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Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
Public speaking chapter 1
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Public speaking chapter 1

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  • 1. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.1Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You Essentials ofEssentials of Public SpeakingPublic Speaking Cheryl Hamilton, Ph.D. 5th Edition5th Edition Public Speaking Ethics and You Chapter 1 Cheryl HamiltonCheryl Hamilton
  • 2. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.2Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You Key IdeasKey Ideas  Benefits of taking Public speakingBenefits of taking Public speaking  The basic types of public speechesThe basic types of public speeches  The communication process and the speakerThe communication process and the speaker  The public speaker’s ethical obligationsThe public speaker’s ethical obligations
  • 3. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.3Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You Flashback . . .Flashback . . . Educated Greeks and Romans studiedEducated Greeks and Romans studied rhetoricrhetoric —the art of persuasive public speaking.—the art of persuasive public speaking. Aristotle’sAristotle’s RhetoricRhetoric divided speaking into:divided speaking into: • ForensicForensic (speaking in court) • DeliberativeDeliberative (political or legislative speaking) • EpideicticEpideictic (ceremonial speaking)
  • 4. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.4Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You Benefits of Public SpeakingBenefits of Public Speaking  Enhances personal developmentEnhances personal development  Influences your worldInfluences your world  Advances your careerAdvances your career
  • 5. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.5 Enhances Personal DevelopmentEnhances Personal Development  Builds personal communication confidenceBuilds personal communication confidence  Gives you more control over your lifeGives you more control over your life – Helps you construct arguments and present positions – Develops critical thinking skills  Makes you a more flexible communicatorMakes you a more flexible communicator  Helps you from feeling manipulatedHelps you from feeling manipulated Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You
  • 6. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.6 Influences Your WorldInfluences Your World  Better prepared for involvement in campusBetter prepared for involvement in campus issuesissues  Better prepared for involvement in civicBetter prepared for involvement in civic issuesissues  Better prepared to share information relevantBetter prepared to share information relevant to a particular positionto a particular position Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You
  • 7. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.71.7 Advances Your Career:Advances Your Career: Example: EngineeringExample: Engineering Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You  Electrical engineers spend over 4 hours perElectrical engineers spend over 4 hours per day communicating (Vestal et al. 1996)day communicating (Vestal et al. 1996)  About 50% of all engineers value oral skillsAbout 50% of all engineers value oral skills above technical skills (Darling & Daniels, 2003)above technical skills (Darling & Daniels, 2003)  Oral skills ranked second to importance afterOral skills ranked second to importance after problem-solving skills (Evans et al. 1993)problem-solving skills (Evans et al. 1993)
  • 8. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.81.8Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You Types of SpeechesTypes of Speeches  InformativeInformative -- Focuses on conveying facts and promoting understanding.  PersuasivePersuasive -- Seeks to influence choices & opinions.  Special occasionSpecial occasion -- Lends a sense of distinction to special occasions.
  • 9. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.9 Informative Vs. PersuasiveInformative Vs. Persuasive InformativeInformative  PromotePromote understanding of aunderstanding of a body of factsbody of facts – Performing Heimlich maneuver – Effects of stress on the body – Growth of YouTube and Twitter PersuasivePersuasive  Seek to influenceSeek to influence beliefs, choices orbeliefs, choices or opinionsopinions – On-campus parking should be expanded – Daily exercise is necessary for health – City and country libraries are the surest avenue for maintaining our demcracy Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You
  • 10. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.10 Special OccasionSpecial Occasion  Gives sense of distinction to important eventsGives sense of distinction to important events  Examples of special occasionsExamples of special occasions – Weddings – Funerals – Award ceremonies – Introducing a new student Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You
  • 11. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.11 The Communication Process:The Communication Process: Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You LISTENER Motivation SPEAKER Message Decoded Message Encoded Stimulus
  • 12. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.12Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You Frame of ReferenceFrame of Reference  BeliefsBeliefs  AttitudesAttitudes  ValuesValues  Background (e.g. education, gender, race,Background (e.g. education, gender, race, hometown)hometown)  ExperiencesExperiences
  • 13. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.13 Differences in Cultural ValuesDifferences in Cultural Values Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You Americans Japanese Arabs 1. Freedom 1. Belonging 1. Family Security 2. Independence 2. Group Harmony 2. Family Harmony 3. Self-Reliance 3. Collectiveness 3. Parental Guidance 4. Equality 4. Age/Seniority 4. Age 5. Individualism 5. Group Consciousness 5. Authority 6. Competition 6. Cooperation 6. Compromise 7. Efficiency 7. Quality 7. Devotion 8. Time 8. Patience 8. Patience 9. Directness 9. Indirectness 9. Indirectness 10. Openness 10. Go-between 10. Hospitality
  • 14. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.14 The Communication Process:The Communication Process: Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You LISTENER Motivation SPEAKER Message Decoded Message Encoded Code Stimulus
  • 15. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.15Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You Communication CodesCommunication Codes  LanguageLanguage (Verbal) - spoken or written words  ParalanguageParalanguage (Vocal) - tone, pitch, volume, etc.  Non-VerbalNon-Verbal (Visual) - eye contact, facial expressions, posture, etc. Vocal & Visual Code Verbal Code
  • 16. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.16 The Communication Process:The Communication Process: Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You LISTENER Motivation SPEAKER Message Decoded Internal Noise Message Encoded Internal Noise Code Feedback Stimulus ENVIRONMENT ENVIRONMENT External Noise
  • 17. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.17Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You Speaking of EthicsSpeaking of Ethics  The public’s perceptions of ethical standardsThe public’s perceptions of ethical standards in several professionsin several professions  Violations and costs of unethical behaviorViolations and costs of unethical behavior  The ethical responsibilities of speakersThe ethical responsibilities of speakers  Classroom ethicsClassroom ethics
  • 18. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.18 The Public’s View of Ethical StandardsThe Public’s View of Ethical Standards Table 1.2 Percentage of people as rating each profession as having “High” or “Very High” ethical standards Profession 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Nurses 83 79 82 84 79 84 83 Druggists, pharmacists 67 72 67 73 67 70 66 Medical doctors 68 67 65 69 63 64 65 Clergy 56 56 54 58 53 56 50 Police officers 59 60 61 54 53 56 63 Accountants — — 39 — — 38 -- Journalists 25 — 28 26 — 25 23 Bankers 35 36 41 37 35 23 19 Lawyers 16 18 18 18 15 18 13 Real estate agents — — 20 — — 17 -- College Professors 59 — 64 58 — 54 Business executives 18 20 16 18 14 12 12 Stockbrokers 15 — 16 17 12 12 9 Congresspersons 17 20 14 14 9 Senators 20 -- 16 15 -- -- 11 Advertising practitioners 12 10 11 11 9 10 11 Car salespeople 7 9 8 7 6 Insurance salespeople 12 -- -- 13 -- -- 10 Copyright Cengage © 2011
  • 19. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.19 Costs of unethical behaviorCosts of unethical behavior  2007: Dismissal from job2007: Dismissal from job (Marilee Jones Admissions Dean at MIT due to(Marilee Jones Admissions Dean at MIT due to untrue facts on resume)untrue facts on resume)  2006: Re-defense of dissertations2006: Re-defense of dissertations (Investigation Ohio University 37 former engineering(Investigation Ohio University 37 former engineering graduate students plagiarized portions of theses orgraduate students plagiarized portions of theses or dissertations)dissertations)  2007: Dismissal from job2007: Dismissal from job (producer of(producer of KatieKatie Couric’s notebookCouric’s notebook for not giving credit tofor not giving credit to Wall StreetWall Street Journal articleJournal article for lines quoted in piece)for lines quoted in piece) Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You
  • 20. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.20 Exaggeration, Distortion and PlagiarismExaggeration, Distortion and Plagiarism  ExaggerationExaggeration – Overstating – Presenting facts as more important than they are  Distortion -Distortion - – Misrepresenting or twisting facts – Stating facts are true when only partially true  PlagiarismPlagiarism – Using ideas of others without giving credit – Using material from the Internet without giving credit Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You
  • 21. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.21Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You Classroom EthicsClassroom Ethics SpeakerSpeaker 1. Always show up when scheduled to speak. 2. Show respect by being prepared. 3. Respect audience opinions 4. Be honest—no plagiarism, exaggeration, or distortion of facts or visuals. Cite sources 5. Limit use of Internet sources. 6. Carefully research all sides of topic. AudienceAudience 1. Support speaker—no homework or daydreaming. 2. Be on time; take job as audience evaluator seriously. 3. Respect speaker’s opinions. 4. Be open-minded; don’t take offense during speeches or class discussions. 5. Don’t distract speaker in any way. 6. Give honest, tactful critiques including strengths and weaknesses.
  • 22. Copyright © 2011 Cengage Learning 1.22Chapter 1 – Public Speaking, Ethics & You Essentials ofEssentials of Public SpeakingPublic Speaking Cheryl Hamilton, Ph.D. 5th Edition5th Edition Public Speaking Ethics and You Chapter 1 Cheryl HamiltonCheryl Hamilton

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