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Webinar: Serie Operazioni per la vostra applicazione - Sessione 6 - Installare l’applicazione

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Fai del 2014 l'anno in cui imparare qualcosa di nuovo. Unisciti alla nostra serie di webinar in 8 parti e scopri quanto è facile sviluppare applicazioni con MongoDB. Le sessioni, tenute dai nostri …

Fai del 2014 l'anno in cui imparare qualcosa di nuovo. Unisciti alla nostra serie di webinar in 8 parti e scopri quanto è facile sviluppare applicazioni con MongoDB. Le sessioni, tenute dai nostri Solutions Architects, vi insegneranno le basi dalla A alla Z, condivideranno le best practice e i trucchi per partire con confidenza. Le sessioni saranno completamente in italiano.

A questo punto avremo fatto l’applicazione. Ora dobbiamo metterla in produzione. Illustreremo le varie architetture per l’alta affidabilità e per la scalabilità orizzontale.

La serie comprende le seguenti sessioni:

10 Giugno 2014 Serie Operazioni per la vostra applicazione - Sessione 7 - Backup e Disaster Recovery:
Questo webinar parlerà delle varie opzioni di backup e di restore. Impara cosa dovresti fare in caso di un guasto e come effettuare le operazioni di backup e recovery dai dati nelle vostre applicazioni.

17 Giugno 2014: Serie Operazioni per la vostra applicazione - Sessione 8 - Monitoraggio e Performance Tuning:
L’ultimo webinar della serie discuterà quali metriche sono importanti e come gestire e monitorare la vostra applicazione per migliorare le performance.

Massimo Brignoli: About the speaker

Massimo ha 44 anni e vive a Milano. Ha lavorato nell’IT per 23 anni per aziende di trasporti, società web e database company. Nel 1998 è entrato una una piccola startup come sviluppatore aiutandola a diventare il più importante portale web italiano, venduto 3 anni più tardi per 700 milioni di dollari. E’ entrato a lavorare in MySQL come pre-vendita viaggiando in tutto il mondo e aiutando le società telecom ad adottare MySQL Cluster. Nel 2012 è entrato in SkySQL come product manager, seguendo l’integrazione con MariaDB e successivamente ha deciso di entrare in MongoDB per seguire nuove sfide professionali. Attualmente e’ Senior Solutions Architect.

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  • Initialize -> Election
    Primary + data replication from primary to secondary
  • Primary down/network failure
    Automatic election of new primary if majority exists
  • New primary elected
    Replication established from new primary
  • Down node comes up
    Rejoins sets
    Recovery and then secondary
  • Consistency
    Write preferences
    Read preferences
  • Not really fire and forget.

    This return arrow is to confirm that the network successfully transferred the packet(s) of data.

    This confirms that the TCP ACK response was received.
  • The mongos does not have to load the whole set into memory since each shard sorts locally. The mongos can just getMore from the shards as needed and incrementally return the results to the client.
  • _id could be unique across shards if used as shard key.
    we could only guarantee uniqueness of (any) attributes if the keys are used as shard keys with unique attribute equals true
  • Transcript

    • 1. Solution Architect, MongoDB Massimo Brignoli #MongoDBBasics ‘Build an Application’Webinar Series Deploying your application in production
    • 2. Agenda • Replica Sets Lifecycle • Developing with Replica Sets • Scaling your database
    • 3. Q&A • Virtual Genius Bar – Use chat to post questions – EMEASolution Architecture / Support Team are on hand – Make use of them during the sessions!!!
    • 4. Recap • Introduction to MongoDB • Schema design • Interacting with the database • Indexing • Analytics – Map Reduce – Aggregation Framework
    • 5. Deployment Considerations
    • 6. Working Set Exceeds Physical Memory
    • 7. Why Replication? • How many have faced node failures? • How many have been woken up from sleep to do a fail-over(s)? • How many have experienced issues due to network latency? • Different uses for data – Normal processing – Simple analytics
    • 8. Replica Set Lifestyle
    • 9. Replica Set – Creation
    • 10. Replica Set – Initialize
    • 11. Replica Set – Failure
    • 12. Replica Set – Failover
    • 13. Replica Set – Recovery
    • 14. Replica Set – Recovered
    • 15. Developing with Replica Sets
    • 16. Strong Consistency
    • 17. Delayed Consistency
    • 18. Write Concern • Network acknowledgement • Wait for error • Wait for journal sync • Wait for replication
    • 19. Unacknowledged
    • 20. MongoDB Acknowledged (wait for error)
    • 21. Wait for Journal Sync
    • 22. Wait for Replication
    • 23. Tagging • Control where data is written to, and read from • Each member can have one or more tags – tags: {dc: "ny"} – tags: {dc: "ny", subnet: "192.168", rack: "row3rk7"} • Replica set defines rules for write concerns • Rules can change without changing app code
    • 24. { _id : "mySet", members : [ {_id : 0, host : "A", tags : {"dc": "ny"}}, {_id : 1, host : "B", tags : {"dc": "ny"}}, {_id : 2, host : "C", tags : {"dc": "sf"}}, {_id : 3, host : "D", tags : {"dc": "sf"}}, {_id : 4, host : "E", tags : {"dc": "cloud"}}], settings : { getLastErrorModes : { allDCs : {"dc" : 3}, someDCs : {"dc" : 2}} } } > db.blogs.insert({...}) > db.runCommand({getLastError : 1, w : "someDCs"}) Tagging Example
    • 25. Wait for Replication (Tagging)
    • 26. Read Preference Modes • 5 modes – primary (only) - Default – primaryPreferred – secondary – secondaryPreferred – Nearest When more than one node is possible, closest node is used for reads (all modes but primary)
    • 27. Tagged Read Preference • Custom read preferences • Control where you read from by (node) tags – E.g. { "disk": "ssd", "use": "reporting" } • Use in conjunction with standard read preferences – Except primary
    • 28. • SAFE writes acceptable for our use case • Potential to use secondary reads for comments, but probably not needed • Use tagged reads for analytics Our application
    • 29. Scaling
    • 30. Working Set Exceeds Physical Memory
    • 31. • When a specific resource becomes a bottle neck on a machine or replica set • RAM • Disk IO • Storage • Concurrency When to consider Sharding?
    • 32. Vertical Scalability (Scale Up)
    • 33. Horizontal Scalability (Scale Out)
    • 34. Partitioning • User defines shard key • Shard key defines range of data • Key space is like points on a line • Range is a segment of that line
    • 35. Initially 1 chunk Default max chunk size: 64mb MongoDB automatically splits & migrates chunks when max reached Data Distribution
    • 36. Architecture
    • 37. What is a Shard? • Shard is a node of the cluster • Shard can be a single mongod or a replica set
    • 38. Meta Data Storage • Config Server – Stores cluster chunk ranges and locations – Can have only 1 or 3 (production must have 3) – Not a replica set
    • 39. Routing and Managing Data • Mongos – Acts as a router / balancer – No local data (persists to config database) – Can have 1 or many
    • 40. Sharding infrastructure
    • 41. Cluster Request Routing • Targeted Queries • Scatter Gather Queries • Scatter Gather Queries with Sort
    • 42. Cluster Request Routing: Targeted Query
    • 43. Routable request received
    • 44. Request routed to appropriate shard
    • 45. Shard returns results
    • 46. Mongos returns results to client
    • 47. Cluster Request Routing: Non-Targeted Query
    • 48. Non-Targeted Request Received
    • 49. Request sent to all shards
    • 50. Shards return results to mongos
    • 51. Mongos returns results to client
    • 52. Cluster Request Routing: Non-Targeted Query with Sort
    • 53. Non-Targeted request with sort received
    • 54. Request sent to all shards
    • 55. Query and sort performed locally
    • 56. Shards return results to mongos
    • 57. Mongos merges sorted results
    • 58. Mongos returns results to client
    • 59. Shard Key
    • 60. Shard Key • Shard key is immutable • Shard key values are immutable • Shard key must be indexed • Shard key limited to 512 bytes in size • Shard key used to route queries – Choose a field commonly used in queries • Only shard key can be unique across shards – `_id` field is only unique within individual shard
    • 61. A suitable shard key for our app… • Occurs in most queries • Routes to each shard • Is granular enough to not exceed 64MB chunks • Any candidates? – Author? – Date? – _id? – Title? – Author & Date?
    • 62. Summary
    • 63. Things to remember • Size appropriately for your working set • Shard when you need to, not before • Pick a shard key wisely
    • 64. Next Session – 10th June • Backup and Disaster Recovery • Backup and restore options
    • 65. Thank you