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Types of schizophrenia spectrum disorder
Types of schizophrenia spectrum disorder
Types of schizophrenia spectrum disorder
Types of schizophrenia spectrum disorder
Types of schizophrenia spectrum disorder
Types of schizophrenia spectrum disorder
Types of schizophrenia spectrum disorder
Types of schizophrenia spectrum disorder
Types of schizophrenia spectrum disorder
Types of schizophrenia spectrum disorder
Types of schizophrenia spectrum disorder
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Types of schizophrenia spectrum disorder

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  • 1. Types of Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorder
  • 2. 1. Schizotypal (Personality) Disorder • Part of schizophrenia spectrum disorder but as it’s a personality disorder so listed along with personality disorders
  • 3. 2. Delusional Disorder • presence of one or more delusions that persist for at least 1 month (Criterion A). • A diagnosis of delusional disorder is not given if the individual has ever had a symptom presentation that met Criterion A for schizophrenia (Criterion B). • impairments in psychosocial functioning may be more circumscribed than those seen in other psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia, and behavior is not obviously bizarre or odd (Criterion C). • If mood episodes occur concurrently with the delusions, the total duration of these mood episodes is brief relative to the total duration of the delusional periods (Criterion D). • The delusions are not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance (e.g., cocaine) or another medical condition (e.g., Alzheimer's disease) and not by another mental disorder (Criterion E).
  • 4. • Associated Features Supporting Diagnosis • Prevalence • Developmental course • Culture-Related Diagnostic Issues • Functional Consequences of Delusional Disorder • Differential Diagnosis
  • 5. 3. Brief Psychotic Disorder • The essential feature of brief psychotic disorder is a disturbance that involves the sudden onset of at least one of the following positive psychotic symptoms: delusions, hallucinations, disorganized speech (e.g., frequent derailment or incoherence), or grossly abnormal psychomotor behavior, including catatonia (Criterion A). • Sudden onset is defined as change from a nonpsychotic state to a clearly psychotic state within 2 weeks, usually without a prodrome. An episode of the disturbance lasts at least 1 day but less than 1 month, and the individual eventually has a full return to the premorbid level of functioning (Criterion B). • The disturbance is not better explained by a depressive or bipolar disorder with psychotic features, by schizoaffective disorder, or by schizophrenia and is not attributable to the physiological effects of a substance (e.g., a hallucinogen) or another medical condition (e.g., subdural hematoma) (Criterion C).
  • 6. • Associated Features Supporting Diagnosis • Prevalence • Developmental course • Culture-Related Diagnostic Issues • Functional Consequences of Delusional Disorder • Differential Diagnosis
  • 7. 4. Schizophreniform Disorder • identical to those of schizophrenia (Criterion A). • Schizophreniform disorder is distinguished by its difference in duration: the total duration of the illness, including prodromal, active, and residual phases, is at least 1 month but less than 6 months (Criterion B). • The diagnosis of schizophreniform disorder is made under two conditions. 1) when an episode of illness lasts between 1 and 6 months and the individual has already recovered, and 2) when an individual is symptomatic for less than the 6 months' duration required for the diagnosis of schizophrenia but has not yet recovered. In this case, the diagnosis should be noted as "schizophreniform disorder (provisional)" because it is uncertain if the individual will recover from the disturbance within the 6-month period. If the disturbance persists beyond 6 months, the diagnosis should be changed to schizophrenia • lack of a criterion • requiring impaired social and occupational functioning
  • 8. • Associated Features Supporting Diagnosis • Prevalence • Developmental course • Culture-Related Diagnostic Issues • Functional Consequences of Delusional Disorder • Differential Diagnosis
  • 9. 5. Schizophrenia • At least two Criterion A symptoms must be present for a significant portion of time during a 1-month period or longer. At least one of these symptoms must be the clear presence of delusions (Criterion Al), hallucinations (Criterion A2), or disorganized speech (Criterion A3). • Grossly disorganized or catatonic behavior (Criterion A4) and negative symptoms (Criterion A5) may also be present. Criterion A is still met if the clinician estimates that they would have persisted in the absence of treatment. • Schizophrenia involves impairment in one or more major areas of functioning (CriterionB). If the disturbance begins in childhood or adolescence, the expected level of function is not attained. • Avolition (i.e., reduced drive to pursue goal-directed behavior; Criterion A5) is linked to the social dysfunction described under Criterion B. There is also strong evidence for a relationship between cognitive impairment and functional impairment in individuals with schizophrenia.
  • 10. • Associated Features Supporting Diagnosis • Prevalence • Developmental course • Culture-Related Diagnostic Issues • Functional Consequences of Delusional Disorder • Differential Diagnosis
  • 11. 6. Schizoaffective Disorder • Diagnostic Features

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