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2011 Washington, DC Job Conditions Report

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  • 1. LOCAL MARKETWASHINGTON D.C.2011 JOB CANDIDATESInsights and Analysis from Professionals,Recruiters and Hiring ManagersSponsored by:Brought to you by Monster Intelligence
  • 2. 2WASHINGTON D.C. – 2011 JOB CANDIDATESWith nearly one-quarter of its employment in the Government sector,Washington D.C.‟s economy and hiring conditions are driven by thelocal government presence as well as the professional sectors thatsupport it. As a result, the area did not experience the dips that otherregions did. Washington D.C. professionals should find improved jobopportunities in 2011 as Government and related opportunities expand.CNNMoney.com recently ranked Washington D.C. as one of the topfive states with shrinking unemployment, stating the region‟s “numbersshow a genuine rebound in the economy.” TABLE OF CONTENTSMonster leveraged more than 1.8 million Washington D.C. resumes Hiring Talent in 2011 3coupled with online job postings for Washington D.C. talent in order to Washington D.C. Talent 3gain insight into candidates and employers. Data is current through Career Talent 4December 2010 unless otherwise noted. Additionally, Monster Education Talent 4surveyed Washington D.C. professionals, HR professionals and hiring Experienced Talent 4managers to present a snapshot of activity within the United States on Job Search Conditions 5Monster. The surveys were conducted between November andDecember 2010. Market Conditions 6 Market Overview 6 Unemployment Rate 8 Payroll Change 8 Online Recruitment Trends 9 Recruitment Activity 10 Hiring Conditions 11 Supply and Demand Analysis 12 Labor Performance Matrix 14 Career Level Requirements 16 Education Level Requirements 16 Experience Requirements 16 Job Type Requirements 17About the Sponsor: Job Status Requirements 17 Qualifications and Benefits 18 Compensation 19 Conclusion 20For over 70 years, Yoh has provided the talent needed for the jobs and Monster Intelligence 20projects critical to our client‟s success, by providing comprehensiveworkforce solutions that focus on Aerospace and Defense,Engineering, Federal Services, Health Care, Life Sciences, InformationTechnology, and Telecommunications. Yoh fulfills immediate resourceneeds and delivers enterprise workforce solutions, including ManagedServices, Recruitment Process Outsourcing, Vendor ManagementSystems, Independent Contractor Compliance, Statement of Work andPayroll Services.For more information, visit www.yoh.com .Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 3. 3HIRING TALENT IN 2011Washington D.C. Talent SkillsThe following data analyzes the supply (resumes) of Listed in the chart below are the top skills madeWashington D.C. professionals on Monster. It provides available by Washington D.C. candidates on theira current picture of Washington D.C. talent availability Monster accounts. The list is full of technical skills,in the United States. including computer skills and software packages. The most popular soft skills include Leadership,Listed below are the top ten Washington D.C. Communications, and Organization.occupations in supply and their share of volume. Theseoccupations account for 89 percent of WashingtonD.C.‟s talent. Office and Administrative Support - 21% Management - 19% Computer and Mathematical - 18% Business and Financial Operations - 10% Sales and Related - 5% Architecture and Engineering - 4% Life, Physical, and Social Science - 4% Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media - 4% Healthcare Practitioners and Technical - 2% Installation, Maintenance, and Repair - 2%Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 4. 4The charts below give a detailed profile of Washington D.C. talent found on Monster including career experience,education level and work experience. Washington D.C. candidates found on Monster are typically Mid-Career with atleast a Bachelor‟s degree and have more than fifteen years of experience. Career LevelCareer TalentForty-seven percent of Washington D.C. job seekers in Student Executive2011 are Mid-Career. Thirty-one percent are Managers or Entry Level 8% 5%above while 22 percent are emerging into today‟s 14% Managerworkforce. 26% Mid Career 47% Education LevelEducation Talent CertificationFifty-nine percent of Washington D.C. job seekers in 2011 -Vocational Masters orhave at least a Bachelor‟s degree. Twenty-five percent have High School 4% Abovean Associate degree or some college experience. 12% 21% Associate/ Some- College 25% Bachelors 38% Years of Work ExperienceExperienced Talent More than 15 YearsThe majority (21 percent) of Washington D.C. job seekershave two to five years of experience. The second largest 10+ to 15 Yearsgroup has more than fifteen years of experience (20 7+ to 10 Yearspercent). 5+ to 7 Years 2+ to 5 Years 1+ to 2 Years Less than 1 Year 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25%Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 5. 5Job Search ConditionsIn a recent Monster survey of over 700 Washington D.C. professionals, respondents were asked if they were activelysearching for a new opportunity and why they were looking. The primary reason Washington D.C. professionals arelooking for a job is their salary is not as desired, reflecting widespread cutbacks during the economic downturn. Otherimportant reasons include seeking a career change and layoffs that occurred and continue to occur in Washington D.C.These responses show that despite improvements in the economy, uncertainly and frustration still exists.The top five reasons Washington D.C. professionals are searching for a job include: 1. Salary is not as desired (25 percent) 2. Seeking a career change (22 percent) 3. Layoffs occurring/occurred (22 percent) 4. Limited or no potential for upward mobility (19 percent) 5. Re-entering the workforce (16 percent)Factors less likely to drive candidates to look for a job were „business is closing‟ and „healthcare benefits not asdesired‟.Washington D.C. professionals report that they are Ability to Find Washington D. C. Jobsomewhat finding success in meeting their job Opportunities That Meet Requirementsexpectations and requirements. Forty-six percent are Poor Excellentfinding „Good‟ to „Excellent‟ conditions. 12% 15%Those respondents that reported „Average‟ to „Poor‟conditions were asked “What makes it challenging Fairlooking for a job”. The two primary reasons job seekers 11%had a difficult time finding Washington D.C. positionswere „getting an employer or recruiter to contact them‟and „finding a job that matches what they want (e.g.,salary, locations, etc.)‟. Good 31%From Monster‟s recent survey to Washington D.C. Averageprofessionals, the majority of respondents (67 percent) 31%are most comfortable with visiting online job boards tosearch for opportunities and post their resumes.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 6. 6Market ConditionsThe nation‟s capital, Washington, D.C. was sheltered from the worst of the economic downturn due to the area‟s strongreliance on the Government sector. After seeing only slight declines the past few years, the area‟s growth is now beingdriven by the rapid increase in Government job opportunities.Market OverviewGovernment roles represent a majority 23 percent of total employment in Washington D.C. Besides housing the federalgovernment, the region accommodates the numerous institutions with close government connections, including foreignembassies, headquarters for the World Bank and International Money Fund, trade unions, lobbying groups, andprofessional associations. Further, private companies from printing to technology support and garner from governmentbusiness; this leads to the second strongest employment group, Professional & Business Services, also representing 23percent of total employment.Non-government sectors include Education - with stalwart institutions including George Washington University andGeorgetown University, Healthcare - with Washington Hospital Center, and Tourism.1Washington, D.C.‟s real estate market has followed the city‟s employment pattern, proceeding through the recessionwith minor negative impact. In November, the region‟s S&P/Case-Schiller index, which tracks the value of single-familyhomes, dropped a slight 0.1 percent over the month and gained 3.5 percent over the year. It was one of only fourmarkets that reported positive year-over-year expansion.2In November 2010, Washington D.C. had 2.9 million employed, 184,300 unemployed, and a 6.0 percent unemploymentrate. Note that the Bureau of Labor Statistics figures included in this report represent the entire Washington D.C. region,including Arlington and Alexandria, Virginia and parts of Maryland and West Virginia. Analyzing the District of Columbiaon its own provides a very different picture since it is a commuter city; it has only 300,000 in the civilian workforce and amuch higher unemployment rate (9.8 percent in November).3Washington D.C.‟s key employment industries are the following: Industry Percent of Washington D.C. Employment Government 23% Professional & Business Services 23% Trade, Transportation & Utilities 13% Educational & Health Services 12% Leisure & Hospitality 9% Other Services 6% Construction 5% Finance 5% All other industries 4%1 Wikipedia.org2 Standard & Poors/Case-Schiller Home Price Indices, January 20113 Bureau of Labor Statistics, www.bls.govCopyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 7. 7Giving evidence of its solid and improving employment situation, Washington D.C. added 49,200 jobs or 1.7 percent ofits workforce from November 2009 to November 2010 compared to a loss of nearly 55,000 the prior year period.Professional & Business Services (+18,500) added the most jobs, followed by Trade, Transportation & Utilities(+14,900), Government (+10,900), and Leisure & Hospitality (+10,200).Moody‟s Economy.com December 2010 forecast predicts an improvement in job conditions over the next twelvemonths, with an expected two percent increase in jobs. The strongest percentage increase is expected in Construction(+7.1 percent).Washington, D.C.‟s 2011 employment picture is relatively positive, as the federal government sustains both thegovernment sector and the related professional employment. The economy and employment is expected to report slightto steady growth, putting the region in a unique position compared to most cities across the nation.Supporting the forecast of growth, a recent Monster survey of nearly 200 Washington D.C. recruiters and hiringmanagers asked “How many positions do they intend to fill in the next six months” and “What percent of the positionsthey expect to fill are new openings vs. replacement positions”. A majority of those hiring in the next six months arefilling a limited numbers of roles (50 percent plan to hire less than ten positions) and limited new roles (42 percent planthat less than 25 percent of positions will be new). Number of Washington D.C. New Openings versus Replacement Washington D.C. Positions to Fill in Next Six Months Positions 60% 30% 50% 40% 20% 30% 20% 10% 10% 0% 0% <10 11-50 >50 <10% 10% - 25% 25% - 50% 50% - 75% 75% - 100%Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 8. 8Unemployment RateThe unemployment rate in the Washington D.C. area remained low during the turbulent economic times the past fewyears, as well as has improved since its peak of 7.0 percent in January 2010. In December, the rate was 5.7 percent,down slightly from 6.0 percent the prior month. The area‟s unemployment rate is considerably stronger than the nation‟sDecember rate of 9.4 percent.The unemployment rate is a lagging measure that indicates both joblessness and strength of the economy. Nationalfigures are seasonally adjusted. Washington D.C. vs. National Unemployment Rate, % Dec07 - Dec10 11.0 9.0 7.0 5.0 3.0 Dec-07 Jun-08 Aug-08 Dec-08 Jun-09 Aug-09 Dec-09 Jun-10 Aug-10 Dec-10 Feb-08 Apr-08 Feb-09 Apr-09 Feb-10 Apr-10 Oct-08 Oct-09 Oct-10 Washington D.C. NationalPayroll ChangePayroll change has also remained above the national trend the past couple of years. Washington D.C.‟s payrollexpanded 1.9 percent in December. The nation‟s payroll has been expanding the last several months as well andreached positive 0.9 percent in December.Payroll change is a key measure of new job creation (or loss), as it measures the total number of people employed in anarea every month. Washington D.C. vs. National Payroll Growth, % YoY Dec07 - Dec10 4.0 2.0 0.0 -2.0 -4.0 -6.0 Feb-08 Feb-09 Feb-10 Dec-07 Oct-08 Dec-08 Oct-09 Dec-09 Oct-10 Dec-10 Jun-08 Aug-08 Jun-09 Aug-09 Jun-10 Aug-10 Apr-08 Apr-09 Apr-10 Washington D.C. NationalCopyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 9. 9Online Recruitment TrendsThe Monster Employment Index (MEI) is a leading indicator of labor market trends as it tracks online recruitment activityby location, occupation, and industry. As seen below, online job recruitment activity in the Washington D.C. metro areahas steadily improved during 2010 despite a slight slowdown typically seen over the holiday season. Though levelsremain far below 2007 and the first half of 2008, signs are positive that Washington D.C. employment is on the mend.  By the end of 2010, the Washington D.C. MEI gained 9 percent (+4 points) since a year prior or 29 percent (+11 points) from its January 2010 low point.  During December, seven of the 21 occupational categories monitored by the Washington D.C. Index showed reduced online demand for workers from a year ago. The largest losses was seen in Architecture and Engineering (-39 percent or -13 points) and Life, Physical, and Social Science (-32 percent or -20 points). The greatest improvements were seen in Construction and Extraction (+55 percent or +21 points) and Transportation and Material Moving (+51 percent or +32 points). Monster Employment Index Washington D.C. YoY Change 110.0 20% YoY Change, % 90.0 0% Index=100 70.0 -20% 50.0 -40% 30.0 -60% Jun-08 Jun-09 Jun-10 Aug-08 Aug-09 Aug-10 Dec-07 Feb-08 Apr-08 Dec-08 Feb-09 Apr-09 Dec-09 Feb-10 Apr-10 Dec-10 Oct-08 Oct-09 Oct-10 The Monster Employment Index presents a monthly snapshot of employer online recruitment activity nationwide for 28 of the largest metro areas, and is generally regarded as a key indicator of demand in the labor market. The Index is based on a real-time review of millions of employer job opportunities culled from a large, representative selection of corporate career sites and job boards, including Monster. Using a baseline value of 100, the Index can be used to compare hiring trends across local markets and occupational groups. As such, a higher Index figure means stronger growth in online job availability.Washington D.C. opportunities across all major online job boards have reported positive expansion following two difficultyears.4 Washington D.C. job postings in 2008 fell 8 percent and in 2009 dropped another 12 percent. Postings werepositive throughout 2010 resulting in a 12 percent gain for the year. Washington D.C. Total "New" Online Job Ads - Dec07 - Dec 10 Job Ads YoY Change Index=100, 2007 Average 150.0 30% 20% YoY Change, % 100.0 10% 0% 50.0 -10% -20% 0.0 -30% Dec-07 Jun-08 Aug-08 Dec-08 Jun-09 Aug-09 Dec-09 Jun-10 Aug-10 Dec-10 Feb-08 Apr-08 Feb-09 Apr-09 Feb-10 Apr-10 Oct-08 Oct-09 Oct-104 Wanted Technologies, Total New Online Ads, Dec ‟08-Dec‟10Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 10. 10Recruitment ActivityThe companies posting Washington D.C. jobs on Monster in 2010 varied across industries. Listed below are the toptwenty (out of nearly 800 industries) not including staffing or temporary employment agencies that may post for a varietyof industries. The top twenty industries posted 61 percent of the Washington D.C. jobs on Monster in 2010, with amajority (10%) in Accounting, Audit & Bookkeeping. 10% - Accounting, Audit & Bookkeeping 2% - Business Serviecs 6% - Computer Services 2% - Telephone Manufacturing 6% - Management Consulting 2% - Transportation, Communication & Utilities 6% - Computer Programming Services 1% - Commercial Physical Research 5% - Aeronatuical & Nautical System Manufacturing 1% - Insurance Agents, Brokers & Services 4% - Computer Sytem Design Services 1% - Telephone Communications 3% - Buiness Consulting 1% - Prepackaged Software 3% - Engineering 1% - Eating Places 3% - Job Training 1% - Radio & TV Manufacturing 2% - Aircraft Manufacturing 1% - Management ServicesThe types of roles Washington D.C. companies posted over the past year include opportunities primarily for IT (26%) aswell as Finance (19 percent) and Sales (10 percent).Washington D.C. Job Postings by Category % Total Job PostingsIT/Software Development 26%Accounting/Finance/Insurance 19%Sales/Retail/Business Development 10%Business/Strategic Management 7%Engineering 5%Administrative/Clerical 3%Project/Project Management 3%Medical/Health 3%Legal 3%Human Resources 2%All Other 19%Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 11. 11Hiring ConditionsSurveyed recruiters predict filling Washington D.C. roles will move fairly quickly. Nearly half (46 percent) of respondentsexpect it will take an average 31 to 60 days to fill a position and 37 percent predict each opportunity will take fewer than30 days. 17 percent plan hiring will take more than 60 days.With the excess of candidates looking for work, it is no surprise that recruiters are having a relatively easy time findingqualified candidates. A very strong 78 percent of respondents said their ability to find Washington D.C. candidates was“Good” to “Excellent”.Those few respondents that reported „Average‟ to „Poor‟conditions were asked “What makes it hard to find Ability to Find Washington D.C. Professionalscandidates”. The primary reason recruiters and hiring That Meet Requirementsmanagers had a difficult time recruiting for Washington Fair PoorD.C. positions was „time required to hire‟, most likely due 5% 1%to the surplus of resumes that they must review to find Average 16% Excellentthe ideal candidate. The next three challenge areas were 33%„unclear job descriptions‟, „nothing‟ and „increasedworkload‟.When looking at the challenges of the candidatesthemselves, responses reveal that recruiters arefrustrated with the types of candidates they are seeingand the fact that they cannot offer them adequate Goodcompensation. The most popular responses were „not 45%enough candidates‟, „under-qualified candidates‟, and„compensation below candidate expectation‟.Recruiters noted the top five areas with planned hiring in Washington D.C. include: 1. IT (45 percent) 2. Sales (32 percent) 3. Engineering (27 percent) 4. Administrative Support (16 percent) 5. Accounting (11 percent)Looking at the methods Washington D.C.‟s recruiters and hiring managers use to recruit talent; most respondents (87percent) are most comfortable with going to online job boards to source candidates.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 12. 12Supply and Demand AnalysisThe Washington D.C. area encompasses counties in the states of Maryland, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Virginia.A comparison of Monster job seekers searching for employment in the market compared to the volume of job postingsin the area reveals higher supplies of talent in the counties of Berkeley in West Virginia and Page and Stafford inVirginia, denoted by the darker green areas in the map below. Recruitment for candidates in Falls Church City andArlington in Virginia and the District of Columbia, noted in light green, may be more competitive as the ratio of resumesper job posting is comparatively low.The types of roles these candidates are seeking span a wide range of areas with the highest volume targetingIT/Software Development (25%), Accounting/Finance/Insurance (18 percent), and Sales/Retail/Business Development(10 percent). IT dominates one-quarter of the categories for both seekers and recruiters.Washington D.C. Job Seekers by Category % Total Job SeekersIT/Software Development 25%Accounting/Finance/Insurance 18%Sales/Retail/Business Development 10%Business/Strategic Management 6%Engineering 5%Administrative/Clerical 4%Project/Program Management 3%Medical/Heath 3%Legal 3%Human Resources 2%All Other 21%Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 13. 13The remainder of this report will focus on key Washington D.C. professions and how supply and demand measures upwhen recruiting for this multifaceted talent pool. Employers Job Seekers 1. Secretaries/Administrative 1. Computer Software Engineers, 9% Assistants, 8% 2. Accountants/Auditors, 6% 2. Computer Software Engineers, 6% 3. Financial Analysts/Advisors, 5% 3. General/Operations Managers, 5% 4. Financial Managers, 4% 4. Computer Systems Analysts, 3% 5. Human Resource Specialists, 3% 5. Other Managers, 3% 6. General/Operations Managers, 3% 6. Marketing/Sales Managers, 3% 7. Computer Systems Analysts, 3% 7. Network/Computer Systems 8. Network/Computer Systems Administrators, 2% Administrators, 3% 8. Computer/IS Managers, 2% 9. Budget Analysts, 3% 9. Financial Analysts/Advisors, 2% 10. Marketing/Sales Managers, 3% 10. Human Resources Specialists, 2% ● ● ● ● ● ●Over one-third of the talent supply (37 percent) and demand (43 percent) in Washington D.C. are for the top tenoccupation clusters provided above. Seven of the top ten opportunities in demand may be found among the topcandidates in supply. Plan for extra time to weed through the excess of resumes and seek prospects to transitioncandidates into other opportunities.Listed below are the top 20 out of over 2,700 job titles in which Washington D.C. job seekers are interested. These 20job titles accounted for 23 percent of the Washington D.C. talent. The list is dominated by IT, administrative andmanager roles. # Job Titles (1-10) # Job Titles (11-20) 1 Administrative Assistant 11 Business Systems Analyst 2 Project Manager 12 Sr. Software Engineer 3 General Manager 13 Office Manager 4 Software Engineer 14 Assistant Manager 5 Executive Administrative Assistant 15 Research Assistant 6 Customer Service Representative 16 Receptionist 7 Financial Analyst 17 General Director 8 Sales Representative 18 Consultant 9 Office and Administrative Support Workers, Other 19 Programmer Analyst 10 Program Manager 20 AccountantCopyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 14. 14The top 20 (out of more than 2,700 titles) Washington D.C. job titles posted on Monster.com from January 2010 toDecember 2010 were dominated by IT, financial and administrative positions and accounted for 23 percent of all jobtitles. # Job Titles (1-10) # Job Titles (11-20) 1 Budget Analyst 11 Sr. Tax Accountant 2 Finance Manager 12 Loan Officer 3 Software Engineer 13 Lead Lawson Integration Engineer 4 Government Contracts Specialist 14 Visual Basic Programmer 5 Contract Administrator 15 Sr. Software Engineer 6 Auditor 16 Sales Representative 7 Financial Analyst 17 Intelligence Analyst 8 Sr. Accountant 18 Sr. Financial Analyst 9 Technical Recruiter 19 Security Administrator 10 Accountant 20 Controller Labor Performance Matrix The Labor Performance Matrix below and on the next page compares job posting and resume performance within the key Washington D.C. occupation clusters. The size of the circle represents the supply, based on the ratio of resumes per job from January 2010 through December 2010. A large circle indicates a large pool of talent in comparison to the demand, and a smaller circle represents areas where the demand may outweigh the supply. How to Read the Matrix: Talent Surplus Not enough jobs to match supply Plan for increased volume of candidates Focus on skills migration Incubator Opportunities (Growth Areas) High growth potential High Performance High growth in jobs and talent Focus on keeping talent Talent Shortage Not enough talent to meet demand At risk for competitionCopyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 15. 15Talent SurplusThe Administrative and Sales categories sit in the Talent Surplus quadrant when comparied to other occupations in theWashington D.C. area. These occupations have a high supply of seekers and a low volume of job postings for themarket. Administrative has a particularly strong surplus of candidates indicated by the size of the circle. The Marketingand Customer Service categories are close to entering this quadrant with a growing abundance of resumes.Incubator Opportunities (Growth Areas)The growth occupations span a wide range of occupations, many of them tending towards the Talent Surplus area.These areas are prime for job opportunity expansion.High PerformanceIT is in the High Performance quadrant and dominates the supply and demand in Washington, D.C. Finance is also inthis area, but closer to the Talent Shortage quadrant. The circles‟ small size indicates demand might outweigh supply.As the economy and employment opportunities expand, ensure programs are in place to keep existing talent andknowledge pool. Plan additional time for recruiting talent into thse positions and look towards realigning trainingprograms to ensure prompt transition of new hirers.Talent ShortageThere are no occupations in the Talent Shortage quadrant, supporting the fact that there is a current suplus ofcandidates and lack of opportunities in the market.The matrix below summarizes occupational supply and demand from January 2010 through December 2010. Talent Surplus High Performance Zone Incubator Talent Shortage ZoneCopyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 16. 16In the following analysis, we compare Washington D.C.‟s talent demand (job postings) with talent supply (resumes)across a range of characteristics. The comparisons reveal the similarities and disparities between the available jobs andthe searching seekers. This analysis provides direction for recruiters and employers in setting their expectations anddevelopment areas.Career LevelA vast majority of job postings (70 percent) are for Mid-level candidates, compared to 47 percent of availableseekers. This disparity is typical and indicates recruiterscould have a difficult time hiring, as an excess of underand over-qualified candidates are in the market.Education LevelWashington D.C. recruiters primarily seek candidates withat most a Bachelor‟s Degree (74 percent), while only 38percent of seekers have at most a Bachelor‟s. As moreseekers than opportunities fall in the Master‟s/Doctorateand Associate/Some College education level, recruitersmight have to settle for an under or over-qualifiedcandidate, potentially causing frustration and conflict. Notethe relatively high percentage of Master‟s/Doctoratecandidates (21%), supporting the area‟s highly educatedworkforce.Experience Level As shown in the chart to the right, Washington D.C.employers are currently seeking to fill roles for those intheir early to mid-career; a majority 61% percent ofpostings are for individuals with 2 to 7 years of experience.Seekers on the other hand are more distributed, withconcentration in 2 to 5 years (21%) and more than 15years (20%) of experience.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 17. 17Job Type RequirementsEighteen percent of 2010 Washington D.C. online positions on Monster are for temporary/contract work while 19percent of seekers are open to temporary, contract, intern, and seasonal work. Temporary work typically grows thefastest as the economy improves due to employers hiring conservatively for the short-term. With 79 percent of jobseekers desiring permanent employment and 21 percent willing to step into either a perment or temporary role,employers should be able to support current hiring needs for this requirement.Job Status RequirementsEmployers should find adequate supply based on employment status: 97 percent of job postings are for full-timeemployment and 3 percent for part-time, while 84 percent of candidates are open to full-time employment, 2 percent forpart-time, and 14 percent for either.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 18. 18Qualifications and BenefitsAs employers look through reams of resumes, the most important qualifications Washington D.C. professionals placethe greatest importance on when applying for opportunities is years of work experience (72 percent) and type(s) of workexperience (69 percent). Recruiters agree that the type of work experience and years of experience is critical in theevaluation of Washington D.C. candidates. When asked “What were the most important qualifications in recruitingWashington D.C. talent”, hirers responded types of work experience (91 percent) and years of work experience (86percent) followed closely by personality/cultural fit (75 percent).Listed below are the most important factors Washington D.C. professionals consider when evaluating a job opportunity.Note that these characteristics have been influenced by the recessionary economy and corporate scandals over thepast few years, as „salary‟ and „stability of position‟ ranked in first and second, respectively.Recruiters were also asked how they would rate the same list of factors in terms of their importance to recruiting talent.Respondents agree that salary, a company‟s reputation and stability of the position are key to landing top talent.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 19. 19CompensationWashington D. C. recruiters appear to be offering notably higher compensation than seekers are requiring, givingencouragement that recruiters can easily satisfy a potential recruit. The median salary offered in 2010 was $85,000 andthe median salary candidates were seeking was $60,000. (Please note these salary requirements may represent totalcompensation for some job seekers and only a base salary for others.)A majority of Washington D.C. job postings on Monster offer a salary in excess of $100,000 (30 percent) while jobseekers requirements are concentrated in the $20-60,000 range (28 percent $40-60,000 and 23 percent $20-40,000).The most significant disparity between recruiters and seekers is at $60,000, where 75 percent of recruiters offer at least$60,000 and only 48 percent of candidates are requiring that amount.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 20. 20Diversify Your Recruitment Strategy in 2011As the nation emerges from its downturn, recruiters should keep in mind the following points when planning for the next12-months.Network to strengthen your brand: Networking has always been a fundamental aspect of establishing a presenceand sourcing candidates. Todays recruiters must actively network across the Internet to get a more holistic view of theapplicant. With Monster’s 20 network communities integrated into its core site, experts are better able to help individualsaccess advice from industry experts and keep on top of trends. These communities also offer employers access to apool of targeted candidates.Play a smart matching game. Have processes and paper work in place, be diligent about screening, and communicatefrequently with hiring managers. Many recruiters are using technology to help quickly match candidates to jobs andeliminate unqualified applicants. Monster’s semantic 6Sense™ search technology powers our Power Resume Searchapplication, sorting and ranking candidates so the best are at the top. Using these types of sorting programs, recruiterssave time and money sourcing candidates that precisely match their positions.Spend accordingly. As budget managers remain cautious, leverage as many benefits as possible that attract andretain employees yet require minimal investment. Keep on top of what is most important to job seekers by leveragingMonster’s free online resources at the Resource Center (http://hiring.monster.com.) The site offers actionable reportsand webinars covering the most current issues facing not only job seekers, but recruiters as well.Monster IntelligenceAs the premier digital employment solution, Monster has consistently maintained a leadership position in defining anddriving innovative products and services to champion digital recruitment. We see tremendous value in providing ourclients, the online recruitment industry, and the public at large with analysis on both job seeker and employer behaviors,as well as general employment market trends. In direct response to our customers‟ needs for strategic human capitalintelligence, Monster created an initiative, entitled Monster Intelligence, that is focused on providing business leadersand HR Executives real-time insight into market trends that will guide them in future recruitment planning.As a market leader, Monster is uniquely positioned to provide strategic information on employment trends to CorporateExecutives and Hiring Managers. These tools provide our customers with views into the labor market andcomprehensive information to further their employment strategy.More details are available at the Monster Resource Center at: http://hiring.monster.com/hr/hr-best-practices.aspx. Wewelcome your insight and comments on the Monster Intelligence reports and encourage you to let us know yourthoughts by providing feedback at Intelligence@monster.comMonster is the primary source of information for this report; it should only be interpreted as a definitive activity report onMonster and its subsidiaries. Monster‟s in-depth data-driven approach improves on typical survey-based methodologiesby dramatically increasing the depth and breadth of information collected as well as by capturing actual behavior ratherthan intended behavior. Data is current through December, 2010 unless otherwise indicated.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 21. 21Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.