Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Benchmarking the Creative Economy, 2013 Economic Revitalization Conference
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Benchmarking the Creative Economy, 2013 Economic Revitalization Conference

109
views

Published on

Dr. Kevin Stolarick, Research Director …

Dr. Kevin Stolarick, Research Director
The Martin Prosperity Institute, Joseph L. Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

Published in: Business, Technology

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
109
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Benchmarking the Creative Economy in Rural Ontario Kevin Stolarick Building Rural ResilienceQueens/Monieson April 8, 2012
  • 2. Brief Overview 1. Creativity in the Rural Context 2. Regions/Benchmarks 3. Results 4. Summary & Conclusions2
  • 3. Creative Economy in Rural Ontario3
  • 4. 4
  • 5. 5
  • 6. Central6
  • 7. 7
  • 8. Central - Overview • Central region of Ontario has a population of 8,215,076 • 91% of Region in Metros – Toronto, Peterborough, Oshawa, Hamilton, St. Catharine’s- Niagara, Kitchener, Brantford, Guelph and Barrie • Focus Community: Midland8
  • 9. Central9
  • 10. Central10
  • 11. Central – Selected Observations & Opportunities • Occupations – Grow professionals in arts & culture and natural & applied sciences – Technical (support) above average. • “Meds and Eds” – The problem with “meds & eds” – Shift away – Maintain current levels – Don’t make a focus11
  • 12. East12
  • 13. 13
  • 14. East - Overview • East Region of Ontario has a population of 1,723,135 • 60% of Region in Metros – Ottawa, Kingston • Highest Regional Creative Class Share • Focus Community: Brockville14
  • 15. 15
  • 16. 16
  • 17. East - Selected Observations & Opportunities • Leverage Creative Class Share – Geographic advantage – Population position • Diversity – Higher scores on diversity indicators – Build immigrant attraction strategies – “Steal” from nearby regions17
  • 18. Southwest18
  • 19. 19
  • 20. Southwest - Overview • Southwest region of Ontario has a population of 1,591,240 • 49% of Region in Metros – Windsor, London • Focus Community: Goderich20
  • 21. 21
  • 22. 22
  • 23. Southwest - Selected Observations & Opportunities • Service Class – High employment – Good incomes (relatively) – Higher wage service class jobs? • Demographics – Older population – Opportunity for specialized healthcare services – Regional leader23
  • 24. Northeast24
  • 25. 25
  • 26. Northeast - Overview • Northeast region of Ontario has a population of 571,608 • 28% of Region in Metros – Sudbury • Focus Community: Temiskaming Shores26
  • 27. 27
  • 28. 28
  • 29. Northeast - Selected Observations & Opportunities • Amenities – Strong base – Low crime – Tourists and new residents • Farming/Fishing/Forestry – Small but relatively strong – Guelph research station – Natural sciences professionals29
  • 30. Northwest30
  • 31. 31
  • 32. Northwest - Overview • Northwest region of Ontario has a population of 245,026 • 50% of Region in Metros – Thunder Bay • Focus Community: Dryden32
  • 33. 33
  • 34. 34
  • 35. Northwest - Selected Observations & Opportunities • Technology – Have tech support workers – Get professionals • Regional Hub – Regional hub for extraction companies – “Toronto of the North” – Support Services – Education/Training • Education – Improve post-secondary opportunities35
  • 36. Summary (228 pages) Canadian Gothic36 Artist Ron Simmer
  • 37. Summary37
  • 38. Conclusions?38
  • 39. Professional Advice • Rural opportunities exist – Tricky to identify – Emerging creative economy – not just cultural industries – Jurisdictional considerations – Alternative opportunities – Unique local strategies – Avoiding “death by best practice” – Generate true regional prosperity • Report as toolkit – ED professionals – Civic and community leaders – Consultants39
  • 40. “Urban” Policy Urban policy is not social policy.40
  • 41. “Urban” Policy Urban policy is not social policy. Urban policy is economic policy.41
  • 42. “Urban” Policy Urban policy is not social policy. Urban policy is economic policy. What happens when you’re not “urban”? What’s your economic policy?42
  • 43. “Urban” Policy What about “non-urban” areas?? • ThinkBig • Look Big • Use a shotgun, not a rifle • (Super secret strategy #4)43
  • 44. Think Big44
  • 45. Look Big45
  • 46. Use a Shotgun not a Rifle46
  • 47. (Super Secret Strategy #4)47
  • 48. Conclusions (!) “The key to success in today’s creative economy is for each region to understand its own strengths and weaknesses. Commiserating by looking at the challenges other regions are facing may be cathartic, and looking with envy at other successful regions may be a palliative, but neither will help the region succeed. Increasing regional prosperity for any region requires a clear picture of the current situation and an understanding of who is leaving the region, who is staying, and who is moving in. By understanding and leveraging current strengths, a region can improve its chance of success. It is only by understanding its unique challenges and opportunities that any region can advance.”48
  • 49. Thank YouKevin Stolarickkms@rotman.utoronto.cawww.martinprosperity.org
  • 50. Creative Class50
  • 51. Who Works in Creative Class? Creative Class: TAPE T = Technology and R&D Innovation A = Arts and Culture P = Professional and Managerial E = Educating and Training51
  • 52. U.S. Creative Class • 30 (% of the workforce) • 40 (million people) • 50 (% of the wages) • 70 (% of the discretionary income)52
  • 53. The Rise of the Creative Class53
  • 54. The Rise of the Creative Class Creative Service Working Farming54
  • 55. Share of creativity-oriented jobs is increasing55
  • 56. Canada & Ontario’s Creative Economy Creative Service Working Workers (Talent) 4,874,885 5,788,767 3,333,726 Canada % of Workforce 35.5% 38.7% 23.0% Workers (Talent) 2,027,152 2,210,604 1,311,995 Ontario % of Workforce 33.2% 39.4% 22.7%56
  • 57. New jobs will be in creativity-oriented androutine-oriented service occupations57
  • 58. Nearly 80 percent of jobs in Canada are inservices industries58
  • 59. Unemployment is higher in routine-orientedoccupations especially in early 90s recession-59
  • 60. Ontario’s distinctive advantage can be createdthrough actions on four fronts61
  • 61. The “4Ts” Talent Regional Growth and Technology Tolerance Prosperity (Inclusiveness) Territory Assets (Amenities)62
  • 62. Rural* Context *Non-metropolitan63
  • 63. Creativity in the Rural Context Share of All Share of Jobs Creative Class JobsMetro Ontario 79.6% 85.4%Rural Ontario 20.4% 14.6%
  • 64. Regions/ Benchmarks66
  • 65. 67
  • 66. Region/Benchmarks Variables • Regional Economics – Population, Income, Housing Value, Population Growth, Unemployment etc. • Occupational Classes – Creative Class, Working Class, Service Class, and Farming, Fishing & Forestry Class • Talent – % of Population 25+ with a BA or above, other education data • Technology – High Tech Establishments/High Tech LQ • Tolerance – Immigrant and Visible minority population share • Territorial Assets – Crime, Voter Turnout, Rec Establishments, Arts & Entertainment Establishments, Bars & Restaurants68
  • 67. Other Regions? So what if my region wasn’t selected? • Appendix for methodology – DIY • Swap: Benchmark Focus –Really 50 Reports • Keep to your region –Or not • StatsCan – CSD Level –Region, Rural, Ontario Summaries –50 potential benchmark regions69
  • 68. 70
  • 69. Outline • The objective of this research is to examine the creative economy in rural communities across Ontario and produce a document that can then be used by any community seeking to better understand how to execute creative economy research and begin to interpret results. • We hope to contribute to the existing body of research on the creative economy in rural communities and assist in the transfer of that knowledge in an accessible format to reach and better inform communities interested in applying the concepts themselves.71
  • 70. Selection of regions/benchmarking variables•5 communities (CSDs) selected for analysis from 5 different regions ofOntario• The types of data examined will focus on the occupational structure of theworkforce and attempt to provide measures that characterize a community’screative and quality of life assets, including its levels of talent, technology. 72
  • 71. Selection of regions/benchmarking variables• Peer regions chosen based on population and location within theeconomic regions• The types of data presented depict the occupational structure of theworkforce and provide measures that characterize a community’s levelof creative assets, including its level of talent, technology and tolerance• Benchmarking & Focus Communities are selected CensusSubdivisions with populations between 5,000 and 20,000• Metro Ontario is defined as within a census metropolitan area• Rural Ontario is defined as everything else73
  • 72. How are the findings applicable to all communities? Where do they go from here? Why does it mater?• The description of the methodology and analytical work done in the report will ensure that any community can reproduce the analysis and benchmarking activities• Will allow communities not only to gauge their own performance in the creative economy, identifying strengths, weaknesses and opportunities, but also to better understand how their community fits within the larger context of the region in which they exist• Any region not included in this report can obtain information about their region from Statistics Canada at the CSD level and compare their results with the focus and benchmarking regions reported here.