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Language Analysis: Language to Persuade
 

Language Analysis: Language to Persuade

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    Language Analysis: Language to Persuade Language Analysis: Language to Persuade Document Transcript

    • LANGUAGE ANALYSIS: LANGUAGE TO PERSUADE The very first thing you should do is write a plan. Here is the format. 1. What is the heart of the issue? Don’t be too simple. The example one is about “Killing Too Many Kangaroos” not simply “kangaroos” or killing kangaroos. 2. List all four or five techniques found in the argument. Make sure you use the proper terms. For example, list “evidence” rather than “statistics”. In our example, I think they were; evidence, anecdote, emotive language, and inclusive language. Now, you are ready to write your response. Please remember that this is written in formal Standard English and should use proper spelling and punctuation. Now you write your introduction. It should contain the following information: 1. What is the issue? (You can find this in your plan). 2. Background to this issue. 3. The name of the article and (if you know it) the writer. Here is an example introduction. The issue of the culling kangaroos has caused some recent controversy and anger in the Australian community. These iconic Australian animals are killed for meat, for their skins and because they are a nuisance to farmers and the environment. In the article “Roos dying out”, dated 17 April, 2001, the writer contends that this is a barbaric and cruel. Once you have your introduction, you should write about the techniques that you listened in your plan. These paragraphs should contain the following information: 1. What is the technique that the writer is using? (find this in your plan) 2. An example from this text of this technique. Use an actual quotation from the text. Put it in quotation marks. 3. The intended impact of this technique on the reader. (find this in the booklet that I gave you) Use the suggested phrases in your booklet to add variety and subtly to your writing. Thanks to Mr Harkness, Mr Atherton and Ms. Highstead for all their help with this, and for letting me steal some of their words for the examples.
    • Here is a first attempt. The writer uses evidence. We see this from the quotes, “At least 15 percent will die slowly” and “Every night 15,000 kangaroos” are shot. This technique is used to add weight and back up the point of view of the writer. However, this is basic. There is another version of this material. To persuade the reader further, this writer provides statistics in relation to the culling and subsequent suffering of kangaroos. This evidence, “At least 15 percent will die slowly” and “Every night 15,000 kangaroos”, adds weight to the writer’s argument. These statistics make the reader see the horror of these killings appear as fact rather than personal opinion. Now that you written about one technique, you need to do this for the remaining techniques in your plan. Remember, you should address between four and six techniques in this pieces. Finally, you need a conclusion. I should contain the following information: 1. The author’s contention in the text. 2. Is this an effective piece of writing? Why? 3. What has happened to the issue since this text was written? 4. A coda or final thought. Here is an example conclusion. The issue of culling kangaroos continues to be a contentious one. The writer of the letter “Roos dying out” clearly articulates concern about the future of these iconic Australian animals. He effectively uses a number of techniques, anecdote, emotive language, and inclusive language, to successfully persuade the reader that this practice must stop. If you want to do a practice over the weekend, I would be happy to go over your work on Monday. Here is a text you can work with. PAYBACK TIME ON THE eve of World Environment Day, state and federal environment ministers should be congratulated for recently moving one step closer to introducing a refund system on drink containers. They have decided to conduct a quot;community attitude surveyquot; to find out how much extra the community is prepared to pay for a refundable deposit on cans and bottles. Thanks to Mr Harkness, Mr Atherton and Ms. Highstead for all their help with this, and for letting me steal some of their words for the examples.
    • If the past is any guide, we can now expect the beverage and packaging industry to launch a scare campaign by suggesting that the price of a slab of beer, for example, will go up considerably. Desperate times call for desperate measures. Thanks to Mr Harkness, Mr Atherton and Ms. Highstead for all their help with this, and for letting me steal some of their words for the examples.