Dataviz Pres1109

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  • Dataviz Pres1109

    1. 1. Data Monica Bulger & Aaron Sobel Visualization Bren School of Environmental Science & Management University of California, Santa Barbara November 30, 2009
    2. 2. Data visualized in 2009 Group Projects --images from “Pathway to Self-Funding,” “Cumulative Impacts of Large-Scale Renewable Energy Development in the West Mojave,” “Management Recommendations for Piute Ponds, EAB,” and “Post-Fire Sedimentation and Flood Risk Potential in the Mission Creek Watershed of Santa Barbara,” available at http://www.bren.ucsb.edu/research/gp2009.htm
    3. 3. Who is your audience?
    4. 4. What is your inform purpose? request advocate publicize what else?
    5. 5. Re-think how you represent data
    6. 6. --image from visualcomplexity.com
    7. 7. Think visually --image from visualcomplexity.com
    8. 8. What is your data story? --image from Design & the Elastic Mind exhibition, “The Million Dollar Blocks Project” available at http://www.moma.org
    9. 9. “Data slides aren’t really about data. They are about the meaning of data.” --Duarte (2008)
    10. 10. Maps tell stories visually
    11. 11. --image from Design & the Elastic Mind exhibition, “New York Talk Exchange” available at http://www.moma.org
    12. 12. Barack Obama Personal Visits by State Jan 2007 - Feb 2008 --Image created by graduate students in UCSBʼs Geography Department using data from IGERT “Issue Browser” project (2009)
    13. 13. 3-D allows for visualizing complex data -- Time Magazine http://www.time.com/time/covers/20061030/where_we_live/
    14. 14. Visualizing the distance to the nearest McDonald’s --Image from infosthetics, available at http://www.infosthetics.com
    15. 15. Stacked Graph Each colored layer represents a musician, progressing from left to right through the eighteen month span growing wider when listening was more frequent, and skinnier when it was not. -- Stacked Graph http://www.leebyron.com/what/lastfm/
    16. 16. Stacked Graph Each colored layer represents a musician, progressing from left to right through the eighteen month span growing wider when listening was more frequent, and skinnier when it was not. -- Stacked Graph http://www.leebyron.com/what/lastfm/
    17. 17. Maps in practice
    18. 18. Sample GP brief Where is the Cuyama Valley located? -- Anderson, C., Dobrowski, B., Harris, M., Moreno, E., Roehrdanz, P. (2009). Conservation Assessment for the Cuyama Valley (Project Brief). Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara. Available at http://www.bren.ucsb.edu/research/gp2009.htm
    19. 19. Draw the viewer’s attention
    20. 20. Focus on key points -- image from Duarteʼs (2008) slide:ology, p. 69
    21. 21. Find the best fit for representing your data visually
    22. 22. Pie charts vs. bar graphs proportion comparison -- image from Dutton, W.J. & Helsper, E.J. (2007). Oxford Internet Survey 2007 Report: The Internet in Britain. Oxford Internet Institute, UK.
    23. 23. What does the pie chart tell us? What information is missing? --Adlerman, D., Maciejowski, N., Randall, J., Shirley, R. (2009). Management Recommendations for Piute Ponds Edwards Air Force Base, California (Project Poster). Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara. Available at http://www.bren.ucsb.edu/research/ gp2009.htm
    24. 24. Decision trees can show the viewer why you chose the path you did --Image from FlowingData, available at http://www.flowingdata.com
    25. 25. activity In groups of 3, improve the following image. --Consider what it’s trying to say --Identify necessary vs. extraneous information --How can you clarify the information and make it more meaningful for your target audience(s)?
    26. 26. Sample GP diagram -- Anderson, C., Dobrowski, B., Harris, M., Moreno, E., Roehrdanz, P. (2009). Conservation Assessment for the Cuyama Valley (Project Brief). Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara. Available at http://www.bren.ucsb.edu/research/gp2009.htm
    27. 27. GP diagram in context --Hess, L. , Johnson, P., Karasek, T., Port-Minner, S., Radhakrishnan, U. (2009). Pathway to Self-Funding: A Case Study on the Calfornia Commerical Spiny Lobster Fishery (Project Poster). Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara. Available at http://www.bren.ucsb.edu/research/gp2009.htm
    28. 28. “Slides should be processed in 3 seconds or less. It’s impossible for people to process your slides and your words
    29. 29. Notes from discussion: * avoid noise: colors that don’t make sense, shapes that aren’t significant, arrows that don’t serve a purpose. This information can be mis-interpreted. * if linear relationship, show it, don’t complicate it with unnecessary info. * is it necessary for each box to be separate? Combine related information.
    30. 30. * Thank you to Jim Frew and Darren Hardy for sharing their expertise throughout the workshop.

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