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2011 Engineering Jobs & Careers Report

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The Engineering Job Conditions Report offers a comprehensive view of the Engineering job market. This study highlights online job postings and candidate resume activity across the United States and …

The Engineering Job Conditions Report offers a comprehensive view of the Engineering job market. This study highlights online job postings and candidate resume activity across the United States and focuses on Engineering professionals and recruiters looking to hire Engineering talent.

Gain insight on online recruitment trends, supply and demand conditions, and how job seeker characteristics mesh against employer needs. Plus, see what Engineering professionals reveal about their careers in Engineering, job search obstacles, and most valued skills and qualifications.

This report provides:

A look at recruiters and hiring managers and their plans for acquiring Engineering talent in 2011
Insight on Engineering professionals and their careers, job search obstacles and valued qualifications and skills

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  • 1. UNITED STATESENGINEERING2011 JOB CANDIDATESInsights and Analysis from Professionals,Recruiters and Hiring ManagersBrought to you by Monster Intelligence
  • 2. 2ENGINEERING – 2011 JOB CANDIDATESThe Engineering sector is showing positive signs for 2011. Online jobpostings are on the rise. The Bureau of Labor Statistics forecasts theoccupation to grow 11% by 2018. Recruiters are having an adequatetime filling roles and meeting employer requirements. Compensationlevels are high. “In an economy that‟s struggled over the last few yearsand is slowly making its way back, engineering has consistently been a 1promising field and it looks to only get better.”Despite the positive momentum, the industry‟s primary challenge lies ineducating and training sufficient candidates to meet employerexpectations. Skills and disciplines are constantly evolving. The TABLE OF CONTENTScandidate pool is well-educated, yet has a surplus of more seniorcandidates. The world is becoming increasingly Engineering-focused Hiring Talent in 2011 3and the U.S. risks lagging behind. Engineering Talent 3 Career Talent 5The report details hiring conditions, market conditions, and talent Education Talent 5supply and talent demand comparisons to provide an in-depth look at Experienced Talent 5the evolving Engineering sector. States and Major Markets 6 Job Search Conditions 7Monster leveraged more than 1.2 million Engineering resumes coupledwith online job postings for talent across the United States in order to Market Conditions 8gain insight into candidates and employers. Data is current through Market Overview 8March 2011 unless otherwise noted. Additionally, Monster surveyed Online Recruitment Trends 10active Engineering professionals, HR professionals and hiring Recruitment Activity 11managers to present a snapshot of activity within the United States. Hiring Conditions 12The surveys were conducted between November and December 2010. Supply and Demand Analysis 13 Labor Performance Matrix 15 Career Level Requirements 17 Education Level Requirements 17 Experience Requirements 17 Job Type Requirements 18 Job Status Requirements 18 Qualifications and Benefits 19 Compensation 20 Conclusion 21 Monster Intelligence 211Balderrama, Anthony. “Industries to Watch: Engineering” AOL Jobs. 1/27/11.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 3. 3HIRING TALENT IN 2011Engineering Talent SkillsThe following data analyzes the supply (resumes) of Listed in the chart below are the top skills madeEngineering professionals on Monster nationwide. It available by Engineering candidates on theirprovides a current picture of key Engineering job seeker Monster accounts. The list is full of specificavailability in the United States. technical skills, including computer skills, software packages, and Engineering-related terms.The top Engineering occupations in supply are fairlydiversified, with the top 10 representing 81 percent ofall candidates. Electical and Electronics Engineers - 16% Mechanical Engineers - 10% Engineering Managers - 9% Industrial Engineers - 8% Engineers, All Other - 8% Computer Hardware Engineers - 8% Electrical and Electronic Engineering Technicians - 6% Industrial Engineering Technicians - 6% Civil Engineers - 5% Materials Engineers - 5%Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 4. 4In a recent Monster survey of more than 1,000 Engineering professionals and 300 Engineering employers, respondentswere asked “Which of the following „hard‟ skills are most in supply/demand when looking for the ideal Engineeringjob/candidate?” Hard skills are technical requirements of a job or activity that are teachable, often requiring on-the-jobtraining or more formal education such as that provided by a college or university.The two key Engineering hard skills referenced by more than 60 percent of employer respondents were ProjectMangement and Design. Consistent with the top skills in supply referenced on the prior page, Engineering professionalshighly ranked Project Management, Microsoft Products and Design.Engineering professionals and employers were each asked “Which of the following „soft‟ skills are most insupply/demand when looking for the ideal Engineering job/candidate?”Engineering professionals and employers agree that Problem Solving is a key success factor (63 percent and 72percent, respectively). Professionals rank Teamwork and Communication next in importance for Engineering roleswhile recruiters rank Self-Confidence and Work Ethic. Note that Leadership is one of the least important soft skill torecruiters, but was ranked fourth by candidates.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 5. 5The charts below give a detailed profile of Engineering job seekers found on Monster including career experience,education level and work experience. Engineering candidates found on Monster are typically Mid-Career with at least aBachelor‟s degree and more than fifteen years of experience.Career TalentA steep 57 percent of Engineering job seekers are Career LevelMid-Career. Twenty-five percent are Managers or Student Executiveabove while 18 percent are emerging into today‟s 5% 2% Entry Level Managerworkforce. 13% 23% Mid Career 57%Education Talent Education LevelEngineering seekers are an educated group. Sixty- Certificationeight percent of Engineering job seekers have at -Vocationalleast a Bachelor‟s degree. Twenty-seven percent High School 4% Masters orhave an Associate degree or Some-college Associate/ 5% Aboveexperience. Some- 24% College 27% Bachelors 44% Years of Work ExperienceExperienced Talent More than 15 YearsA majority of Engineering job seekers are seasonedprofessionals. A strong 44 percent have over 10 10+ to 15 Yearsyears of experience while 17 percent have 2 to 5 7+ to 10 Yearsyears of experience. 5+ to 7 Years 2+ to 5 Years 1+ to 2 Years Less than 1 Year 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30%Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 6. 6States and Major MarketsDetailing Engineering resumes by state shows the strong population of job seekers in California and Texas, as well ason the East coast. In order of volume, the states with the most active Engineering resumes are California, Texas,Florida, Michigan and Ohio; each has over 5 percent of all Engineering job seeker resumes.The top 20 markets account for 58 percent of all Engineering job seeker resumes. Los Angeles and New York City havethe strongest concentration of candidates, each with a 6 percent share. Engineering Resumes on Monster.com, May 10 - Apr 11 Top 20 U.S. Markets - Highest Volume 6% 6% 5% 5% 4% 4% 4% 3% 3% 3% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 1% 1% 1% Dallas Denver Cleveland Houston Orlando Chicago Phoenix Minneapolis Raleigh- Seattle Los Angeles Tampa Boston Atlanta New York San Francisco Philadelphia Washington San Diego Detroit, MI Durham D.C.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 7. 7Job Search ConditionsThe primary reason Engineering professionals are looking for a job is due to layoffs that occurred and continue to occur,which shows that despite improvements in the economy, uncertainly still exists. The second most popular response wasundesirable salary, suggesting that many professionals have accepted or maintained positions below their worth tomaintain employment through difficult times. As more jobs become available many may leave current employment toseek higher compensation.The top five reasons Engineering professionals are searching for a job include: 1. Layoffs occurring/occurred (24 percent) 2. Salary is not as desired (16 percent) 3. Re-entering the workforce (16 percent) 4. Limited or no potential for upward mobility (13 percent) 5. Relocating/moving (12 percent)Factors less likely to drive candidates to look for a job were „relationship with peer‟, „relationship with manager‟, and„healthcare benefits are not as desired‟.Engineering professionals report that they aresomewhat finding success in meeting their jobexpectations and requirements. A solid 44 percent arefinding „Good‟ to „Excellent‟ conditions.Those respondents that reported „Average‟ to „Poor‟conditions were asked “What makes it challenginglooking for a job?”The three primary reasons job seekers had a difficulttime finding Engineering positions were „finding a jobthat matches what they want (e.g., salary, locations,etc.)‟, „getting an employer or recruiter to contact them‟,and „too few jobs‟.From Monster‟s recent survey to Engineeringprofessionals, the majority of respondents (68 percent)are most comfortable with going to online job boards tosearch for opportunities and post their resume.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 8. 8Market ConditionsThe economic downturn in 2009 negatively impacted the Engineering occupation as firms were forced to cut theirbudgets, reduce research and design initiatives, and institute layoffs. 2010 brought constrained and variable growth.Initial indications for 2011 are positive, yet can vary widely across the array of Engineering disciplines.Market OverviewEngineers‟ primary job, defined by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), is to “apply the principles of science andmathematics to develop economical solutions to technical problems.” Engineers offer critical skills to develop productand infrastructure, provide manufacturing solutions, cut costs, innovate, improve the environment, and advance newtechnology. The field is incredibly wide and diverse; the BLS identifies 17 engineering specialties, each with numeroussubdivisions.There are several factors influencing Engineering occupations today: The constant need for the design and development of new products and technology, including the push for more efficient processes to enhance profitability and competitiveness Continued population growth demands more infrastructure, food, energy and clean water, each of which engineers are tasked with developing Related to population growth, is the expanding aging population which requires increased medical care and medical products, spurring the growth in particular of Biomedical Engineers Expanding concern for our environment, driving for example the investigation of solar energy, minimizing environmental hazards, and making products and processes safe International competition is stunting U.S. job expansion, in particular for Computer Hardware, Electrical and Electronics EngineersIn 2008, approximately 36 percent of engineering jobs were in manufacturing industries, 30 percent in professional,scientific and technical service industries, 12 percent in government roles, and the remainder divided among 2construction, telecommunications, wholesale trade and other industries.Engineering remains one of the highest paying occupations. The National Association of Colleges and Employersrecent 2010 survey ranked Engineering roles in eight of the top 10 highest paying majors (each of them in excess of$57,000) as well as noted that select Engineering roles had some of the largest year-over-year salary increases (for 3example, Electrical Engineer offers were up 4.4 percent to $61,690), an encouraging sign for the sector.Contributing to the high salaries is the sector‟s constant shortage of qualified candidates. The PresidentialAdministration has taken a strong initiative to develop the nation‟s critical “STEM” (Science, Technology, Engineering,and Mathematics) occupations by exposing grade school children at an early age, better training teachers, and 4providing more hands-on education.Related to candidate shortage is the U.S.‟s Engineering brain drain. Not only are foreign nationals coming to the U.S. forEngineering education and then heading back to their home countries (more than 50 percent of Engineering doctoraldegrees are awarded to foreign nationals), but also many countries are rapidly escalating their own Engineeringprograms, meaning fewer foreign nationals could eventually come to the U.S. for education.As comparison, one-third of U.S. bachelor degrees are in Science and Engineering compared to 63 percent in Japanand 56 percent in China. “The blunt truth is that unless we produce more STEM-capable workers, U.S. technology 4leaders will be forced to offshore more high-tech jobs and with them, our best shot at keeping America competitive.”2 Bureau of Labor Statistics3 Hopkins, Katy. “Brighter Job Outlook for Class of 2011.” Usnews.com. 3/9/11.4 The STEM Lab Report’s “STEM and the Workforce of the Future.” November 2010.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 9. 9Despite the challenges that the industry faces, long term prospects are positive. According to the BLS, engineers held1.6 million jobs in 2008 and employment opportunities are forecasted to grow 11% to 1.8 million by 2016. The chartbelow shows the five top engineering disciplines, which represent 65% of the total engineering field. Key Engineering Occupations 2008 2018 % Growth Civil Engineers 278 346 +24% Mechanical Engineers 239 253 +6% Industrial Engineers 215 245 +14% Electrical Engineers 158 161 +2% Electronics Engineers, except Computers 144 144 +0% TOTAL ALL ENGINEERING OCCUPATIONS 1,572 1,750 +11%Out of the total 178,000 engineering jobs created from 2008 to 2018, the greatest number of new jobs will be for CivilEngineers (67,600) and Industrial Engineers (30,600).Another encouraging detail for the occupation, U.S. News & World Report recently listed the best 50 U.S. careers for2011 and four of them (Biomedical Engineer, Civil Engineer, Computer Software Engineer, and EnvironmentalEngineering Technician) were engineering-related careers. These careers were ranked strongly based on theirexpected growth (at the top, Biomedical Engineers are forecasted to increase an extraordinary 72% over the nextdecade, from 16,000 to 27,600 as the aging baby boom generation requires more medical procedures and medicalinnovation), good pay, and varied educational requirements.With business and consumer confidence reviving in 2011, Engineering roles will evolve as well. The sector will need toaddress the candidate shortages over the long term, including working with universities, local education programs andassociations to ensure a full pipeline of trained Engineering candidates, as well as work to continually educate and honethe skills of those already in the workforce.A recent Monster survey of nearly 350 Engineering recruiters and hiring managers supports the constrained optimism.The respondents were asked “How many Engineering positions do you intend to fill in the next six months?” and “Whatpercent of the Engineering positions you expect to fill are new openings versus replacement positions?”A majority of those hiring in the next six months are filling a limited numbers of roles (64 percent plan to hire less thanten positions). Further, employers are filling a minimal amount of new roles, as 46 percent plan that less than 25 percentof positions will be new versus replacement ones.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 10. 10Online Recruitment TrendsThe Monster Employment Index (MEI) is a leading indicator of labor market trends as it tracks online recruitment activityby location, occupation, and industry. As seen below, each of the three indices noted here (National, Architecture &Engineering, and Information) reported positive momentum in 2010 followed by a cautious December or January dipand then improved performance in February and March 2011. The Architecture & Engineering MEI follows online job postings for a wide selection of architects, drafters and engineers. The Index rose 5 points (+5 percent) from February to March 2011 but gained an impressive 13 points (+15 percent) year-over-year. It hit its low point of 73 in July 2009. The Information MEI, which is an industry group that includes technology, as well as other information sectors such as publishing, motion picture, broadcasting, and telecommunications, reported similar trends. The Index gained 3 points (+4 percent) both month-over-month and year-over-year in March 2011. The Information Index hit its low point of 67 in July 2009. Monster Employment Index National Arch/Eng (Occupation) Information (Industry) 190 170 150 130 110 90 70 50 Jan-09 Jan-10 Jan-11 Jul-08 Mar-08 Mar-09 Jul-09 Mar-10 Jul-10 Mar-11 Sep-09 Sep-08 Sep-10 May-08 Nov-08 May-09 Nov-09 May-10 Nov-10 The Monster Employment Index presents a monthly snapshot of employer online recruitment activity nationwide for 28 of the largest metro areas, and is generally regarded as a key indicator of demand in the labor market. The Index is based on a real- time review of millions of employer job opportunities culled from a large, representative selection of corporate career sites and job boards, including Monster. Using a baseline value of 100, the Index can be used to compare hiring trends across local markets and occupational groups. As such, a higher Index figure means stronger growth in online job availability.Engineering opportunities across all major online job boards have reported positive expansion following two difficult 5years. Job postings in 2008 fell 6 percent and in 2009 dropped 36 percent. After declining the first two months, jobpostings reported positive growth for the remainder of 2010, ending the year with a 33 percent gain. The first quarter of2011 job advertisements continued the positive trend with a 54 percent increase over the prior year. Engineering Total "New" Online Job Ads - Mar 08 - Mar 10 Job Ads YoY Change Index=100, 2008 Average 120.0 100% 100.0 YoY Change, % 50% 80.0 60.0 0% 40.0 -50% 20.0 0.0 -100% May-08 Sep-08 May-09 Sep-09 May-10 Sep-10 Jul-08 Jan-09 Jul-09 Jan-10 Jul-10 Jan-11 Nov-08 Nov-09 Nov-10 Mar-08 Mar-09 Mar-10 Mar-115 Wanted Technologies, Total New Online Ads, Jan ’09-Jan’11Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 11. 11Recruitment ActivityA variety of companies are seeking Engineering professionals on Monster. Listed below are the top ten (out of morethan nearly 800 industries) not including staffing or temporary employment agencies that may post for a variety ofindustries. The industries span a wide range and the top ten only represent 34 percent of the Engineering jobs onMonster from April 2010 to March 2011. 11% - Engineering Services 2% - Business Consulting 4% - Semiconductors and Related 2% - Management Consulting Services 3% - Highway and Street 2% - Computer Programming Construction Services 3% - Search and Navigation 2% - Accounting, Auditing, Equipment Bookkeeping 3% - Radiotelephone 2% - Commercial Physical and Communications Biological ResearchThe types of roles Engineering companies posted from April 2010 to March 2011 include roles primarily forElectrical/Electronics Engineering (25 percent), Mechanical Engineering (17 percent), and Industrial/ManufacturingEngineering (15 percent). Engineering Job Postings by Category % Total Job Postings Electrical/Electronics Engineering 25% Mechanical Engineering 17% Industrial/Manufacturing Engineering 15% Systems/Process Engineering 10% CAD/Drafting 6% Civil & Structural Engineering 5% RF/Wireless Engineering 5% Energy/Nuclear Engineering 4% Aeronautic/Avionic Engineering 4% Chemical Engineering 3% All Other 6%Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 12. 12Hiring ConditionsRecruiters surveyed by Monster are taking time to sort through the Engineering candidates to land the ideal employee.Recruiters predict more than half (54 percent) of opportunities will take an average of 31 to 60 days to fill. Thirty percentof respondents expect opportunities to take more than 60 days to fill and 15 percent plan for less than 30 days.With the excess of candidates looking for work, recruiters are having a relatively easy time finding qualified candidates.61 percent of respondents said their ability to find Engineering candidates was „Good‟ to „Excellent‟, though mostresponses were concentrated in „Good‟ (46 percent).The minority of respondents that reported „Average‟to „Poor‟ conditions were asked “What makes it Ability to Find Engineering Professionalshard to find candidates?” to Meet Requirements Poor Fair ExcellentThe primary reason recruiters and hiring managers 3% 7% 15%had a difficult time recruiting for Engineering talentis the „time required to hire‟. Extra time is requiredto sort through the various skills and experiences ofcandidate resumes and match them to therequirements of the position. Additionally, increasedworkloads and unclear job descriptions from hiring Averagemanagers were also noted as causing delays. 29%When looking at the challenges of the candidatesthemselves, responses were few and varied. Somehirers noted there were „under qualified Goodcandidates‟, „not enough candidates‟, and 46%„compensation below candidate expectations‟.Recruiters noted the top five Engineering areas withplanned hiring include: 1. Electrical (54 percent) 2. Mechanical (54 percent) 3. Manufacturing (39 percent) 4. Computer (28 percent) 5. Industrial (19 percent)From Monster‟s recent survey to Engineering recruiters and hiring managers, a majority of respondents (78 percent) aremost comfortable with going to online job boards to source candidates, where a majority of candidates are posting theirresumes.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 13. 13Supply and Demand AnalysisBelow is a comparison of Monster job seekers searching for employment in the Engineering segment compared to thevolume of Engineering job postings by state. The dark green areas reveal higher supplies of candidates; these statesinclude Florida, Mississippi, New Hampshire, and Georgia. Recruitment for candidates in lighter green areas such asWashington D.C., Wisconsin, Iowa, and Wyoming, where the ratio of resumes per job posting is lower than in otherareas, may have more competitive hiring conditions.The types of roles these candidates are seeking span a range of Engineering disciplines with the highest volumetargeting Electrical/Electronics (16 percent) and Industrial/Manufacturing (15 percent). Engineering Job Seekers by Category % Total Resumes Electrical/Electronics Engineering 16% Industrial/Manufacturing Engineering 15% Mechanical Engineering 13% CAD/Drafting 11% Systems/Process Engineering 9% Aeronautic/Avionic Engineering 7% Energy/Nuclear Engineering 7% Civil & Structural Engineering 6% RF/Wireless Engineering 5% Environmental and Geological Engineering 5% All Other 6%Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 14. 14The remainder of this report will focus on key Engineering professions and how supply and demand measures up whenrecruiting for this multifaceted talent pool. Employers Job Seekers 1. Electrical/Electronics Engineers, 16% 1. Electrical/Electronics Engineers, 17% 2. Mechanical Engineers, 10% 2. Industrial Engineers, 12% 3. Engineering Managers, 9% 3. Engineering Managers, 10% 4. Industrial Engineers, 8% 4. Engineers, All Other, 8% 5. Engineers, All Other, 8% 5. Mechanical Engineers, 7% 6. Computer Hardware Engineers, 8% 6. Electrical/Electronic Eng Tech, 6% 7. Electrical/Electronic Eng Tech, 6% 7. Computer Hardware Engineers, 5% 8. Industrial Engineering Technicians, 6% 8. Industrial Engineering Technicians, 5% 9. Civil Engineers, 5% 9. Civil Engineers, 4% ● ● ● ● ● ●The top nine occupations in the job seeker occupation list above are the exact same titles, though in slightly differentorder, as the employer occupation list. The occupations are not concentrated in one key occupation, but are distributedamong these top roles. The nine occupations noted above account for 76 percent of all talent supply and 74 percent ofall talent demand.Listed below are the top 20 out of over 150 Engineering job titles in which job seekers are interested. These 20 job titlesaccount for 62 percent of the Engineering talent. # Job Titles (1-10) # Job Titles (11-20) 1 Mechanical Engineer 11 Civil Engineer 2 Electronics Technician 12 Project Analyst 3 Hardware Test Engineer 13 Mechanical Engineering Technician 4 Electrical Engineer 14 Industrial Engineer 5 Quality Assurance Technician 15 Civil Design Technician 6 Project Engineer 16 Telecommunications Network Engineer 7 Manufacturing Engineer 17 Safety Specialist 8 Engineers, Other 18 Electrical Engineering Manager 9 Engineering Manager 19 Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Other 10 Process Engineer 20 Engineering DirectorCopyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 15. 15The top 20 Engineering specific job titles posted on Monster.com from April 2010 to March 2011 are listed below andaccount for 57 percent of Engineering opportunities. # Job Titles (1-10) # Job Titles (11-20) 1 Engineering Manager 11 Sanitary Engineer 2 Electrical Engineer 12 Manufacturing Engineer 3 Mechanical Engineer 13 Petroleum Engineer 4 Electronics Technician 14 Civil Engineer 5 Project Engineer 15 Quality Assurance Technician 6 Process Engineer 16 Sr. Mechanical Engineer 7 Industrial Engineer 17 Sr. Electrical Engineer 8 Project Analyst 18 Mechanical Engineering Technician 9 Staff Engineer 19 Test Technician 10 Operations Analyst 20 Automation Engineer Labor Performance Matrix The Labor Performance Matrix below and on the next page compares job posting and resume performance within the Engineering occupation clusters. The size of the circle represents the supply, based on the ratio of resumes per job from April 2010 through March 2011. A large circle indicates a large pool of talent in comparison to the demand, and a smaller circle represents areas where the demand may outweigh the supply. How to Read the Matrix: Talent Surplus Not enough jobs to match supply Plan for increased volume of candidates Focus on skills migration Incubator Opportunities (Growth Areas) High growth potential High Performance High volume in jobs and talent Focus on keeping talent and generating jobs Talent Shortage Not enough talent to meet demand At risk for competitionCopyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 16. 16Talent SurplusCAD/Drafting is the only Engineering occupation with a surplus of resumes and fewer job opportunities to meet jobseeker needs. Recruiters could consider retraining or other workplace development programs in order to put thesecandidates to work in other Engineering disciplines.Systems/Process is in the Growth quadrant and close to entering the Talent Surplus area, showing a stronger volume ofcandidates and lower volume of job postings. However, the smaller circle size may indicate a competitive area for talent.Should the demand for Systems/Process Engineers outgrow the supply, employers may face a talent shortage.Incubator Opportunities (Growth Areas)The Growth occupations span a range of Engineering occupations. These areas are prime for candidate and/or jobopportunity expansion.High PerformanceThere are three occupations in the High Performance quadrant: Industrial/Manufacturing, Mechanical andElectrical/Electronics. There is an ample supply of both job postings and seeker resumes for these occupations. Theirsmaller circle size suggests as opportunities expand without equal talent expansion that demand for talent may behighly competitive.Talent ShortageThere are no occupations in the Talent Shortage area, showing the low volume of job opportunities compared tointerested candidates in the Engineering sector.The matrix below summarizes occupational supply and demand from April 2010 through March 2011. Talent Surplus High Performance Zone Talent Shortage Incubator ZoneCopyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 17. 17In the following analysis, we compare talent demand (job postings) with talent supply (resumes) across a range ofcharacteristics for key Engineering occupations. The comparisons reveal the similarities and disparities between theavailable jobs and the searching seekers. This analysis provides direction for recruiters and employers in setting theirexpectations and development areas.Career LevelA steep 73 percent of job postings are for Experienced (Non-Manager) candidates compared to 57 percent of resumes.Recruiters might have to settle with a candidate who hasslightly more or less experience than desired.Education LevelEngineering recruiters are primarily searching for candidateswith at most a Bachelor‟s degree (81 percent). Though thetalent supply pool is a very educated group (68 percent haveat least a Bachelor‟s degree) recruiters could be challengedto fill roles as many seekers are either under or over-qualifiedwith respect to education level.Experience LevelCandidates and job postings are concentrated at oppositeends of the spectrum in terms of years of experience. A high63 percent of job opportunities are for candidates with 2 to 7years of experience while 57 percent of candidates have over7 years of experience.Some recruiters might need to settle on candidates with moreyears of experience than desired which may lead to highercompensation.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 18. 18Job Type RequirementsTwenty-one percent of postings are for contract roles, which is typical for the Engineering sector, while 29 percent ofcandidates are open to either contract or permanent positions. Seventy-nine percent of postings are for permanent roleswhile 71 percent of candidates are open to permanent roles only. There should be adequate supply to meet recruiterdemand for this requirement. Engineering Job Type Engineering Job Type Resumes, Apr 10-Mar 11 Job Postings, Apr 10-Mar 11 Either Intern/ Type Seasonal 27% <1% Intern/ Temp/ Seasonal Contract 1% 21% Temp/ Permanent Contract 79% 1% Permanent 71%Job Status RequirementsNearly all (99 percent) of Engineering job postings are for full-time employment while 1 percent are for part-time. With84 percent of candidates open to full-time employment only and 16 percent considering either full-time or part-time,employers should have an ample pool of talent to meet their needs within these criteria. Engineering Job Status Engineering Job Status Resumes, Apr 10-Mar 11 Job Postings, Apr 10-Mar 11 Part-time Either 1% Status 15% Part-time 1% Full-time 84% Full-time 99%Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 19. 19Qualifications and BenefitsEngineering professionals and employers place the greatest importance on the same top three qualifications within theengineering field: type(s) of work experience (professionals=71 percent; employers=83 percent), years of workexperience (professionals=67 percent; employers=68 percent) and education (professionals=47 percent; employers=63percent).Listed below are the most important factors Engineering professionals consider when evaluating a job opportunity.Candidates highly value the stability of a position, salary, and recognition of employees for hard work.Recruiters were asked how they would rate the same list of factors in terms of their importance to recruiting talent.Salary was at the top of the list, followed by stability of position and company‟s reputation. Interestingly, recognition ofemployees for hard work was ranked near the bottom of the list, when it was in the top three factors for candidates.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 20. 20CompensationCompensation expectations for recruiters and candidates are slightly skewed, as candidates have higher expectationsfor the lower paying jobs (under $60,000) and lower expectations for the higher paying jobs (over $80,000).The median salary offered in 2010 was $92,500 and the median salary candidates were seeking was $72,000. Pleasenote these salary requirements may represent total compensation for some job seekers and only a base salary forothers.A significatn 39 percent of Engineering job postings on Monster offer a salary over $100,000 while most job seekershave more modest expectations (56 percent expect to earn between $40-60,000).The most significant disparity between recruiters and seekers is at $60,000, where a higher percentage of employersoffer greater salaries than candidates are requiring. This trend supports the fact that there is a lack of available, skilledtalent and that recruiters are willing to pay top-dollar for in-demand skills. The industry and relevant associations andeducation programs need to continue to develop future Engineers as well as train existing ones to keep their skillscurrent.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 21. 21Diversify Your Recruitment Strategy in 2011As the nation emerges from its downturn, recruiters should keep in mind the following points when planning for the next12-months.Network to strengthen your brand: Networking has always been a fundamental aspect of establishing a presenceand sourcing candidates. Todays recruiters must actively network across the Internet to get a more holistic view of theapplicant. With Monster’s 20 network communities integrated into its core site, experts are better able to help individualsaccess advice from industry experts and keep on top of trends. These communities also offer employers access to apool of targeted candidates.Play a smart matching game. Have hiring processes and paper work in place, be diligent about screening, andcommunicate frequently with hiring managers. Many recruiters are using technology to help quickly match candidates tojobs and eliminate unqualified applicants. Monster’s semantic 6Sense™ search technology powers our Power ResumeSearch application, sorting and ranking candidates so the best are at the top. Using these types of sorting programs,recruiters save time and money sourcing candidates that precisely match their positions.Spend accordingly. As budget managers remain cautious, leverage as many benefits as possible that attract andretain employees yet require minimal investment. Keep on top of what is most important to job seekers by leveragingMonster’s free online resources at the Resource Center (http://hiring.monster.com.) The site offers actionable reportsand webinars covering the most current issues facing not only job seekers, but recruiters as well.Monster IntelligenceAs the premier digital employment solution, Monster has consistently maintained a leadership position in defining anddriving innovative products and services to champion digital recruitment. We see tremendous value in providing ourclients, the online recruitment industry, and the public at large with analysis on both job seeker and employer behaviors,as well as general employment market trends. In direct response to our customers‟ needs for strategic human capitalintelligence, Monster created an initiative, entitled Monster Intelligence, that is focused on providing business leadersand HR Executives real-time insight into market trends that will guide them in future recruitment planning.As a market leader, Monster is uniquely positioned to provide strategic information on employment trends to CorporateExecutives and Hiring Managers. These tools provide our customers with views into the labor market andcomprehensive information to further their employment strategy.More details are available at the Monster Resource Center at: http://hiring.monster.com/hr/hr-best-practices.aspx. Wewelcome your insight and comments on the monster intelligence reports and encourage you to let us know yourthoughts by providing feedback at Intelligence@monster.comMonster is the primary source of information for this report; it should only be interpreted as a definitive activity report onMonster and its subsidiaries. Monster‟s in-depth data-driven approach improves on typical survey-based methodologiesby dramatically increasing the depth and breadth of information collected as well as by capturing actual behavior ratherthan intended behavior. Data is current through March, 2011 unless otherwise indicated.Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.
  • 22. 22Copyright @ 2011 by Monster, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system ortransmitted in any form by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission ofMonster, Inc.