Ch. 4 – Switching Concepts
CCNA 3 version 3.0
Overview

Routers
Switches, Bridges
Hub, Repeaters

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Ethernet networks used to be built using repeaters.
When the ...
Ethernet/802.3 LAN development

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Distance limitations
Ethernet is fundamentally a shared technology where all ...
Bridges

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A bridge is a Layer 2 device used to divide, or segment, a network.
A bridge is capable of collecting and...
Switches

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Switches create a virtual circuit between two connected devices,
establishing a dedicated communicati...
Router

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A router is a Layer 3 device.
Used to “route” traffic between two or more Layer 3 networks.
Routers mak...
Factors that impact network performance
Elements of Ethernet/802.3 networks

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Broadcast data frame delivery of Ethernet/802.3
The carrier sense multiple...
Half-Duplex

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Originally Ethernet was a half-duplex technology.
Using half-duplex, a host could either trans...
Duplex Transmissions

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Simplex Transmission: One way and one way only.

– One way street

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Half-duplex Transmission: E...
Network Congestion

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Today's networks are experiencing an increase in the transmission of
many forms of media:
– Large g...
Network Latency

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Latency, or delay, is the time a frame or a packet takes to travel from
the source station to the ...
Ethernet 10 BASE-T transmission time

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Transmission time equals the number of bits being sent times the bit
time f...
The benefits of using repeaters

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The distance that a LAN can cover is limited due to attenuation.
Attenuation mea...
Full-duplex transmitting

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Full-duplex Ethernet allows the transmission of a packet and the
reception of a dif...
Duplex Transmissions

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Simplex Transmission: One way and one way only.

– One way street

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Half-duplex Transmission: E...
LAN segmentation

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Not the best diagram, let’s look at some examples…
Sending and receiving Ethernet frames on a bus
1111

2222

3333

nnnn

Abbreviated
MAC
Addresses

3333 1111

•
•

When an ...
Sending and receiving Ethernet frames on a bus

1111

Nope
2222

Hey, that’s
me!
3333

Nope
nnnn

Abbreviated
MAC
Addresse...
Sending and receiving Ethernet frames on a bus
1111

•

2222

3333

nnnn

Abbreviated
MAC
Addresses

So, what happens when...
Sending and receiving Ethernet frames on a bus
1111

2222

3333

nnnn

X

Collision!

Abbreviated
MAC
Addresses
Access Methods
Two common types of access methods for LANs include
• Non-Deterministic: Contention methods (Ethernet, IEEE...
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CSMA/CD
CSMA/CD (Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision
Detection)
• Common contention method used with Ethernet ...
•

CSMA/CD and Collisions
CSMA/CD (Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection)
• Listens to the network’s shar...
•

CSMA/CD and Collisions
1111

Notice the
location of
the DA!

Nope
2222

Hey, that’s
me!
3333

Nope
nnnn

Abbreviated
MA...
•

Sending and receiving Ethernet frames via a hub

3333 1111
1111

?

2222

•
•

5555

3333

4444

So, what does a hub do...
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Sending and receiving Ethernet frames via a hub

Hub or
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Sending and receiving Ethernet frames via a hub

3333 1111
1111

2222
Nope

•
•
•

5555
Nope

•
•

3333 For
me!

4444 N...
•

Sending and receiving Ethernet frames via a hub

2222 1111
1111

2222
For
me!

5555
Nope

3333 Nope

4444 Nope

•

Anot...
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Sending and receiving Ethernet frames via a switch
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Sending and receiving Ethernet frames via a switch
Source Address Table
Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC
Add.

3333...
•

No Destination Address in table, Flood
Source Address Table
Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC
Add.
1
1111

switch

3...
•

Destination Address in table, Filter
Source Address Table
Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC
Add.
1
1111
6
3333

swit...
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Destination Address in table, Filter
Source Address Table
Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC
Add.
1
1111
6
3333

3333...
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No Collisions in Switch, Buffering
Source Address Table
Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC
Add.
1
1111
6
3333
9
4444
...
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Collision Domains
Source Address Table
Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC
Add.
1
1111
6
3333
Collision
9
4444

switch...
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Other Information
Source Address Table
Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC
Add.
1
1111
6
3333
9
4444

•

switch

•

•
...
Side Note - Transparent Bridging
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Transparent bridging (normal switching process) is defined in IEEE
802.1d describing t...
Transparent Bridge Process - Jeff Doyle
Receive Packet
Learn source address or refresh aging timer

Is the destination a b...
•

What happens here?
Source Address Table
Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC
Add.
1
1111
6
3333
1
2222
1
3333

1111

•
...
•

What happens here?
Source Address Table
Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC
Add.
1
1111
6
3333
1
2222
1
5555

1111

33...
•

What happens here?
Source Address Table
Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC
Add.
1
1111
6
3333
1
2222
1
5555

1111

33...
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LAN segmentation with routers

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•
•
•
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Routers provide segmentation of networks, adding a latency factor of
20% to 3...
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Layer 2 and layer 3 switching
(routing)

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•
•
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A layer 3 switch is typically a layer 2 switch that includes a routin...
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Symmetric and asymmetric switching

Note: Most switches are now
10/100, which allow you to use
them symmetrically or
as...
Ethernet switch latency

•
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Latency is the period of time from when the beginning of a frame
enters to when the end of t...
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Memory buffering
•

switch

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•
•
1111

3333

Abbreviated
MAC
addresses

•
2222

4444

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An Ethernet switch may use a ...
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Two switching methods

•

•

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Store-and-forward – The entire frame is received before any
forwarding takes place.
– T...
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Cut-through

Cut-through
• Fast-forward – Offers the lowest level of latency.
– Fast-forward switching immediately forw...
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Cut-through

Cut-through
• Fragment-free – Fragment-free switching filters out collision fragments before
forwarding be...
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Two switching methods

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Adaptive cut-through
– In this mode, the switch uses cut-through until it detects
a given num...
Functions of a switch

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The main features of Ethernet switches are:
– Isolate traffic among segments
– Achieve greater a...
How switches learn
addresses
“Learning bridges” or
Learning switches”

•

•
•
•
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Bridges and switches learn in the follo...
Filter or Flood (Switch)

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•

•
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If a switch has the frame’s destination address in its CAM table (or
Source Address Ta...
Filter or Flood (Switch)

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Switches flood frames that are:
– Unknown unicasts
– Layer 2 broadcasts
– Multicasts (unless ...
Why segment LANs? (Layer 2 segments)

Hub

•
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Switch

First is to isolate traffic between segments.
The second reason is...
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Why segment LANs? (Layer 2 segments)

switch

Collision
Domains

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1111

3333

Abbreviated
MAC
addresses

2222

4444

•...
•

Broadcast domains

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 0
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

S w itc h 1

1...
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Switches and broadcast domains

These are logical not
physical representations
of what happens to
these frames.

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Swi...
Switches and broadcast domains

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•
•

When a device wants to send out a Layer 2 broadcast, the destination
MAC address in...
Switches and broadcast domains
Communication between switches and
workstation
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Hubs to VLANs
Part 1
(Part 2 will be discussed when we cover VLANs.)
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Using Hubs
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•
•
•
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Layer 1 devices
Inexpensive
In one port, out the others
One collision domain
One broadcast domain
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Single Hub
Hub 1

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 4
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 ....
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Single Hub
Hub 1

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .2 2
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 ....
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Multiple Hubs
Hub 1

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 2
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

A ll H u b
...
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Using Switches
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•
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Layer 2 devices
Layer 2 filtering based on Destination MAC addresses and
Source Address Table
O...
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Switches create multiple parallel paths
Hub

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 2
2 5 5 .2 5 5...
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Hubs do not create multiple parallel paths
Collision!

Hub

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2...
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Switches create multiple parallel paths
Hub

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 2
2 5 5 .2 5 5...
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Switches create multiple parallel paths
Hub
Frames
buffered

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 ....
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Other Switching Features
Review
• Asymmetric ports: 10 Mbps and 100 Mbps
• Full-duplex ports
• Cut-through versus Store...
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Other Switching Features

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 2
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

S w itc...
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Introducing Multiple Subnets/Networks
without Routers
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•
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Switches are Layer 2 devices
Router are Layer 3 devices
Da...
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Switched Network with Multiple Subnets
ARP Request

172.30.1.21
255.255.255.0

172.30.2.10
255.255.255.0

All Switched ...
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Switched Network with Multiple Subnets
ARP Request

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 0
2 5 5...
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One Solution: Physically separate the subnets

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3
2 5 5 .2 5...
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Another Solution: Use a Router

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

1...
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Switches with multiple subnets
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So far this should have been a review.
Lets see what happens when we have two subne...
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Router-on-a-stick or One-Arm-Router (OAR)
interface e 0
ip address 172.30.1.1 255.255.255.0
ip address 172.30.2.1 255.2...
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Router-on-a-stick or One-Arm-Router (OAR)
interface e 0
ip address 172.30.1.1 255.255.255.0
ip address 172.30.2.1 255.2...
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Router-on-a-stick or One-Arm-Router (OAR)
interface e 0
ip address 172.30.1.1 255.255.255.0
ip address 172.30.2.1 255.2...
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Router-on-a-stick or One-Arm-Router (OAR)
interface e 0
ip address 172.30.1.1 255.255.255.0
ip address 172.30.2.1 255.2...
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Interface for each subnet
1 7 2 . 3 0 . 1 . 1 E0
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

E1 ...
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Still one broadcast domain
1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

R o u te r

1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0...
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Introducing VLANs
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VLAN = Subnet
VLANs create separate broadcast domains within the
switch.
Routers are needed ...
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Layer 2 Broadcast Segmentation
Switch Port: VLAN ID
ARP Request

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0
VLAN 1

S w ...
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Layer 2 Broadcast Segmentation

123456.
121221.

Port
VLAN

Port-centric VLAN Switches
• As the Network Administrator, ...
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Without VLANs – No Broadcast Control
ARP Request

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0

S w itc h 1

1 7 2 .3 0 .2...
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With VLANs – Broadcast Control
Switch Port: VLAN ID
ARP Request

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0
VLAN 1

S w ...
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Inter-VLAN Traffic
Switch Port: VLAN ID

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0
VLAN 1

S w itc h 1

1 7 2 .3 0 .2 ....
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Inter-VLAN Traffic
Switch Port: VLAN ID
To 172.30.2.12

1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0
VLAN 1

S w itc h 1

...
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Inter-VLAN Routing needs a Router
1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .1
2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0
(V L A N 1 )

R o u te r

123456.
121221.

•
...
Ch. 4 – Switching Concepts
CCNA 3 version 3.0
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Switching

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Switching

  1. 1. Ch. 4 – Switching Concepts CCNA 3 version 3.0
  2. 2. Overview Routers Switches, Bridges Hub, Repeaters • • • • Ethernet networks used to be built using repeaters. When the performance of these networks began to suffer because too many devices shared the same segment, network engineers added bridges to create multiple collision domains. As networks grew in size and complexity, the bridge evolved into the modern switch, allowing microsegmentation of the network. Today’s networks typically are built using switches and routers, often with the routing and switching function in the same device.
  3. 3. Ethernet/802.3 LAN development • • • • • • Distance limitations Ethernet is fundamentally a shared technology where all users on a given LAN segment compete for the same available bandwidth. This situation is analogous to a number of cars all trying to access a one-lane road at the same time. Because the road has only one lane, only one car can access it at a time. The introduction of hubs into a network resulted in more users competing for the same bandwidth. Collisions are a by-product of Ethernet networks.
  4. 4. Bridges • • • A bridge is a Layer 2 device used to divide, or segment, a network. A bridge is capable of collecting and selectively passing data frames between two network segments. Bridges do this by learning the MAC address of all devices on each connected segment. Using this information, the bridge builds a bridging table and forwards or blocks traffic based on that table. This results in smaller collision domains and greater network efficiency. • Bridges do NOT restrict broadcast traffic. •
  5. 5. Switches • • • • • Switches create a virtual circuit between two connected devices, establishing a dedicated communication path between two devices. Switches on the network provide microsegmentation. This allows maximum utilization of the available bandwidth. A switch is also able to facilitate multiple, simultaneous virtual circuit connections. Broadcast frames to all connected devices on the network.
  6. 6. Router • • • • • A router is a Layer 3 device. Used to “route” traffic between two or more Layer 3 networks. Routers make decisions based on groups of network addresses, or classes, as opposed to individual Layer 2 MAC addresses. Routers use routing tables to record the Layer 3 addresses of the networks that are directly connected to the local interfaces and network paths learned from neighboring routers. Routers are not compelled to forward broadcasts.
  7. 7. Factors that impact network performance
  8. 8. Elements of Ethernet/802.3 networks • • • • • Broadcast data frame delivery of Ethernet/802.3 The carrier sense multiple access/collision detect (CSMA/CD) method allows only one station to transmit at a time. Multimedia applications with higher bandwidth demand such as video and the Internet, coupled with the broadcast nature of Ethernet, can create network congestion. Normal latency as the frames travel across the layers Extending the distances and increasing latency of the Ethernet/802.3 LANs by using Layer 1 repeaters.
  9. 9. Half-Duplex • • • • • • • Originally Ethernet was a half-duplex technology. Using half-duplex, a host could either transmit or receive at one time, but not both. If the network is already in use, the transmission is delayed. When a collision occurs, the host that first detects the collision will send out a jam signal to the other hosts. Upon receiving the jam signal, each host will stop sending data, then wait for a random period of time before attempting to retransmit. The back-off algorithm generates this random delay. As more hosts are added to the network and begin transmitting, collisions are more likely to occur.
  10. 10. Duplex Transmissions • Simplex Transmission: One way and one way only. – One way street • Half-duplex Transmission: Either way, but only one way at a time. – Two way street, but only one way at a time (land slide). • Full-duplex Transmission: Both ways at the same time. – Two way street
  11. 11. Network Congestion • Today's networks are experiencing an increase in the transmission of many forms of media: – Large graphics files – Images – Full-motion video – Multimedia applications
  12. 12. Network Latency • • • Latency, or delay, is the time a frame or a packet takes to travel from the source station to the final destination. It is important to quantify the total latency of the path between the source and the destination for LANs and WANs. Latency has at least three sources: – First, there is the time it takes the source NIC to place voltage pulses on the wire and the time it takes the receiving NIC to interpret these pulses. This is sometimes called NIC delay. – Second, there is the actual propagation delay as the signal takes time to travel along the cable. – Third, latency is added according to which networking devices, whether they are Layer 1, Layer 2, or Layer 3, are added to the path between the two communicating computers.
  13. 13. Ethernet 10 BASE-T transmission time • • • • Transmission time equals the number of bits being sent times the bit time for a given technology. Another way to think about transmission time is the time it takes a frame to be transmitted. Small frames take a shorter amount of time. Large frames take a longer amount of time. Each 10 Mbps Ethernet bit has a 100 ns transmission window. – Therefore, 1 byte takes a minimum of 800 ns to transmit. – A 64-byte frame, the smallest 10BASE-T frame allowing CSMA/CD to function properly, takes 51,200 ns ( 51.2 microseconds). – Transmission of an entire 1000-byte frame from the source station requires 800 microseconds.
  14. 14. The benefits of using repeaters • • • • The distance that a LAN can cover is limited due to attenuation. Attenuation means that the signal weakens as it travels through the network. The resistance in the cable or medium through which the signal travels causes the loss of signal strength. An Ethernet repeater is a physical layer device on the network that boosts or regenerates the signal on an Ethernet LAN.
  15. 15. Full-duplex transmitting • • • • • • Full-duplex Ethernet allows the transmission of a packet and the reception of a different packet at the same time. To transmit and receive simultaneously, a dedicated switch port is required for each node. The full-duplex Ethernet switch takes advantage of the two pairs of wires in the cable by creating a direct connection between the transmit (TX) at one end of the circuit and the receive (RX) at the other end. Ethernet usually can only use 50%-60% of the available 10 Mbps of bandwidth because of collisions and latency. Full-duplex Ethernet offers 100% of the bandwidth in both directions. This produces a potential 20 Mbps throughput, which results from 10 Mbps TX and 10 Mbps RX.
  16. 16. Duplex Transmissions • Simplex Transmission: One way and one way only. – One way street • Half-duplex Transmission: Either way, but only one way at a time. – Two way street, but only one way at a time (land slide). • Full-duplex Transmission: Both ways at the same time. – Two way street
  17. 17. LAN segmentation • Not the best diagram, let’s look at some examples…
  18. 18. Sending and receiving Ethernet frames on a bus 1111 2222 3333 nnnn Abbreviated MAC Addresses 3333 1111 • • When an Ethernet frame is sent out on the “bus” all devices on the bus receive it. What do they do with it?
  19. 19. Sending and receiving Ethernet frames on a bus 1111 Nope 2222 Hey, that’s me! 3333 Nope nnnn Abbreviated MAC Addresses 3333 1111 • • • Each NIC card compares its own MAC address with the Destination MAC Address. If it matches, it copies in the rest of the frame. If it does NOT match, it ignores the rest of the frame. – Unless you are running a Sniffer program
  20. 20. Sending and receiving Ethernet frames on a bus 1111 • 2222 3333 nnnn Abbreviated MAC Addresses So, what happens when multiple computers try to transmit at the same time?
  21. 21. Sending and receiving Ethernet frames on a bus 1111 2222 3333 nnnn X Collision! Abbreviated MAC Addresses
  22. 22. Access Methods Two common types of access methods for LANs include • Non-Deterministic: Contention methods (Ethernet, IEEE 802.3) – Only one signal can be on a network segment at one time. – Collisions are a normal occurrence on an Ethernet/802.3 LAN • Deterministic: Token Passing (Token Ring)
  23. 23. • CSMA/CD CSMA/CD (Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection) • Common contention method used with Ethernet and IEEE 802.3 • “Let everyone have access whenever they want and we will work it out somehow.”
  24. 24. • CSMA/CD and Collisions CSMA/CD (Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection) • Listens to the network’s shared media to see if any other users on “on the line” by trying to sense a neutral electrical signal or carrier. • If no transmission is sensed, then multiple access allows anyone onto the media without any further permission required. • If two PCs detect a neutral signal and access the shared media at the exact same time, a collision occurs and is detected. • The PCs sense the collision by being unable to deliver the entire frame (coming soon) onto the network. (This is why there are minimum frame lengths along with cable distance and speed limitations. This includes the 5-4-3 rule.) • When a collision occurs, a jamming signal is sent out by the first PC to detect the collision. • Using either a priority or random backoff scheme, the PCs wait certain amount of time before retransmitting. • If collisions continue to occur, the PCs random interval is doubled, lessening the chances of a collision.
  25. 25. • CSMA/CD and Collisions 1111 Notice the location of the DA! Nope 2222 Hey, that’s me! 3333 Nope nnnn Abbreviated MAC Addresses 3333 1111 And as we said, • When information (frame) is transmitted, every PC/NIC on the shared media copies part of the transmitted frame to see if the destination address matches the address of the NIC. • If there is a match, the rest of the frame is copied • If there is NOT a match the rest of the frame is ignored.
  26. 26. • Sending and receiving Ethernet frames via a hub 3333 1111 1111 ? 2222 • • 5555 3333 4444 So, what does a hub do when it receives information? Remember, a hub is nothing more than a multiport repeater.
  27. 27. • Sending and receiving Ethernet frames via a hub Hub or
  28. 28. • Sending and receiving Ethernet frames via a hub 3333 1111 1111 2222 Nope • • • 5555 Nope • • 3333 For me! 4444 Nope • The hub will flood it out all ports except for the incoming port. Hub is a layer 1 device. A hub does NOT look at layer 2 addresses, so it is fast in transmitting data. Disadvantage with hubs: A hub or series of hubs is a single collision domain. A collision will occur if any two or more devices transmit at the same time within the collision domain. More on this later.
  29. 29. • Sending and receiving Ethernet frames via a hub 2222 1111 1111 2222 For me! 5555 Nope 3333 Nope 4444 Nope • Another disadvantage with hubs is that is take up unnecessary bandwidth on other links. Wasted bandwidth
  30. 30. • Sending and receiving Ethernet frames via a switch
  31. 31. • Sending and receiving Ethernet frames via a switch Source Address Table Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC Add. 3333 1111 • switch • • 1111 3333 • Abbreviated MAC addresses 2222 4444 • Switches are also known as learning bridges or learning switches. A switch has a source address table in cache (RAM) where it stores source MAC address after it learns about them. A switch receives an Ethernet frame it searches the source address table for the Destination MAC address. If it finds a match, it filters the frame by only sending it out that port. If there is not a match if floods it out all ports.
  32. 32. • No Destination Address in table, Flood Source Address Table Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC Add. 1 1111 switch 3333 1111 • • • • 1111 3333 • Abbreviated MAC addresses 2222 4444 How does it learn source MAC addresses? First, the switch will see if the SA (1111) is in it’s table. If it is, it resets the timer (more in a moment). If it is NOT in the table it adds it, with the port number. Next, in our scenario, the switch will flood the frame out all other ports, because the DA is not in the source address table.
  33. 33. • Destination Address in table, Filter Source Address Table Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC Add. 1 1111 6 3333 switch 1111 3333 • • • 1111 • 3333 Abbreviated MAC addresses • 2222 4444 Most communications involve some sort of client-server relationship or exchange of information. (You will understand this more as you learn about TCP/IP.) Now 3333 sends data back to 1111. The switch sees if it has the SA stored. It does NOT so it adds it. (This will help next time 1111 sends to 3333.) Next, it checks the DA and in our case it can filter the frame, by sending it only out port 1.
  34. 34. • Destination Address in table, Filter Source Address Table Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC Add. 1 1111 6 3333 3333 1111 switch 1111 3333 • • 1111 Now, because both MAC addresses are in the switch’s table, any information exchanged between 1111 and 3333 can be sent (filtered) out the appropriate port. What happens when two devices send to same destination? What if this was a hub? Where is (are) the collision domain(s) in this example? 3333 Abbreviated MAC addresses 2222 4444 • •
  35. 35. • No Collisions in Switch, Buffering Source Address Table Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC Add. 1 1111 6 3333 9 4444 3333 1111 switch 3333 4444 • • 1111 3333 • Abbreviated MAC addresses 2222 4444 Unlike a hub, a collision does NOT occur, which would cause the two PCs to have to retransmit the frames. Instead the switch buffers the frames and sends them out port #6 one at a time. The sending PCs have no idea that their was another PC wanting to send to the same destination.
  36. 36. • Collision Domains Source Address Table Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC Add. 1 1111 6 3333 Collision 9 4444 switch 3333 1111 Domains 3333 4444 • 1111 3333 • Abbreviated MAC addresses 2222 4444 When there is only one device on a switch port, the collision domain is only between the PC and the switch. (Cisco curriculum is inaccurate on this point.) With a full-duplex PC and switch port, there will be no collision, since the devices and the medium can send and receive at the same time.
  37. 37. • Other Information Source Address Table Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC Add. 1 1111 6 3333 9 4444 • switch • • 1111 3333 Abbreviated MAC addresses • 2222 4444 How long are addresses kept in the Source Address Table? – 5 minutes is common on most vendor switches. How do computers know the Destination MAC address? • ARP Caches and ARP Requests How many addresses can be kept in the table? – Depends on the size of the cache, but 1,024 addresses is common. What about Layer 2 broadcasts? – Layer 2 broadcasts (DA = all 1’s) is flooded out all ports.
  38. 38. Side Note - Transparent Bridging • Transparent bridging (normal switching process) is defined in IEEE 802.1d describing the five bridging processes of: – learning – flooding filtering – forwarding – aging • These will be discussed further in STP (Spanning Tree Protocol)
  39. 39. Transparent Bridge Process - Jeff Doyle Receive Packet Learn source address or refresh aging timer Is the destination a broadcast, multicast or unknown unicast? No Yes Flood Packet Are the source and destination on the same interface? No Yes Filter Packet Forward unicast to correct port
  40. 40. • What happens here? Source Address Table Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC Add. 1 1111 6 3333 1 2222 1 3333 1111 • 3333 1111 2222 5555 3333 Notice the Source Address Table has multiple entries for port #1.
  41. 41. • What happens here? Source Address Table Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC Add. 1 1111 6 3333 1 2222 1 5555 1111 3333 • • • 3333 1111 2222 5555 The switch filters the frame out port #1. But the hub is only a layer 1 device, so it floods it out all ports. Where is the collision domain?
  42. 42. • What happens here? Source Address Table Port Source MAC Add. Port Source MAC Add. 1 1111 6 3333 1 2222 1 5555 1111 3333 Collision Domain 3333 1111 2222 5555
  43. 43. • LAN segmentation with routers • • • • • Routers provide segmentation of networks, adding a latency factor of 20% to 30% over a switched network. This increased latency is because a router operates at the network layer and uses the IP address to determine the best path to the destination node. Bridges and switches provide segmentation within a single network or subnetwork. Routers provide connectivity between networks and subnetworks. Routers also do not forward broadcasts while switches and
  44. 44. • Layer 2 and layer 3 switching (routing) • • • • A layer 3 switch is typically a layer 2 switch that includes a routing process, I.e. does routing. (Oh yea, also known as routing. Got to love those people in Marketing.) Layer 3 switching has many meanings and in many cases is just a marketing term. Layer 3 switching is a function of the network layer. The Layer 3 header information is examined and the packet is forwarded based on the IP address.
  45. 45. • Symmetric and asymmetric switching Note: Most switches are now 10/100, which allow you to use them symmetrically or asymmetrically.
  46. 46. Ethernet switch latency • • Latency is the period of time from when the beginning of a frame enters to when the end of the frame exits the switch. Latency is directly related to the configured switching process and volume of traffic.
  47. 47. • Memory buffering • switch • • • 1111 3333 Abbreviated MAC addresses • 2222 4444 • An Ethernet switch may use a buffering technique to store and forward frames. Buffering may also be used when the destination port is busy. The area of memory where the switch stores the data is called the memory buffer. This memory buffer can use two methods for forwarding frame: – port-based memory buffering – shared memory buffering In port-based memory buffering frames are stored in queues that are linked to specific incoming ports. Shared memory buffering deposits all frames into a common memory buffer which all the ports on the switch share.
  48. 48. • Two switching methods • • • Store-and-forward – The entire frame is received before any forwarding takes place. – The destination and source addresses are read and filters are applied before the frame is forwarded. – CRC Check done Cut-through – The frame is forwarded through the switch before the entire frame is received. – This mode decreases the latency of the transmission, but also reduces error detection. 1900 and 2800 series switches this is configurable, otherwise depends on the model of the switch.
  49. 49. • Cut-through Cut-through • Fast-forward – Offers the lowest level of latency. – Fast-forward switching immediately forwards a packet after reading the destination address. – There may be times when packets are relayed with errors. – Although this occurs infrequently and the destination network adapter will discard the faulty packet upon receipt.
  50. 50. • Cut-through Cut-through • Fragment-free – Fragment-free switching filters out collision fragments before forwarding begins. – Collision fragments are the majority of packet errors. – In a properly functioning network, collision fragments must be smaller than 64 bytes. – Anything greater than 64 bytes is a valid packet and is usually received without error. – Fragment-free switching waits until the packet is determined not to be a collision fragment before forwarding.
  51. 51. • Two switching methods • Adaptive cut-through – In this mode, the switch uses cut-through until it detects a given number of errors. – Once the error threshold is reached, the switch changes to store-and-forward mode.
  52. 52. Functions of a switch • The main features of Ethernet switches are: – Isolate traffic among segments – Achieve greater amount of bandwidth per user by creating smaller collision domains
  53. 53. How switches learn addresses “Learning bridges” or Learning switches” • • • • • Bridges and switches learn in the following ways: – Reading the source MAC address of each received frame or datagram – Recording the port on which the MAC address was received. The bridge or switch learns which addresses belong to the devices connected to each port. The learned addresses and associated port or interface are stored in the addressing table. The bridge examines the destination address of all received frames. The bridge then scans the address table searching for the destination address.
  54. 54. Filter or Flood (Switch) • • • • If a switch has the frame’s destination address in its CAM table (or Source Address Table) it will only send the frame out the appropriate port. If a switch does not have the frame’s destination MAC address in its CAM table, it floods (sends) it out all ports except for the incoming port (the port that the frame came in on) known as an Unknown Unicast, or if the destination MAC address is a broadcast. Note: A CAM table may contain multiple entries per port, if a hub or a switch is attached to that port. Most Ethernet bridges can filter broadcast and multicast frames.
  55. 55. Filter or Flood (Switch) • Switches flood frames that are: – Unknown unicasts – Layer 2 broadcasts – Multicasts (unless running multicast snooping or IGMP) • Multicast are special layer 2 and layer 3 addresses that are sent to devices that belong to that “group”.
  56. 56. Why segment LANs? (Layer 2 segments) Hub • • Switch First is to isolate traffic between segments. The second reason is to achieve more bandwidth per user by creating smaller collision domains.
  57. 57. • Why segment LANs? (Layer 2 segments) switch Collision Domains • 1111 3333 Abbreviated MAC addresses 2222 4444 • A switch employs “microsegmentation” to reduce the collision domain on a LAN. The switch does this by creating dedicated network segments, or point-to-point connections.
  58. 58. • Broadcast domains 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 0 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc e d N e tw o r •A l l ARP huRequestk T w o S b n e ts   • • S w itc h 2 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 6 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 - T w o N e tw o rk s S e v e r a l C o llis io n D o m a in s  O n e p e r s w itc h p o r t O n e B r o a d c a s t D o m a in 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 5 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 4 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 7 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 Even though the LAN switch reduces the size of collision domains, all hosts connected to the switch are still in the same broadcast domain. Therefore, a broadcast from one node will still be seen by all the other nodes connected through the LAN switch.
  59. 59. • Switches and broadcast domains These are logical not physical representations of what happens to these frames. • Switches flood frames that are: – Unknown unicasts – Layer 2 broadcasts – Multicasts (unless running multicast snooping or IGMP) • Multicast are special layer 2 and layer 3 addresses that are sent to devices that belong to that “group”.
  60. 60. Switches and broadcast domains • • • When a device wants to send out a Layer 2 broadcast, the destination MAC address in the frame is set to all ones. A MAC address of all ones is FF:FF:FF:FF:FF:FF in hexadecimal. By setting the destination to this value, all the devices will accept and process the broadcasted frame.
  61. 61. Switches and broadcast domains
  62. 62. Communication between switches and workstation
  63. 63. • Hubs to VLANs Part 1 (Part 2 will be discussed when we cover VLANs.)
  64. 64. • Using Hubs • • • • • Layer 1 devices Inexpensive In one port, out the others One collision domain One broadcast domain
  65. 65. • Single Hub Hub 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 4 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S in g le H u b  O n e N e tw o r k ( I P N e t w o r k A d d r e s s - u s u a lly )  O n e C o llis io n D o m a in  O n e B r o a d c a s t D o m a in This is fine for small workgroups, but does not scale well for larger workgroups or heavy traffic.
  66. 66. • Single Hub Hub 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .2 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 Note: Different color hosts refer to different subnets. S in g le H u b - T w o s u b n e ts  T w o s u b n e ts  O n e C o llis io n D o m a in  O n e B r o a d c a s t D o m a in • • • What if the computers were on two different subnets? Could they communicate within their own subnet? Yes Between subnets? No, need a router. The sending host will check the destination IP address with its own IP address and subnet mask. The AND operation will determine that it is on a different subnet and cannot be reached without sending the packet to a default gateway (router). This is even though they are on the same physical network.
  67. 67. • Multiple Hubs Hub 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 A ll H u b  O ne  O ne  O ne • 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 s N e tw o rk A d d re s s C o llis io n D o m a in B r o a d c a s t D o m a in Hub 2 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 4 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 5 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 7 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 6 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 Same issues as before, with more of an impact on the network.
  68. 68. • Using Switches • • • • Layer 2 devices Layer 2 filtering based on Destination MAC addresses and Source Address Table One collision domain per port One broadcast domain across all switches
  69. 69. • Switches create multiple parallel paths Hub 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h a n d H u b N e tw o r k  O n e N e tw o rk  S e v e r a l C o llis io n D o m a in s  O n e p e r s w it c h p o r t  O n e fo r th e e n tir e H u b  O n e B r o a d c a s t D o m a in 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 4 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 5 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 Two parallel paths: (complete SAT tables) • • Data traffic from 172.30.1.24 to 172.30.1.25 Data traffic from 172.30.1.26 to 172.30.1.2 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 7 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 6 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0
  70. 70. • Hubs do not create multiple parallel paths Collision! Hub 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h a n d H u b N e tw o r k  O n e N e tw o rk  S e v e r a l C o llis io n D o m a in s  O n e p e r s w it c h p o r t  O n e fo r th e e n tir e H u b  O n e B r o a d c a s t D o m a in 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 4 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 5 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 As opposed to the Hub: • • Data traffic from 172.30.1.21 to 172.30.1.22 Data traffic from 172.30.1.23 to 172.30.1.24 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 7 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 6 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0
  71. 71. • Switches create multiple parallel paths Hub 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h a n d H u b N e tw o r k  O n e N e tw o rk  S e v e r a l C o llis io n D o m a in s  O n e p e r s w it c h p o r t  O n e fo r th e e n tir e H u b  O n e B r o a d c a s t D o m a in 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 4 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 5 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 7 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 6 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 Collisions and Switches: What happens when two devices on a switch, send data to another device on the switch? 172.30.1.24 to 172.30.1.25 and 172.30.1.26 to 172.30.1.25
  72. 72. • Switches create multiple parallel paths Hub Frames buffered 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h a n d H u b N e tw o r k  O n e N e tw o rk  S e v e r a l C o llis io n D o m a in s  O n e p e r s w it c h p o r t  O n e fo r th e e n tir e H u b  O n e B r o a d c a s t D o m a in 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 4 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 5 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 7 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 6 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 The switch keeps the frames in buffer memory, and queues the traffic for the host 172.30.1.25. This means that the sending hosts do not know about the collisions and do not have to re-send the frames.
  73. 73. • Other Switching Features Review • Asymmetric ports: 10 Mbps and 100 Mbps • Full-duplex ports • Cut-through versus Store-and-Forward switching
  74. 74. • Other Switching Features 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 4 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 A ll S w itc h e d N e tw o r k  O n e N e tw o rk  S e v e r a l C o llis io n D o m a in s  O n e p e r s w itc h p o r t  O n e B r o a d c a s t D o m a in • • S w itc h 2 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 5 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 6 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 8 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 7 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 Ports between switches and server ports are good candidates for higher bandwidth ports (100 Mbps) and full-duplex ports. Most switch ports today are full-duplex.
  75. 75. • Introducing Multiple Subnets/Networks without Routers • • • Switches are Layer 2 devices Router are Layer 3 devices Data between subnets/networks must pass through a router.
  76. 76. • Switched Network with Multiple Subnets ARP Request 172.30.1.21 255.255.255.0 172.30.2.10 255.255.255.0 All Switched Network - Two Networks  Two Subnets  Several Collision Domains  One per switch port  One Broadcast Domain • • • • Switch 1 172.30.1.23 255.255.255.0 Switch 2 172.30.2.12 255.255.255.0 172.30.1.25 255.255.255.0 172.30.2.14 255.255.255.0 172.30.2.16 255.255.255.0 172.30.1.27 255.255.255.0 What are the issues? Can data travel within the subnet? Yes Can data travel between subnets? No, need a router! What is the impact of a layer 2 broadcast, like an ARP Request?
  77. 77. • Switched Network with Multiple Subnets ARP Request 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 0 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 A ll S w itc h e d N e tw o r k - T w o N e tw o r k s  T w o S u b n e ts  S e v e r a l C o llis io n D o m a in s  O n e p e r s w itc h p o r t  O n e B r o a d c a s t D o m a in • • • S w itc h 2 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 5 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 4 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 6 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 7 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 All devices see the ARP Request, even those on the other subnets that do not need to see it. One broadcast domain means the switches flood all broadcast out all ports, except the incoming port. Switches have no idea of the layer 3 information contained in the ARP Request.This consumes bandwidth on the network and processing cycles on the hosts.
  78. 78. • One Solution: Physically separate the subnets 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 5 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 T w o S w itc h e d N e tw o r k s  T w o S u b n e ts  S e v e r a l C o llis io n D o m a in s  O n e p e r s w itc h p o r t  T w o B r o a d c a s t D o m a in • • S w itc h 2 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 6 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 0 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 6 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 4 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 But still no data can travel between the subnets. How can we get the data to travel between the two subnets?
  79. 79. • Another Solution: Use a Router 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h 1 R o u te r 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 5 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 • S w itc h 2 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 6 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 R o u te d N e tw o rk s  T w o S u b n e ts  S e v e r a l C o llis io n D o m a in s  O n e p e r s w itc h p o r t  C o m m u n ic a tio n b e tw e e n s u b n e ts 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 0 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 6 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 4 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 Two separate broadcast domains, because the router will not forward the layer 2 broadcasts such as ARP Requests.
  80. 80. • Switches with multiple subnets • • So far this should have been a review. Lets see what happens when we have two subnets on a single switch and we want to route between the two subnets.
  81. 81. • Router-on-a-stick or One-Arm-Router (OAR) interface e 0 ip address 172.30.1.1 255.255.255.0 ip address 172.30.2.1 255.255.255.0 secondary R o u te r 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 s e c 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 ARP Request Secondary addresses can be used when the router does not support sub-interfaces which will be discussed later. 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 0 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 • • 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 R o u te d N e tw o rk s  T w o S u b n e ts  C o m m u n ic a tio n b e t w e e n s u b n e t s When a single interface is used to route between subnets or networks, this is know as a router-on-a-stick. To assign multiple ip addresses to the same interface, secondary addresses or subinterfaces are used.
  82. 82. • Router-on-a-stick or One-Arm-Router (OAR) interface e 0 ip address 172.30.1.1 255.255.255.0 ip address 172.30.2.1 255.255.255.0 secondary 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 R o u te r 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 s e c 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 0 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 R o u te d N e tw o rk s Advantages  T w o S u b n e t s  C o m m n ic a ti n b e t w e n s u b n t s • Useful when there areu limitedo Ethernete interfacese on the router. Disadvantage • Because a single link is used to connect multiple subnets, one link is having to carry the traffic for multiple subnets. • Be sure this is link can handle the traffic.
  83. 83. • Router-on-a-stick or One-Arm-Router (OAR) interface e 0 ip address 172.30.1.1 255.255.255.0 ip address 172.30.2.1 255.255.255.0 secondary R o u te r 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 s e c 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 ARP Request 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 0 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 R o u te d N e tw o rk s  T w o S u b n e ts  C o m m u n ic a tio n b e t w e e n s u b n e t s • 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 Still the same problem of the switch forwarding broadcast traffic to all devices on all subnets.
  84. 84. • Router-on-a-stick or One-Arm-Router (OAR) interface e 0 ip address 172.30.1.1 255.255.255.0 ip address 172.30.2.1 255.255.255.0 secondary 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 R o u te r 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 s e c 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 0 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 R o u te d N e tw o rk s  T w o S u b n e ts  C o m m u n ic a tio n b e t w e e n s u b n e t s 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 Remember to have the proper default gateway set for each host. • 172.30.1.0 hosts - default gateway is 172.30.1.1 • 172.30.2.0 hosts - default gateway is 172.30.2.1
  85. 85. • Interface for each subnet 1 7 2 . 3 0 . 1 . 1 E0 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 E1 1 7 2 . 3 0 . 2 . 1 R o u te r S w itc h 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 0 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 R o u te d N e tw o rk s  T w o S u b n e ts  C o m m u n ic a t io n b e t w e e n s u b n e t s • • 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 An Ethernet router interface per subnet may be used instead of one. However this may be difficult if you do not have enough Ethernet ports on your router.
  86. 86. • Still one broadcast domain 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 R o u te r 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 ARP Request 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 0 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 R o u te d N e tw o rk s  T w o S u b n e ts  C o m m u n ic a t io n b e t w e e n s u b n e t s • 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 Still the same problem of the switch forwarding broadcast traffic to all devices on all subnets.
  87. 87. • Introducing VLANs • • • • VLAN = Subnet VLANs create separate broadcast domains within the switch. Routers are needed to pass information between different VLANs This is only an introduction, as we will discuss VLANs and Inter-VLAN Routing in later chapters.
  88. 88. • Layer 2 Broadcast Segmentation Switch Port: VLAN ID ARP Request 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 VLAN 1 S w itc h 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 0 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 VLAN 2 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 VLAN 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 VLAN 2 123456. 121221. Port VLAN Tw o VLANs  T w o S u b n e ts • • An ARP Request from 172.30.1.21 for 172.30.1.23 will only be seen by hosts on that VLAN. The switch will flood broadcast traffic out only those ports belonging to that particular VLAN, in this case VLAN 1.
  89. 89. • Layer 2 Broadcast Segmentation 123456. 121221. Port VLAN Port-centric VLAN Switches • As the Network Administrator, it is your job to assign switch ports to the proper VLAN. • This assignment is only done at the switch and not at the host. • Note: The following diagrams show the VLAN below the host, but it is actually assigned on the switch.
  90. 90. • Without VLANs – No Broadcast Control ARP Request 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 S w itc h 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 0 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 No VLANs  S a m e a s a s in g le V L A N  T w o S u b n e ts • • 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 Without VLANs, the ARP Request would be seen by all hosts. Again, consuming unnecessary network bandwidth and host processing cycles.
  91. 91. • With VLANs – Broadcast Control Switch Port: VLAN ID ARP Request 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 VLAN 1 S w itc h 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 0 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 VLAN 2 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 VLAN 1 Tw o VLANs  T w o S u b n e ts 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 VLAN 2 123456. 121221. Port VLAN
  92. 92. • Inter-VLAN Traffic Switch Port: VLAN ID 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 VLAN 1 S w itc h 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 0 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 VLAN 2 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 VLAN 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 VLAN 2 123456. 121221. Port VLAN Tw o VL Ns 1. Remember that VLANA IDs (numbers) are assigned to the switch port and not to the host. o(Port-centric VLAN switches)  T w S u b n e ts 2. Be sure to have all of the hosts on the same subnet belong to the same VLAN, or you will have problems. • Hosts on subnet 172.30.1.0/24 - VLAN 1 • Hosts on subnet 172.30.2.0/24 - VLAN 2 • etc.
  93. 93. • Inter-VLAN Traffic Switch Port: VLAN ID To 172.30.2.12 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 VLAN 1 S w itc h 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 0 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 VLAN 2 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .2 3 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 VLAN 1 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 VLAN 2 123456. 121221. Port VLAN Tw o VLANs  T w o S u b n e ts • • A switch cannot route data between different VLANs. Note: The host will not even send the Packet unless it has a default gateway to forward it to.
  94. 94. • Inter-VLAN Routing needs a Router 1 7 2 .3 0 .1 .1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 (V L A N 1 ) R o u te r 123456. 121221. • • • 1 7 2 .3 0 .2 .1 2 5 5 .2 5 5 .2 5 5 .0 (V L A N 2 ) Port VLAN A router is need to route traffic between VLANs (VLAN = Subnet). There are various methods of doing this including Router-on-a-stick with trunking (more than one VLAN on the link). This will be discussed later when we get to the chapter on VLANs and Inter-VLAN Routing.
  95. 95. Ch. 4 – Switching Concepts CCNA 3 version 3.0

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