Role of the police

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Year 10 Legal Studies

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  • Your PowerPoint was really good, it was really interesting finding out about the Water Police.
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  • Molly your powerpoint was very informative and interesting, the pictures were amazing. The presentation of your piece was great!
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Role of the police

  1. 1. ROLE OF THE POLICE Molly
  2. 2. CONTENTS Water Police (Part A) Becoming a policeman/woman Newspaper articles Bibliography
  3. 3. THE WATER POLICE
  4. 4. Water Police <ul><li>Official Name: Water Police </li></ul><ul><li>Background information/when it came into existence: </li></ul><ul><li>The Water Police were established in 1840 by Charles Joseph La Trobe, Superintendent of the Port Phillip District. The first ever overseas stream service was developed by 1852 and by 1855 the Water Police had grown greatly. The Motor Boating Act was enounced in 1961. In 1962 the Motor Boating (general) Regulations came into action. The first policing was conducted by an ex-naval officer and coxswain attached to the Ports and Harbours Authority. The Victorian Police were assigned the task of enforcing the law provisions of the Motor Boating Act and Regulations in 1963. This started the Motor Boating Squad later in February 1964. </li></ul><ul><li>The name of the squad was changed in 1980 to the Water Police Squad. De-centralisation of the Water Police began in 1985. Now, one sergeant and four stable constables are based at Paynesville on the Gippsland Lakes. A senior constable was placed permanently at Benalla to cover Lakes Eildon, Hume, Dartmouth and all other waterways in north east Victoria in 1992. </li></ul><ul><li>These days the squad are based at Williamstown in a state of the art complex located at the rear of the Williamstown police station. They are co-located with the Search and Rescue Squad but each still functions as separate units. </li></ul>Skills and training Duties Current examples Reasons for existence Other information Contents page
  5. 5. Special skills and training required for the officers in this branch <ul><li>Training </li></ul><ul><li>Intensive training would need to be conducted in order for a person to become a Water Policeman/woman. The usual police training would need to be conducted, such as examinations and the general training of what being a police officer involves. Extensive training would need to be conducted in order for a police officer to specialise in this area. They would need to be taught the correct technique to rescuing others. They would need to be trained how to approach others. They would need to be taught how to conduct a search rescue and they would need to be trained in first aid. They would need to be taught how to drive a boat and a jet ski. They would need to know how to dive and it would be necessary that they had good swimming skills. They would need to conduct training as to how to understand the weather and how to read bearings. Training of how to react under intense and dangerous situations would need to be conducted. Theory training of the laws applying to the water would be necessary to ensure that the person had a full understanding and could actually enforce the laws. </li></ul>Continue
  6. 6. Special skills and training required for the officers in this branch (continued) <ul><li>Skills </li></ul><ul><li>Many skills would be required to be a Water Policeman/woman. It would be essential that the person was a good swimmer, reasonably fit and quite able. There are certain fitness requirements that one must have before they can become a police officer. These are indicated below: </li></ul><ul><li>Fitness Component </li></ul><ul><li>  Result Required </li></ul><ul><li>  Grip Test: 30 kg in each hand </li></ul><ul><li>  Illinois Agility Run: Complete course in under 20 seconds </li></ul><ul><li>  Shuttle Run (Beep Test): Attain Level 6.10 </li></ul><ul><li>  Push Ups: Complete 5 push ups </li></ul><ul><li>  Prone Bridge: Hold the prone bridge position for 60 seconds </li></ul><ul><li>  Obstacle Climb: Climb safely over a 1.3 metre obstacle </li></ul><ul><li>  Swimming: Complete a 100 metre swim in under 4 minutes </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>Continue
  7. 7. Skills continued <ul><li>The person would need to be brave and able to act in dangerous situations. They would need to be smart and to be a quick thinker. They would need to have knowledge of the laws and of the water. It would be necessary for them to be a good communicator and to be able to work effectively with others. For someone to become a police officer they must be fluent in their own language and must also be able to write in another language. They would need a tertiary degree. They would need to have some level of computer skills and other technology skills. The person would need to be diversity-competent, meaning that they understand and respect that everyone has characteristics which make them unique.   </li></ul><ul><li>It would also be important that the person had several values. These include: </li></ul><ul><li>Integrity </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Flexibility </li></ul><ul><li>Respect </li></ul><ul><li>Support </li></ul><ul><li>Professionalism </li></ul>Back to water police
  8. 8. Duties performed by the Water Police <ul><li>A brief overview (See next slide for more detail) </li></ul><ul><li>Main tasks: </li></ul><ul><li>Coordinate all marine incidents in Victoria </li></ul><ul><li>See to search and rescue incidents </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure that all vessels have appropriate safety equipment and comply with registration requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure that marine laws and regulations are being enforced </li></ul><ul><li>Participate in intensive training and maintenance of their vessels-to ensure that all members and equipment are in good condition. </li></ul><ul><li>Transport other units to locations that cannot be accessed by foot </li></ul><ul><li>Give latitudinal and longitudinal references to incidents occurring in the water </li></ul><ul><li>Examine vessels that have been involved in boating accidents and decide if prosecution is necessary. </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare Inquest briefs. </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain a data base of all marine vessels. </li></ul>Continue
  9. 9. More detail The Water Police have many important roles and duties. They coordinate all marine incidents throughout Victoria. Per year, they receive over 700 calls for assistance. In reference to a search and rescue incident, the Water Police first receive a call from the Rescue Coordination Centre. This is staffed 24 hours. Crews (with certain equipment) then leave to see to the incident. The Marine Coordinator overlooks the operation and are responsible for the coordination of police resources. This includes assistance received from the Air Wing or Search and Rescue and volunteer resources (such as the Voluntary Coast Guard.) The Water Police squad provide a 24 hour service which is in charge of patrolling Port Phillip bay, Western Port bays and other waterways throughout Victoria. The Water Police are in charge of ensuring that all vessels have appropriate safety equipment, that they comply with registration requirements and that marine laws and regulations are enforced. The Water Police monitor Victoria’s waterways all year round. During winter, when there are less call outs, the squad conduct intensive training and maintenance on their vessels. This is to ensure that all of the equipment and members of the squad are in good working conditions. The Water Police are sometimes used to transport other units to locations that cannot be accessed by foot. This is often used if they are looking for a remote drug crop. The police give latitudinal and longitudinal references for incidents that may occur in the water because other squads are often not very familiar with these bearings. The Water Police examine vessels which have been involved in boating accidents. They then advise whether prosecution should occur. They are also involved in the preparation of inquest briefs. They maintain a database of all marine vessels. Back to Water Police
  10. 10. Examples of current activities carried out by the Water Police <ul><li>Due to flooding from torrential rain in December 2010 (in Victoria), the Water Police were in charge of rescuing people who got caught in the flooding. In one particular instance, they rescued a man who was clinging to a tree for four hours after crossing a flooded creek when returning from a pub. </li></ul>Continue
  11. 11. Current activities continued <ul><li>The Water Police were closely involved in the Queensland flooding which occurred this year. They were in charge of conducting rescues for people stuck in the floods or conducting searches for missing people. They were also closely involved in the aftermath of the floods in making sure not only that people were safe, but also that their belongings were safe. </li></ul><ul><li>This summer the Water Police also conducted a blitz on boat usage in Port Phillip Bay. They were checking for boat licenses and were also focusing on improper use of jet skis. </li></ul>Back to water police
  12. 12. Reasons for the existence of this squad <ul><li>The Water Police are a very important part in ensuring that our community functions properly. They exist for several reasons. The main reason for their existence is to make sure that people on the water obey all laws. This is important because it looks after the well being of themselves and of others, it sets out boundaries and allows people to enjoy themselves and to work together. The Water Police are also very important in looking after and rescuing others. They ensure that all people who may get into trouble in the water receive the help which they may need. Without the Water Police, then people would not be protected or looked after. Before the Water Police were introduced, there were several problems with people being silly on the water or people get injured, hurt or dying on or in the water. It seemed necessary that something needed to be done to look after these people and to ensure that the community could function. These are the main reasons that the water police actually came in existence-to look after others in the community. </li></ul>Continue
  13. 13. Reasons continued <ul><li>Other reasons for the water police’s existence are outlined below: </li></ul><ul><li>To coordinate marine incidents </li></ul><ul><li>To rescue people if they are in need (in water related situations) </li></ul><ul><li>To conduct search investigations for people that may go missing (in the water) </li></ul><ul><li>To ensure that all vessels are appropriately equipped with safety equipment, that they comply with registration requirements and that marine laws and regulations are enforced </li></ul><ul><li>To transport other units to locations that cannot be accessed by foot </li></ul><ul><li>To give longitudinal and latitudinal references for incidents that may occur in the water </li></ul><ul><li>To examine vessels involved in boating accidents and decide whether prosecution is necessary </li></ul><ul><li>To prepare inquest briefs </li></ul><ul><li>Prevent crimes on vessels </li></ul>Back to Water Police
  14. 14. Other relevant or interesting information <ul><li>Each year the Water Police handle about 700 marine incidents. They travel on boats and jet skis. </li></ul><ul><li>The Water Police often need assistance from outside organisations in search and rescue operations. These organisations include the Western Port Safety Council, Australian Volunteer Coast Guard, Southern Peninsula Rescue Squad, Mornington Bay Rescue Squad, Ocean Rescue Squad at Lakes Entrance and the Royal Volunteer Coastal Patrol. Sometimes additional volunteer groups, commercial shipping, fishing vessels and aircraft are also used to assist in operations. They are directed by the Marine Coordinator. </li></ul><ul><li>The Water Police work closely with Parks Victoria, Transport Safety Victoria and Commercial Boating. They have a liaison with Australian Marine Safety Authority which is based in Canberra. </li></ul><ul><li>The Water Police constantly check the weather and also encourage others to do so.   </li></ul>Back to Water Police
  15. 15. BECOMING A POLICE OFFICER
  16. 16. Training undertaken to become a police officer-Are you eligible? <ul><li>To become a police officer you must first apply and sit the entrance examination. To be able to apply you must be eligible. To be eligible you must be the following things: </li></ul><ul><li>• Be 18 years or over </li></ul><ul><li>• Be an Australian citizen or have permanent residency </li></ul><ul><li>• Have a current Victorian driver’s licence </li></ul><ul><li>• If you are under 21 you must have passed the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) or equivalent (Senior Level Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL) is accepted) </li></ul>Continue
  17. 17. The entrance exam <ul><li>If you meet all of the previously mentioned requirements then you can apply to sit the entrance exam. This is a three hour exam with the contracted assessor. You cannot apply to become a police officer unless you have successfully completed the exam. The exam comprises of a spelling and comprehension section, a maths section, a reasoning section, an English skills, grammar, vocabulary and reading section and a writing task section. </li></ul>Continue
  18. 18. Conformation letter and pack <ul><li>If you successfully complete the exam, then you will receive a letter confirming your result and also containing an application pack. This pack includes an application form, a consent to check records and an initial employment details form. After receiving the pack, you should proceed to make an appointment with a sergeant at the nearest police station, taking along all completed forms as well as other important documentation (birth certificate, Level 1 first aid qualification etc.). The sergeant can certify all these documents. It is required that you have been immunised against hepatitis C before commencing work. At this stage, you will then be assessed depending on your background information. Any prior offences, criminal history or recommendations will be checked. </li></ul>Continue
  19. 19. Medical testing <ul><li>After the background check, you will be sent a medical release form and a medical certification booklet. The form must be completed in order to participate in the fitness and psychological testing component of the application process. The medical booklet must be completed by undergoing medical examinations and eye testing. A urine sample must be given to test for alcohol and other drugs. You must then undergo fitness testing and must pass this to continue on. There is also a psychological test to try to understand one’s personality. </li></ul>Continue
  20. 20. Selection panel <ul><li>After completing these tests you will then need to appear before a selection panel and answer a series of behavioural based questions. You will need to achieve a high standard in these questions to pass. After these questions you will be given a final assessment. If you are deemed successful you will be awarded a final score which determines your place in the pool of candidates awaiting induction into the Victoria Police Academy. </li></ul>Continue
  21. 21. The Police Academy <ul><li>The Victorian Police Academy is where all training commences. This is a 23 week training regime. It is designed to equip you with the knowledge, skills and confidence to complete your training ‘on the job’ while performing operational duties as a probationary constable. To become a probationary constable, you must successfully complete the training at the academy. You must qualify in all aspects of the training and show that you have the personal qualities, temperament and attitude to be an effective member of the Victorian Police. You must follow the Academy moto which is: ‘ Do your best, do what’s right and treat others as you would expect them to treat you’. Training at the academy requires dedication and commitment. It is rigorous, disciplined and mentally demanding. The Academy equips you with the basic skills of what being a police officer is all about. The training hours are usually from 7:30am-4:10pm Monday to Friday. At the Academy you spend time at lectures, doing physical training and learning operational skills required to carry out your duties. There are regular practical assessments and exams . </li></ul>Continue
  22. 22. After the academy <ul><li>You must graduate from the Academy and then spend two years as a Probationary Constable. You will then nominate three metropolitan areas where you would like to complete your training, however you could be posted anywhere in Victoria. </li></ul>Contents page
  23. 23. NEWSPAPER ARTICLES Article 1 Article 5 Article 4 Article 3 Article 2 Contents page
  24. 24. Article 1 <ul><li>Water police target 'hoon' boaters </li></ul><ul><li>December 22, 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>First it was hoon drivers that had their cars confiscated. Now, hoons in boats can be taken off the water. </li></ul><ul><li>In an Australian first, hoon boating laws introduced in Victoria this week give water police powers to keep dangerous boaters high and dry and ban their vessels for 48 hours. </li></ul><ul><li>As the summer holidays start, water police will patrol popular holiday destinations to make sure people are boating safely, acting Senior Sergeant Andrew Gardner said. </li></ul><ul><li>Those areas include Geelong, Lake Eildon, East Gippsland, Wilsons Promontory, Western Port Bay, Queenscliff and Chelsea. </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;The hoon road laws have seen police crack down on dangerous behaviour on our streets, and now we are taking these messages to the water&quot;, Acting Snr Sgt Gardner said. </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;We have found hoon behaviour in our bays and inland waterways to be a growing problem, with a small minority of people putting the wider community at risk.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Police will be able to place an embargo notice on a boat, ordering that it not be operated for a specified period, or that the offender not operate it. </li></ul><ul><li>Boat operators must obey laws regarding speed, the distance they must keep from swimmers and other craft, and having a blood alcohol level below .05 or zero for those aged under 21. </li></ul><ul><li>Other laws include requirements to carry personal flotation devices or life jackets, flares, two-way radios and fire extinguishers. </li></ul><ul><li>People should report to police if they see hoon boaters behaving dangerously, Acting Snr Sgt Gardner said. </li></ul>Continue
  25. 25. Article 1 summary-Water Police <ul><li>December 2009 Water Police target hoon boaters </li></ul><ul><li>In December 2009, the first ever hoon boating laws were introduced in Victoria. These gave Water Police the power to keep dangerous boaters off the water and allowed them to confiscate their vessels for 48 hours. Acting senior sergeant Gardner of the Water Police commented that these new laws would allow the police to crack down on any dangerous behaviour in the water, as they had been able to do on the streets. He said that the behaviour in the bays and inland waterways had been a growing problem with innocent people being put at risk. These new laws that were introduced allow the Water Police to place an embargo notice on a boat, saying that the boat cannot operate for a specific time frame or that the offender can never operate it again. The new laws state that boat operators must obey the laws regarding speed, the distance they must keep from swimmers and other craft, having a blood alcohol level below .05 or zero for those aged under 21 and also that people must carry personal flotation devices or life jackets, flares, two-way radios and fire extinguishers. The Water Police currently enforce these new laws as they endeavour to look after people in the community. </li></ul><ul><li>This article indicates the type of work conducted by the Water Police. It clearly shows the roles that they must carry out and the laws that they must enforce. The new water laws that were introduced were very important in helping the water police to properly carry out their roles. </li></ul>Back to Newspapers page
  26. 26. Article 2-Water Police <ul><li>Water police patrol holiday hotspots after woman's death </li></ul><ul><li>From: AAP </li></ul><ul><li>January 05, 2009 12:00AM </li></ul><ul><li>WATER police will patrol popular Victorian holiday destinations in coming weeks for recreational boaters flouting safety regulations. </li></ul><ul><li>The move comes after the death of an 18-year-old woman at Lake Eildon last week. </li></ul><ul><li>Police will scour areas including Queenscliff, Geelong, Lake Eildon, East Gippsland, Wilson's Promontory and Western Port Bay, checking safety equipment and boat licences and breath-testing vessel operators. January is the busiest month for accidents on the water, with police responding to more than 240 incidents on the state's waterways last January. Water Police Acting Senior Sergeant Greg Barras said boaters were subject to the same alcohol laws as motorists. “Getting behind the wheel of a vessel when you are affected by alcohol is just as irresponsible as getting behind the wheel of a car after drinking,'' he said. A blood alcohol limit of zero applies to those under 21 and their supervisor, and a .05 blood alcohol limit applies to those over 21. “People do not think that the same drink driving laws which affect motorists apply to boaters,'' he said. “They see a clear stretch of water and do not see that it poses the same risk as a busy road when in fact the dangers are often hidden under the surface of the water,'' Sen Sgt Barras said. “Other factors such as dehydration, fatigue and constant motion combined with alcohol could greatly affect a driver's coordination and reaction time, which could lead to an even greater risk of having an accident. “The message we want to put out is simple, don't drink alcohol and then try to operate a boat.'' Police will also issue $142 fines to those caught not wearing life jackets. Sen Sgt Barras urged boaters to check their vessel before heading out, as well as weather and safety reports. Casey Hardman, 18, died after she was flung from a speedboat driven by a 16-year-old male when it collided with a tree on Lake Eildon on December 28. </li></ul>Continue
  27. 27. Article 2 summary <ul><li>January 5 th 2009 Water Police patrol holiday hotspots after woman’s death </li></ul><ul><li>This article states that Water Police are going to patrol popular Victorian holiday destinations for recreational boaters who are breaking the safety requirement laws. This move came after the death of an 18 year old woman at Lake Eildon. She was flung from a speedboat driven by a 16 year old male when it collided with a tree. The police planned on scouring areas including Queenscliff, Geelong, Lake Eildon, East Gippsland, Wilson’s Promontory and Western Port Bay, the aim being to check safety equipment and boat licenses and to breath test vessel operators. Water Police Acting Senior Sergeant, Greg Barras, commented that boaters were subject to exactly the same alcohol laws as motorists. He said that getting behind the wheel of a vessel when affected by alcohol is just as irresponsible as getting behind the wheel of a car after drinking. He commented that people do not think that the same drink driving laws apply to boat drivers and that they often underestimate the dangers that the water can actually have. He said that other factors such as dehydration, fatigue and constant motion combined with alcohol can greatly affect a driver’s coordination and reaction time, which increases the risk of an accident. The blood alcohol limit of zero applies to those under the age of 21 and their supervisor. People over the age of 21 must have a blood alcohol reading below .05. </li></ul><ul><li>Water Police are aiming to put out the message to not drive a boat when affected by alcohol. They will issue $142 fines to those caught not wearing life jackets. </li></ul><ul><li>This article clearly shows the types of roles undertaken by the Water Police. It shows the role they play in enforcing the law and how dangerous accidents can occur if the law is not followed. </li></ul>Back to Newspapers page
  28. 28. Article 3-Dogs Squad <ul><li>Police find boozy bandit a-snooze in alley </li></ul><ul><li>Thomas Hunter </li></ul><ul><li>March 21, 2011 - 1:42PM </li></ul><ul><li>Police dogs found a dozy, boozed-up bandit sleeping off an ill-considered raid on his neighbourhood convenience store just a short staggering distance from the scene of the crime. </li></ul><ul><li>Police arrested the 51-year-old man about 30 minutes after he walked into the store in Station Street, Fairfield, about 11pm yesterday and raised his jumper to show what the worker thought was a knife. </li></ul><ul><li>The robber demanded cash and cigarettes, which the worker placed in a green canvas shopping bag. </li></ul><ul><li>Advertisement: Story continues below </li></ul><ul><li>The man then took the bag and fled south along Station Street. </li></ul><ul><li>A Victoria Police spokesman said the dog squad quickly found a scent and tracked the robber to an alley just 300 metres from the shop. He said the offender appeared to be drunk and was asleep with his ill-gotten booty. </li></ul><ul><li>The spokesman said the man, a Fairfield resident, was taken into custody. </li></ul>Continue
  29. 29. Article 3 summary <ul><li>March 21 st 2011 Police find boozy bandit a-snooze in alley </li></ul><ul><li>Related to the dog squads section of the police </li></ul><ul><li>This article describes how the police arrested a 51 year old man. The man walked into his neighbourhood convenience store in Station Street, Fairfield at 11pm. He raised his jumper to the worker and showed him what the worker thought was a knife. He then raided the store. He demanded cash and cigarettes. The worker gave these to him in a green canvas shopping bag. The man took the bag and fled along Station Street. </li></ul><ul><li>The Police dog squad then played a very important role in finding the man. The dogs found a scent and tracked the robber to an alley just 300 metres from the shop. When the dog squad found the offender he appeared drunk and was asleep with the things he had stolen. He was a Fairfield resident and was taken into custody. </li></ul><ul><li>This article demonstrates the importance of the dog squad as it shows how the dogs were able to quickly and easily find the offender. The job would have taken much longer if the dogs had not been able to pick up a scent. This article shows how the dog squad plays an important role in catching offenders quickly and maintaining peace in society. </li></ul>Back to Newspapers page
  30. 30. Article 4 <ul><li>Article 4–Water Police </li></ul><ul><li>Water police join hunt for missing man </li></ul><ul><li>From: AAP </li></ul><ul><li>February 04, 2011 9:56AM </li></ul><ul><li>WATER police will join the search for a man missing after trying to move his boat before Cyclone Yasi hit the north Queensland coast. </li></ul><ul><li>The man was last seen on Tuesday on his yacht at Port Hinchinbrook, near where Yasi made landfall at Mission Beach at midnight on Wednesday. He was taking cover in mangroves, but has not been seen or heard from since. Cairns Water Police will search the area today along with other emergency services personnel. The man is described as being aged 30 to 40, with a tanned complexion and of a solid build. He's believed to be on a yacht named Panku. </li></ul>Continue
  31. 31. Article 4 summary <ul><li>February 2011 Water Police join hunt for missing man </li></ul><ul><li>In February 2011, the Water Police joined the search for a man who went missing after he was trying to move his boat before Cyclone Yasi hit the north Queensland coast. The man was believed to have been last seen with his yacht at Port Hinchinbrook. This was near where Cyclone Yasi made landfall at Mission Beach at midnight. The man had been taking cover in some mangroves, but had not been seen or heard from since. The Water Police were in charge of searching the area along with other emergency services personnel. </li></ul><ul><li>This article shows the importance of the Water Police. They contributed greatly to helping to find the man. If we did not have the Water Police, then there would have been no specialist people looking for the man. The Water Police protect us and help us </li></ul>Back to Newspapers page
  32. 32. Article 5-Water Police <ul><li>POLICE have identified a man whose body was found floating in the Swan River yesterday. </li></ul><ul><li>The body was discovered about 200m from the riverbank in front of the Applecross Tennis Club on Ardross Street at about 10.40am. </li></ul><ul><li>Police today revealed the drowned man was a 37-year-old from West Leederville. </li></ul><ul><li>His father has been informed of his death, but police have not revealed the man's name. </li></ul><ul><li>An early morning walker today found a bag containing clothes and identification belonging to the man on the Como side of the river near Canning Bridge just after 7am. </li></ul><ul><li>The bag contained the man's pension card, police said. </li></ul><ul><li>Detective Senior Sergeant Neville Beard said the man had not sustained any injuries on his body and his death was not thought to be suspicious. </li></ul><ul><li>“ It appears he may have been exercising in the river yesterday morning before succumbing to the river,” he said. </li></ul><ul><li>“ The person… is of slim to medium athletic build, so it would appear that he’s a windsurfer or a triathlete or a cyclist or something similar.” </li></ul><ul><li>He said it was likely the man had only been in the water for a short time before he died. </li></ul><ul><li>The dead man was wearing a short sleeved black Rip Curl wet suit. </li></ul><ul><li>Water Police divers this morning returned to the area where the man’s body was found, and will continue to search the river near Como for any further items which may help with their inquiries into his death. </li></ul><ul><li>Como resident Les Hull said he discovered the bag containing the man’s belongings while on his daily walk along the foreshore path between the river and Kwinana Freeway. </li></ul><ul><li>“ I did hear that they’d found someone in the river there the other day, so I just went back and rang the police,” he said. </li></ul><ul><li>“ It is sad and I hope (police) get to the end of it.” </li></ul><ul><li>He said the bag contained a pair of jeans, shoes, a beanie, a pair of gloves, and a jacket, as well as a pension card which identified the owner. </li></ul>Continue
  33. 33. Article 5 summary <ul><li>September 15 th 2010-Police Identify man, 37, whose body was found in Swan River </li></ul><ul><li>In this article the Water Police identified a man whose body was found floating in the Swan River. The Water Police discovered the body 200m from the riverbank in front of the Applecross Tennis Club on Ardross Street. The police revealed that he was 37 and from West Leederville. The police have not released the man’s name. A walker found a bag containing clothes and identification belonging to the man who was found. </li></ul><ul><li>According to Detective Senior Sergeant Beard, the man had not sustained any injuries on his body and his death was not believed to be suspicious. It appeared that the man had been exercising and had only been in the water a short time before he died. </li></ul><ul><li>The Water Police returned to the area where he was found. Divers searched the river for any further items which may have helped with their inquiries into his death. </li></ul><ul><li>This article clearly shows the roles performed by the Water Police. It was the police who found the man’s body and then it was them who conducted inquiries into how the man died. They played an important role in trying to understand this death. </li></ul>Back to Newspapers page
  34. 34. Bibliography <ul><li>‘ Are you ready to experience an extraordinary career?’ Available at: http://www.policecareer.vic.gov.au/download/English-Victoria-Police-Website.pdf (Accessed 22nd March 2011) </li></ul><ul><li>‘ At the Academy’. 2011. Available at: http://www.policecareer.vic.gov.au/meet-our-people/at-the-academy.aspx (Accessed 21st March 2011) </li></ul><ul><li>Hunter, Thomas. ‘Police find boozy bandit a-snooze in alley’. 2011. Available at: http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/police-find-boozy-bandit-asnooze-in-alley-20110321-1c2yn.html (Accessed 21 st March 2011) </li></ul><ul><li>Lynch, Jared. ‘Water everywhere as Victoria turns tropical’. 2010. Available at: http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/water-water-everywhere-as-victoria-turns-tropical-20101208-18pro.html (Accessed 21st March 2011) </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Police yet to identify man whose body was found in Swan River’. 2010. Available at: http://www.news.com.au/police-yet-to-identify-man-whose-body-was-found-in-swan-river/story-e6frg13u-1225923641869 (Accessed 22nd March 2011) </li></ul><ul><li>Victorian Police’. 2011. Available at: www.police.vic.gov.au (Accessed22nd March 2011) </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Water Police join hunt for missing man’. 2011. Available at: http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/breaking-news/water-police-join-hunt-for-missing-man/story-e6frf7jx-1226000011112 (Accessed 21st March 2011) </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Water Police target hoon boaters’. 2009. Available at: http://www.theage.com.au/national/water-police-target-hoon-boaters-20091222-laik.html (Accessed 22nd March 2011) </li></ul>Contents page

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