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Seattle Job Conditions Report, 2011
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Seattle Job Conditions Report, 2011

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The Seattle Job Conditions Report offers a comprehensive view of the Seattle job market. This study highlights online job postings and candidate resume activity across Seattle and focuses on Seattle ...

The Seattle Job Conditions Report offers a comprehensive view of the Seattle job market. This study highlights online job postings and candidate resume activity across Seattle and focuses on Seattle professionals and recruiters looking to hire Seattle talent.

Gain insight on online recruitment trends, supply and demand conditions, and how job seeker characteristics mesh against employer needs. Plus, see what Seattle professionals reveal about their careers in Seattle, job search obstacles, and most valued skills and qualifications.

This report provides:

* An overall look at Seattle supply and demand, together with a comparison of job seeker characteristics and employer requirements
* A look at recruiters and hiring managers and their plans for acquiring Seattle talent in 2011
* Insight on Seattle professionals and their careers, job search obstacles and valued qualifications and skills

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    Seattle Job Conditions Report, 2011 Seattle Job Conditions Report, 2011 Document Transcript

    • LOCAL MARKETSEATTLE2011 JOB CANDIDATESInsights and Analysis from Professionals,Recruiters and Hiring ManagersBrought to you by Monster Intelligence
    • 2SEATTLE – 2011 JOB CANDIDATESSeattle professionals should find an improving economy and labormarket in 2011. Major components of Seattle‟s labor force include jobsin Information Technology, International Trade, and ProfessionalServices, each of which are forecasted to expand in 2011.A recent survey by the Greater Seattle Chamber of Commerce polled1,200 local businesses and found “we are beginning to emerge fromthe economic doldrums, but we are not out of the woods yet.” Forty-onepercent of surveyed companies plan to hire in 2011, with a majority of 1the jobs stemming from companies with six to 100 employees. TABLE OF CONTENTSOverall, Seattle‟s employment picture is moving in a positive directionyet will continue to experience bumps and take time to fully recover. Hiring Talent in 2011 3Employers will remain cautious and keep budgets constrained until Seattle Talent 3confidence and economic performance is restored. Career Talent 4 Education Talent 4Monster leveraged nearly half a million Seattle resumes coupled with Experienced Talent 4online job postings for Seattle talent in order to gain insight into Job Search Conditions 5candidates and employers. Data is current through February 2011unless otherwise noted. Additionally, Monster surveyed active Seattle Market Conditions 6professionals, HR professionals and hiring managers to present a Market Overview 6snapshot of activity within the United States. The surveys were Unemployment Rate 8conducted between November and December 2010. Payroll Change 8 Online Recruitment Trends 9 Recruitment Activity 10 Hiring Conditions 11 Supply and Demand Analysis 12 Labor Performance Matrix 14 Career Level Requirements 16 Education Level Requirements 16 Experience Requirements 16 Job Type Requirements 17 Job Status Requirements 17 Qualifications and Benefits 18 Compensation 19 Conclusion 20 Monster Intelligence 201 Dunphy. Stephen. “Seattle businesses like 2011 prospects.” Crosscut.com. 11/10/10.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 3HIRING TALENT IN 2011Seattle Talent SkillsThe following data analyzes the supply (resumes) of Listed in the chart below are the top skills madeSeattle professionals on Monster. It provides a current available by Seattle candidates on their Monsterpicture of available Seattle talent. accounts. Microsoft Office products and Customer Service top the list followed by Leadership andListed below are the top ten Seattle occupations in Communications, the two most popular soft skills.supply and their share of volume. These occupationsaccount for 88 percent of Seattle‟s talent. Management - 23% Office and Administrative Support - 21% Computer and Mathematical - 14% Business and Financial Operations - 7% Sales and Related - 7% Architecture and Engineering - 4% Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media - 4% Production - 3% Installation, Maintenance, and Repair - 3% Life, Physical, and Social Science - 2%Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 4The charts below give a detailed profile of Seattle talent found on Monster from March 2010 to February 2011 includingcareer experience, education level and work experience. Seattle candidates found on Monster are typically Mid-Careerwith at least a Bachelor‟s degree and more than fifteen years of experience. Career LevelCareer TalentForty-five percent of Seattle job seekers are Mid-Career. Student Executive Entry Level 6% 5%Thirty-eight percent are Managers or above while 17 11%percent are emerging into today‟s workforce. Manager 33% Mid Career 45% Education LevelEducation Talent CertificationForty-eight percent of Seattle job seekers have at least a -Vocational Masters orBachelor‟s degree. Thirty percent have an Associate‟s 6% Abovedegree or some college experience. 14% High School 16% Bachelors Associate/ 34% Some- College 30% Years of Work ExperienceExperienced TalentThe majority (22 percent) of Seattle job seekers have more More than 15 Yearsthan fifteen years of work experience, closely followed and 10+ to 15 Yearsbalanced by those with two to five years of experience (20percent). 7+ to 10 Years 5+ to 7 Years 2+ to 5 Years 1+ to 2 Years Less than 1 Year 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25%Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 5Job Search ConditionsIn a recent Monster survey of more than 400 Seattle professionals, respondents were asked if they were activelysearching for a new opportunity and why they were looking. The primary reason Seattle professionals are looking for ajob is due to layoffs that occurred and continue to occur in the region, which shows that despite improvements in theeconomy, uncertainly and frustration still exists.The top five reasons Seattle professionals are searching for a job include: 1. Layoffs occurring/occurred (25 percent) 2. Salary is not as desired (19 percent) 3. Limited or no potential for upward mobility (18 percent) 4. Seeking a career change (17 percent) 5. Re-entering the workforce (17 percent)Factors less likely to drive candidates to look for a job were „relationship with a peer or manager‟, „business is closing‟and „healthcare benefits are not as desired‟.Seattle professionals report that they are somewhatfinding success in meeting their expectations andrequirements. Thirty-eight percent are finding „Good‟ to„Excellent‟ conditions.Those respondents that reported „Average‟ to „Poor‟conditions were asked “What makes it challenginglooking for a job?”The two primary reasons job seekers had a difficulttime finding Seattle positions was „getting an employeror recruiter to contact them‟ and „finding a job thatmatches what they want (e.g., salary, locations, etc.)‟.In Monster‟s recent survey to Seattle professionals, themajority of respondents (76 percent) are mostcomfortable with going to online job boards to searchfor opportunities and post their resume.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 6Market ConditionsSince Seattle was later than most in feeling the effects of the recession, its recovery is delayed as well. Initial signs ofrecovery emerged in 2010 and the area‟s economic and employment market should continue to slowly turn around in2011.Market OverviewSeattle is home to a mix of companies ranging from transportation to service and high tech to manufacturing andranging from older industrial companies to new start-ups and “green” focused companies. Local companies withheadquarters in Seattle include Amazon, Starbucks, and Nordstrom; Microsoft and Costco are established insurrounding towns. Boeing, once headquartered in Seattle, is still one of the area‟s largest employers. The Port ofSeattle is the second largest handler of container cargo in the country and despite being challenged by the recent 2recession, is still one of the area‟s key economic drivers.Government is Seattle‟s second largest employer and represents 16 percent of total employment. The sector hasrecently reported layoffs and is forecasted to make more layoffs as it works to balance constricted budgets. 3In January 2011, Seattle had 1.7 million employed, 171,500 unemployed, and a 9.1 percent unemployment rate. 4Seattle‟s key employment industries are the following : Industry Percent of Seattle Employment Trade, Transportation, & Utilities 19% Government 16% Professional & Business Services 14% Education & Health Services 13% Manufacturing 10% Leisure & Hospitality 9% Financial Activities 5% Information 5% All other industries 9%From January 2010 to January 2011, Seattle added 14,200 jobs, after adding a solid 34,000 jobs from December 2009to December 2010. In January, the employment sector benefited from continued growth in Professional and BusinessServices (+7,100), Trade, Transportation & Utilities (+6,100 jobs), and Education & Health Services (+4,400). The mostsignificant job loss was in Construction (-5,300), which has now lost over 55,000 jobs since its peak in 2007.Government lost 2,800 jobs over the year.Moody‟s Economy.com February 2011 forecast predicts a 1.8 percent expansion in Seattle jobs over the next twelvemonths. All sectors are predicted to be steady or expanding with the exception of Government, which is forecasted toconstrict by 4.1 percent.2 Wikipedia.org3 Bureau of Labor Statistics4 Seattle Workers Employed by Industry; Bureau of Labor Statistics, January 2011 dataCopyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 7Seattle‟s housing market is still depressed and constricting. A report from Zillow.com revealed that at the end of 2010over one-third (34 percent) of all single-family homeowners in the Seattle area owe more on their mortgage than theirhomes are worth, up 23 percent from a year prior. The annual losses in home value are shrinking, but are still verysignificant: $59 billion in 2008, $28 billion in 2009, and $25 billion in 2010. In December, the city‟s Case-Schiller HousePrice Index, which tracks changes in the residential housing market, was down -6.0 percent for the year and -2.0percent from November to December. In comparison, the U.S. National Index was down -4.1 percent and -3.9 percent, 5respectively).Seattle‟s overall employment picture for the next year is one of slow recovery, reflecting the growth driven by renewedinvestment, business expansion, and growing consumer confidence offset by uncertainty in the government sector andconstant fluctuations of the national economy. A recent local magazine predicted limited growth in 2011 and forecasted“the breakout year for the regional economy is now slated to be 2012…..but full recovery from the Great Recession – 6when employment returns to its 2007 peak – will not occur until late 2013.”A recent Monster survey of over 150 Seattle recruiters and hiring managers supports the conservative optimism.Respondents were asked “How many positions do you intend to fill in the next six months?” and “What percent of thepositions you expect to fill are new openings vs. replacement positions?”Of the 92 percent of employers that plan to hire in the next six months, a majority are filling a limited number of roles (50percent plan to hire less than ten positions) and very limited new roles (56 percent plan that less than 25 percent ofpositions will be new).5 The Federal Reserve Board’s Beige Book, 1/11; Zillow.com6 Conway, Dick. “Economic Forecast 2011: The Economic Bind.” Seattle Business Magazine. January 2011.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 8Unemployment RateThough Seattle‟s unemployment rate rose from its December 2010 rate of 8.8 percent to 9.1 percent in January 2011, itis improved from the 9.5 percent peak reported in January and February 2010. The area‟s unemployment rate lays in- 7line with both the state‟s rate of 9.1 percent and nation‟s of 9.0 percent (8.9 percent in February).The unemployment rate is a lagging measure that indicates both joblessness and strength of the economy. National andstate figures are seasonally adjusted.Payroll ChangeJob creation in the Seattle metro area rose 0.9 percent in January, continuing the improvement trend reportedthroughout 2010. Again, Seattle‟s expansion is close to both Washington‟s (+0.7 percent) and the nations‟ (+0.8 8percent; +1.0 percent in February).Payroll change is a key measure of new job creation (or loss), as it measures the total number of people employed in anarea every month.7, 8 Bureau of Labor StatisticsCopyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 9Online Recruitment TrendsThe Monster Employment Index (MEI) is a leading indicator of labor market trends as it tracks online recruitment activityby location, occupation, and industry. As seen below, online job recruitment activity in the Seattle metro area returned topositive expansion in 2010 after reporting significant declines in 2008 and a flat 2009, a positive sign for this metro area.  In February 2011, the Seattle MEI gained 8 percent (+8 points) from January and 16 percent (15 points) compared to the year prior. The Index hit its low point of 84 points in January 2010.  During February, four of the 21 occupational categories monitored by the Index showed a decline in online demand for workers from a year prior: Healthcare Practitioners and Technical; Protective Service; Healthcare Support; and Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance. The greatest percentage improvements were seen in Architecture and Engineering (+49 percent or +40 points) and Production (+45 percent or +34 points). The Monster Employment Index presents a monthly snapshot of employer online recruitment activity nationwide for 28 of the largest metro areas, and is generally regarded as a key indicator of demand in the labor market. The Index is based on a real- time review of millions of employer job opportunities culled from a large, representative selection of corporate career sites and job boards, including Monster. Using a baseline value of 100, the Index can be used to compare hiring trends across local markets and occupational groups. As such, a higher Index figure means stronger growth in online job availability.Seattle opportunities across all major online job boards reported a strong 2010 expansion (+27 percent) following a 9difficult 2009 (-33 percent). Postings maintained their positive momentum in 2011, rising 21 percent in January.9 Wanted Technologies, New Online Ads, Jan’09-Jan’11Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 10Recruitment ActivityThe companies posting Seattle jobs on Monster from March 2010 to February 2011 varied across industries. Listedbelow are the top twenty (out of more than 800 industries) not including staffing or temporary employment agencies thatmay post for a variety of industries. The top 20 industries posted nearly two-thirds (62 percent) of the Seattle jobs onMonster; Catalog and Mail-Order Houses generated a majority (12 percent) of the opportunities. Overall, a wideassortment of companies has posted roles, including computer, telecommunications and business services (e.g.management consulting, business services, etc.). 12% - Catalog and Mail-Order Houses 2% - Business Consulting 8% - Computer Services 1% - Engineering Services 6% - Computer Programming Services 1% - Computer Systems Design 6% - Highway and Street Construction 1% - Insurance Agents, Brokers and Services 4% - Radiotelephone Communications 1% - Prepackaged Software 4% - Holding Companies 1% - Computer Processing and Data Preparation 4% - Management Consulting 1% - Industrial and Personal Service Paper 3% - Accounting, Auditing, Bookkeeping 1% - Cable and Other Pay Television Services 2% - Business Services 1% - Fire, Marine and Casualty Insurance 1% - Medical, Dental and Hospital Equipment and 2% - Telephone Communications SuppliesThe types of roles Seattle companies posted over the past year include roles primarily for IT (23 percent), Finance (20percent), and Sales (14 percent) type roles.Seattle Job Postings by Category % Total Job PostingsIT/Software Development 23%Accounting/Finance/Insurance 20%Sales/Retail/Business Development 14%Engineering 5%Medical/Health 4%Administrative/Clerical 4%Business/Strategic Management 4%Logistics/Transportation 3%Manufacturing/Production/Operations 3%Customer Support/Client Care 3%All Other 17%Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 11Hiring ConditionsRecruiters surveyed by Monster predict filling Seattle roles will move fairly quickly. Nearly half (45 percent) ofrespondents expect it will take between 31 and 60 days to fill a position and 34 percent predict each opportunity willtake fewer than 30 days to fill. 21 percent plan for more than 60 days.With the excess of candidates looking for work, it is no surprise that recruiters are having a relatively easy time findingqualified candidates. 74 percent of respondents said their ability to find Seattle candidates was “Good” to “Excellent”.Those few respondents that reported „Average‟ to „Poor‟ conditions were asked “What makes it hard to findcandidates?”The primary reasons recruiters and hiring managers had a difficult time recruiting for Seattle positions was the extensivetime required to hire as well as the increased workload, most likely due to the surplus of resumes that they must reviewto find the ideal candidate.When looking at the challenges of the candidatesthemselves, responses reveal that recruiters arefrustrated with the types of candidates they are seeing.Even though there is a surplus of available candidates,recruiters still noted there were under-qualified and notenough candidates. Next in importance, they notedcompensation was below candidate expectations.Recruiters ranked the top areas with planned hiring inSeattle as: 1. Sales (48 percent) 2. IT (36 percent) 3. Engineering (29 percent) 4. Customer Service (14 percent) 5. Manufacturing/Production (14 percent) 6. Marketing, Media & PR (14 percent)Monster‟s recent survey to Seattle recruiters and hiring managers found that a majority of respondents (83 percent) aremost comfortable with going to online job boards to source candidates, the first choice for candidates searching for ajob.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 12Supply and Demand AnalysisAs defined here, the Seattle area encompasses counties surrounding the city and only in the state of Washington. Acomparison of Monster job seekers seeking employment in the market compared to the volume of job postings in thearea reveals higher supplies of talent in the counties of Douglas and Chelan, denoted by the darker green areas in themap below. Recruitment for candidates in lighter green counties such as King, Snohomish, and Grays Harbor may bemore competitive as the ratio of resumes per job posting is lower than in other Seattle areas.The types of roles these candidates are seeking span a wide range of areas with the highest volume targetingIT/Software Development (10 percent) and Administrative/Clerical (10 percent) opportunities followed bySales/Retail/Business Development (9 percent).Seattle Job Seekers by Category % Total Job SeekersIT/Software Development 10%Administrative/Clerical 10%Sales/Retail/Business Development 9%Customer Support/Client Care 7%Accounting/Finance/Insurance 5%Project/Program Management 5%Manufacturing/Production/Operations 5%Marketing/Product 5%Business/Strategic Management 4%Medical/Health 4%All Other 36%Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 13The remainder of this report will focus on key Seattle professions and how supply and demand measures up whenrecruiting in this dynamic area. Job Seekers Employers 1. General/Operations Managers, 6% 1. Computer Software Engineers, 14% 2. Computer Software Engineers, 5% 2. Accountants and Auditors, 4% 3. Secretaries/Administrative Assistants, 3. Human Resources Specialists, 4% 5% 4. Marketing/Sales Managers, 4% 4. Marketing/Sales Managers, 5% 5. General/Operations Managers, 3% 5. Customer Service Representatives, 6. Financial Analysts/Advisors, 3% 4% 7. Financial Managers, 3% 6. Other Managers, 3% 8. Computer Systems Analysts, 3% 7. Computer Systems Analysts,3% 9. Bookkeeping/Accounting/Auditing, 8. Human Resources Specialists, 2% 3% 9. Supervisors/Managers of Office and 10. Computer Programmers, 2% Administrative Support Workers, 2% 11. Customer Service Representatives, 10. Sales, 2% 2% ● ● ● ● ● ●Over one-third of the supply (37 percent) and nearly one-half of the demand (45 percent) in Seattle are for the top tenoccupation clusters listed above. Six of the top ten opportunities in demand may be found among the top candidates insupply. Several of the roles most in demand but not on the top ten supply list include finance jobs, showing recruitersmight have a challenge finding qualified candidates for these roles.Listed below are the top 20 out of over 2,700 job titles in which Seattle job seekers are interested. These 20 job titlesaccounted for 22 percent of the Seattle talent and have a strong selection of administrative, customer service, andmanager-level roles. # Job Titles (1-10) # Job Titles (11-20) 1 Customer Service Representative 11 Retail Salesperson 2 Administrative Assistant 12 Software Quality Assurance Engineer 3 Manager 13 Receptionist 4 Project Manager 14 Business Systems Analyst 5 Sales Representative 15 Office Assistant 6 Software Engineer 16 Director 7 Program Manager 17 Marketing and Sales Manager 8 Office Manager 18 Assistant Manager 9 Executive Administrative Assistant 19 Customer Service 10 Office and Administrative Support Workers, Other 20 Sr. Software EngineerCopyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 14The top 20 (out of more than 2,100) Seattle job titles posted on Monster.com from March 2010 to February 2011 aredominated by IT and finance roles and accounted for nearly one-quarter (24 percent) of all job titles. # Job Titles (1-10) # Job Titles (11-20) 1 Software Engineer 11 Sales Executive 2 Lead J.D. Edwards Architect 12 Data Entry Clerk 3 Sales Representative 13 Product Manager 4 Customer Service Representative 14 Accounting Manager 5 Cost Accountant 15 Sr. Accountant 6 Executive Recruiter 16 Accounting Clerk III 7 Accounts Payable Clerk 17 Sr. Software Engineer 8 Financial Analyst 18 Software Quality Assurance Engineer 9 Compensation Analyst 19 Finance Manager 10 Accountant 20 Executive Administrative Assistant Labor Performance Matrix The Labor Performance Matrix below and on the next page compares job posting and resume performance within the key Seattle occupation clusters. The size of the circle represents the supply based on the ratio of resumes per job from March 2010 through February 2011. A large circle indicates a large pool of talent in comparison to the demand, and a smaller circle represents areas where the demand may outweigh the supply. How to Read the Matrix: Talent Surplus Not enough jobs to match supply Plan for increased volume of candidates Focus on skills migration Incubator Opportunities (Growth Areas) High growth potential High Performance High volume in jobs and talent Focus on keeping talent and generating jobs Talent Shortage Not enough talent to meet demand At risk for competitionCopyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 15Talent SurplusAdministrative and Customer Service sit squarely in the Talent Surplus quadrant. These categories show a strongsupply of resumes and fewer job opportunities to meet job seeker needs. Recruiters need to plan for additional time andresources to help screen increased volumes of candidates and could consider retraining or other workplacedevelopment programs to ensure the surplus of candidates are put to work, particularly in Sales, IT and Finance roles,which are showing a need for talent.Incubator Opportunities (Growth Areas)The growth occupations span a wide range of categories and are prime for candidate and/or job opportunity expansion.High PerformanceSales and IT are in the High Performance quadrant, demonstrating an ample volume of both job postings and seekerresumes. The small circle size, however, indicates that demand may outweigh supply. Recruiters need to actively andcontinuously recruit qualified candidates in order to fill these types of roles.Talent ShortageFinance is in the Talent Shortage area, showing a strong volume of opportunities and weak volume of candidates. Thevery small circle size further confirms the lack of qualified candidates.The matrix below summarizes occupational supply and demand from March 2010 through February 2011. Talent Surplus High Performance Zone Incubator Zone Talent ShortageCopyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 16In the following analysis, we compare Seattle talent demand (job postings) with talent supply (resumes) across a rangeof characteristics. The comparisons reveal the similarities and disparities between the available jobs and the searchingseekers. This analysis provides direction for recruiters and employers in setting their expectations and developmentareas.Career LevelA significant 78 percent of job postings are for mid-careertalent compared with 45 percent of new resumes. Due tothis imbalance, recruiters may need to be flexible in theircareer requirement, most likely finding an excess of over-qualified Manager-level candidates.Education LevelSeattle recruiters are concentrated in searching forcandidates with at most a Bachelor‟s Degree (63percent). As the talent supply pool is more distributedacross education levels, recruiters could be challenged tofill roles as many seekers are either under or over-qualified.Experience LevelA high 63 percent of job opportunities are for candidateswith 2 to 7 years of experience compared to the 34percent of available seekers. Some recruiters will need tosettle on candidates with more years of experience thandesired which may lead to higher compensation.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 17Job Type RequirementsOnly 64 percent of Seattle job postings are for permanent positions and the remaining 36 percent are for temporary andintern work. The volume of temporary work roles, which typically expand the fastest post-recession as employersconservatively hire for the short-term, is high compared to other regions. This trend could indicate underlying weaknessin the city‟s business climate, the high percentage of IT roles which typically hire contract candidates, as well as beinfluenced by the other types of roles available.With 74 percent of job seekers desiring permanent employment and 26 percent willing to step into either a permanent ortemporary role, employers might be convincing some workers to take a temporary position in lieu of a permanent one.Job Status RequirementsNinety-six percent of job postings are for full-time employment and only 4 percent for part-time, while 78 percent ofcandidates are open to full-time employment, 2 percent for part-time and 20 percent for either. Employers should havean ample pool of talent to meet their needs within these criteria.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 18Qualifications and BenefitsAs employers look through reams of resumes, the qualifications Seattle professionals place the greatest importance onwhen applying for opportunities is „type(s) of work experience‟ (73 percent) and „years of work experience‟ (72 percent).Recruiters agree that work experience is the most critical qualification, ranking „type‟ and „years‟ in the same order (89percent and 82 percent, respectively.)Listed below are the most important factors Seattle professionals consider when evaluating a job opportunity. Note thatthese characteristics have been influenced by the recessionary economy and corporate scandals over the past fewyears as the top two include „stability of position‟ and „salary‟.Recruiters were asked how they would rate the same list of factors in terms of their importance to recruiting talent. Thetop two items were the same, though ordered: „salary‟ (94 percent) and „stability of position‟ (92 percent).Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 19CompensationCompensation expectations for recruiters and candidates are in fairly close alignment giving encouragement thatrecruiters can easily satisfy a potential recruit‟s salary expectations. The median salary offered from March 2010 toFebruary 2011 was $62,500 and the median salary candidates were seeking was $52,000. The discrepancy could bedue to the types of jobs and candidates available, as well the salary requirements may represent total compensation forsome job seekers and only a base salary for others.The vast majority (32 percent) of Seattle job postings on Monster offer a salary ranging from $20-40,000. Most jobseekers (30 percent) expect to earn the same amount.The chart below shows how closely Seattle employers and professionals compensation requirements are. For example,67 percent of both employers and seekers expect to earn at least $40,000.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 20Diversify Your Recruitment Strategy in 2011As the nation emerges from challenging times, recruiters should keep in mind the following points when planning for thenext 12-months.Network to strengthen your brand: Networking has always been a fundamental aspect of establishing a presenceand sourcing candidates. Todays recruiters must actively network across the Internet to get a more holistic view of theapplicant. With Monster’s 20 network communities integrated into its core site, experts are better able to help individualsaccess advice from industry experts and keep on top of trends. These communities also offer employers access to apool of targeted candidates.Play a smart matching game. Have processes and paper work in place, be diligent about screening, and communicatefrequently with hiring managers. Many recruiters are using technology to help quickly match candidates to jobs andeliminate unqualified applicants. Monster’s semantic 6Sense™ search technology powers our Power Resume Searchapplication, sorting and ranking candidates so the best are at the top. Using these types of sorting programs, recruiterssave time and money sourcing candidates that precisely match their positions.Spend accordingly. As budget managers remain cautious, leverage as many benefits as possible that attract andretain employees yet require minimal investment. Keep on top of what is most important to job seekers by leveragingMonster’s free online resources at the Resource Center (http://hiring.monster.com.) The site offers actionable reportsand webinars covering the most current issues facing not only job seekers, but recruiters as well.Monster IntelligenceAs the premier digital employment solution, Monster has consistently maintained a leadership position in defining anddriving innovative products and services to champion digital recruitment. We see tremendous value in providing ourclients, the online recruitment industry, and the public at large with analysis on both job seeker and employer behaviors,as well as general employment market trends. In direct response to our customers‟ needs for strategic human capitalintelligence, Monster created an initiative, entitled Monster Intelligence, that is focused on providing business leadersand HR Executives real-time insight into market trends that will guide them in future recruitment planning.As a market leader, Monster is uniquely positioned to provide strategic information on employment trends to CorporateExecutives and Hiring Managers. These tools provide our customers with views into the labor market andcomprehensive information to further their employment strategy.More details are available at the Monster Resource Center at: http://hiring.monster.com/hr/hr-best-practices.aspx. Wewelcome your insight and comments on the monster intelligence reports and encourage you to let us know yourthoughts by providing feedback at Intelligence@monster.comMonster is the primary source of information for this report; it should only be interpreted as a definitive activity report onMonster and its subsidiaries. Monster‟s in-depth data-driven approach improves on typical survey-based methodologiesby dramatically increasing the depth and breadth of information collected as well as by capturing actual behavior ratherthan intended behavior. Data is current through February, 2011 unless otherwise indicated.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
    • 21Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.