teams – Patch Releases for immediate production support needs – BI/Report development – Infrastructure Support (h/w, DB, OS) © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    32. 32. Hybrid Project Management ReleaseWaterfall Project M1 T1 M2 Release Agile Project Team A A1 A2 A3 A4 A5ScrumTeams Team B B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 Sprint 1 Sprint 2 Sprint 3 Now multiply the dependencies, projects and resources by Your reality… you can see that Agile isn’t Easy… 32 © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    33. 33. Where We are Seeing Agile…Scrum Kanban• New Application Dev • Production Support• Major/minor enhancements • BI/Report Development• Brand development • Art Design & Production• Marketing Campaigns • Ux Design• Large enterprises with • Patch Releases quarterly/timed release • Marketing Collateral schedules • Press Releases © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    34. 34. WHAT’S NEXT? © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    35. 35. How Agile are you?• Glacial Flow – Our waterfall may eventually thaw to release the waters of delivery – Maybe. – Someday? © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    36. 36. How Agile are you?• Maybe too rapid… – Class 6 Rapids - “Whitewater, typically with huge waves, huge rocks and hazards, huge drops… almost inescapable hydraulic… considered hazardous even for expert paddlers using state-of-the-art equipment, and come with the warning "danger to life or limb." © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    37. 37. Agile Maturity Levels• Iterative – Big Bang Deliveries, Big Requirements – Iterative Development, Follow-on QA• Incremental – Regular Deliveries, Smaller Requirements – Iterative Development, QA side-by-side• Evolutionary – Continuous Delivery, Small Requirements – Test-First Development © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    38. 38. Take Your Next Step• Identify Current State  Goal State• Define achievable interim goals and ownership• Inspect Progress Regularly (Metrics)• Adapt to reality• Share Successes & Learn from Experience © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    39. 39. cPrime is here to Help!Engaged for your project management success. © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    40. 40. © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.
    41. 41. What Services We OfferConsultingWhen you need expert advice, our consultants can help • Solution Architects – Assess , design, and drive solutions for your Agile transformation • Coaches – Mentor and guide your Agile Teams through their growing pains • Technical Experts – Install, configure, and train your people on tools required for the new Agile process • Engagement Managers – Manage the logistics, scheduling, and resources for your Agile transformationTrainingFor individuals and organizations. Public. Private. On-site. On-line. • Practical “how it’s done” training for Agile processes • Certification Based Training - PMP®, PMI ACP, Certified ScrumMaster, Certified Product Owner, PgMp(SM), Etc. • Customized Trainings – Customized trainings for the PMO & Technology groups in every format (Instructor-led, e-learning, training portals) • We’re Accredited! - We are a Registered Education provider for the PMI.StaffingFull-time employment, Executive Search, Consulting, and Contract to Hire • ScrumMasters, Product Owners, Project Managers, Business Analysts & Technical Experts - From one resource to a complete team • Technology Experts – In test and deployment automation, continuous integration, agile project-management tools, Oracle, SAP, Business Intelligence, E-Commerce, Web Applications, SharePoint & more. • Specialized Recruiting Process - HR and IT technical experts ensure we find the right person, every time. © 2012 cPrime Inc., Foster City, CA. All Rights Reserved.

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