2012 Atlanta Job Market Report - Monster.com

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The Atlanta Job Conditions Report offers a comprehensive view of the Atlanta job market. This study highlights online job postings and candidate resume activity across Atlanta and focuses on Atlanta …

The Atlanta Job Conditions Report offers a comprehensive view of the Atlanta job market. This study highlights online job postings and candidate resume activity across Atlanta and focuses on Atlanta professionals and recruiters looking to hire Atlanta talent.

Gain insight on online recruitment trends, supply and demand conditions, and how job seeker characteristics mesh against employer needs.

This report provides:

An overall look at market conditions including unemployment shifts, payroll changes and online recruitment trends in the Atlanta area
A profile of Atlanta talent that includes insight into the types of candidates that are currently in supply
An analysis of Atlanta supply and demand, together with a comparison of job seeker characteristics and employer requirements

More in: Career
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  • 1. LOCAL MARKETATLANTA2012 JOB CONDITIONSInsights and Analysis from Professionals,Recruiters and Hiring ManagersBrought to you by Monster Insights
  • 2. 2ATLANTA – 2012 JOB CONDITIONSAtlanta professionals should find mixed hiring and economicconditions in 2012. Though the local economy is diverse andmade notable improvements in 2011, the area has and will in theshort term suffer from reserved employer hiring, a weakened realestate market, and higher than average unemployment rate.Forecasts suggest somewhat stable employment; though expectsome continued job loss in 2012.As the Federal Reserve Board’s Beige Book recentlysummarized, Atlanta’s hiring continues to be modest. Employersare still using a higher level of temporary and part-time help thanusual and will do so until they see sustained improvement in TABLE OF CONTENTS 1demand. MARKET CONDITIONS 3It will take Atlanta another couple of years to realize the potential Market Overview 3of its educated job seeker population, desirable living conditions Unemployment Rate 4and presence of strong Fortune 500 companies and return to Payroll Change 4labor market expansion and low levels of unemployment it once Online Recruitment Trends 5had. HIRING TALENT IN 2012 7Monster leveraged more than 624,000 Atlanta resumes coupledwith online job postings for Atlanta talent in order to gain insight Atlanta Talent 7into candidates and employers. Data is current through Skills 8December 2011 unless otherwise noted. Job Search 8 SUPPLY AND DEMAND ANALYSIS 9 Geography 9 Occupations 9 Labor Performance 11 Career Level 12 Education 12 Work Experience 12 Job Type (Perm or Contract) 13 Job Status (Full or Part-time) 13 Compensation 14 CONCLUSION 15 MONSTER INSIGHTS 151 The Federal Reserve Board‟s Beige Book, November 30, 2011Copyright @ 2012 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 3. 3MARKET CONDITIONSAtlanta is expected to face continuing economic and employment challenges in 2012. Conditions such as a laggingunemployment rate and payroll growth, as well as an unreliable real-estate market, are causing employers to remainvery cautious before hiring new talent. However, Atlanta has a lot to offer with its below average cost of living andattractive quality of life. This will help Atlanta rebuild its economy. The cost of living consistently ranks below the national 2average and may entice candidates to come to Atlanta or to stay in the area.MARKET OVERVIEWAtlanta has a diverse economy supported by a wide range of industries and companies. The area has expertise inglobal logistics, bioscience, and health IT. Leading companies headquartered in the area include Coca-Cola, The HomeDepot, UPS, Delta Air Lines, The Southern Company, NCR and First Data. The region benefits from its localuniversities, including Emory University, Georgia Tech and Georgia State University, as well as mild weather and an 3affordable cost of living. 4In October 2011, Atlanta had 2.4 million employed, 266,400 unemployed, and a 9.9 percent unemployment rate.Atlanta’s key employment industries are the following: Industry Percent of Atlanta Employment Trade, Transportation, & Utilities 23% Professional & Business Services 18% Government 14% Education & Health Services 13% Leisure & Hospitality 10% Manufacturing 7% Financial Activities 6% All other industries 9%From November 2010 to November 2011, the Atlanta economy shed 13,100 jobs. Financial Activities and Governmentreported the most significant declines, losing 10,700 and 10,100 jobs, respectively. Trade, Transportation & Utilitiesadded 8,500 new jobs. Professional & Business Services and Education & Health Services each added approximately 35,000 roles over the twelve-month period.Moody’s Analytics’ December 2011 jobs forecast predicts a minimal 0.6 percent expansion in Atlanta jobs over the nexttwelve months compared to 0.8 percent for the nation. Nearly all sectors are predicted to be flat or declining with theexception of Natural Resources & Mining, Construction, and Other Services. A Georgia State University economist 5forecasted Atlanta will gain 17,400 jobs in 2012 and 40,200 in 2013.Like employment, the area’s real estate market is also facing a delayed recovery. Standard & Poor’s Case-ShillerAtlanta index fell by 5.9 percent from August to September, reporting a new index low, and declined 9.8 percent year-over-year. In comparison, the nation reported a 0.1 percent expansion from August to September and a 3.9 percent 6annual decline. Atlanta home prices are forecasted to drop a further 6.7 percent in 2012.2 Metro Atlanta Chamber (MAC), www.metroatlantachamber.com3 Metro Atlanta Chamber‟s “Metro Atlanta Executive Profile.”4 Bureau of Labor Statistics, www.bls.gov; November 2011 data5 Shockley, Jenifer. “Outlook „muddled‟ due to domestic uncertainty and global headwinds.”Georgia State University‟s J. Mack Robinson College of Business. 11/16/116 S&P/Case-Shiller Home Price Indices, released 11/29/11; housingpredictor.comCopyright @ 2012 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 4. 4UNEMPLOYMENT RATEAtlanta’s unemployment rate was 9.2 percent in November 2011, down from 9.9 percent in October. The area’sunemployment rate reached its peak in January 2010, hitting a high 10.7 percent. Atlanta’s unemployment rate lies in 7between the state’s November rate of 9.9 percent and the nation’s 8.6 percent rate.The unemployment rate is a lagging measure that indicates both joblessness and strength of the economy. National andstate figures are seasonally adjusted. Atlanta vs. National Unemployment Rate, % Nov 08 - Nov11 13.0 11.0 9.0 7.0 5.0 3.0 May-09 May-10 May-11 Sep-11 Jan-09 Jul-09 Sep-09 Jan-10 Jul-10 Sep-10 Jan-11 Jul-11 Nov-08 Nov-09 Nov-10 Nov-11 Mar-10 Mar-09 Mar-11 Atlanta NationalPAYROLL CHANGEJob creation in the Atlanta metro area has been negative since December 2010. In November 2011, the area reported a-0.6 percent decline over the prior year. This rate falls below both Georgia’s -0.5 percent decline and the nation’s 1.2 7percent expansion. Note the nation has expanded its payroll rate since September 2010.Payroll change is a key measure of new job creation (or loss), as it measures the total number of people employed in anarea every month. Atlanta vs. National Payroll Growth, % YoY Nov08 - Nov11 2.0 0.0 -2.0 -4.0 -6.0 -8.0 May-11 May-09 Jul-09 May-10 Jan-09 Sep-09 Jan-10 Jul-10 Sep-10 Jan-11 Jul-11 Sep-11 Nov-08 Nov-09 Nov-10 Nov-11 Mar-09 Mar-10 Mar-11 Atlanta National7 Bureau of Labor Statistics, www.bls.gov; November 2011 dataCopyright @ 2012 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 5. 5ONLINE RECRUITMENT TRENDSThe Monster Employment Index (Index) tracks online recruitment activity and related job opportunities across Atlantaand is a leading indicator of labor market trends.The Atlanta Index continued its upward trajectory during 2011 indicating sustained growth in online job availabilitythroughout the year. By December 2011, the Atlanta Index stood at a level of 96, which represents an increase of 8points or 9 percent for the year. The Atlanta Index hit its low point of 66 points in January 2010 after reaching an all-timehigh of 149 in October 2007 suggesting further recovery remains underway.Growth was primarily driven by higher demand for workers in skilled trades such as installation, maintenance and repair,construction and extraction, production, and transportation and material moving. Online recruiting also surged in life,physical, and social sciences, architecture and engineering, and computer and mathematical occupations.The Atlanta Index demonstrates a moderation in online job demand during the second half of the year. The AtlantaIndex’s annual growth rate peaked at 24 percent in December 2010; by December 2011 it had dipped to 9 percentmatching its annual 9 percent low in June 2011.The Atlanta Index results for the past 13 months are as follows:Dec 10 Jan 11 Feb 11 Mar 11 Apr 11 May 11 Jun 11 Jul 11 Aug 11 Sep 11 Oct 11 Nov 11 Dec 11 88 77 91 94 99 101 101 103 108 104 106 105 96The Atlanta Index results over the past three years: Monster Employment Index Atlanta YoY Change 150 50% 125 25% YoY Change, % Index=100 100 0% 75 -25% 50 -50% Dec-08 Aug-09 Dec-09 Dec-10 Dec-11 Jun-09 Jun-10 Aug-10 Jun-11 Aug-11 Feb-09 Feb-10 Feb-11 Apr-09 Oct-09 Apr-10 Oct-10 Apr-11 Oct-11 The Monster Employment Index presents a monthly snapshot of employer online recruitment activity nationwide for 28 of the largest metro areas, and is generally regarded as a key indicator of demand in the labor market. The Index is based on a real- time review of millions of employer job opportunities culled from a large, representative selection of corporate career sites and job boards, including Monster. Using a baseline value of 100, the Index can be used to compare hiring trends across local markets and occupational groups. As such, a higher Index figure means stronger growth in online job availability.Copyright @ 2012 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 6. 6Atlanta’s online job demand rose in 17 of the 24 occupational categories tracked by the Monster Employment Index in2011, suggesting continued hiring activity across a diverse range of companies. Occupations showing the greatest rateof increase over the year include personal care and service, installation, maintenance, and repair, and protectiveservice. Most Wanted Occupational Experience in November Dec Dec % Occupations 2010 2011 YoY YoY Personal Care and Service 381 469 +88 23% Installation, Maintenance, and Repair 112 151 +39 35% Occupations showing the Protective Service 86 111 +25 29% greatest rate of increase in Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media 95 117 +22 23% online job demand in 2011 Military Specific 86 106 +20 23% Computer and Mathematical 76 95 +19 25% Life, Physical, and Social Science 77 96 +19 25% Building and Grounds Cleaning and Maintenance 62 79 +17 27% Architecture and Engineering 69 83 +14 20%Installation, maintenance, and repair increased 39 points or 35 percent in 2011. Both automotive and buildingequipment contractors contain many positions for mechanics, technicians and repairers. Increased demand forcommunications has also contributed to the rise in demand for equipment and line installers and repairers in thetelecommunications sector.Online demand for computer and mathematical occupations continued its ascent in 2011, rising 19 points or 25percent for the year 2011. The increase was driven, in part, by rising demand for health IT, cyber security, and digitalmedia. Often referred to as the nation’s health IT capital, Atlanta is at the forefront of consumer digital health with more 8than 135 healthcare IT companies across the state.Life, physical, and social science was up 19 points or 25 percent for the year, reflecting a gradual build-up in demandfor researchers, college professors and other scientists and professionals with a high level of formal education. Fast-growing biosciences remain drivers of this category.8 Metro Atlanta Chamber (MAC), www.metroatlantachamber.comCopyright @ 2012 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 7. 7As seen on Monster, the types of jobs many Atlanta Job Postings by Category % Total Job PostingsAtlanta companies posted over the past yearinclude roles primarily for IT (27 percent), finance IT/Software Development 27%(17 percent), and sales (15 percent). Accounting/Finance/Insurance 17% Sales/Retail/Business Development 15% Medical/Health 5% Business/Strategic Management 5% Engineering 4% Market/Product 3% Project/Program Management 2% Human Resources 2% Logistics/Transportation 2% All Other 18%HIRING TALENT IN 2012Atlanta’s talent is experienced, well educated, and covers a broad range of skills and expertise. With a 9.2%unemployment rate reported in November 2011 companies should be able to find the talent they need to hire for most oftheir general roles. Despite this large talent pool, it should be noted that many companies requiring specialized skills infields such as health IT, cyber security and wireless are reporting greater challenges finding the right (or enough) talent 9to hire.ATLANTA TALENTThe types of roles Atlanta candidates are seeking Atlanta Job Seekers by Category % Total Job Seekerson Monster span a wide range of areas with thehighest volume targeting Administrative/Clerical Administrative/Clerical 13%(13 percent) opportunities followed by Customer Customer Support/Client Care 10%Support/Client Care (10 percent). Sales/Retail/Business Development 9% IT/Software Development 6% Accounting/Finance/Insurance 6% Medical/Health 5% Manufacturing/Production/Operations 5% Business/Strategic Management 4% Manufacturing/Production/Operations 4% Logistics/Transportation 4% All Other 34%9 Metro Atlanta Chamber (MAC), www.metroatlantachamber.comCopyright @ 2012 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 8. 8SKILLSDespite a relatively high unemployment rate that has Top Skills - Atlanta Job Seekersbeen hovering around 10 percent, some employers Customer Support/Servicein Atlanta may struggle to find the right talent. Gapsmay exist between the skills workers have or present Salesand the qualifications employers require to meet their Microsoft Excelhiring needs. Microsoft WordHow do companies overcome skill gaps? Microsoft PowerPoint English LanguageLanding the best hard-to-find talent may require Time Managementsome fine-tuning when it comes to talent acquisition Microsoft Outlookstrategies. As recruitment activities heat-up for 2012,consider some of these tactics shared by three Problem Solving Skills 10corporate powerhouses: Training/Teaching Billing  Showcase what employees enjoy  Unleash employee connections Recruiting/Staffing/Hiring  Mount a strategic employee training effort Organizational Skills Microsoft OfficeAtlanta’s talent pool boasts Customer Service andSales as the top most common skills, referenced in Administrative Skillsover 35% of seeker resumes. Marketing Communication Skills Analysis Skills Telephone Skills Customer Relations 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50%JOB SEARCHOver the past 12 months, Monster has seen an average of 440,000 Atlanta area job searches each month. 62 percentof Atlanta job searches did not contain a keyword suggesting Job Seekers cast a wide-area search before narrowingactivity.Top Keywords Searched by Atlanta Job Seekers Include: 1. Sales 11. Part Time 2. Customer Service 12. Receptionist 3. Accounting 13. Construction 4. Warehouse 14. Medical Assistant 5. Administrative Assistant 15. Manager 6. Human Resources 16. Real Estate 7. Marketing 17. Data Entry 8. Retail 18. Manufacturing 9. Healthcare 19. Education 10. Administrative 20. Finance10 Monster "The Skills Gap: Creative Ways to Manage Talent Acquisition"Copyright @ 2012 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 9. 9SUPPLY AND DEMAND ANALYSISGEOGRAPHYAs defined here, the Atlanta marketencompasses primarily Georgia cities andtowns and select counties in the states ofAlabama and North Carolina.A comparison of Monster job candidatesseeking employment in the market comparedto the volume of job postings in the areareveals higher supplies of talent in easternGeorgia, denoted by the darker green areasin the map.Recruitment for candidates in lighter greenareas, such as those regions surrounding thecity of Atlanta, may be more competitive asthe ratio of resumes per job posting is lowercompared to other areas around Atlanta.OCCUPATIONSOver one-third of the supply (37 percent) and an even higher 41 percent of the demand in Atlanta are for the top tenoccupation clusters listed below. Six of the top ten opportunities in demand may be found among the top candidates insupply. The roles that are not in common include administrative, financial and IT positions. Employers Job Seekers 1. Secretaries/Admin. Assistants, 7% 1. Computer Software Engineers, 12% 2. Customer Service Reps., 6% 2. Accountants/Auditors, 8% 3. General/Operations Managers, 5% 3. Computer Systems Analysts, 3% 4. Marketing/Sales Managers, 4% 4. General/Operations Managers, 3% 5. Managers, General, 4% 5. Marketing/Sales Managers, 3% 6. Computer Software Engineers, 3% 6. Emergency Management, 3% 7. Computer Systems Analysts, 2% 7. Financial Analysts/Advisors, 3% 8. Office Supervisors/Managers, 2% 8. Computer Programmers, 2% 9. Sales, General, 2% 9. Human Resources Specialists, 2% 10. Human Resources Specialists, 2% 10. Office Supervisors/Managers, 2% ● ● ● ● ● ●Copyright @ 2012 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 10. 10Listed below are the top 20 (out of nearly 2,700) job titles in which Atlanta job seekers are interested. These 20 job titlesaccounted for 26 percent of the talent in Atlanta and have a strong selection of administrative, customer service, andmanager-level roles. # Job Titles (1-10) # Job Titles (11-20) 1 Customer Service Representative 11 Assistant Manager 2 Administrative Assistant 12 Retail Salesperson 3 General Manager 13 Receptionist 4 Sales Representative 14 Clerk/Typist 5 Project Manager 15 Office and Administrative Support Workers 6 Office Manager 16 General Director 7 Customer Service 17 Business Systems Analyst 8 Executive Administrative Assistant 18 Software Engineer 9 Warehouse Worker 19 Sales Executive 10 Medical Assistant 20 Human Resources Administrative AssistantThe top 20 (out of nearly 2,500) Atlanta job titles posted on Monster.com from December 2010 to November 2011 aredominated by IT and Finance roles and accounted for 24 percent of all job titles. # Job Titles (1-10) # Job Titles (11-20) 1 Software Engineer 11 Sr. Software Engineer 2 Disaster Relief Services Director 12 Project Manager 3 Staff Accountant 13 Warehouse Manager 4 Sr. Accountant 14 Sales Representative 5 Accountant 15 Payroll Manager 6 Financial Analyst 16 Software Quality Assurance Engineer 7 Customer Service Representative 17 Scientist 8 Accounts Payable Clerk 18 Financial Accountant 9 Cost Accountant 19 Sr. Financial Analyst 10 Java Developer 20 Product ManagerCopyright @ 2012 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 11. 11 LABOR PERFORMANCE The supply and demand below compares job posting and resume performance within the key Atlanta occupation clusters from January 2011 through December 2011. The chart plots demand (Atlanta job postings on Monster) versus supply (Atlanta candidates on Monster). The size of the circle represents the number of resumes per job posting. A large circle indicates a large pool of talent in comparison to the demand, and a smaller circle represents areas where the demand may outweigh the supply.Administrative and Customer Service occupations show a Talent Surplus due to a strong supply of resumes andfewer job opportunities to meet job seeker needs. Recruiters need to plan for additional time and resources to helpscreen increased volumes of candidates and could consider retraining or other workplace development programs toensure the surplus of candidates are put to work, particularly in Sales, Finance and IT roles which are showing a needfor talent.The Sales and Healthcare occupations demonstrate adequate supply of both resumes and postings. Their smallercircle sizes reveal that these clusters have a smaller resume per postings ratio compared to other Atlanta segmentssuch as Hospitality. Demand could outweigh supply from additional expansion from these areas.Finance and IT show a solid volume of opportunities and lower volumes of candidates. The small circle size furtherconfirms the shortage of candidates in each of these areas. Recruiters need to actively and continuously recruitqualified candidates in order to fill these types of roles and should consider working with local educators to ensureprograms continue that help to develop the skills required to meet hiring needs.Copyright @ 2012 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 12. 12In the following analysis, we compare Atlanta talent demand (job postings) with talent supply (resumes) across a rangeof characteristics. The comparisons reveal the similarities and disparities between the available jobs and the searchingseekers. This analysis provides direction for recruiters and employers in setting their expectations and developmentareas.CAREER LEVEL Atlanta - Career LevelA majority 44 percent of Atlanta job seekers are Mid- Job Postings ResumesCareer (or Experienced, Non-Mangers). Thirty-sixpercent are Managers or above while 20 percent are 2%emerging into today’s workforce. Executive 5% 14%A steep percent of job postings (72 percent) are for Mid- Manager 31%Career talent compared with 44 percent of new 72%resumes. Due to this imbalance, recruiters may need to Experienced (Non-Manager) 44%be flexible in their career requirement, most likely 11%leveraging the strong excess of over-qualified Manager- Entry Level 12%level candidates (assuming these candidates are open 1%to such opportunities). Student 8% Atlanta - Education LevelEDUCATION Job Postings ResumesA solid 44 percent of Atlanta job seekers have at least aBachelor’s Degree while 34 percent have an Associate’s 5%degree or some college experience. Masters/Doctorate 12% 57%Atlanta recruiters are concentrated in searching for Bachelors 32%candidates with at most a Bachelor’s Degree (57 7%percent) followed very closely by those with at most a Associate/Some-College 34%High School Degree (28 percent). Based on the myriad 28%of education levels, recruiters may want to broaden their High School 16%search for candidates as well as adjust compensation 3%accordingly. Certification - Vocational 6%WORK EXPERIENCEAtlanta job seekers are concentrated in two main Atlanta - Years of Experiencegroups: 22 percent have more than 15 years of work Job Postings Resumesexperience and another 19 percent have 2 to 5 years of <1%experience. More than 15 Years 22% 3%A high 39 percent of job opportunities are for candidates 10+ to 15 Years 18%with 2 to 5 years of experience compared to only 19 7%percent of available seekers. It is common that 7+ to 10 Years 14%candidates are more senior compared to available jobs; 24% 5+ to 7 Years 15%Atlanta has a strong population of seasoned candidates(40 percent have over 10 years of experience). Some 39% 2+ to 5 Years 19%recruiters might need to settle on candidates with moreyears of experience than desired which could lead to 1+ to 2 Years 14% 7%higher compensation. 13% Less than 1 Year 5%Copyright @ 2012 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 13. 13JOB TYPE (PERMANENT OR CONTRACT)Three-quarters of Atlanta job postings are for permanent positions and the remaining 25 percent are for temporary andintern work. With at most 21 percent of job seekers interested in a temporary role, employers might have to convincesome job seekers to settle for a temporary instead of permanent position. Atlanta Job Type Atlanta Job Type New Resumes Job Postings Intern/ Either Type Seasonal 20% <1% Intern/ Seasonal Temp/ <1% Contract Temp/ 25% Contract 1% Permanent 75% Permanent 79%JOB STATUS (FULL OR PART-TIME)Nearly all Atlanta jobs (97 percent) are for full-time employment while 3 percent are for part-time; 80 percent ofcandidates are open to full-time employment, 2 percent for part-time, and 18 percent for either. Employers should havean ample pool of talent to meet their needs within these criteria. Atlanta Job Status Atlanta Job Status New Resumes Job Postings Either Part-time Status 3% 18% Part-time 2% Full-time Full-time 80% 97%Copyright @ 2012 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 14. 14COMPENSATIONAtlanta recruiters have a slightly higher salary requirement compared to candidate’s salary expectations. Supportingthis, the median salary offered from January 2011 to December 2011 was $62,500 and the median salary candidateswere seeking was $45,000. The discrepancy could be due to the types of jobs and candidates available, as well thesalary requirements may represent total compensation for some job seekers and only a base salary for others.The majority of Atlanta candidates (41 percent) expect a salary of $40-60,000 while approximately one quarter ofemployers expect to pay each in the $20-40,000, $40-60,000 and $60-80,000 range.The chart below shows that Atlanta employers have compensation requirements in excess of candidates, with thehighest disparity at $60,000, where 48 percent of employers expect to pay at least $60,000 and only 28 percent ofcandidates expect to earn at least $60,000.Copyright @ 2012 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 15. 15DIVERSIFY YOUR RECRUITMENT STRATEGY IN 2012As the nation continues to manage challenging economic conditions, recruiters should keep in mind the following pointswhen planning for the next 12-months.Network to strengthen your brand: Networking has always been a fundamental aspect of establishing a presenceand sourcing candidates. Todays recruiters must actively network across the Internet to get a more holistic view of theapplicant. BeKnown, Monster‟s social app on Facebook, extends your reach. Build your employer brand on the world‟smost active social network.Play a smart matching game. Have processes and paper work in place, be diligent about screening, and communicatefrequently with hiring managers. Monster‟s patented 6Sense® search technology powers a suite of products to helpdeliver the precise, relevant matches you need to save you time and money. See more of the talent you have and findthe talent you need with Monster SeeMore, our cloud-based search and analytics platform. Let Monster Power ResumeSearch.® match qualified job seekers to your opportunities. Power Resume will sort and rank candidates for you, so thebest matches are right at the top, saving you time and effort.Spend accordingly. As budget managers remain cautious, leverage as many benefits as possible that attract andretain employees yet require minimal investment. Keep on top of what is most important to job seekers by leveragingMonster‟s free online resources at the Resource Center (http://hiring.monster.com.) The site offers actionable reportsand webinars covering the most current issues facing not only job seekers, but recruiters as well.MONSTER INSIGHTSAs the premier digital employment solution, Monster has consistently maintained a leadership position in defining anddriving innovative products and services to champion digital recruitment. We see tremendous value in providing ourclients, the online recruitment industry, and the public at large with analysis on both job seeker and employer behaviors,as well as general employment market trends. In direct response to our customers’ needs for strategic human capitalintelligence, Monster created an initiative, entitled Monster Insights, that is focused on providing business leaders andHR Executives real-time insight into market trends that will guide them in future recruitment planning.As a market leader, Monster is uniquely positioned to provide strategic information on employment trends to CorporateExecutives and Hiring Managers. These tools provide our customers with views into the labor market andcomprehensive information to further their employment strategy.More details are available at the Monster Resource Center at: http://hiring.monster.com/hr/hr-best-practices.aspx. Wewelcome your insight and comments on the monster intelligence reports and encourage you to let us know yourthoughts by providing feedback at Intelligence@monster.comMonster is the primary source of information for this report; it should only be interpreted as a definitive activity report onMonster and its subsidiaries. Monster’s in-depth data-driven approach improves on typical survey-based methodologiesby dramatically increasing the depth and breadth of information collected as well as by capturing actual behavior ratherthan intended behavior. Data is current through December 2011 unless otherwise indicated.Copyright @ 2012 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 16. 16Copyright @ 2012 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.