Chapter 1  BehavioralNeurochemistry   Dr. Mohamed Abu-Alsebah  General-, Forensic- & Neuro-           PsychiatristCommunit...
I. Introduction: Complexities in the   Neurochemistry of Behavioral Disorders Certain chemical substances may influence  ...
A. Neurotransmitter disturbancesMany behavioral disorders – particularly  psychiatric and movement disorders – are  associ...
B. Underlying pathologyAll behavioral abnormalities represent: The primary pathologic process Brain’s attempt to correct...
II. Neuronal Transmission of InformationRoman y Cajal: “neuron doctrine”           The  neuron is the basic unit of the ne...
1. Ion channelsThe electrical means of neuronal transfer involves  the action potential: When a neuron is  stimulated, a d...
2. ReceptorsThe chemical means of information transfer  across neurons involves neurochemical  receptors located in the me...
B. Intra-neuronal transportInformation – in the form of specific  chemical substances – can pass through the  body of a ne...
1. Cyclic nucleotides are substances such as  cAMP and cGMP. They are called second messengers because  they help transla...
The increase in cAMP concentration may  then activate cAMP-dependent protein  phosphorylation, causing a change in ion  pe...
c. The regulation of adenylate cyclase occurs  through guanine-nucleotide binding proteins,  G proteins.Gs proteins stimul...
b. The calcium binds with calmodulin, to associate  with and modulate a number of calcium-  dependent enzymes, such as a c...
C. Inter-neuronal transport1. Synapse = connection, the synapses are the  primary facilitators of the inter-neuronal trans...
In some cases the messenger act on  receptors, known as auto-receptors,  on the presynaptic membrane.b. Electrical synapse...
2. Neuroregulators are chemicals that carry    information between neurons.They include neurotransmitters,    neuromodulat...
b. Neuromodulators, released from presynaptic   membranes and exert their effects on receptors.Neuromodulators are release...
3. Types of neurotransmittersa. They are divided into two types, depending on   their effects on the postsynaptic neuron.(...
4. Neurotransmitter criteria        a. Criteria to be considered a                neurotransmitter.(1) It must be present ...
(4) Pharmacologic agents should  alter the dose-response curve of the  applied neurotransmitter in the  same magnitude and...
b. Classification(1) Neurotransmitters that meet all of the criteria are  considered definite neurotransmitters and includ...
5. Steps in neurochemical transmissiona. SynthesisMay occur either near the presynaptic membrane   where it is to be relea...
d. Release(1) For some neuroregulators, a vesicle  containing the regulator liberates its contents.  The regulator may sim...
e. TerminationThe action of a neuroregulator may be terminated   by diffusion out of the receptor area,   metabolism of th...
b. TransductionIt is the process by which regulator binding with the   receptor results in a biologic response of the neur...
Modulator proteins, such as G proteins,  may provide the means through which  neuromodulators and neurohormones  affect sy...
(b) It was thought at one time that one neuron   could possess only one neuroregulator, which   had the same function (exc...
7. Neurochemical methodsThere are two basic ways to study the interaction  between neurotransmitters, hormones, or drugs  ...
(a) Specific binding of a ligand is  characterized by high affinity and low  capacity.(b) Nonspecific binding is character...
(3) Receptors can be isolated and  purified, then a functional system  reconstituted using the purified receptor  and tran...
(3) Autoradiography employs:  Information obtained is similar to that  obtained using immunocytochemistry.(4) High perform...
III. BIOLOGIC AMINESA. Dopamine1. SynthesisTyrosine hydroxylation is the rate-limiting step  in the synthesis of all major...
Two forms of MAO exist. Dopamine is deaminated  by both forms.(a) MAO-A deaminates norepinephrine and  serotonin.(b) MAO-B...
3. ReceptorsThe action of dopamine is either inhibitory or  excitatory. Inhibition is the more common  effect.There are fi...
c. The three additional dopamine receptors are: D3,   D4, and D5 dopamine receptors.Based on their regional brain distribu...
(2) Mesolimbic and mesocortical tractsThe dopaminergic neurons that form these  tracts are found in the ventral tegmental ...
(3) Tuberoinfundibular (tuberohypophyseal) tractThe dopaminergic neurons of this tract are located in  the arcuate and per...
(5) Incertohypothalamic tractA small group of neurons in the zona incerta  project from the dorsal posterior hypothalamus ...
5. Effects on behaviorFrom a behavioral perspective, the most  important dopaminergic tracts are the  nigrostriatal, mesol...
(1) The nigrostriatal tract degenerates in  Parkinson’s disease, resulting in the  clinical picture of akinesia, tremor, r...
Tardive dyskinesia occurs after long-term  treatment with neuroleptic drugs and  usually appears as choreoathetoid  moveme...
b. SchizophreniaDopamine is also important for the organization  of thought and feeling.(1) Schizophrenia – a disorder mar...
(2) The psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia result  from a hyperdopaminergic state, based on some of  the evidence listed ...
B. Norepinephrine1. Synthesis2. Metabolisma. Two metabolites of norepinephrine are  commonly measured in plasma or urine: ...
b. Norepinephrine is released into the  synaptic cleft from storage vesicles by the  process of exocytosis. After release,...
b. α2-Receptors are mainly postsynaptic,  negatively linked to adenylate cyclase,  and decrease the synthesis of  norepine...
d. β2-Receptors are mainly postsynaptic and   also positively linked to adenylate cyclase.e. In the periphery, β1-receptor...
(2) Nonselective β-antagonists: propranolol,  alprenolol, nadolol, and timolol.4. Important brain tractsTwo major groups o...
This nucleus sends projections to the cerebellum and spinal cord and through the median forebrain bundle to the hippocampu...
5. Effects on behaviora. Neuromodulatory functionsNoradrenergic axons projects to most areas  of the brain, and norepineph...
(2) Norepinephrine system mediates an  organism’s orientation to the environment:  When unexpected external sensory stimul...
(1) The catecholamine theory of mood  disorders states that reduced activity of  catecholaminergic systems (usually the  n...
(c) Amphetamines, which cause the release of  norepinephrine, cause an elevation of mood.(d) Tricyclic antidepressants inc...
c. Movement disordersNorepinephrine is involved in various  movement disorders [i.e., autosomal  dominant torsion dystonia...
C. Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)]1. Synthesis2. Metabolisma. Serotonin catabolism involves oxidation  of the amino...
(2) Apart from degradation, serotonin may be  inactivated by reuptake into the presynaptic  neuron, a process that is inhi...
(b) 5-HT1B receptors, found in high density  in the striatum, function as autoreceptors.(c) 5-HT1C receptors in the choroi...
(3) 5-HT3 receptor produces rapid excitatory  effects in postsynaptic neurons. The receptor  is expressed within the hippo...
(4) Other serotonin receptors: recently  identified 5-HT4; 5-HT5, including subtypes 5-  HT5A and 5-HT5B; 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 ...
4. Important brain tractsThe most important serotonergic neurons in  the brain are located in clusters in or around  the m...
5. Effects on behaviorSerotonin is important for many central  processes,     including      pain     perception,  aggress...
(2) Another theory, known as the  permissive serotonin hypothesis,  states that lowered serotonin activity  “permits” low ...
b. SchizophreniaThe      transmethylation       hypothesis     of  schizophrenia asserts that certain methylated  derivati...
D. Histamine1. Synthesis2. MetabolismHistamine is methylated to methyl-histamine and  subsequently      is    oxidized    ...
Histamine H1 and H2 receptors are excitatory in  the hypothalamus, hippocampal formation,  and thalamus; it is mainly inhi...
Within the CNS, H2 receptors are abundantly  expressed in the neocortex, hippocampus,  amygdala, and striatum. H2 receptor...
Particularly high levels of H3 receptor binding are found in the frontal cortex, striatum, amygdaloid complex, and substan...
4. Important brain tractsHistamine is found in high concentrations in  the mesencephalon, hippocampus, thalamus,  basal ga...
a.     Anorexia       nervosa,    an    illness   characterized by excessive weight loss, has   been reported to be treate...
IV. ACETYLCHOLINEA. SynthesisCholine cannot be synthesized in neurons; it is transported into the brain by high- affinity ...
B. MetabolismACh is inactivated by cholinesterases, including  pseudo-cholinesterase                      and  acetylcholi...
1. Nicotinic receptors are channels allowing sodium to   enter the neuron. Therefore, they are excitatory.a. Sites(1) Nico...
2. Muscarinic receptors may be excitatory or   inhibitory. Presynaptic ACh receptors are mainly   muscarinic.a. SitesMusca...
c. TypesMuscarinic receptors are divided into two types,   M1 and M2.(1) M1 receptors are postsynaptic and   excitatory an...
D. Important brain tractsThere is an important cholinergic pathway from  the basal forebrain (the nucleus basalis) to the ...
1. ACh is important in movement both peripherally   and centrally.a. PeripherallyACh is the main transmitter for skeletal ...
2. ACh also is important in memory and  cognitionDementing illnesses such as Alzheimer’s  disease is associated with a los...
V. AMINO ACIDSA. Inhibitory neurotransmitters1. GABAIt has proved to be purely inhibitory in all  studies to date.Unlike m...
a. Synthesisb. MetabolismGABA is catalyzed by GABA transaminase to   succinic semialdehyde, which is oxidized to   succini...
(a) Some GABA-A receptors are coupled to a  recognition site for benzodiazepines, which  potentiate GABA’s inhibitory acti...
(2) Inhibitory interneurons in almost all  areas of the brain contain GABA.(3) GABAergic pathways extend from the  striatu...
2. Glycine structurally is the simplest amino  acid.a. Like GABA, glycine is an inhibitory  neurotransmitter.  Its action ...
B. Excitatory neurotransmittersThe only amino acids act as excitatory  neurotransmitters are glutamate and  aspartate. The...
2. Receptors   There are multiple receptor subtypes for  glutamate.a. Kainate receptors and quisqualate receptors  operate...
3. Important brain tractsGlutamate exists in the corticostriatal pathway  and in cerebellar granule cells, and that  aspar...
b. It also is important for kindling, where repeated   subthreshold electrical stimulation eventually   results in a seizu...
b. Prostaglandins and thromboxanes exist in  every tissue and body fluid, their synthesis is  increased in response to wid...
b. Eicosanoids are released from brain tissue  following ischemia or trauma and may  contribute to the development of edem...
Adenosine receptors also are found in the striatum,  where adenosine may help modulate  dopaminergic transmission.VII. NEU...
- Peptides coexist with the simpler (“classic”)  transmitters within a single neuron, which  contradicts Dale’s principle....
b. In the 1970’s, a class of endogenous  neuropeptides that bind to receptors that  mediate response to opioids named  enk...
2. Endogenous opioids familiesNumerous endogenous opioids have been  identified, which fall into one of three families:  e...
b. Kappa (κ) receptors mediate spinal  analgesia and papillary miosis. Dynorphins are  agonists at these receptors.c. Delt...
4. Effects on behaviora. Many behavioral states and neuropsychiatric  disorders, including thermoregulation, seizure  indu...
B. Gut peptidesThey are found in both the brain and the  digestive tract.1. Substance P has been found in the spinal  cord...
b. It also may be involved in a major  excitatory outflow tract from the  striatum to the substantia nigra and  globus pal...
2. Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a polypeptide that is   released from the gut in response to chime, amino   acids, fats, and o...
3. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)  is a 29-amino acid peptide originally  discovered in the intestine and named f...
4. Somatostatina. It is found in the GIT, in the islets of  Langerhans, and in several areas in the  nervous system.b. Its...
d. Somatostatin injection in animals is   associated with decreased spontaneous   motor activity.e. Increased Somatostatin...
5. Neurotensin is found in the substantia  gelatinosa of the spinal cord, the brain stem  (especially in the motor nucleus...
C. Pituitary, hypothalamic, and pineal  peptides1. Overviewa. Pituitary hormonesThe pituitary gland consists of two main l...
(2) The posterior pituitary secretes vasopressin and   oxytocin.(3) The intermediate lobe is vestigial in adult   humans. ...
2. ACTH (corticotrophin) is found in the limbic  system, brain stem, and thalamus and may be  important in learning, memor...
b. A deficit of cortisol is seen in Addison’s   disease, which may be accompanied by   depression, lethargy, and fatigue.c...
Some patients with mania, schizoaffective,   bulimia, or anorexia nervosa may also exhibit   these findings. Suppression o...
--- GH exhibits a diurnal pattern of  release, with higher levels secreted  during sleep.a. The somatic effects of GH appe...
4. TSH (thyrotropin) causes the release of the  thyroid hormones T3 and T4. The release of  TSH is controlled by TRH.a. TR...
5. LH and FSH regulate ovarian follicle  growth, spermatogenesis, and testosterone  secretion. Release of LH and FSH from ...
6. Prolactin is controlled by PIF and PRF.a. Prolactin regulates the activity of the mammary  glands during lactation. Sle...
7. Vasopressin and oxytocin are formed  from larger precursor hormones known as  neurophysins.a. Synthesis and releaseThey...
(2) The release of vasopressin (ADH) is  increased by stress, pain, exercise, and a  variety of drugs (e.g., morphine, nic...
b. Effects(1) Vasopressin is mainly inhibitory and may be  important in learning, memory, and  attention. Treatment with v...
(b) Centrally, oxytocin may be an inhibitory  neurotransmitter or neuromodulators and may  act in a way opposite to vasopr...
MSH is important in the control of pigmentation  in animals. It may have a role in learning and  memory. MSH and MSH-inhib...
b. Because the pineal gland can transform information   contained in light into chemical information contained in   melato...
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  1. 1. Chapter 1 BehavioralNeurochemistry Dr. Mohamed Abu-Alsebah General-, Forensic- & Neuro- PsychiatristCommunity Mental Health Specialist Director of Mh Services, MoH
  2. 2. I. Introduction: Complexities in the Neurochemistry of Behavioral Disorders Certain chemical substances may influence mood, thought, and action. With the discovery of neuroleptics, antidepressants, lithium, L-dopa, LSD, and other drugs that have a profound effect on normal and abnormal behavior, the field of psychopharmacology has grown considerably and, with it, interest in the basic biochemistry of behavior.
  3. 3. A. Neurotransmitter disturbancesMany behavioral disorders – particularly psychiatric and movement disorders – are associated with disturbances of specific neurotransmitters.1. Although schizophrenia, tardive dyskinesia, and Parkinson’s disease are associated with dopaminergic abnormalities, and depression with dysfunction in norepinephrine pathways, many neurochemical abnormalities are proposed for each of these conditions.2. Response to drugs is a complex issue i.e., very few psychopharmacologic drugs affect a single transmitter system.
  4. 4. B. Underlying pathologyAll behavioral abnormalities represent: The primary pathologic process Brain’s attempt to correct or compensate for it.Conditions involving only a limited number of neurochemical systems usually demonstrate changes in other neurochemical systems.C. Other factors that influence a patient’s neurochemical status include age, gender, diet, and pharmacotherapy – all of which affect behavior.
  5. 5. II. Neuronal Transmission of InformationRoman y Cajal: “neuron doctrine” The neuron is the basic unit of the nervous system.Information basic to behavior is transferred, in the form of specific chemicals and energy, both within neurons and between neurons.A. Neuronal membranesNeuronal membranes play an important role in both intra-neuronal and inter-neuronal processes.They contain the means by which information is transferred from one neuron to the next.Information transfer across neurons occurs via electrical or chemical changes.
  6. 6. 1. Ion channelsThe electrical means of neuronal transfer involves the action potential: When a neuron is stimulated, a dramatic change in the electrical potential across the axonal membrane is propagated down the length of the axon.a. The action potential depends on the opening and closing of ion channels that allow the passage of ions such as Na, K, Cl, and Ca.b. The passage of these ions across the neuronal membrane causes depolarization (in which the electrical potential differences across the membrane rises from approximately -70 mV to -15 mV), followed by repolarization (the baseline high potential differences is restored).
  7. 7. 2. ReceptorsThe chemical means of information transfer across neurons involves neurochemical receptors located in the membrane itself.a. Neurochemical receptors are proteins that bind to specific chemical substances, which results in the eventual triggering of specific processes within the neuron.b. These receptors are important for the action of neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones.
  8. 8. B. Intra-neuronal transportInformation – in the form of specific chemical substances – can pass through the body of a neuron from one portion to another, often along axons or dendrites, and can influence some specific aspect of neuronal function (e.g., nuclear processes, energy metabolism). Cyclic nucleotides, calcium, and phosphatidyl-inositol are important intra-neuronal “messengers”.
  9. 9. 1. Cyclic nucleotides are substances such as cAMP and cGMP. They are called second messengers because they help translate the information received from extracellular messengers (e.g., neurotransmitters, hormones) into an intracellular response. Not all neurotransmitters exert their effects through the cyclic nucleotide system.a. Certain neurotransmitters – by binding to receptors – activate adenylate cyclase, the enzyme that catalyses the formation of cAMP from ATP.
  10. 10. The increase in cAMP concentration may then activate cAMP-dependent protein phosphorylation, causing a change in ion permeability in the neuronal membrane.b. Some receptors (possibly including α2- adrenergic receptors, dopamine D2 receptors, somatostatin receptors, certain muscarinic cholinergic receptors and opiate receptors) inhibit, rather than activate, adenylate cyclase.
  11. 11. c. The regulation of adenylate cyclase occurs through guanine-nucleotide binding proteins, G proteins.Gs proteins stimulate and Gi proteins inhibit adenylate cyclase; the exact function of Go proteins is less clear.2. Calcium and several associated binding proteins – most notably calmodulin – form another second messenger system.a. Depolarization is associated with significant quantities of calcium entering the neuron.
  12. 12. b. The calcium binds with calmodulin, to associate with and modulate a number of calcium- dependent enzymes, such as a calcium- calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, certain types of adenylate cyclase, phosphodiesterase, and ATPase.3. Phosphatidyl-inositol is a membrane phospholipid that is hydrolyzed by a specific phospholipase C following receptor occupation to yield diacylglycerol (DAG) and inositol triphosphate, which in turn activate protein kinase C and increase intracellular calcium, respectively.
  13. 13. C. Inter-neuronal transport1. Synapse = connection, the synapses are the primary facilitators of the inter-neuronal transfer of information.Three synapses : chemical, electrical, and conjoint.a. Chemical synapses: the most important type.Each consists of a specific region where the membranes of two neurons are in close approximation.A chemical messenger released from the pre- synaptic membrane travels across the synaptic cleft and acts on a specific receptor on the postsynaptic membrane.
  14. 14. In some cases the messenger act on receptors, known as auto-receptors, on the presynaptic membrane.b. Electrical synapses, transmit information directly through the transfer of an electrical charge and do not employ chemical messengers.c. Conjoint synapses operate through both chemical and electrical means.
  15. 15. 2. Neuroregulators are chemicals that carry information between neurons.They include neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones. Neurotransmitters are neuroregulators that exert their effects on specific pre- or postsynaptic receptors.The transfer of information by neurotransmitters takes 1 to 2 m.sec, in contrast to that mediated by other neuroregulators, which takes much longer.
  16. 16. b. Neuromodulators, released from presynaptic membranes and exert their effects on receptors.Neuromodulators are released from membranes other than synaptic ones, and they may act on receptors located on large numbers of neurons.Their effects last longer than those of neurotransmitters on certain synapses.c. Neurohormones also act on receptors located on neurons and are released into the systemic circulation and, thus, travel throughout the body, unlike the other neuroregulators.
  17. 17. 3. Types of neurotransmittersa. They are divided into two types, depending on their effects on the postsynaptic neuron.(1) Excitatory neurotransmitters increase the firing of the postsynaptic neuron.(2) Inhibitory neurotransmitters decrease the firing of the postsynaptic neuron.b. Some neurotransmitters are solely excitatory (e.g., glutamate, aspartate) or solely inhibitory (e.g., GABA, glycine), others may function either way (e.g., dopamine, acetylcholine).c. Some transmitters are excitatory or inhibitory at different synapses on the same neuron.
  18. 18. 4. Neurotransmitter criteria a. Criteria to be considered a neurotransmitter.(1) It must be present in nerve terminals.(2) Stimulation of the nerve must cause the release of the transmitter in sufficient amounts to exert its actions on the postsynaptic neuron.(3) The effects of the transmitter on the postsynaptic membrane must be similar to those of transmitter stimulation of the presynaptic nerve, such as activating the same ion channels.
  19. 19. (4) Pharmacologic agents should alter the dose-response curve of the applied neurotransmitter in the same magnitude and direction that they alter the naturally occurring synaptic potential.(5) A mechanism for inactivation or metabolism of the transmitter must exist in the vicinity of the synapse.
  20. 20. b. Classification(1) Neurotransmitters that meet all of the criteria are considered definite neurotransmitters and include ACh, dopamine, norepinephrine, epinephrine, GABA, serotonin, and glycine.(2) Those that meet some, but not all, of the criteria are considered supposed neurotransmitters and include glutamate, aspartate, and substance P.(3) Those that meet only one or two criteria are considered neurotransmitter candidates and include adenosine, cAMP, prostaglandins, and most peptides.
  21. 21. 5. Steps in neurochemical transmissiona. SynthesisMay occur either near the presynaptic membrane where it is to be released or elsewhere in the neuron.Peptide neurotransmitters are synthesized in the soma of the neuron and transported along the axon to the nerve terminals.b. TransportIt is moved from the site of its synthesis to the site of its storage or release.c. StorageOften occurs in vesicles specific to that purpose.
  22. 22. d. Release(1) For some neuroregulators, a vesicle containing the regulator liberates its contents. The regulator may simply diffuses out of both the vesicle and the neuron or the vesicle combines with the neuron plasma membrane, externalizing its contents through the process of exocytosis.(2) The process of release is dependent on the influx of calcium that occurs with depolarization of the pre-synaptic membrane.(3) Autoreceptors on the presynaptic neuron can modulate the release of that transmitter.
  23. 23. e. TerminationThe action of a neuroregulator may be terminated by diffusion out of the receptor area, metabolism of the regulator, or reuptake of the regulator, usually into the presynaptic neuron.Reuptake is the most important process for monoamines, whereas metabolism is important for ACh and the peptides.6. Mechanism of neuro-regulator effectsa. BindingBinding to the recognition site of specific receptors is the first step in the action of neurotransmitters.
  24. 24. b. TransductionIt is the process by which regulator binding with the receptor results in a biologic response of the neuron.(1) Transduction occurs through so-called effector proteins, which are closely linked to the receptor protein.The basic types of effector proteins include nucleotide cyclases that catalyze the formation of cyclic nucleotides and ion channels that control passage of certain ions through the membrane.(2) Modulator proteins may be interposed between the receptor and effector proteins and may themselves have binding sites for neuromodulators and neurohormones.
  25. 25. Modulator proteins, such as G proteins, may provide the means through which neuromodulators and neurohormones affect synaptic function.(a) Some neuromodulators, usually peptides, coexist with neurotransmitters in the same neuron and may regulate the time course and the magnitude of the postsynaptic activity of the neurotransmitter.
  26. 26. (b) It was thought at one time that one neuron could possess only one neuroregulator, which had the same function (excitation or inhibition) at every synapse of that neuron. This was referred to as Dale’s principle, but it is now known to be incorrect.c. AmplificationFollowing transduction, the full response of the neuron to the neurotransmitter occurs through amplification of the initial response, which may occur through the activation of enzymes, proteins phosphorylation, hormone release, or other mechanisms.
  27. 27. 7. Neurochemical methodsThere are two basic ways to study the interaction between neurotransmitters, hormones, or drugs and receptors:Measurement of the biologic response of an isolated organ preparation and measurement of ligand binding to tissue slices or homogenates.The ligand can be one of many agonists or antagonists that bind to a certain receptor.a. Identifying supposed receptors(1) Ideally, putative receptors are identified by receptor saturability, specificity, and reversibility.
  28. 28. (a) Specific binding of a ligand is characterized by high affinity and low capacity.(b) Nonspecific binding is characterized by low affinity and high capacity.(c) Binding of ligand to receptor should be reversible.(2) Much can be learned about receptors using radioactive ligands, or radioligands.The number and affinity of receptors can be determined from a binding assay, in which receptors are mixed with radioligands.
  29. 29. (3) Receptors can be isolated and purified, then a functional system reconstituted using the purified receptor and transduction machinery.b. Identifying specific neurotransmitters or receptors in the CNS(1) Immunocytochemistry.(2) In situ hybridization uses radiolabeled DNA to localize mRNAs specific for particular proteins.
  30. 30. (3) Autoradiography employs: Information obtained is similar to that obtained using immunocytochemistry.(4) High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).(5) Neural tracts may be identified by intracellular dye injections, selective lesioning, retrograde labeling with horseradish peroxidase, or anterograde labeling with certain lectins.
  31. 31. III. BIOLOGIC AMINESA. Dopamine1. SynthesisTyrosine hydroxylation is the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of all major catecholamines (i.e., dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine).2. Metabolisma. Two enzymes are important for the inactivation of catecholamines.(1) Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is located on the outer membrane of the mitochondria oxidative deamination of intracellular, extra vesicular catecholamines.
  32. 32. Two forms of MAO exist. Dopamine is deaminated by both forms.(a) MAO-A deaminates norepinephrine and serotonin.(b) MAO-B deaminates β-phenylethylamine and benzylamine.(2) Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is found on the outer plasma membranes of most cells. COMT methylates most extracellular catecholamines.b. A major metabolite of dopamine in urine and plasma is homovanillic acid (HVA), which is formed through the action of both MAO and COMT, in either order.
  33. 33. 3. ReceptorsThe action of dopamine is either inhibitory or excitatory. Inhibition is the more common effect.There are five types of dopamine receptors:a. D1 receptors are generally postsynaptic and activate adenylate cyclase.b. D2 receptors are both postsynaptic and presynapticThe therapeutic efficacy of antipsychotic drugs are correlated strongly with their affinities for the D2 receptor, implicating this subtype as an important site for the action of antipsychotic drugs.
  34. 34. c. The three additional dopamine receptors are: D3, D4, and D5 dopamine receptors.Based on their regional brain distributions and primary effector mechanisms, the D3 and D4 receptors are D2-like, and D5 are D1-like.4. Important brain tractsa. Major dopaminergic tracts (pathways)(1) Nigrostriatal tractRuns from the pars compacta of the substantia nigra to the striatum.This pathway is important in the initiation of movement as its destruction causes a reduction or loss of movement.
  35. 35. (2) Mesolimbic and mesocortical tractsThe dopaminergic neurons that form these tracts are found in the ventral tegmental area of Tsai, which lies superior and medial to the substantia nigra.The neurons project to the limbic system – including the amygdala, nucleus accumbens, septum, and cingulate gyrus – and to the cerebral cortex, predominantly to the frontal lobes.These tracts are important in affect, cognition, and motivation.
  36. 36. (3) Tuberoinfundibular (tuberohypophyseal) tractThe dopaminergic neurons of this tract are located in the arcuate and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus and project to the median eminence of the hypothalamus and to the intermediate lobe of the pituitary gland.Dopamine is thought to be important in the regulation of prolactin release.(4) Medullary periventricular tractDopaminergic cell bodies are located in the motor nucleus of the vagus nerve projecting to the periventricular and periaqueductal gray areas, the reticular formation, and the spinal cord gray areas.
  37. 37. (5) Incertohypothalamic tractA small group of neurons in the zona incerta project from the dorsal posterior hypothalamus to the dorsal anterior hypothalamus and to the septum.b. Other sitesDopaminergic neurons are also located in the interplexiform cells of the inner nuclear layer of the retina and in the periglomerular cells of the olfactory bulb.These neurons lack axons and make connections via dendrodendritic synapses.
  38. 38. 5. Effects on behaviorFrom a behavioral perspective, the most important dopaminergic tracts are the nigrostriatal, mesolimbic, and mesocortical tracts.a. Parkinsonism and other movement disordersNormal control of voluntary movements relies on a balance between dopaminergic and cholinergic components of the basal ganglia.
  39. 39. (1) The nigrostriatal tract degenerates in Parkinson’s disease, resulting in the clinical picture of akinesia, tremor, rigidity, and loss of postural reflexes.(2) Neuroleptic drugs (because they block postsynaptic dopamine receptors) and reserpine (because it depletes dopamine) also cause Parkinsonism.(3) Certain hyperkinetic disorders (e.g., Huntington’s disease, tardive dyskinesia) are related to a relative excess of dopamine transmission.
  40. 40. Tardive dyskinesia occurs after long-term treatment with neuroleptic drugs and usually appears as choreoathetoid movements of the mouth and hands.(a) Tardive dyskinesia: long-term treatment with neuroleptic drugs causes super- sensitivity of postsynaptic D2 receptors.(b) This hypothesis has been questioned and may not explain the development of tardive dyskinesia only in some patients.
  41. 41. b. SchizophreniaDopamine is also important for the organization of thought and feeling.(1) Schizophrenia – a disorder marked by hallucinations, delusions, thought disorder, and inappropriate or blunted affect – is related to abnormalities in dopamine transmission in the mesolimbic and mesocortical areas of the brain.This is known as the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia. Dopaminergic abnormalities alone do not account for the entire clinical picture.
  42. 42. (2) The psychotic symptoms of schizophrenia result from a hyperdopaminergic state, based on some of the evidence listed below.(a) The ability of neuroleptic drugs to block D2 receptors correlates significantly with their antipsychotic potency.(b) Drugs that enhance dopaminergic transmission (e.g., amphetamine, L-dopa) tend to worsen schizophrenic symptoms and can produce hallucinations and delusions in normal individuals.(c) Increased concentrations of dopamine and dopamine receptor activity in patients with schizophrenia.
  43. 43. B. Norepinephrine1. Synthesis2. Metabolisma. Two metabolites of norepinephrine are commonly measured in plasma or urine: 3- methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxymandelic acid (vanillylmandelic acid, or VMA). 30-40% of urinary MHPG is formed in the brain. Both MHPG and VMA are formed through the oxidative deamination of norepinephrine involving the enzyme MAO-A.
  44. 44. b. Norepinephrine is released into the synaptic cleft from storage vesicles by the process of exocytosis. After release, there is an active reuptake process that removes norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft.3. Receptorsa. α1-Receptors are postsynaptic and act by raising intracellular calcium.Prazosin exerts a relatively selective α1- receptor blockade.
  45. 45. b. α2-Receptors are mainly postsynaptic, negatively linked to adenylate cyclase, and decrease the synthesis of norepinephrine in the presynaptic neuron when stimulated. At low doses, clonidine is an α2-agonist and piperoxan and yohimbine are selective α2- antagonists.c. β1-Receptors are mainly postsynaptic and are positively linked to adenylate cyclase.
  46. 46. d. β2-Receptors are mainly postsynaptic and also positively linked to adenylate cyclase.e. In the periphery, β1-receptors are found predominantly in the heart, whereas β2- receptors are found mainly in the lungs, blood vessels, and vascular beds in skeletal muscle.f. Nonselective β-agonists and β-antagonists(1) Nonselective β-agonists include epinephrine and norepinephrine; these are equipotent on β1-receptors, but epinephrine is much more potent than norepinephrine on β2-receptors.
  47. 47. (2) Nonselective β-antagonists: propranolol, alprenolol, nadolol, and timolol.4. Important brain tractsTwo major groups of noradrenergic neuron tracts exist in the brain.a. The first group arises from the locus ceruleus (“blue spot”), which is a cluster of pigmented neurons located within the pontine central gray area along the lateral aspect of the fourth ventricle.
  48. 48. This nucleus sends projections to the cerebellum and spinal cord and through the median forebrain bundle to the hippocampus, ventral striatum, and entire cerebral cortex.b. The second group of tracts originates in the lateral ventral tegmental area and projects to basal forebrain areas such as the septum and amygdala.
  49. 49. 5. Effects on behaviora. Neuromodulatory functionsNoradrenergic axons projects to most areas of the brain, and norepinephrine is likely an important neuromodulators.(1) Norepinephrine enhances locomotor responses to dopamine; it plays a role in various physiologic functions, including the sleep-wake cycle, pain, anxiety, and arousal.
  50. 50. (2) Norepinephrine system mediates an organism’s orientation to the environment: When unexpected external sensory stimuli arise, norepinephrine neuronal firing increases, whereas it decreases during tonic vegetative activities.b. MoodNorepinephrine is important in the genesis and maintenance of mood and may be related to mood and anxiety disorders.
  51. 51. (1) The catecholamine theory of mood disorders states that reduced activity of catecholaminergic systems (usually the noradrenergic system) in certain brain area may be associated with depression and higher activity with mania.(a) Reserpine, which depletes norepinephrine, causes a state similar to depression.(b) MAO inhibitors (e.g., iproniazid, phenelzine) have antidepressant properties.
  52. 52. (c) Amphetamines, which cause the release of norepinephrine, cause an elevation of mood.(d) Tricyclic antidepressants increase the availability of norepinephrine.(e) Propranolol, a nonselective β-blocker, causes symptom improvement in some patients with mania, but also to worsen depression.(2) There is some indirect pharmacologic evidence of norepinephrine hyperactivity in some schizophrenic patients and in patients with anxiety disorders.
  53. 53. c. Movement disordersNorepinephrine is involved in various movement disorders [i.e., autosomal dominant torsion dystonia, Parkinson’s disease, Tourette’s syndrome (which is marked by vocal and tics), akathisia (a disorder of motor restlessness associated with neuroleptic drugs)]. Some evidence suggests noradrenergic hyperactivity in at least a subset of patients with tardive dyskinesia
  54. 54. C. Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)]1. Synthesis2. Metabolisma. Serotonin catabolism involves oxidation of the amino group, which is catalyzed by MAO (primarily MAO-A), followed by rapid oxidation to 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA).(1) Melatonin is an N-acetylated derivative of serotonin that is made in the pineal gland.
  55. 55. (2) Apart from degradation, serotonin may be inactivated by reuptake into the presynaptic neuron, a process that is inhibited by tricyclic antidepressants. Drugs such as reserpine and tetrabenazine deplete serotonin from the vesicles.3. Receptorsa. Types(1) 5-HT1 receptors preferentially bind serotonin and are separated into several subclasses.(a) 5-HT1A receptors, found in the hippocampus, inhibit cyclic AMP production.
  56. 56. (b) 5-HT1B receptors, found in high density in the striatum, function as autoreceptors.(c) 5-HT1C receptors in the choroids plexus; occupation of 5-HT1C receptors is linked to phosphatidylinositol turnover(2) 5-HT2 receptors preferentially bind spiperone (a drug that is also a D2- antagonist) and are thought to be more important in mediating the behavioral effects of serotonin. They are found in the neocortex and hippocampus and in platelets
  57. 57. (3) 5-HT3 receptor produces rapid excitatory effects in postsynaptic neurons. The receptor is expressed within the hippocampus, neocortex, amygdala, hypothalamus, and brainstem motor nuclei. Outside the brain, it is found in the pituitary gland, enteric nervous system sympathetic ganglia, and in sensory ganglia. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists such as ondansetron (Zofran) have been used as anti- emetic agents and are under evaluation as potential anti-anxiety and cognitive- enhancing agents.
  58. 58. (4) Other serotonin receptors: recently identified 5-HT4; 5-HT5, including subtypes 5- HT5A and 5-HT5B; 5-HT6 and 5-HT7 receptors.(5) Presynaptic serotonin receptors also exist. LSD acts as both a receptor blocker and a partial agonist, and it exerts more potent effects on presynaptic serotonin receptors.b. ActionsThe predominant action of serotonin on receptors is inhibition, although excitation has been described in some cases.
  59. 59. 4. Important brain tractsThe most important serotonergic neurons in the brain are located in clusters in or around the middle, or raphe, of the pons and mesencephalon, including the median and dorsal raphe nuclei.a. The median raphe neurons innervate limbic structures including amygdala.b. The dorsal raphe neurons innervate the striatum, cerebral cortex, thalamus, and cerebellum.
  60. 60. 5. Effects on behaviorSerotonin is important for many central processes, including pain perception, aggression, appetite, thermoregulation, blood pressure control, heart rate, and respiration. It is important for induction of sleep and wakefulness.a. mood disorders(1) It has been suggested that low activity of serotonin in the brain is associated with depression, whereas high activity is associated with mania.
  61. 61. (2) Another theory, known as the permissive serotonin hypothesis, states that lowered serotonin activity “permits” low levels of catecholamines to cause depression and high levels to cause mania.(3) Some serotonin reuptake blockers (e.g., fluoxetine, fluvoxamine) are powerful antidepressants.
  62. 62. b. SchizophreniaThe transmethylation hypothesis of schizophrenia asserts that certain methylated derivatives of serotonin, formed as a result of errors in metabolism, may cause psychosis.(1) This theory is supported by the finding that LSD and serotonin derivatives (e.g., dimethyltryptamine, harmaline, psilocybin) cause hallucinations and behavioral abnormalities.c. Serotonin also probably is involved in OCD.
  63. 63. D. Histamine1. Synthesis2. MetabolismHistamine is methylated to methyl-histamine and subsequently is oxidized to 1,4- methylimidazoleacetic acid.3. ReceptorsThere are three types of histamine receptors, H1, H2, and H3. They exist in the brain and in the periphery. H1 and H2 receptors activate adenylate cyclase.
  64. 64. Histamine H1 and H2 receptors are excitatory in the hypothalamus, hippocampal formation, and thalamus; it is mainly inhibitory in the cerebral cortex.a. Histamine type 1 (H1) receptors are expressed throughout the body, in smooth muscle of the GIT and blood vessel walls. H1 receptors are widely distributed throughout the CNS.b. H2 receptors are widely distributed throughout the body, and are found in gastric mucosa, smooth muscle, cardiac muscle, and cells of the immune system.
  65. 65. Within the CNS, H2 receptors are abundantly expressed in the neocortex, hippocampus, amygdala, and striatum. H2 receptor antagonists are widely used in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease.c. Unlike H1 and H2 histamine receptors, H3 receptors are located presynaptically on axon terminals. Those located on histaminergic terminals act as autoreceptors to inhibit histamine release.H3 receptors are also located on nonhistaminergic nerve terminals, where they inhibit the release of a variety of neurotransmitters.
  66. 66. Particularly high levels of H3 receptor binding are found in the frontal cortex, striatum, amygdaloid complex, and substantia nigra.Lower levels are found in peripheral tissues such as the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and lung.Antagonists of H3 receptors have been proposed to have appetite suppressant, arousing, and cognitive-enhancing properties.
  67. 67. 4. Important brain tractsHistamine is found in high concentrations in the mesencephalon, hippocampus, thalamus, basal ganglia, and cerebral cortex.5. Effects on behaviorHistamine is important in arousal, water intake, vasopressin release, thermoregulation, and cardiovascular function.Blockade of histamine receptors leads to weight gain, sedation, and hypotension.
  68. 68. a. Anorexia nervosa, an illness characterized by excessive weight loss, has been reported to be treated successfully with cyproheptadine, a drug that blocks H2 receptors (it also blocks5-HT receptors).b. The tricyclic antidepressant doxepin, in addition to being a serotonin agonist, also has powerful H1- and H2-receptor- blocking abilities, although it is not clear how this relates to its antidepressant potential.
  69. 69. IV. ACETYLCHOLINEA. SynthesisCholine cannot be synthesized in neurons; it is transported into the brain by high- affinity and low-affinity transport processes.The high-affinity process, which is inhibited by hemicholinium-3, is the primary factor regulating the amount of ACh present in neurons.
  70. 70. B. MetabolismACh is inactivated by cholinesterases, including pseudo-cholinesterase and acetylcholinesterase; the latter is reversibly inhibited by physostigmine and almost irreversibly inhibited by organophosphorus compounds such as those used in insecticides.C. ReceptorsThe two main types of ACh receptors – nicotinic and muscarinic receptors – both occur in the brain.
  71. 71. 1. Nicotinic receptors are channels allowing sodium to enter the neuron. Therefore, they are excitatory.a. Sites(1) Nicotinic receptors in the peripheral nervous system are located on the cell bodies of postganglionic neurons of both the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the ANS.(2) Also are located at the junctions of motor nerves and skeletal muscle.(3) In the brain but less is known about them than about muscarinic receptors.b. Nicotinic receptor agonists include nicotine, and antagonists include curare drugs.
  72. 72. 2. Muscarinic receptors may be excitatory or inhibitory. Presynaptic ACh receptors are mainly muscarinic.a. SitesMuscarinic receptors are located in the peripheral ganglia of both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system.They also are located on the end organs of the parasympathetic nervous system (i.e., smooth muscle and glands).b. Muscarinic receptor agonists include muscarine (a mushroom alkaloid), pilocarpine, and oxotremorine. Antagonists include atropine.
  73. 73. c. TypesMuscarinic receptors are divided into two types, M1 and M2.(1) M1 receptors are postsynaptic and excitatory and are widespread throughout the neocortex.(2) M2 receptors are concentrated in the cortical laminae that demonstrate the greatest choline acetyltransferase activity. They are presynaptic and modulate the release of ACh, probably through inhibition of adenylate cyclase.
  74. 74. D. Important brain tractsThere is an important cholinergic pathway from the basal forebrain (the nucleus basalis) to the hippocampus and probably to the cerebral cortex. The striatum is rich in ACh, where it is found mainly in short intrastriatal neurons.E. Effects on behaviorIn animals, ACh is believed to be important in movement, sleep, aggression, exploratory behavior, sexual behavior, and memory. For humans, the most important effects involve movement and memory.
  75. 75. 1. ACh is important in movement both peripherally and centrally.a. PeripherallyACh is the main transmitter for skeletal muscles; many powerful neurotoxins (e.g., curare, α- bungarotoxin) paralyze by blocking ACh receptors.b. CentrallyACh and dopamine exist in reciprocal balance in the extrapyramidal motor system. A decrease in one (e.g., a decrease in dopamine in Parkinson’s disease) can be offset somewhat by decreasing the other (e.g., by using anticholinergic drugs).
  76. 76. 2. ACh also is important in memory and cognitionDementing illnesses such as Alzheimer’s disease is associated with a loss of cholinergic transmission in the brain – both to the hippocampus and to the cerebral cortex.A decreased number of cholinergic neurons in the nucleus basalis of Meynert (located in the basal forebrain) has been reported in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and certain other dementing disorders.
  77. 77. V. AMINO ACIDSA. Inhibitory neurotransmitters1. GABAIt has proved to be purely inhibitory in all studies to date.Unlike most other neurotransmitters, GABA is limited almost entirely to the CNS.Present in as many as 60% of synapses, GABA is 200 to 1000 times more abundant than dopamine, ACh, norepinephrine, and other transmitters.
  78. 78. a. Synthesisb. MetabolismGABA is catalyzed by GABA transaminase to succinic semialdehyde, which is oxidized to succinic acid, which enters the citric acid cycle.c. ReceptorsAt least two types of GABAergic receptors exist in the CNS.(1) GABA-A receptors are the classic postsynaptic GABA receptors. Muscimol is a selective agonist, and bicuculline (a convulsant) and picrotoxin are selective antagonists.
  79. 79. (a) Some GABA-A receptors are coupled to a recognition site for benzodiazepines, which potentiate GABA’s inhibitory action.(b) Benzodiazepine receptors exist in two forms.(2) GABA-B receptors: Baclofen, a drug used to treat spasticity, is a selective agonist.d. Important brain tractsMany brain pathways contain GABA.(1) GABA is the primary neurotransmitter for Purkinje cells, which are the only efferent neurons for the entire cerebellar cortex.
  80. 80. (2) Inhibitory interneurons in almost all areas of the brain contain GABA.(3) GABAergic pathways extend from the striatum to the substantia nigra and to the globus pallidus, which may be important in movement disorders such as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases.(4) GABAergic pathway extends from the magnocellular neurons of the posterior hypothalamus to the neocortex.
  81. 81. 2. Glycine structurally is the simplest amino acid.a. Like GABA, glycine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter. Its action is much more restricted than that of GABA, however, as it is found only in the brain stem and spinal cord and, possibly, in the retina and diencephalons.b. Strychnine blocks the action of glycine.3. Other possibly inhibitory amino acids include alanine, cystathionine, and serine.
  82. 82. B. Excitatory neurotransmittersThe only amino acids act as excitatory neurotransmitters are glutamate and aspartate. These neurotransmitters, as well as some of their analogs (e.g., kainic acid), are neurotoxic under certain conditions.1. SynthesisBoth glutamate and aspartate can be synthesized from glucose.
  83. 83. 2. Receptors There are multiple receptor subtypes for glutamate.a. Kainate receptors and quisqualate receptors operate to allow the influx of sodium; N-methy- D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, which normally are blocked by physiologic concentrations of magnesium, open to allow sodium and calcium into the cell upon depolarization.b. Phencyclidine (PCP), a common drug of abuse, is an antagonist at the NMDA receptor and has effects on the σ-opioid receptor.
  84. 84. 3. Important brain tractsGlutamate exists in the corticostriatal pathway and in cerebellar granule cells, and that aspartate exists in the hippocampal commissural pathway.Glutamate and aspartate may be the primary excitatory transmitters of the brain.4. Effects on behaviora. Glutamate, especially via NMDA receptors, may be involved in long-term potentiation of neurons in the hippocampus, a process important for memory storage.
  85. 85. b. It also is important for kindling, where repeated subthreshold electrical stimulation eventually results in a seizure.VI. Other Non-peptide Neurotransmitter CandidatesA. Prostaglandins and thromboxanes1. Synthesis and biochemistryThey belong to a family of substances known as eicosanoids, which are products of arachidonic acid metabolism.a. These hormone-like substances are among the most abundant of autacoids (i.e., compounds synthesized at or close to their sites of action
  86. 86. b. Prostaglandins and thromboxanes exist in every tissue and body fluid, their synthesis is increased in response to widely varied stimuli, and they have diverse and complicated biologic actions.2. Nervous system effectsa. Prostaglandins do not appear to function as neurotransmitters, but they may play a neuromodulatory role.Prostaglandin E2 act to inhibit the stimulated release of dopamine and norepinephrine. PGE2 modulates the serotonin system.
  87. 87. b. Eicosanoids are released from brain tissue following ischemia or trauma and may contribute to the development of edema and to deterioration of blood-brain barrier.B. Purines1. ATP may function as a neurotransmitter in the intrinsic, nonadrenergic, noncholinergic neurons of visceral smooth muscle.2. Adenosine may serve as an inhibitory neuromodulators of excitatory cells in the cerebellum, hippocampus, medial geniculate body, and septum.
  88. 88. Adenosine receptors also are found in the striatum, where adenosine may help modulate dopaminergic transmission.VII. NEUROPEPTIDES- Neuropeptides function principally as neurohormones.- They are important in psychoneuroendocrinology.- They may serve as neuromodulators and, in some cases, as neurotransmitters (their course of action is much slower than that of ACh, dopamine, and norepinephrine).
  89. 89. - Peptides coexist with the simpler (“classic”) transmitters within a single neuron, which contradicts Dale’s principle.A. Endogenous opioids1. Overview and terminologya. Opium has been used as a pain reliever and psychotomimetic drug for millennia. In the nineteenth century, it was determined that most of this action is due to the alkaloid morphine.
  90. 90. b. In the 1970’s, a class of endogenous neuropeptides that bind to receptors that mediate response to opioids named enkephalins (meaning “in the head”). Other substances called endorphins (a contraction of “endogenous” and “morphine”).c. Enkephalins and endorphins are called the endogenous opioids.
  91. 91. 2. Endogenous opioids familiesNumerous endogenous opioids have been identified, which fall into one of three families: enkephalins [e.g., methionine and leucine enkephalin (met- and leu-enkephalin)], endorphins (e.g., α-, β-, and γ-endorphins), and dynorphins (e.g., dynorphin A, dynorphin B).3. Opioid receptorsa. Mu (μ) receptors mediate supraspinal analgesia, respiratory depression, and euphoria. Morphine and met-enkephalin are agonists at these receptors.
  92. 92. b. Kappa (κ) receptors mediate spinal analgesia and papillary miosis. Dynorphins are agonists at these receptors.c. Delta (δ) receptors in the CNS are associated with mood components of opioid action. Leu- enkephalin is an agonist at these receptors.d. Epsilon (ε) receptors may produce catatonia. β-endorphin is an agonist at these receptors.e. Sigma (σ) receptors are associated with psychotomimetic effects of certain opiates.
  93. 93. 4. Effects on behaviora. Many behavioral states and neuropsychiatric disorders, including thermoregulation, seizure induction, alcoholism, schizophrenia, general effects on locomotion (especially hypomotility and some movement disorders), and analgesia, are associated with alterations in endogenous opioids, particularly β-endorphin.b. The treatment with opiate antagonists (e.g., naloxone, naltrexone): in the case of narcotic overdose & may be helpful in some cases of self-mutilatory behavior.
  94. 94. B. Gut peptidesThey are found in both the brain and the digestive tract.1. Substance P has been found in the spinal cord, substantia nigra, striatum, amygdala, hypothalamus, and cerebral cortex.a. Substance P may be the principal neurotransmitter for the primary afferent sensory fibers that travel through the dorsal roots to the substantia gelatinosa of the spinal cord and carry information about pain.
  95. 95. b. It also may be involved in a major excitatory outflow tract from the striatum to the substantia nigra and globus pallidus and, thus, be important for movement. Substance P abnormalities have been implicated in the pathophysiology of Huntington’s disease, a hereditary movement disorder in which its levels have been reported to be reduced.
  96. 96. 2. Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a polypeptide that is released from the gut in response to chime, amino acids, fats, and other substances, whereupon it stimulates gallbladder motility and secretion of pancreatic enzymes. CCK is found in the hippocampus, neocortex, brain stem, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, and amygdala.a. Behaviorally, CCK may be associated with satiety.b. CCK coexist with dopamine in neurons in the ventral tegmental area of the brain stem and in the nucleus accumbens – brain regions that are thought to be important in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.
  97. 97. 3. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a 29-amino acid peptide originally discovered in the intestine and named for its ability to alter blood flow in the gut.a. VIP is extremely common in the neocortex, where it has been found in a distribution indicating the VIP neurons may be localized to single cortical columns.b. VIP appears to be excitatory in action and to be coupled with cAMP.
  98. 98. 4. Somatostatina. It is found in the GIT, in the islets of Langerhans, and in several areas in the nervous system.b. Its hormonal actions include suppression of the release of GH and TSH in the brain and suppression of the release of glucagon and insulin in the pancreas.c. It is thought to be important in the production of slow wave sleep and REM sleep, in appetite, and in motor control.
  99. 99. d. Somatostatin injection in animals is associated with decreased spontaneous motor activity.e. Increased Somatostatin levels have been reported in the corpus striatum of patients with Huntington’s disease, whereas decreased levels have been reported in the cortex of patients with Alzheimer’s disease.f. Somatostatin may modulate the activity of the nigrostriatal dopamine tract.
  100. 100. 5. Neurotensin is found in the substantia gelatinosa of the spinal cord, the brain stem (especially in the motor nucleus of the trigeminal nerve and substantia nigra), hypothalamus, amygdala, nucleus accumbens, septum, and anterior pituitary gland.- Neurotensin is excitatory and may play a role in arousal, thermoregulation, and pain perception.- It is involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, mostly because of its coexistence with dopamine in some axon terminals.
  101. 101. C. Pituitary, hypothalamic, and pineal peptides1. Overviewa. Pituitary hormonesThe pituitary gland consists of two main lobes.(1) The anterior pituitary secretes six hormones, most of which have tropic properties (i.e., they have an affinity for a specific target gland). Its hormones include:(a) ACTH (b) GH (c) TSH(d) LH (e) FSH (f) Prolactin
  102. 102. (2) The posterior pituitary secretes vasopressin and oxytocin.(3) The intermediate lobe is vestigial in adult humans. MSH is believed to be secreted from this part of the pituitary gland in animals, but possibly from the anterior pituitary in humans.b. Hypothalamic hormones, or releasing factors, control the release of anterior pituitary hormones. The anterior pituitary hormones control the release of hormones from target endocrine glands.c. Pineal hormones: Melatonin is synthesized in the pineal gland
  103. 103. 2. ACTH (corticotrophin) is found in the limbic system, brain stem, and thalamus and may be important in learning, memory, and attention.- ACTH regulates the release of cortisol; ACTH is regulated by the CRF.- The levels of both ACTH and cortisol exhibit a diurnal variation, and cortisol levels peak at approximately 7 A.M.a. Excess amounts of cortisol are seen in Cushing’s syndrome, which may be associated with depression, mania, hallucinations, delusions, and delirium.
  104. 104. b. A deficit of cortisol is seen in Addison’s disease, which may be accompanied by depression, lethargy, and fatigue.c. A subset of patients with endogenous depression have:--- high cortisol levels,--- loss of the normal diurnal variation in cortisol levels,--- and “early escape” from suppression of cortisol secretion following administration of dexamethasone in the dexamethasone suppression test.
  105. 105. Some patients with mania, schizoaffective, bulimia, or anorexia nervosa may also exhibit these findings. Suppression of cortisol levels during the dexamethasone suppression test, however, indicate the presence of antidepressant- responsive endogenous depressive illness.3. GH (somatotropin) increases protein synthesis, decreases the utilization of carbohydrates, and facilitates the mobilization of fats.--- GH secretion and synthesis are controlled by GH-RF and GH-release inhibiting factor (somatostatin).
  106. 106. --- GH exhibits a diurnal pattern of release, with higher levels secreted during sleep.a. The somatic effects of GH appear to require the involvement of a family of polypeptides called somatomedins.b. Norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin alter GH concentrations, and stress causes increased release of GH.
  107. 107. 4. TSH (thyrotropin) causes the release of the thyroid hormones T3 and T4. The release of TSH is controlled by TRH.a. TRH is localized in the dorsomedial and periventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus.b. TRH is inhibitory to postsynaptic neurons and, apart from its effects on thyroid function, is involved in mood and behavior.Some patients with major depression show a blunted TSH response to intravenous infusion of TRH, which suggests hypothalamic- pituitary dysfunction in major depression.
  108. 108. 5. LH and FSH regulate ovarian follicle growth, spermatogenesis, and testosterone secretion. Release of LH and FSH from the anterior pituitary is regulated by GnRH.a. GnRH injection in males causes an increase in sexual arousal, and injections have been used with some success to treat delayed puberty.b. GnRH may function as a neurotransmitter as well as a hormone, and it may be excitatory or inhibitory.
  109. 109. 6. Prolactin is controlled by PIF and PRF.a. Prolactin regulates the activity of the mammary glands during lactation. Sleep, exercise, pregnancy, and breast-feeding increase circulatory levels of prolactin.b. Dopamine may function physiologically as PIF. Most neuroleptic medications block dopamine receptors in the tuberoinfundibular dopamine tract, causing an increase in circulating prolactin and therefore inducing beast enlargement and lactation. This is a common side effect of neuroleptics in women – which can also occur in men.
  110. 110. 7. Vasopressin and oxytocin are formed from larger precursor hormones known as neurophysins.a. Synthesis and releaseThey are synthesized in large neurons in the supraoptic, & paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus.(1) The neurons from the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei project to the posterior pituitary, where the hormones are released into the circulation.
  111. 111. (2) The release of vasopressin (ADH) is increased by stress, pain, exercise, and a variety of drugs (e.g., morphine, nicotine, barbiturates). Alcohol decreases its release, resulting in diuresis.(3) The release of oxytocin is stimulated by estrogens, vaginal and breast stimulation, and psychic stress.-- Oxytocin release is inhibited by severe pain, increased temperature, and loud noise.
  112. 112. b. Effects(1) Vasopressin is mainly inhibitory and may be important in learning, memory, and attention. Treatment with vasopressin improves memory in patients with dementia and brain damage.(2) Oxytocin(a) The main peripheral effects of oxytocin include stimulation of the myoepithelial cells lining ducts of the beast – causing expression of milk – and inducing contraction of uterine smooth muscles during parturition.
  113. 113. (b) Centrally, oxytocin may be an inhibitory neurotransmitter or neuromodulators and may act in a way opposite to vasopressin in terms of its effects on memory, actually causing amnesia.8. MSH is structurally similar to ACTH. Its release is regulated by dopamine and possibly by MSH-inhibiting factor and MSH-releasing factor.a. MSH is found in the pituitary gland as well as a number of other brain area, including the hypothalamus, and cerebral cortex.
  114. 114. MSH is important in the control of pigmentation in animals. It may have a role in learning and memory. MSH and MSH-inhibiting factor have both been reported to have antidepressant effects.9. Melatonin is synthesized from serotonin in the pineal gland.a. Melatonin has important neuroendocrinologic effects. It is involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. Melatonin synthesis is regulated by the day-night or light-dark cycle, and levels are increased during darkness.
  115. 115. b. Because the pineal gland can transform information contained in light into chemical information contained in melatonin, the pineal gland has been called a “neuroendocrine transducer”.c. Some depressed patients show low nocturnal melatonin levels.d. In seasonal mood disorder, affected individuals have regularly occurring seasonal depressions, usually in the fall and winter. Early morning therapy with bright light (phototherapy) has shown benefit and may be associated normalization of the so-called dim-light onset of melatonin secretion. The role of melatonin is seasonal mood disorder, however, is far from clear.
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