What's Next for Philanthropy: San Diego breakout session summary
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What's Next for Philanthropy: San Diego breakout session summary

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For more information about the What's Next for Philanthropy initiative, and other materials, go to: http://www.monitorinstitute.com/wn4cp.

For more information about the What's Next for Philanthropy initiative, and other materials, go to: http://www.monitorinstitute.com/wn4cp.

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What's Next for Philanthropy: San Diego breakout session summary What's Next for Philanthropy: San Diego breakout session summary Presentation Transcript

  • WHAT’S NEXT for COMMUNITY PHILANTHROPY Summary of Innovation & Design Breakouts Council on Foundations Fall 2013 Conference on Community Foundations © Deloitte Consulting LLP
  • Some context for this document In January, the Monitor Institute launched the What’s Next for Community Philanthropy initiative with support from the Council on Foundations, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. The initiative is a field-wide study that aims to engage over 700 community foundations across the nation in thinking about and re-imagining the community foundation model—in a way that builds on past successes and explores new approaches and possibilities for serving communities in the future. As part of the project, Monitor Deloitte specialist leader Gabriel Kasper and his team designed four activities for the Council on Foundations Fall 2013 Conference on Community Foundations, including: the keynote speech, an interactive “Flipping Orthodoxies” card exercise, an “Innovation Wall,” and three Innovation & Design Breakout sessions. What follows is a summary of the Innovation & Design Breakouts. It is intended for those who participated in these sessions, to remind us of the various “ideation” exercises in which we partook and of the various crazy (and more palpable) ideas that we came up with during our time together. -2- © Deloitte Consulting LLP
  • Just in case you forgot, here’s what you’d signed up for: What's Next for Community Philanthropy Innovation & Design Breakouts Join the Monitor Institute for a fun, thought-provoking workshop focused on re-imagining the roles and activities that community foundations play in your communities. Using structured innovation methodologies, the interactive breakout session will move beyond the conversations begun in the What’s Next for Community Philanthropy plenary, helping you challenge long-held assumptions and imagine new ways of working so you can better serve your community in the future. -3- © Deloitte Consulting LLP
  • The ground rules • • • • • • There are no bad ideas: Decades of practice in the innovation and design world tell us that you can’t start with being realistic; then you get incremental improvements. We need to come up with ideas that are “way out there” and only later dial them back. There is no critiquing others: Otherwise, others won’t feel comfortable sharing their crazy ideas. Work fast—even if it’s frustrating: You will pretty consistently wish you had more time, and this will probably feel a little uneasy. This exercise is meant to feel that way—speed helps to break us out of our engrained and stubborn habits. Try not to talk about your current work: Unless it really, really fits, because this is about creating new ideas. Listen to directions. Because we’ll be going fast, we won’t have a lot of time to explain things. Be open & engaged. This type of exercise flops miserably if you don’t come along, and works best if you dive in—you’ll come up with more and better ideas, and you’ll certainly have more fun. -4- © Deloitte Consulting LLP
  • The agenda for our breakouts • Design Challenge: Innovation & design processes generally need what’s called a “Design Challenge,” the “something” that you are working to fix or to think creatively about. For the purpose of this breakout, the design challenge was a specific role that you could play in your respective communities. • Ideation: Given the time constraints of the breakout sessions, we focused mainly on coming up with new ideas and associations: – What If: Think of who is already playing this role well & what you could copy from them. (This exercise is about “borrowing shamelessly” and underpins the fact that innovation doesn’t have to be new; it just has to be new to you.) – What Now / MacGyver: Think of the most common things you are already doing to play the role & write these down… Now cross them out; you are not allowed to do any of the things you just wrote down! What now?! How would you play that role in a different way? (Innovation often comes from responding to significant constraints.) – 1000 words: For each of five pictures (e.g., of a forest, a crowded subway, a beehive, kids playing soccer, and a swimmer) look at the picture for 30 seconds & write down whatever comes to mind in relation to your design challenge. (This exercise is about free association and is meant to surface principles ,not ideas.) – Crazy ideas: Think of as many crazy ideas you can try in order to play your role better… and choose the one craziest idea from among the group. (Where the MacGyver exercise was about imposing constraints, this one is meant to stimulate thinking by removing all constraints.) • Synthesis: Finally, with a little over 15 minutes left on the clock, we looked across all the ideas we created and came up with a handful of experiments we may want to try. -5- © Deloitte Consulting LLP
  • A few of the craziest ideas… and more realistic experiments Less than 75 minutes later, participants came up with many ideas – some crazy, others more tame – about ways they could innovate how they do their work in their respective communities… We’re hopeful that with more time and the right stakeholders ‘round the table, a similar process would yield very fruitful results! A Selection of Crazy Ideas A Selection of More Realistic Experiments • Add an open-ended question about the “biggest need in your community” to the census—and open up this data for anyone willing to analyze it! • Have a for-profit subsidiary that invests in triple bottom line businesses, to promote economic development. • Lead a national effort to create seed or VC funds at community foundations, to help support entrepreneurs. • Support job creation, mentoring, preparation for jobs, and neighborhood revitalization to promote economic development. • Sponsor a photo contest in which residents digitally submit photographs of the best and worst aspects of their communities, to get a better sense of community needs. • Combine top-down community needs research with bottom-up research, e.g., listening campaigns that include “office hours” at local coffee houses. • Host local block parties that encourage residents to meet their neighbors and discuss issues. • Host a film festival in which nonprofit present their issues and then engage donors in watching and co-creating solutions. • Encourage flash mobs to volunteer their time, coordinate community work days, and promote cross cultural volunteerism. • Own a legal pot farm, the dispensary that distributes the pot, and a “munchies” diner nearby to make additional revenue for the community foundation. • Crowdsource residents to take photographs that showcase the biggest needs in their communities; collect and display the images in a big collage in a public area. • Invest our community foundation’s entire endowment in local, sustainable businesses as a way to promote local economic development. • Have a for-profit arm that hires entrepreneurs, with profits from their businesses going back to an innovation fund that promotes local economic development. • Sponsor a global block party that gets residents engaged and talking about issues about which they’re passionate. • Create a massive circus tent, with staff disguised as clowns and talking to local residents as a way to get additional input on community issues and needs. -6- © Deloitte Consulting LLP
  • Capture of the table templates: Economic Development Planning The outputs of the four ideation exercises (what if, MacGyver, 1000 Words, and Crazy Ideas) were captured on these table templates -7- © Deloitte Consulting LLP
  • Capture of the table templates: Facilitating Community Dialog The outputs of the four ideation exercises (what if, MacGyver, 1000 Words, and Crazy Ideas) were captured on these table templates -8- © Deloitte Consulting LLP
  • Capture of the table templates: Leadership Development The outputs of the four ideation exercises (what if, MacGyver, 1000 Words, and Crazy Ideas) were captured on these table templates -9- © Deloitte Consulting LLP
  • Capture of the table templates: Researching Community Needs The outputs of the four ideation exercises (what if, MacGyver, 1000 Words, and Crazy Ideas) were captured on these table templates - 10 - © Deloitte Consulting LLP
  • Capture of the table templates: Sustainable & Impact Investing The outputs of the four ideation exercises (what if, MacGyver, 1000 Words, and Crazy Ideas) were captured on these table templates - 11 - © Deloitte Consulting LLP
  • Capture of the table templates: Advocacy & Measurement The outputs of the four ideation exercises (what if, MacGyver, 1000 Words, and Crazy Ideas) were captured on these table templates - 12 - © Deloitte Consulting LLP
  • Capture of the table templates: Attracting & Co-Creating with Donors The outputs of the four ideation exercises (what if, MacGyver, 1000 Words, and Crazy Ideas) were captured on these table templates - 13 - © Deloitte Consulting LLP
  • Capture of the table templates: Civic Participation & Coalitions The outputs of the four ideation exercises (what if, MacGyver, 1000 Words, and Crazy Ideas) were captured on these table templates - 14 - © Deloitte Consulting LLP
  • Next steps • If you use any of the exercises from our Innovation & Design Breakout at your community foundation, we would like to know! We’re hoping to document how people use the tool as an additional way to refine and improve it over time. Please e-mail any feedback about your experience to WN4CP@deloitte.com. • We will be testing and refining our current design—as well as new ideation, synthesis, and prototyping exercises—over the coming months in workshops across the U.S. and Canada. • And finally, we’ve added the names of participants who gave us their cards from the Innovation & Design sessions to the What's Next community mailing list, and will notify you when we get ready to publish our toolkit. (If you didn’t give us your business card but would like us to add you to our list, just email us at WN4CP@deloitte.com and we’ll add you to it!) - 15 - © Deloitte Consulting LLP
  • WHAT’S NEXT for COMMUNITY PHILANTHROPY Gabriel Kasper MONITOR INSTITUTE A part of Deloitte Consulting LLP For more information, visit monitorinstitute.com/wn4cp or email us at wn4cp@deloitte.com