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Mc graw.hill.mcts.windows.vista.client.configuration.study.gu Mc graw.hill.mcts.windows.vista.client.configuration.study.gu Document Transcript

  • MCTS Windows Vista™ Client Configuration Study Guide (Exam 70-620)
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  • MCTS Windows Vista™ Client Configuration Study Guide (Exam 70-620) Curt Simmons McGraw-Hill is an independent entity from Microsoft Corporation and is not affiliated with Microsoft Corporation in any manner. This publication and CD may be used in assisting students to prepare for the Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist exam 70-620. Neither Microsoft Corporation nor McGraw-Hill warrants that use of this publication and CD will ensure passing the relevant exam. Microsoft is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and other countries. New York Chicago San Francisco Lisbon London Madrid Mexico City Milan New Delhi San Juan Seoul Singapore Sydney Toronto
  • Copyright © 2007 by The McGraw-Hill Companies. All rights reserved. Manufactured in the United States of America. Except as permitted under the United States Copyright Act of 1976, no part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the publisher. 0-07-159483-3 The material in this eBook also appears in the print version of this title: 0-07-148999-1. All trademarks are trademarks of their respective owners. Rather than put a trademark symbol after every occurrence of a trademarked name, we use names in an editorial fashion only, and to the benefit of the trademark owner, with no intention of infringement of the trademark. Where such designations appear in this book, they have been printed with initial caps. McGraw-Hill eBooks are available at special quantity discounts to use as premiums and sales promotions, or for use in corporate training programs. For more information, please contact George Hoare, Special Sales, at george_hoare@mcgraw-hill.com or (212) 904-4069. TERMS OF USE This is a copyrighted work and The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. (“McGraw-Hill”) and its licensors reserve all rights in and to the work. Use of this work is subject to these terms. Except as permitted under the Copyright Act of 1976 and the right to store and retrieve one copy of the work, you may not decompile, disassemble, reverse engineer, reproduce, modify, create derivative works based upon, transmit, distribute, disseminate, sell, publish or sublicense the work or any part of it without McGraw-Hill’s prior consent. You may use the work for your own noncommercial and personal use; any other use of the work is strictly prohibited. Your right to use the work may be terminated if you fail to comply with these terms. THE WORK IS PROVIDED “AS IS.” McGRAW-HILL AND ITS LICENSORS MAKE NO GUARANTEES OR WARRANTIES AS TO THE ACCURACY, ADEQUACY OR COMPLETENESS OF OR RESULTS TO BE OBTAINED FROM USING THE WORK, INCLUDING ANY INFORMATION THAT CAN BE ACCESSED THROUGH THE WORK VIA HYPERLINK OR OTHERWISE, AND EXPRESSLY DISCLAIM ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. McGraw-Hill and its licensors do not warrant or guarantee that the functions contained in the work will meet your requirements or that its operation will be uninterrupted or error free. Neither McGraw-Hill nor its licensors shall be liable to you or anyone else for any inaccuracy, error or omission, regardless of cause, in the work or for any damages resulting therefrom. McGraw-Hill has no responsibility for the content of any information accessed through the work. Under no circumstances shall McGraw-Hill and/or its licensors be liable for any indirect, incidental, special, punitive, consequential or similar damages that result from the use of or inability to use the work, even if any of them has been advised of the possibility of such damages. This limitation of liability shall apply to any claim or cause whatsoever whether such claim or cause arises in contract, tort or otherwise. DOI: 10.1036/0071489991
  • Professional Want to learn more? We hope you enjoy this McGraw-Hill eBook! If you’d like more information about this book, its author, or related books and websites, please click here.
  • ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS About the Author Curt Simmons (B.A., M.Ed, MCSE, CTT) is a technology author, trainer, and courseware developer based in Dallas, Texas. Curt specializes in Windows operating systems and networking technologies, and he is the author of more than fifty books focusing on Windows and related networking technologies. He is also the author of the MCSE Windows XP Professional Study Guide. When he is not writing or teaching, Curt spends his time with his wife and daughters. You can reach Curt at curt_simmons@hotmail.com. About the Technical Editor David R. Miller (MCT, MCSE, CISSP, ECSA, CEH, CWNA, CCNA, CNE, Security+, A+, N+, etc.) is an instructor and author of numerous books, curricula, certification exams, and computer-based training videos. He regularly performs as a Microsoft Subject Matter Expert (SME) on several Microsoft product lines, including Windows Vista, Windows Longhorn Server, and Exchange Server 2007. He is the principal author of the information systems security book entitled Security Administrator Street Smarts (Sybex, 2007). David can be reached at DMiller@MicroLinkCorp.com. About LearnKey LearnKey provides self-paced learning content and multimedia delivery solutions to enhance personal skills and business productivity. LearnKey claims the largest library of rich streaming-media training content that engages learners in dynamic media-rich instruction complete with video clips, audio, full-motion graphics, and animated illustrations. LearnKey can be found on the Web at www.LearnKey.com.
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  • CONTENTS AT A GLANCE 1 Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam 2 Install Windows Vista 3 Manage Post-Installation Issues 4 Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer 5 Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall 6 Network with Windows Vista 7 Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 8 Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space ................. 301 9 Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347 10 Troubleshoot Reliability and Performance Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 383 11 Configure Windows Update, Data Protection, and Power Options ...... 431 12 Configure and Troubleshoot Mobile Computing ......................... 473 A About the CD ................................................................ 513 ....................................................................... 517 .......................................................................... 535 Glossary Index ......................... 1 ....................................................... 33 ............................................ ......................... 63 107 .................... 157 .............................................. 199 ........................ 251 vii
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  • For more information about this title, click here CONTENTS About the Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam v xix xxiii xxv .... 1 What Is Configuring the Microsoft Windows Vista Client? . . . . . . . . What Is Windows Vista? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Management Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of Exam 70-620 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Audience Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Getting Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exploring the Exam Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What Is Covered in This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 2: Install Windows Vista . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 3: Manage Post Installation Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 10: Troubleshoot Reliability and Performance Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 5 8 8 9 10 14 14 14 14 15 15 15 15 16 16 ix
  • x MCTS Windows Vista Client Configuration Study Guide Chapter 11: Configure Windows Update, Data Protection, and Power Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 12: Configure and Troubleshoot Mobile Computing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . What You Should Already Know . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Windows 200x . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TCP/IP Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Global Computing Knowledge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ Two-Minute Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Q&A Self Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Self Test Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Install Windows Vista .......................... 33 Identify Hardware Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Minimum Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Windows Vista Upgrade Advisor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Perform a Clean Installation of Windows Vista . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Running a Clean Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 2-1: Performing a Clean Installation of Windows Vista . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Windows PE ................................... Exercise 2-2: Creating an Image with Windows PE . . . . . Upgrade a Previous Version of Windows to Windows Vista . . . . . . . . Getting Ready for an Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Running the Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting Up a Dual-Boot Configuration ................ User State Migration Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 2-3: Using USMT Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Upgrade from One Version of Windows Vista to Another . . . . . . . . . Windows Anytime Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ Two-Minute Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Q&A Self Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Question . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Self Test Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 17 17 17 23 24 25 27 30 34 35 35 37 38 38 43 43 44 45 46 46 48 49 49 50 53 55 59 60 62 Manage Post-Installation Issues ................. 63 Configure and Troubleshoot User Account Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using UAC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 64 16
  • Contents Exercise 3-1: UAC Alerts for Admin Approval Mode . . . Exercise 3-2: UAC Alerts for Standard Users . . . . . . . . . Configure and Troubleshoot Parental Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting Up Parental Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configure Web Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configure Other Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Activity Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 3-3: Configuring Parental Controls . . . . . . . . . . Install and Configure Windows Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Managing Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 3-4: Updating a Driver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 3-5: Uninstalling and Redetecting a Hardware Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 3-6: Using the File Signature Verification Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Troubleshoot Installation and Post-Installation Configuration Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Windows Experience Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Problems with File access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Issues with Temporary Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 3-7: Temporary Recorded Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . Issues with Standard Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Problems with Older Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ Two-Minute Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Q&A Self Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Question . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Self Test Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer xi 67 69 71 72 72 75 78 79 82 82 84 86 88 91 91 91 92 92 93 93 97 99 103 104 106 . . . . 107 Conf igure Internet Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Internet Explorer Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Internet Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 4-1: Using Tabbed Browsing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configure Dynamic Security Settings in Internet Explorer 7 . . . . . . . Tools Menu Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Security Zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Customizing Privacy Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 108 116 124 126 126 129 134
  • xii MCTS Windows Vista Client Configuration Study Guide Configure and Troubleshoot Windows Aero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Turning on Configuring Windows Aero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 4-2: Troubleshooting Windows Aero . . . . . . . . . Using Windows Flip 3D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Certification Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ Two-Minute Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Q&A Self Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Question . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Self Test Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Configure Windows Defender . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Running a Scan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Microsoft Spynet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Working with Quarantined Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Software Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Allowed Items and Windows Defender Web Site . . . . . . . . . Exercise 5-1: Configuring Windows Defender . . . . . . . . . Configure Security Settings in Windows Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Windows Firewall Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Windows Firewall Advanced Settings . . . . . . . . Exercise 5-2: Enabling the Ping Command in Windows Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ Two-Minute Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Q&A Self Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Question . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Self Test Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 137 138 140 142 145 146 148 152 153 155 Network with Windows Vista 158 160 162 166 167 167 168 168 170 172 176 179 183 185 191 192 195 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Conf igure Networking by Using the Network and Sharing Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exploring the Network and Sharing Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . Troubleshoot Connectivity Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vista’s Diagnostic Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 201 214 214
  • Contents Using the Network Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Troubleshooting TCP/IP Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 6-1: Using APIPA or DHCP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring a Static IP Address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 6-2: Manually Configuring TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . Helpful TCP/IP Troubleshooting Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Troubleshooting Virtual Private Network Access . . . . . . . . . Exercise 6-3: Configuring VPN Connectivity . . . . . . . . . Conf igure Remote Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Remote Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 6-4: Using Remote Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Remote Desktop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 6-5: Creating a Remote Desktop Connection . . . ✓ Two-Minute Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Q&A Self Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Question . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Self Test Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 xiii 215 216 217 219 219 222 225 227 229 229 231 232 233 238 240 245 246 348 Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications . . . . 251 Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Windows Media Player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 7-1: Creating a Playlist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Windows Movie Maker and Windows DVD Maker . . . . . . . Exercise 7-2: Configuring the DVD Menu . . . . . . . . . . . Windows Photo Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Windows Media Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 7-3: Configuring an MCE Device . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ Two-Minute Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Q&A Self Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Question . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Self Test Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 252 252 257 263 272 277 282 292 294 295 298 299 300 Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301 Configure Windows Mail ................................ Setting Up a Windows Mail Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302 302
  • xiv MCTS Windows Vista Client Configuration Study Guide Configuring Windows Mail Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sending and Receiving E-Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Managing Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 8-1: Creating a Message Rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Customizing Windows Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Security Features in Windows Mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Message Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configure Windows Meeting Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting Up Windows Meeting Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting Up a New Meeting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Troubleshooting Windows Meeting Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 8-2: Verifying Firewall Settings and Services . . . ✓ Two-Minute Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Q&A Self Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Question . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Self Test Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 306 310 312 313 318 319 321 323 323 325 330 332 335 336 341 342 344 Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347 Configure Windows Sidebar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the Sidebar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding, Removing, and Detaching Gadgets . . . . . . . . . . . . . Customizing Gadgets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 9-1: Adding, Configuring, and Removing a Gadget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configure Windows Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Create Appointments and Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using Multiple Calendars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Calendar Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sharing a Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 9-2: Creating and Configuring a Calendar . . . . . Configure Windows Fax and Scan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fax Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fax and Scan Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 9-3: Creating a Fax Account and Sending a Fax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348 349 352 354 356 358 359 359 362 363 364 365 367 369 370
  • Contents xv ✓ Two-Minute Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Q&A Self Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Question . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Self Test Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 374 376 379 380 382 10 Troubleshoot Reliability and Performance Issues . . . 383 Troubleshoot Performance Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Troubleshoot with Performance Information and Tools . . . . . Gather Performance Information with Task Manager . . . . . . Using Performance Tools to Improve Performance . . . . . . . . Using Performance Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 10-1: Creating a New Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 10-2: Creating a Data Collector Set . . . . . . . . . . . Troubleshoot Reliability Issues with Diagnostic Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . Resource Overview Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reliability Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 10-3: Enabling the RACAgent . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ Two-Minute Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Q&A Self Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Question . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Self Test Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Configure Windows Update, Data Protection, and Power Options 384 384 387 392 404 408 410 413 413 414 417 420 422 426 427 429 . . . . . . . . . . . 431 Configure Windows Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Removing an Installed Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hiding an Update . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Troubleshooting Common Update Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 11-1: Hiding and Resorting an Update . . . . . . . Configure Windows Data Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Backing Up and Restoring Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 11-2: Backing Up Data Using Windows Vista Backup and Restore Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 11-3: Restoring Items Using Windows Vista Backup and Restore Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432 437 437 438 439 442 442 442 448
  • xvi MCTS Windows Vista Client Configuration Study Guide Configuring BitLocker Drive Encryption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 11-4: Configuring a GPO for USB Flash Drive Usage with BitLocker Drive Encryption . . . . . Configure Power Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configure the Power Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 11-5: Creating a Custom Power Plan . . . . . . . . . ✓ Two-Minute Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Q&A Self Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Question . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Self Test Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 449 451 452 455 458 461 463 468 469 471 12 Configure and Troubleshoot Mobile Computing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 473 Configure Mobile Display Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Video Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using Multiple Monitors .......................... Exercise 12-1: Conf iguring Multiple Monitors . . . . . . . . Configure Mobile Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Managing USB Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Managing Wireless Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 12-2: Setting Up a Bluetooth-Enabled Device . . . Using the Sync Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Exercise 12-3: Creating a New Sync Partnership . . . . . . . Using Windows SideShow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configure Tablet PC Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Tablet PC Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Pen and Input Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ✓ Two-Minute Drill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Q&A Self Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Question . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Self Test Answers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lab Answer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A About the CD 474 474 477 478 482 482 484 484 486 487 491 495 495 497 503 504 508 509 510 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 513 System Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LearnKey Online Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 514 514
  • Contents Installing and Running MasterExam and MasterSim . . . . . . . MasterExam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MasterSim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Electronic Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CertCam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Removing Installation(s) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LearnKey Technical Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Glossary Index xvii 514 515 515 515 515 516 516 516 516 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 517 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 535
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  • PREFACE W indows Vista is the latest iteration of the Windows product, bringing a number of new features to the Windows operating system and to the Windows networking. This book is designed to help you learn all about Windows Vista in preparation for Exam 70-620, Configuring Microsoft Windows Vista Client. The Windows Vista MCTS exam tests your ability to support Microsoft Windows Vista by configuring various components of the operating system, including the new built-in applications and networking features. This book, along with your real-world experience and hands-on practice, can help you prepare for and pass the exam. The Windows Vista client exam can provide you with the Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist certification. In keeping with Microsoft’s certification tradition, the Windows Vista exam is challenging. You will need knowledge of Windows Vista both conceptually and in actual configurations. As such, you will need hands-on experience in order to master the exam. This book is designed to help you be successful. Using the knowledge you gain from this book, the hands-on labs you perform, and the practice questions and exam, you will be ready to tackle Exam 70-620. In This Book This book is organized in such a way as to serve as an in-depth review for the Windows Vista client exam for both experienced Windows Vista professionals and newcomers to Microsoft technologies. Each chapter covers a major aspect of the exam, with an emphasis on the “why” as well as the “how to” of working with and supporting Windows Vista. On the CD For more information on the CD-ROM, please see the Appendix. xix
  • xx MCTS Windows Vista Client Configuration Study Guide Exam Readiness Checklist At the end of the Introduction you will find an Exam Readiness Checklist. This table has been constructed to allow you to cross-reference the official exam objectives with the objectives as they are presented and covered in this book. The checklist also allows you to gauge your level of expertise on each objective at the outset of your studies. This should allow you to check your progress and make sure you spend the time you need on more difficult or unfamiliar sections. References have been provided for the objective exactly as the vendor presents it, the section of the study guide that covers that objective, and a chapter and page reference. In Every Chapter We’ve created a set of chapter components that call your attention to important items, reinforce important points, and provide helpful exam-taking hints. Take a look at what you’ll find in every chapter: ■ Every chapter begins with the Certification Objectives—what you need to know in order to pass the section on the exam dealing with the chapter topic. The Objective headings identify the objectives within the chapter, so you’ll always know an objective when you see it! ■ Exam Watch notes call attention to If you want to connect to a computer from behind a firewall, a network administrator must allow communication over TCP port 3398. information about, and potential pitfalls in, the exam. These helpful hints are written by authors who have taken the exams and received their certification⎯who better to tell you what to worry about? They know what you’re about to go through! ■ Practice Exercises are interspersed throughout the chapters. These are step- by-step exercises that allow you to get the hands-on experience you need in order to pass the exams. They help you master skills that are likely to be an area of focus on the exam. Don’t just read through the exercises; they are hands-on practice that you should be comfortable completing. Learning by doing is an effective way to increase your competency with a product. The practical exercises will be very helpful for any simulation exercises you may encounter on the Windows Vista exam.
  • Preface xxi ■ Inside the Exam sidebars highlight some of the most common and confusing problems that students encounter when taking a live exam. Designed to anticipate what the exam will emphasize, they will help ensure you know what you need to know to pass the exam. You can get a leg up on how to respond to those difficult-to-understand questions by focusing extra attention on these sidebars. ■ Scenario and Solutions sections lay out potential problems and solutions in a quick-to-read format. SCENARIO & SOLUTION Can Windows Vista Home basic use the Aero interface as long as the hardware requirements are met? No. Aero is not available in Windows Vista Home edition. I want to make sure a sound card is compatible with Windows Vista before I upgrade. How can I check this? Run the Windows Upgrade Advisor. You can also check the Hardware Compatibility List. ■ The Certification Summary is a succinct review of the chapter and a ✓ Q&A restatement of salient points regarding the exam. ■ The Two-Minute Drill at the end of every chapter is a checklist of the main points of the chapter. It can be used for last-minute review. ■ The Self Test offers questions similar to those found on the certification exams. The answers to these questions, as well as explanations of the answers, can be found at the end of each chapter. By taking the Self Test after completing each chapter, you’ll reinforce what you’ve learned from that chapter while becoming familiar with the structure of the exam questions. ■ The Lab Question at the end of the Self Test section offers a unique and challenging question format that requires the reader to understand multiple chapter concepts to answer correctly. These questions are more complex and more comprehensive than the other questions, as they test your ability to take all the knowledge you have gained from reading the chapter and apply it to complicated, real-world situations. These questions are aimed to be more difficult than what you will find on the exam. If you can answer these questions, you have proven that you know the subject!
  • xxii MCTS Windows Vista Client Configuration Study Guide Some Pointers Once you’ve finished reading this book, set aside some time to do a thorough review. You might want to return to the book several times and make use of all the methods it offers for reviewing the material: 1. Re-read all the Two-Minute Drills, or have someone quiz you. You also can use the drills as a way to do a quick cram before the exam. You might want to make some flash cards out of 3 × 5 index cards that have the Two-Minute Drill material on them. 2. Re-read all the Exam Watch notes. Remember that these notes are written by authors who have taken the exam and passed. They know what you should expect—and what you should be on the lookout for. 3. Review all the S&S sections for quick problem solving. 4. Re-take the Self Tests. Taking the tests right after you’ve read the chapter is a good idea, because the questions help reinforce what you’ve just learned. However, it’s an even better idea to go back later and do all the questions in the book in one sitting. Pretend that you’re taking the live exam. (When you go through the questions the first time, you should mark your answers on a separate piece of paper. That way, you can run through the questions as many times as you need to until you feel comfortable with the material.) 5. Complete the Exercises. Did you do the exercises when you read through each chapter? If not, do them! These exercises are designed to cover exam topics, and there’s no better way to get to know this material than by practicing. Be sure you understand why you are performing each step in each exercise. If there is something you are not clear on, re-read that section in the chapter.
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS W e would like to thank the following people: ■ All the incredibly hard-working folks at McGraw-Hill, including Tim Green and Jennifer Housh for their help in launching a great series and being solid team players. ■ Thanks to Agatha Kim for keeping everything moving in the right direction. Also, a big thanks to David Miller for the fine technical review of this book. xxiii
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  • INTRODUCTION W elcome to the Windows Vista Study Guide. This book is all you need to master the concepts that you are likely to see on Exam 70-620. This book is written so that you can study each individual exam objective and then use the knowledge you gain in order to tackle those difficult and often tricky Microsoft exam questions. The Windows Vista exam tests your knowledge of configuring and supporting Windows Vista as well as networking with Windows Vista. This book’s exploration of the functionality and use of Windows Vista will help you meet the exam’s objectives and provide you with the knowledge that the exam expects you to have. The Windows Vista exam counts as a certification as a Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist. Some of you are probably new to the certification game— in fact, this may be your first exam, or you may be updating your certification or gaining new certifications. Regardless of your status, this book is your best source of information, along with real-world experience and hands-on practice, for passing Exam 70-620. How to Take a Microsoft Certification Exam Microsoft certification exams are complex and difficult, in a number of ways. The exams expect you to have solid conceptual knowledge of the exam objectives, yet you must also have hands-on experience in order to master the exam questions. Put these two elements with a time limit and a lot of reading, and there is no doubt that even the most seasoned test takers—myself included!—find the Microsoft exams nerve-racking. Yet, despite the difficultly, thousands of people have mastered these exams—and you can as well. This book will help you prepare for Exam 70-620, but I’m expecting that you bring some experience and prior knowledge to the table. If you are just getting started in the IT business, you should consider studying some general Windows Vista configuration and networking books before tackling certification— this will make your likelihood of success much higher. xxv
  • xxvi MCTS Windows Vista Client Configuration Study Guide The Windows Vista exam expects you to be a Microsoft product expert. This means that you have to know the ins and outs of Windows Vista, but you must also know how to use and configure Windows Vista’s networking and application features. In order to test your knowledge, you are likely to see the following kinds of questions: ■ Conceptual questions Conceptual questions are designed to test your knowledge. You’ll be asked a question and you must provide the technically correct answer. ■ Interface/diagram questions In order to test your real-world knowledge of Windows Vista, you may see questions that give you portions of the Vista interface or questions that give you a network diagram. You must then examine the interface and correctly answer the question. ■ Scenarios Almost all questions on the exam are scenario based. This means you will be put into a situation where a problem is at hand, and then you will be asked to solve the problem. Even when the question is a basic conceptual question, you’ll find that the exam often gives a long (and often unnecessarily detailed) scenario concerning that question. Test Structure Like all good test takers, you want to know what the test will be like, especially if you have never taken a Microsoft exam before. If you have taken a Microsoft exam, you can expect the same kinds of questions and formats as you have seen in the past. Question Types Let’s first consider the question types that you are likely to see on the exam. The concepts in the following sections apply to the Windows Vista exam, but you will also see these same formats on other exams as well. Multiple Choice Almost all questions on the exam are structured in a multiple choice format. This means that you will see a question and several possible answers. You must click the
  • Introduction xxvii correct answer in order to get the question right. Some questions require two or more answers, while others say “Choose all that apply.” However, the great majority of the exam questions give you a question for which there is one correct answer. For example: Susan is a user on your network. Susan’s laptop computer was recently upgraded to Windows Vista. Susan travels frequently with her laptop, giving sales presentations at various client sites. Susan needs to make certain that she is able to use Windows Vista’s hibernation feature. However, Susan reports that hibernation is unavailable. You check Susan’s computer and discover that the Advanced Power Configuration Interface (ACPI) is not supported in the current computer’s BIOS. You install a new BIOS on the computer. What must you do now? A. Enable Hibernation. B. Reinstall Windows Vista. C. Run the File and Settings Transfer Wizard. D. Enable the L2TP protocol. As you can see, you are presented with a scenario problem and asked to choose the correct answer. By the way, the correct answer here is A. Since the BIOS is updated, she can enable hibernation. Graphical Questions Some questions will contain a screen capture of the interface or a network diagram. When you read the question on the screen, you will need to click the Exhibit button to see the picture. You must then inspect the picture and make a decision about the correct answer. The question is still a multiple choice question, but the exhibit simply helps you answer the question correctly. For example: A user in your company travels frequently with his laptop computer. When the user is away from the office, he primarily uses battery power. During meetings, the user often accesses the laptop, and then the laptop may be idle for an hour or more. You need to configure the laptop to conserve as much power as possible
  • xxviii MCTS Windows Vista Client Configuration Study Guide while still being readily available to the user. Consider the current Power Options configuration: What do you need to change in order to conserve power while keeping the laptop readily available? A. Turn the monitor off after 10 minutes of inactivity. B. Turn on Sleep after 10 minutes of inactivity. C. Configure hibernation to become active after 10 minutes of inactivity. D. Turn off the hard disk after 10 minutes of inactivity. As you can see, you simply review the current setting and determine what needs to be changed in order to meet the needs. In this case, the best answer is B. Sleep conserves the most power without shutting down the system (which hibernation does), so that the system saves power and is readily available. The trick with graphical questions is to keep in mind that the picture is provided to help you answer the question. Do not get so bogged down in the graphic that you lose sight of the question and what the question really wants you to do. Free Response Questions More than likely, your entire Windows Vista exam will be made up of multiple choice questions. However, you may encounter free response questions, which are
  • Introduction xxix usually configured in drag-and-drop fashion. For example, a question may ask you to provide a series of steps in order to complete some action. You’ll see the steps listed, and you have to drag and drop those steps so that they appear in the correct order. Again, you may not see even a single question of this type on this exam, but don’t be surprised if you do. Knowledge-Based and Performance-Based Questions As I have mentioned, the exam consists of knowledge-based and performance-based questions. Often, questions contain a mix of the two question types. Keep in mind that knowledge-based questions require a technical answer from memory, while performance-based questions put you in situations where you must choose the best action. The idea is that the exam tests your real-world experience along with your technical knowledge. Let’s consider a few examples. First, here is a basic knowledge-based question: You need to configure a VPN connection with a Windows Vista computer and a Windows NT 4.0 RRAS Server. In order to configure the connection, which protocol should be used? A. PPTP B. L2TP C. FTP D. HTTP This is a simple knowledge-based question. In order to answer the question correctly, you have to know that VPN connections use either the PPTP or L2TP protocols. However, Windows NT Server 4.0 supports only PPTP, so A is the correct answer. This is a simple knowledge question. Most questions that you will see on the exam will try to combine both knowledge-based concepts and real-world experience. For example: Your company uses a firewall in order to protect network users and sensitive information. You need to configure a Windows Vista computer for Remote Desktop with another Windows Vista computer. One computer is located at a remote office, while the second computer is located on the network. You configure the computers for Remote Desktop, but you are unable to connect to the computer on the network. What needs to be done? A. Configure the firewall to allow Remote Desktop traffic. B. Make the network computer a member server.
  • xxx MCTS Windows Vista Client Configuration Study Guide C. Configure the external computer to allow TCP port 4483. D. Configure the internal computer’s Windows Firewall. This question combines both knowledge-based information and real-world experience. You have to know the acronyms and connection issues that come into play in order to answer the question. The correct answer is A. By default, firewalls do not automatically allow remote desktop traffic, so the firewall will have to be configured to allow the traffic to pass. The Windows Vista exam will not ask you specific questions about how to configure the firewall, but you have to know enough to be aware of what is causing the problem. Study and Testing Strategies In order to successfully pass Exam 70-620, you’ll need to study hard, but you’ll also need to study smartly. This means that you’ll need to use this book and your time wisely. I’ve taken many Microsoft exams and taught many classes to students taking the exams, and the following format works best for most people: 1. Study each chapter. I recommend that you take notes when you study the chapter. Most people remember technical information more accurately if they write the information down. Highlighting huge sections of the chapter will normally not help you, although some highlighting may be beneficial. Review the Certification Summaries and Key Point Summaries at the end of the chapters. 2. Once you have studied the chapter, take the quiz and perform the lab exercise at the end of the chapter. The quiz and the lab exercise are designed to test your knowledge of the chapter’s content. If you miss some questions, make sure you review the missed material before moving on. 3. Make sure you perform the hands-on lab exercises. There is no replacement for hands-on practice, so make sure you have a Windows Vista (preferably Ultimate) computer that you can practice on. Explore! Try different settings and configurations! Get your hands dirty! 4. Continue this same process until you have studied the entire book. Then, go back and review all key point summaries and all quizzes. 5. Take the practice exam on the CD-ROM. The practice exam contains questions similar in style and content to that you may see on the exam. The practice exam is a good measuring tool for determining how ready you are for the exam.
  • Introduction xxxi Once you have studied carefully and smartly, you are ready to take the exam. When you are taking the exam, I recommend the following strategies: ■ Relax. Sure, the exam is important, but it does not define you as a person. If you fail the exam, you can always take it over again, and if you are very nervous about the exam, you probably will not do well. ■ Remember that the exam is timed. This doesn’t mean that you have to be in a ridiculous hurry, but you can’t spend twenty minutes on a single question either. ■ Rule out answers that are incorrect. If you are unsure of an answer, try ruling out answer options that you know are incorrect. This will help narrow your decision and increase the odds that you will answer the question correctly. ■ Answer every question. Unanswered questions are counted as incorrect, so if you simply do not know the answer to a question, make your best guess. ■ The exam contains a “mark” feature. This allows you to mark a question for review at the end of the exam so you can change your answer (if you have time). The mark feature can be helpful, but only mark questions that you may have a reasonable chance of answering correctly. If you simply do not know the answer to the question, take a guess and move on. Spend your time on questions that you at least have a chance of answering correctly. ■ Do not skip questions. If you do not know or are unsure of the answer, take a guess and move on. You may not have time to return to the question, and unanswered questions are counted as incorrect. ■ Make sure you know what the question is asking. Some questions will be confusing and give you a lot of information that you really don’t need. Always ask yourself “What does the question really want to know?” ■ Use scratch paper. The testing center will provide you with as much scratch paper as you want. Use the scratch paper to help untangle complicated questions or sketch diagrams when necessary.
  • xxxii MCTS Windows Vista Client Configuration Study Guide Signing Up Microsoft exams are administered by Sylvan Prometric and Pearson Virtual University Enterprises (VUE). A testing center is near you, and you can find it and register for an exam by visiting one of these: ■ www.prometric.com ■ www.vue.com Regardless of the testing company you choose to go with, the exam and the fee will be the same. When you sign up for a test, you’ll need to provide your contact information and social security number, the exam number you are signing up for, the testing center at which you want to test, and a payment method (credit card or voucher). See Prometric’s and Vue’s Web sites for more details. When You Take the Test And finally, here’s a few tips to remember on test day: ■ You need two forms of ID in order to take the exam—and one of them has to be a picture ID. A driver’s license and social security card work well. ■ You cannot take anything into the testing center except a pen or pencil. Sorry, you can’t take this book along for the ride. ■ Schedule the exam during a time of the day when you are most alert. If you are a morning person, take the exam during the morning—if you are an afternoon/evening person, take the exam then. Do yourself a favor and give yourself the best edge possible. ■ Don’t take the exam on an empty stomach. Food fuels the brain, so eat a modest, balanced meal before the exam. Avoid excessive caffeine or alcohol before the exam—both of these drugs impair your ability to think clearly and to take the exam in a calm manner. ■ If you feel yourself getting overwhelmed during the exam, pause for moment, close your eyes, and count backward from 20 to 1. This will help calm you down. You can take a break if you like, but the exam clock keeps ticking. ■ Finally, keep a good perspective. You probably will not answer every question correctly, and that is okay. Just remember to work carefully and pace yourself. Apply what you know and take the exam questions for what they really are—questions to test your knowledge and skills.
  • Introduction xxxiii Exam 70-620 Official Objective Study Guide Coverage Chapter Number Page Number Installing and Upgrading Windows Vista Identify Hardware Requirements Identify Hardware Requirements 2 34 Perform a Clean Installation Perform a Clean Installation 2 37 Upgrade a Previous Version of Windows to Windows Vista Upgrade a Previous Version of Windows to Windows Vista 2 44 Upgrade from One Edition of Windows Vista to Another Upgrade from One Edition of Windows Vista to Another 2 49 Install and Configure Windows Drivers Install and Configure Windows Drivers 3 82 Troubleshoot installation Post-installation Configuration Issues Troubleshoot PostInstallation Configuration Issues 3 91 Configure and Troubleshoot Windows Aero Configure and Troubleshoot Windows Aero 4 137 Configure and Troubleshoot Parental Controls Configure and Troubleshoot Parental Controls 3 71 Configure Windows Internet Explorer Configure Windows Internet Explorer 4 108 Configure and Troubleshoot User Account Control Configure and Troubleshoot User Account Control 3 64 Configure Windows Defender Configure Windows Defender 5 158 Configuring and Troubleshooting Post-Installation System Settings Configuring Windows Security Features
  • xxxiv MCTS Windows Vista Client Configuration Study Guide Official Objective Study Guide Coverage Chapter Number Page Number Configuring Windows Security Features (Cont.) Configure Dynamic Security for Internet Explorer 7 Configure Dynamic Security for Internet Explorer 7 4 126 Configure Security Settings in Windows Firewall Configure Security Settings in Windows Firewall 5 170 Configure Networking by Using the Network and Sharing Center Configure Networking by Using the Network and Sharing Center 6 200 Troubleshoot Connectivity Issues Troubleshoot Connectivity Issues 6 214 Configure Remote Access Configure Remote Access 6 229 Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 7 252 Configure Windows Mail Configure Windows Mail 8 302 Configure Windows Meeting Space Configure Windows Meeting Space 8 323 Configure Windows Calendar Configure Windows Calendar 9 358 Configure Windows Fax and Scan Configure Windows Fax and Scan 9 365 Configure Windows Sidebar Configure Windows Sidebar 9 348 Troubleshoot Performance Issues Troubleshoot Performance Issues 10 384 Troubleshoot Reliability Issues by Using Built-in Diagnostic Tools Troubleshoot Reliability Issues by Using Built-in Diagnostic Tools 10 413 Configure Windows Update Configure Windows Update 11 432 Configure Data Protection Configure Data Protection 11 442 Configuring Network Connectivity Configuring Applications Included with Windows Vista Maintaining and Optimizing Systems That Run Windows Vista
  • Introduction Official Objective Study Guide Coverage Chapter Number xxxv Page Number Configuring and Troubleshooting Mobile Computing Configure Mobile Display Settings Configure Mobile Display Settings 12 474 Configure Mobile Devices Configure Mobile Devices 12 482 Configure Tablet PC Software Configure Tablet PC Software 12 495 Configure Power Options Configure Power Options 11 452
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  • 1 Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVES 1.01 What Is Configuring the Microsoft Windows Vista Client? 1.02 Overview of Exam 70-620 1.03 What Is Covered in This Book 1.04 ✓ Q&A What You Should Already Know Two-Minute Drill Self Test
  • 2 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam W elcome to Microsoft’s Windows Vista and Exam 70-620. Exam 70-620 is a Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS) exam. Simply passing this exam earns you MCTS status. As Microsoft’s newest operating system at the time of this writing, Windows Vista brings rich functionality, as well as fun, to the latest iteration of Windows. You can think of Windows Vista as a functional and fun leap from Windows XP. While Windows XP brought enhanced security and functionality to the desktop, Windows Vista provides much, much more, making it Microsoft’s most complex, but helpful operating system to date. Designed for both the home and business markets, Windows Vista comes in Home Basic, Home Premium, Business, and Ultimate versions, each supporting different features that we’ll explore in later chapters. As an IT professional, you are expected by Microsoft to be able to install, configure, and administer Windows Vista, primarily in a networking environment. This exam helps to prove to employers that you are ready to tackle the issues and challenges that await you in supporting Windows Vista. CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 1.01 What Is Configuring the Microsoft Windows Vista Client? I’ve taken many Microsoft exams, and whenever I look at an exam title and see the word “configuring,” I always think to myself, “So the exam can ask virtually anything!”—and that sentiment is right. Exam 70-620 expects you to know almost everything about Windows Vista—from planning a deployment to solving implementation and administration problems. However, don’t feel overwhelmed, because this book is designed to give you knowledge and technical skills you’ll need to master Exam 70-620. In order to understand all that the exam covers, it is important to spend a few moments considering a broad overview of Windows Vista. The following sections explore the primary features of Windows Vista so that you can fully understand the type of content on which the exam is likely to focus. What Is Windows Vista? Windows Vista is Microsoft’s contribution to desktop and networking power and friendliness. It is designed to be all things to all people, and that’s a tall order to fill.
  • What Is Configuring the Microsoft Windows Vista Client? 3 Also, with the new Aero interface design that is less cluttered and highly configurable, Windows Vista is easy for the new user to master and complex enough to interest the advanced user. In the following sections, I’ll give you a brief overview of some of Windows Vista’s features (from the perspective of the exam). This is meant to be an overview, not a comprehensive review. Of course, the best introduction to the operating system is to simply get your hands on the keyboard and explore! New Look and Feel Windows Vista provides a new interface for users called Aero, which is available in the Home Premium version and up, assuming the hardware can support it. With this interface, you’ll see a simplification of Windows menus and the desktop, which is now typically clean except for the Recycle Bin, as you can see in Figure 1-1. FIGURE 1-1 Windows Vista desktop
  • 4 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam By accessing the Start menu and Taskbar properties, you can completely configure the way the system looks, and you completely customize the items you see on the Start menu. The idea is to provide a complex operating system that does not overwhelm the user. Users can configure the items they need to see, while allowing other items to remain hidden. By accessing Personalization, shown in Figure 1-2, you can configure the way the desktop looks, along with screen savers, sounds, mouse pointers, and general theme settings. Personalization gives you a streamlined way to configure Windows Vista. You’ll also see a more graphical, streamlined view through the system. Folders are very easy to use and even suggest tasks to users. The Windows Vista Control Panel, shown in Figure 1-3, also hides its typical icon list and tries to help users in a task-based FIGURE 1-2 Personalization options
  • What Is Configuring the Microsoft Windows Vista Client? 5 FIGURE 1-3 Control Panel manner through a category view. Again, here you can also switch to classic view and use Windows Vista in a way that works for you. Overall, the new Vista look is easier, provides more options, and makes the operating system more interesting for end users. Management Tools If you have spent any time working with Windows XP, you’ll quickly recognize many of the features of Windows Vista. Here are some examples of the features: ■ Windows Vista is designed for the NTFS file system, which provides the greatest security and most management features of any file system. ■ Interfaces now have a more graphical look rather than simple dialog boxes and menus. Although you can still access these classic options, you often see a more graphical approach to configuration. For example, System in Control Panel has long been a typical dialog box with numerous tabs, but now you first see a graphical interface, shown in Figure 1-4.
  • 6 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam FIGURE 1-4 System ■ Common management tools also appear in Windows Vista. Performance and the Computer Management console, Event Viewer, Device Manager, Disk Management, and a number of other tools are readily available. The Administrative Tools applet in Control Panel shown in Figure 1-5 gives you access to several features quickly and easily. Networking Windows Vista is a true network operating system. It provides the features and functionality as well as the security technology to make it the operating system of choice for large Microsoft networks as well as the operating system of choice for the home or small office user. Although the exam focuses on Windows Vista as the operating system for medium to large networks, it is an operating system that can
  • What Is Configuring the Microsoft Windows Vista Client? 7 FIGURE 1-5 Administrative Tools essentially function anywhere. Regardless of your networking needs, Windows Vista can meet the goal. Following are some examples you can use for networking: ■ For the home or small office user, Windows Vista can automatically assign itself an IP address and auto-configure TCP/IP settings. In the domain environment, Windows Vista is fully compatible with Windows 200x networking and can function with DHCP and DNS network servers. You can make changes to Windows Vista’s IP configuration “on the fly” without the need to reboot. ■ Universal Plug and Play makes Windows Vista an excellent choice for a network operating system because Windows Vista can more easily detect network media and automatically install the necessary drivers to function with those media. ■ Aside from local area networking, Windows Vista can easily function in a variety of roles. For example, Windows Vista can be used as a file server or as a Web server, and it can be used to establish virtual private networks.
  • 8 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam ■ Internet connectivity is provided via modem or broadband connectivity (or LAN connectivity), and Internet Explorer 7 is the most secure version of IE ever produced. Additionally, home and small office users can take advantage of Internet Connection Sharing, in which one computer is connected to the Internet and other network computers use the Internet via that connection. A simple wizard helps home and small office users configure these connections. New Applications Windows Vista brings along standard Windows applications, such as Windows Media Player, but it also provides an integrated Windows Media Center. There are several new features, such as Windows SideShow and Windows CardSpace, along with several new applications, including Windows Mail, Windows DVD Maker, Windows Photo Gallery, the Sync Center, Windows Meeting Space, and many others. CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 1.02 Overview of Exam 70-620 Exam 70-620 is designed to test your configuration knowledge of Windows Vista. Specifically, the exam expects that you understand enough about the installation, configuration, and administration of Windows Vista to work with it in a Microsoft network environment. In other words, you can expect the exam to focus on Windows Vista in terms of network connectivity and functionality. You’ll primarily face questions that ask you how to configure and use Windows Vista in a variety of network settings. Exam 70-620 builds on basic Windows knowledge and assumes that you have hands-on experience working with Windows Vista in a Microsoft network environment. Because of the real-world experience factor, the exam does not narrowly focus on single objectives. Instead, you are likely to see questions that combine a number of objectives into a scenario. In other words, Microsoft sees your education and technical knowledge as global. Audience Profile As you are beginning your Exam 70-620 studies, it is important to consider the audience for which this exam was developed and to make sure you fit into that
  • Overview of Exam 70-620 9 audience profile. This exam is designed for IT professionals who work in medium to very large networking environments that use Windows Vista as the desktop operating system. You should have real-world experience in supporting Windows Vista and resolving configuration issues and problems for users. The reality, of course, is that not all of us work in environments with those kinds of specifications. So, does that mean you cannot pass the exam? No, not at all. What it does mean is that the exam was written with this audience in mind, so you’ll need to take a close look at the audience profile and your own skills and then determine how you can study and practice using Windows Vista, but this book will help guide you through that study process. Getting Ready Before taking Exam 70-620, I recommend a three-part preparation process that will help you to be successful on exam day: ■ Study this book and get hands-on practice This book is designed to be all you need to master Exam 70-620, but you need to make use of all of the book’s components in order to be successful. Be sure to practice and study all of the chapter content and chapter questions carefully. Then, use the book’s CD-ROM to further practice and test your skills. You also need hands-on practice with Windows Vista (preferably the Ultimate version). ■ Check for updates Although they rarely do, exam certification objectives can change from time to time. So you should get in the habit of periodically checking www.microsoft.com/learning for updates to Exam 70-620 or the MCTS program in general. Also, as you are studying Windows Vista, keep a check on www.microsoft.com/windowsvista for late-breaking news and product updates. ■ Explore the exam format If you are somewhat unfamiliar with Microsoft exams, you can download some sample versions at www.microsoft.com/learning so that you can see the exam format you might have. Be advised that the exams may give you scenario-based questions or interface questions where you are required to configure portions of Windows Vista. Perfect practice makes perfect performance, so know what to expect before arriving at the testing center.
  • 10 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam Exploring the Exam Objectives You can access the Windows Vista client exam objectives by visiting www.microsoft. com/learning. The exam objectives are the primary skills being measured on the exam. It is important that you understand the major focus of those exam objectives, and the following sections review them so that you’ll know what to expect. Installing and Upgrading Windows Vista The exam expects you to know how to prepare for a Windows Vista installation, install the OS, and resolve installation problems. Specifically, you can expect the exam to focus on the following topics: ■ Identify hardware requirements You’ll need to know what hardware requirements are necessary for different versions of Windows Vista. ■ Perform a clean installation You’ll need to know how to perform a clean installation of Windows Vista on a PC that has no operating system or on a PC that had a previous version of Windows. ■ Upgrade to Windows Vista from a previous version of Windows The exam will test your ability to upgrade Windows from a previous version to Windows Vista, including memorized knowledge of upgrade paths and scenarios. ■ Upgrade from one edition of Windows Vista to another edition Since there are several editions of Windows Vista, how you can upgrade between versions and what versions can be upgraded? You need to know this information for the exam. ■ Troubleshoot Windows Vista installation issues For the most part, Windows Vista installation is very easy, but you’ll need to know how to resolve problems when they occur. ■ Install and configure Windows Vista drivers install and configure new hardware drivers. You’ll need to know how to
  • Overview of Exam 70-620 11 Configuring and Troubleshooting Post-Installation System Settings Exam 70-620 expects you to be able to configure initial settings after an installation and resolve post-installation problems. Specifically, you will need to know how to do the following: ■ Troubleshoot post-installation configuration issues This objective covers a wide variety of potential problems and issues regarding general configuration once Windows Vista is installed. ■ Configure and troubleshoot Windows Aero The new Aero interface has specific hardware and configuration requirements you’ll need to know. ■ Configure and troubleshoot parental controls Windows Vista gives you the ability to manage what users can and cannot do via parental controls. You’ll need to know how to configure these controls to meet a variety of needs. ■ Configure Windows Internet Explorer You’ll be expected to know how to configure IE, especially the new features and security options. Configuring Windows Security Features Security is a major focus and concern in the computing world today, and you’ll need to know how to configure and use the security features that are built into Windows Vista. You’ll need to know how to do the following: ■ Configure and troubleshoot User Account Control User Account Control is a new feature in Windows Vista designed to stop malware or spyware (along with other software) from getting installed without your permission. You’ll need to know how to configure UAC and administer it. ■ Configure Windows Defender The exam expects you to know how to configure and use the features found in the Windows Defender software. ■ Configure Dynamic Security for Internet Explorer 7 For the exam, you’ll need to know to configure the new dynamic security features found in IE 7. ■ Configure security settings in Windows Firewall Windows Firewall provides protection against hacker attacks as well as any unauthorized access from the Internet or local network. You’ll need to know how to configure it for the exam.
  • 12 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam Configuring Network Connectivity Windows Vista provides support and ease of configuration for all kinds of network scenarios. You are expected to know how to do the following: ■ Configuring networking by using the Network and Sharing Center The Network and Sharing Center is the primary interface in Windows Vista to configure networking and sharing options. You’ll need to know how to use it for the exam. ■ Troubleshoot connectivity issues You’ll be expected to resolve a number of different connectivity issues and problems using Windows Vista. ■ Configure Remote Access You’ll need to know how to configure Windows Vista to access remote services, such as Virtual Private Networking. Configuring Applications Included with Windows Vista Windows Vista provides a number of new applications. For the exam, you need to know how to do the following: ■ Configure and troubleshoot media applications Windows Vista includes several applications that help you create and manage multimedia. You’ll need to have some hands-on experience with these applications for the exam. ■ Configure Windows Mail Replacing Outlook Express, the new default mail client is Windows Mail. The exam will expect you to be able to configure this mail application. ■ Configure Windows Meeting Space Create virtual meetings on your PC with people on your network or the Internet. ■ Configure Windows Calendar A new calendar application enables you to manage a busy schedule, including the creation of multiple calendars, all from the same interface. ■ Configure Windows Fax and Scan You can now fax and scan documents via new interface that makes management easy. You’ll face some configuration questions on the exam. ■ Configure Windows Sidebar Windows Sidebar features mini-applications called gadgets that deliver information or entertainment on your desktop. You’ll need to know how to configure it for the exam.
  • Overview of Exam 70-620 13 Maintaining and Optimizing Systems That Run Windows Vista Windows Vista includes new features that enable you to optimize and manage system performance more easily. You’ll need to know how to do the following: ■ Troubleshoot performance issues Using the available tools in Windows Vista, you’ll need to know how to troubleshoot and resolve performance problems. ■ Troubleshoot reliability issues by using built-in diagnostic tools Windows Vista includes new tools that enable you to track performance and reliability. You’ll need to know how to use and interpret the data from these tools for the exam. ■ Configure Windows Update Windows Update continues to be the preferred method of getting updates for Windows Vista. You’ll need to know the configuration options for the exam. ■ Configure Data Protection Windows Vista provides built-in data protection tools and options. You’ll need to know all about these for the exam. Configuring and Troubleshooting Mobile Computing Laptop computers have created an entire mobile workforce. As a Windows Vista expert, you’ll need to know how to configure mobile computing for a variety of situations. For the exam, you’ll need to know how to do the following: ■ Configure mobile display settings Since display settings can be different for mobile PCs, you’ll need to know the issues concerning general settings and multiple monitor configurations. ■ Configure mobile devices You’ll need to know how to connect, manage, and sync mobile devices with Windows Vista. ■ Configure Tablet PC software You’ll need to know how to configure tablet PC settings on Windows Vista, including pen and input devices. ■ Configure Power Options and how to manage them. You’ll need to know the different power options
  • 14 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 1.03 What Is Covered in This Book This book is designed to cover every exam objective and give you the technical information and practice you need to master Exam 70-620. Although I cover every exam objective, it is important to note that Microsoft exam objectives are often not listed in a logical order. However, in this book, I have reorganized these exam objectives so that you can learn all about Windows Vista logically and completely. The following sections give you a global overview of the chapters to come. Chapter 2: Install Windows Vista In this chapter, you’ll learn about installing Windows Vista. You’ll find out how to plan a Windows Vista installation according to hardware requirements and how to identify those hardware requirements. You’ll also learn how to perform a clean installation of Windows Vista, upgrade from a previous version of Windows (and what versions can be upgraded), and how to upgrade from one version of Windows Vista to another. Chapter 3: Manage Post Installation Issues Once an installation is complete, you can begin to configure and manage software and possible problems that occur after an installation. In this chapter, you’ll explore how to troubleshoot installation problems, how to troubleshoot post-installation problems, and how to install and configure drivers for Windows Vista so that your hardware will work with the operating system. You’ll also see how to configure and use parental controls and how to configure and manage the new User Account Control (UAC) in Windows Vista. Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer Windows Aero is the name for the new glass-like interface in Windows Vista. Aero has certain hardware requirements and configuration requirements, and since it is a new feature, you can expect to face some exam scenarios where you have to configure and troubleshoot Windows Aero. This chapter will walk you through that process.
  • What Is Covered in This Book 15 Internet Explorer 7 also includes several new features, including tabbed browsing and certain security features. You’ll need to know to use these features and how to configure and troubleshoot problems with IE 7. You’ll find out how in this chapter. Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall Security is a constant issue and concern in the IT world, and Windows Vista provides two software packages that can help prevent spyware, adware, and malware as well as unauthorized access to the computer. Windows Defender protects against common spyware threats, while Windows Firewall blocks unauthorized access to the computer. You’ll face exam situations and configuration issues for both of these security products, and this chapter will show you what you need to know. Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista Windows Vista is easier to configure in terms of networking than previous operating system. Using a new Network and Security Center, you can configure both public and private networking settings with only the click of a button. Vista also provides easy access to network connections and provides a wizard that can help set up a variety of connections, including connections to a wireless network. You’ll need to know how to configure all of these options for the exam. Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications Windows Vista provides several applications to create and manage media. You can create movies and burn DVDs using Windows Movie Maker and Windows DVD Maker. You can also manage photos using the new Windows Photo Gallery. You can manage music and other media using the revamped Windows Media Player and the integrated Windows Media Center. You’ll need to get some hands-on practice with these applications, and you can use this chapter to help you prepare for the exam. Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space Windows Mail is a new application in Windows Vista, designed to work as a standalone default mail client but also to be used in a networking environment. There are many configuration and management options in Windows Mail, and the exam will expect you to have a good command of these features.
  • 16 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam Windows Meeting Space is also a new application that enables you to hold virtual meetings on your PC with people on your network or via the Internet. You can communicate with the meeting attendees and even distribute electronic handouts. This chapter will show you how to use this new software. Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan Windows Vista provides a new calendar, which enables you to create multiple calendars on the same interface. You can manage your work and personal life, and even the calendar of a coworker, via Windows Calendar. You’ll need to know how to configure it for the exam. Also, Windows Vista provides a new fax and scan console that looks similar to an e-mail client. You can fax and scan documents, receive faxes, and store sent and received documents in individual folders. Finally, Windows Sidebar is a new feature of Windows Vista that provides miniapplications called gadgets. You can access available gadgets in Windows Vista and download new ones from the Internet. You’ll find out how to configure and use the Sidebar in this chapter. Chapter 10: Troubleshoot Reliability and Performance Issues Windows Vista includes several tools to enable you to troubleshoot performancerelated problems and examine system reliability. You’ll need to know how to use these tools, including both how to configure the tools and how to analyze data that you receive from them. This chapter explores these tools and shows you how to use them and troubleshoot performance problems. Chapter 11: Configure Windows Update, Data Protection, and Power Options Windows Update continues to be an important part of Windows Vista as a means to download updates for your PC. You can configure a few important Windows Update options for the exam, and this chapter will show you how. You’ll also explore data protection, including data backup and recovery, as well as some new data protection features available in Windows Vista. Finally, this chapter explores the Power Options in Windows Vista, how to configure them, and how to create custom power management solutions.
  • What You Should Already Know 17 Chapter 12: Configure and Troubleshoot Mobile Computing Mobile computing is an important part of any business environment in this day and age, and the exam reflects that fact by including objectives related to configuring and troubleshooting mobile computing. This chapter explores mobile display settings, mobile devices, and the configuration of tablet PC software. You’ll need to know about the new interfaces and configuration features for mobile computing, and this chapter explores those issues. CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 1.04 What You Should Already Know Exam 70-620 is a demanding exam that expects prior knowledge and skills. As such, this is not a beginner’s exam. Before beginning your study of Windows Vista in preparation for Exam 70-620, you should consider the following sections carefully to make sure you have the required prerequisite knowledge. Windows 200x Windows Vista is designed to work on a Windows 200x network. Because of this functionality, you are very likely to see some overlap of Windows 200x networking technologies that are not explicitly stated as objectives for Exam 70-620. It is important to keep in mind that the Windows Vista exam does not test your knowledge of Windows 200x networking—at least, not directly. However, the exam expects you to understand how Windows Vista can be used in a domain environment and how you can configure Windows Vista for such an environment. In order to understand those features, you must have a firm understanding of Windows 200x networking functions and features. In light of this fact, you need a firm command of a few concepts, namely ■ Windows Networking ■ Windows Domain Controller and Member Server Roles ■ Active Directory Management ■ Group Policy ■ Remote Access Service ■ Virtual Private Networking
  • 18 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam Although not designed to be a comprehensive overview, the following sections review each of these issues. You need to understand how Windows Vista fits into Microsoft’s networking technologies. You won’t face explicit exam questions concerning this material, but don’t be surprised if you find a question that puts you in a networking situation. As you are reading, consider your own skills. If you believe you may be deficient in a particular area, you may need further study before tackling Exam 70-620. Windows Networking Windows 200x provides premier networking servers, functions, and features that can meet the needs of a small workgroup or a global network. In the days of Windows NT, Microsoft entered the networking arena, previously dominated by Novell and UNIX systems. However, Windows NT left a lot to be desired, was difficult to manage, and did not scale well as networks grew and changed. The entire construct of Microsoft networking changed with the release of Windows 2000. Windows 2000/.NET networks are easier to manage, provide more services, and have essentially no practical limit in terms of scalability. There are a number of reasons for these changes and a number of technologies behind the change. Network Configuration In order to understand Windows 200x/.NET networking, we must first take a look at the structure of a Windows 200x network. Windows 200x networks are built on sites, domains, and organizational units (OUs). An understanding of these components is critical to understanding Windows networking and how Windows Vista functions within that network. Networks are physically divided into sites. A site is simply a physical collection of networked computers. Typically, a site denotes that the computers are located in one geographic location. For example, let’s say that a company has an office in New York and an office in Houston. A network exists in each location. In terms of Windows 200x networking, each location can function as a site. Then, using the site configuration, network administrators can determine how those two physical locations can connect to the wide area network (WAN). This connection may be a WAN link, such as a T3 connection, or in the case of small network sites, it might be a modem connection or a VPN connection over the Internet. There are a number of connection possibilities, all depending on the needs of the network and the cost.
  • What You Should Already Know 19 So why does Windows 200x use site configuration to group computers? There are a few different reasons that this physical configuration is important: ■ Sites help Windows 200x networking components determine what network traffic is considered “inexpensive” and local. In other words, the definition of sites helps the Windows 200x Server know if certain computers are considered local or on a remote subnet that requires a more expensive and less reliable WAN link in order to communicate. ■ Sites help Windows 200x control replication. Replication is the process of updating the Active Directory data that resides on each Windows 200x domain controller. Updates flow easily between domain controllers within a site, but Windows 2000 knows that replication to domain controllers out of the site can be costly and troublesome. When you define those sites, you can further define how Windows 200x Servers can communicate with each other in remote sites. You can see that sites enable an administrator to define locations and the WAN links connecting them. Windows 200x can then use this information to help you control replication and traffic. While site configuration is a physical look at the geographical locations that make up local and remote network segments, Windows 200x domains and organization units (OUs) are logical divisions of that network. A domain is a Windows 200x grouping of users and computers for management and security purposes. The domain is not connected to the site—a domain can contain several different sites, or a site can contain several different domains. The site physically segments the network, while the domain is a logical division. Why are domains used? Consider this example: Let’s say you have a network with two sites: New York and Houston. The New York site contains 2000 users, while the Houston site contains 4000 users. Each site is managed by its own administrative team and has different security standards. In this case, two domains can be used, one at each site, so that different administrative teams can manage the sites and implement different security standards. Now let’s consider this same example in a different way. What if New York and Houston were managed by the same administrative team with the same security standards? In this case, only one domain is needed. The single domain encompasses both sites, and the administrative team manages the single, logical domain. In Windows NT, domains caused a lot of problems because Windows NT could only handle so many users and computers per domain. For large networks, the domain
  • 20 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam structure often grew ridiculously complex and earned Windows NT the reputation of not scaling well. Not so in Windows 200x networks—Windows 200x domains can scale to millions of objects with no complications. In many cases, a large network now needs only a single domain. Only when different administrative structures or security needs are necessary do networks need to use a multiple domain model. However, what happens if you want to use a single domain but enable different administrators to manage different portions of it? This is where OUs come into play. Using an OU is a way to segment a large domain into manageable chunks. Different administrators can be delegated to have control over different OUs, and you can apply different Group Policy objects to different OUs. OUs can be used in a number of helpful administrative ways, for example: ■ Different departments can be configured as OUs so that an administrator can handle the department’s specific needs. ■ Different divisions, such as Users, Management, and Production, can be created to manage users more easily. ■ Different resources, such as Printers and Shared Folders, can even be configured into an OU structure so that different administrators can manage those resources. As you can see, there are a number of different approaches that can be taken with OUs. The point is that a large domain can be easily segmented and controlled by different administrators without the headache and expense of creating multiple domains. Domain Name System In order for a network to scale well, it must be able to accommodate users, computers, and resources as they are acquired. In other words, the structure of the network must easily allow growth. The Windows 200x domain structure allows growth, but its naming structure also easily allows growth as well. Domain Name System (DNS) is the name of the IP address mapping system used in Windows 200x networks. Windows Vista is fully compatible with the DNS standard and is capable of functioning and communicating on a Windows 200x network. DNS is a naming standard that uses a series of discrete domain names in order to identify network hosts. DNS is highly scalable; in fact, every computer on the Internet is identified by a DNS name. DNS uses domain names to identify host computers. For example, server1.osborn.com uniquely recognizes server1, which resides in the Osborne domain, which is located in the com domain. By resolving com, Osborne, and server1, the server’s IP address, can be located so that communication can occur on the Internet.
  • What You Should Already Know 21 Windows 2000 networks function using this same standard, which provides unlimited scalability and a cohesive naming strategy with the Internet. Mycompany.com is a Windows domain as well as an Internet site; jwilliams@mycompany.com is both a username and an e-mail address. The use of DNS also enables child and grandchild domains. For example, let’s say you have a domain named mycompany.com. You want to create an additional domain that will function as a child called Production. When you create the new domain using Windows 2000 Server, the new domain will be named Production.mycompany.com. What if you want to further subdivide the Production domain in to North and South? Then you would have North.production .mycompany.com and South.production.mycompany.com. If you have spent any time working with Windows NT, you may be wondering what happened to Windows Internet Naming Service (WINS). WINS mapped NetBIOS names to IP addresses in pre–Windows 200x networks. WINS is still supported in Windows 200x networks for backward compatibility with older Windows systems, such as NT and 9x. A pure Windows 200x/XP/Vista network does not need WINS because DNS is used. Windows Domain Controller and Member Server Roles One of the reasons that Windows 200x can support large domains and a flexible domain/OU structure concerns the use of domain controllers. A domain controller is a Windows 200x Server computer that holds and manages the Active Directory database. Using the Active Directory, you can add users, manage groups and security, manage resources, and perform other domain-specific tasks. In other words, a domain controller manages the domain, and you manage the domain through the functions that you perform on a domain controller. Windows NT used domain controllers, but it used a single-master model in which there was one Primary Domain Controller (PDC) per domain and multiple Backup Domain Controllers (BDCs). The PDC contained a writable copy, the domain database, while the BDCs contained read-only copies. BDCs helped in load management and could be used in the event of a PDC failure. The problem is that a single PDC per domain could not scale well and was not flexible in terms of management. In Windows 200x, a multimaster domain controller model is used. This means that there are no PDCs or BDCs. Every domain controller maintains a writable copy of the Active Directory database. You can make changes to that database on any domain controller, and those changes are replicated to other domain controllers throughout the environment. Because of the multimaster model, Windows 200x domains can scale to the millions of objects with as many domain controllers as needed. Administrators
  • 22 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam have the management flexibility they need without the configuration confusion that often came with PDCs and BDCs. Other Windows 200x Servers can be used in the domain without functioning as domain controllers. These domain member servers can function as DNS servers, DHCP servers, intranet servers, print servers, and file servers. This feature enables many different servers to be used for different purposes without taxing the use of domain controllers. The end result is a network that is much easier to manage and much more flexible. Active Directory Management The Active Directory, which was first introduced in Windows 2000, is a directory service for the network. It is a way for administrators to store user and computer accounts, keep track of network resources, and manage the network. For users, the Active Directory provides a highly searchable way to find network resources. The Active Directory stores information about resources categorized by attributes. For example, a shared printer might have attributes for “laser, staple, color,” and other characteristics. Users can then search on those attributes, such as “laser printer,” and locate a shared laser printer on the network. A common question new Windows 200x network enthusiasts often ask is “Where, exactly, is the Active Directory?” The Active Directory resides on each domain controller. When a domain controller is created, it receives a copy of the Active Directory database and is set up as a replication partner with another domain controller. For this reason, there is no single master copy of the Active Directory database. Rather, each domain controller in a domain contains a writable copy of that database that can be managed by administrators. Let’s say your environment has five domain controllers. You add a new user on one of them. Since this new user has to be added to all domain controllers, the replication process begins in order to replicate that data. Any time a change is made on one domain controller, replication makes certain that change occurs on all of the domain controllers. This feature assures that each domain controller has the same copy of the Active Directory database. The good news with this multimaster model, aside from ease of administration, is fault tolerance. If a domain controller goes down, the network is not affected, since other domain controllers are available and performing the same functions. In fact, every domain controller in the domain would have to fail at the same time in order for there to be domain functionality failure. Group Policy Group Policy is a powerful feature of Windows 200x networks that enables administrators to finely control desktop settings, computer configurations,
  • What You Should Already Know 23 account policies, and even software. Implemented at the site, domain, or OU level, network use of Group Policy enables an environment to streamline user and computer configuration and enables different administrators to impose different policies. For example, let’s say that you have a basic site policy. That site policy is inherited by all domains and OUs in that location. However, a certain domain in that environment has additional policies that it needs to invoke. By default, the Domain policy overrules the site policies and can be used to reverse or loosen Site-level GPO settings. It is only when the setting called “enforce” in the Group Policy Management Console is enabled on Site-level GPOs that the Site-level GPO dominates the Domain GPO. Remote Access Service Windows 200x networks continue to provide support for RAS, or the Remote Access Service. RAS enables Windows 200x to accept logins from remote clients. For example, let’s say you are traveling with your laptop computer. Using RAS, you can use a modem to dial an RAS server and gain access to the local network remotely. This feature enables users to access network resources even when they are not physically connected to the network. RAS is also used as the VPN server and as a controlling component in 802.11i authentication as well. Virtual Private Networking Virtual private networks (VPNs) enable a remote computer to connect securely to a Windows 2000/XP/Vista computer using the Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) or the Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) with IPsec. A VPN enables a secure tunnel over a public network, such as the Internet or intranet, so that private data can be securely passed using the public network as a WAN link. TCP/IP Networking Windows 200x is built on TCP/IP networking, and Windows Vista is designed for TCP/IP. You don’t need to be a master IP planner, but you do need to have a good handle on TCP/IP networking concepts, such as the following: ■ IP addressing ■ Subnet masks ■ Default gateways ■ Common transmission control protocols
  • 24 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam ■ Common Internet protocols ■ DHCP ■ DNS Global Computing Knowledge Finally, as with any Microsoft certification exam, the more you know, the more likely you are to succeed. It’s important that you have a strong background in all kinds of operating systems and networking issues. You should know a thing or two about a wide range of client computers, such as Windows, Macintosh, and perhaps Linux. Armed with these tools, you are ready to tackle Windows Vista. CERTIFICATION SUMMARY This chapter gave you an overview of Windows Vista and explored the exam objectives. In order to be successful in this exam, you’ll need to spend time studying the chapters to come and working with Windows Vista. As you study, keep in mind the target audience and remember that the exam will approach Windows Vista in terms of a LAN or WAN network desktop system. As you study for the exam, also keep in mind that exam objectives may overlap with content from other exams. You should have a general understanding of Windows 200x networking and Active Directory concepts. In short, study this book carefully, but study smartly as you prepare for Exam 70-620, and make sure you get some hands-on practice.
  • Two-Minute Drill ✓ 25 TWO-MINUTE DRILL What Is Configuring the Microsoft Windows Vista Client? ❑ Windows Vista is the latest, robust operating system from Microsoft. Available in Home Basic, Home Premium, Business, and Ultimate versions, Windows Vista contains the networking and management functions necessary for small networks and large networks. Exam 70-620 will test your knowledge of Windows Vista in a medium-sized to large-Windows 200x network. ❑ There are many new features, including management, applications, and even the new Aero interface. Because there have been so many new additions and changes to older interfaces, hands-on practice is a must. Overview of Exam 70-620 ❑ You must be able to install, upgrade, and troubleshoot Windows Vista installations. ❑ You must be able to configure and troubleshoot post-installation system settings. ❑ You must be able to configure Windows security features. ❑ You must be able to configure Network Connectivity. ❑ You must be able to configure applications included with Windows Vista. ❑ You must be able to configure and troubleshoot mobile computing. What Is Covered in This Book ❑ In Chapter 2, you will install, upgrade, and troubleshoot a Windows Vista installation. ❑ In Chapter 3, you will manage post-installation issues. ❑ In Chapter 4, you will configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer. ❑ In Chapter 5, you will configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall. ❑ In Chapter 6, you will configure networking with Windows Vista. ❑ In Chapter 7, you will configure and troubleshoot media applications. ❑ In Chapter 8, you will configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space.
  • 26 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam ❑ In Chapter 9, you will configure Windows Calendar, Fax and Scan, and Windows Sidebar. ❑ In Chapter 10, you will troubleshoot performance and reliability issues. ❑ In Chapter 11, you will configure Windows Update, Data Protection, and Power Options. ❑ In Chapter 12, you will configure and troubleshoot mobile computing. What You Should Already Know ❑ You should be familiar with Windows 200x networking and Windows 200x Server. ❑ You should have a global knowledge of TCP/IP networking and IP networking protocols and services.
  • Self Test 27 SELF TEST The following questions will help you measure your understanding of the material presented in this chapter. Read all of the choices carefully, as there may be more than one correct answer. Choose all correct answers for each question. 1. The Windows Vista exam is likely to view your role with Windows Vista in what type of environment? A. Home use B. Small office C. Windows 2000 LAN or WAN D. All of the above 2. Windows Firewall was designed for what environment? (Choose all that apply.) A. Home use B. Small office C. Linux networks D. None of the above 3. What two applications will play multiple kinds of media? (Choose two.) A. Windows Photo Gallery B. Windows Media Player C. Windows Media Center D. Windows Sync Center 4. What new interface makes various networking configurations easier and more streamlined in one centralized interface? A. Network Connections B. Connect To C. Network and Sharing Center D. Sync Center 5. Which statement is not true regarding Windows Aero? A. Aero was supported in Windows XP Professional. B. Aero is a glass-like interface. C. Aero has specific hardware requirements. D. Aero requires some configuration.
  • 28 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam 6. What file system is the preferred file system for Windows Vista? A. FAT B. FAT32 C. DVNS D. NTFS 7. When is Windows Vista’s automatic IP address feature typically used? A. Home/Small office network B. Windows 200x domain C. In conjunction with a DHCP server D. When a DNS server is not available 8. Which of the following features are supported by Windows Vista? A. EFS B. VPN C. PPTP D. TCP/IP 9. The new Aero interface can be considered as which of the following? A. HTML object B. Theme C. Skin D. API 10. Which one statement best describes Exam 70-620? A. The exam is very objective specific. B. The exam may include items from other exams. C. The exam requires subnet masking skills. D. None of these statements are correct. 11. Which Windows 200x network feature provides physical information about network locations? A. Sites B. Domains C. OUs D. Group Policy
  • Self Test 29 12. You work in a Windows 200x network that contains a single domain. Management wants to segment the network so that certain administrators can more effectively manage the networking needs and group policy of several departments. What needs to be created? A. Sites B. Domains C. OUs D. Group Policy 13. Which statement best describes how Windows 200x uses domain controllers? A. A single-master model is used. B. A multimaster model is used. C. PDCs are used. D. BDCs are used. 14. How is WINS used in a Windows 200x network? A. WINS is supported for backward compatibility. B. WINS is used for name resolution by all Windows 2000/XP clients. C. WINS is used by Windows 2000 BDCs. D. WINS is used to support IPsec. 15. What two protocols can be used by VPNs in Windows Vista? A. NetBIOS B. IPsec C. DLC D. L2TP
  • 30 Chapter 1: Introduction to the Windows Vista Client Exam SELF TEST ANSWERS ✓ 1. ® D. Exam 70-620 may test your knowledge of using Windows Vista in all of these situations. ® A, B, and C are all incorrect. You may face questions from any of these environments. ˚ ✓ 2. ® A and B. Windows Firewall is designed for home users or small office users. ® C and D are incorrect. Windows Firewall is not designed for the environments other than ˚ Windows. ✓ 3. ® B and C. Windows Media Player and Windows Media Center can play different kinds of media files. ® A and D are all incorrect because these applications do not play different media. ˚ ✓ 4. ® C. The new Network and Sharing Center makes networking configuration options easier and more streamlined. ® A, B, and D are incorrect because these options do not provide the primary network ˚ configuration interface. ✓ 5. ® A. Aero was not available in Windows XP. ® B, C, and D are incorrect. All of these statements are true. ˚ ✓ 6. ® D. NTFS is the file system of choice. ® A, B, and C are incorrect. FAT and FAT32 are supported, but NTFS is the preferred file ˚ system. DVNS is a not a file system. ✓ 7. ® A. Automatic IP addressing is typically used in a home or in small office networks so that users can avoid the trouble of configuring TCP/IP. ® B, C, and D are incorrect. Automatic IP address assignment is designed for the home or ˚ small office and not a Windows 200x domain. Although Windows Vista can assign itself an IP address in the event that a DHCP server is not available, this is not its typical use. DNS does not affect IP addressing. ✓ 8. ® A, B, C, and D. Windows Vista supports all of these features, and this question also serves as a good warning that you will need to know your acronyms! ✓ 9. ® B. The Aero interface is a theme. You can change the default theme using Personalization. ® A, C, and D are incorrect because Aero is a theme. ˚ ✓ 10. ® B. Although the exam objectives are your primary guide, the exam may include items from other exams, since Microsoft expects your knowledge to be global. ® A, C, and D are incorrect. These statements do not accurately describe the exam. ˚ ✓ 11. ® A. Windows 200x sites determine how computers are physically located in different geographic locations and how traffic between sites should be handled.
  • Self Test Answers 31 ® B, C, and D are incorrect. Domains and OUs are used to logically manage the network, so ˚ B and C are incorrect. D is incorrect because Group Policy does not affect network location structure. ✓ 12. ® C. When you need to segment a domain for management purposes, Organizational Units can be used. ® A, B, and D are incorrect. Sites are not used to segment domains, so A is incorrect. ˚ Although additional domains could be used, there is no need for them in this case, since a different administrative or security structure is not needed. Therefore, B is also incorrect. Group Policy cannot be used to segment a domain, so D is also incorrect. ✓ 13. ® B. A multimaster model is used. All domain controllers function as peers, and all contain a copy of the Active Directory database. ® A, C, and D are incorrect. Since a multimaster model is used, there is no need for PDCs or ˚ BDCs, except for backward compatibility. ✓ 14. ® A. In a true Windows 2000/XP/Vista network, only DNS is needed for name resolution. WINS is maintained for backward compatibility with down-level clients, such as NT and 9x. ® B, C, and D are incorrect. Since WINS is provided for backward compatibility only, all of ˚ these answer options are incorrect. ✓ 15. ® B and D. VPN networking in Windows Vista can use the IPsec or L2TP protocol (along with PPTP as well). ® A and C are incorrect. NetBIOS and DLC are not used by Windows Vista virtual private ˚ networks.
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  • 2 Install Windows Vista CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVES 2.01 Identify Hardware Requirements 2.02 Perform a Clean Installation of Windows Vista 2.03 Upgrade a Previous Version of Windows to Windows Vista 2.04 ✓ Q&A Upgrade from One Version of Windows Vista to Another Two-Minute Drill Self Test
  • 34 Chapter 2: Install Windows Vista T he installation of a new operating system is always one of those tasks that leave people holding their breath. After all, the installation of a new operating system can introduce a number of problems, and in an upgrade scenario the possibility of data loss is always present. The good news is that Windows Vista is very easy to install, and under most circumstances, if the minimum hardware requirements are met, installation is typically problem free. As a support professional, you’ll need to know the ins and outs of Windows Vista installation, and you can expect the exam to question you on a number of features and issues as well. In this chapter, we’ll explore Windows Vista installation procedures, upgrade issues, and how to upgrade from one version of Windows Vista to another. The good news is that installation from a support personnel’s point of view is typically straightforward. The exam does not expect you to know how to roll out hundreds of unattended installations in a network environment; rather, the exam expects you to be able to support individuals who are trying to install Windows Vista. CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 2.01 Identify Hardware Requirements As with previous versions of Windows, the key to a successful Windows Vista installation is careful planning before the installation takes place. All too often, IT professionals as well as end users are a little too eager to install a new operating system and do not take the time to plan the installation first. Through proper planning, you can avoid problems before they occur and you can make sure your computer and applications are ready to meet the demands of Windows Vista. Once you are armed with the correct information, installation is typically anticlimactic because you solve potential problems before they occur. Naturally, the first place to start is hardware requirements. Sure, you’ve heard this before, but the simple fact remains: your computer must be able to handle the hardware demands of Windows Vista, or your installation will either fail or give you a system that is so pitifully slow that it is of no practical value. Before installing Windows Vista, you need to check out the computer’s hardware and make sure it’s powerful enough to handle the demands of Windows Vista. Tables 2-1 and 2-2 give you the minimum, as well as the recommended, hardware requirements for Windows Vista. As you might expect, the base, or minimum, hardware requirements are just that—what you need to install Windows Vista and for it to actually run. However, if you want good performance from the machine, you should meet the recommended hardware requirements and, preferably, exceed them.
  • Identify Hardware Requirements 35 Minimum Requirements As you might imagine, the hardware requirements for Windows Vista Home Basic are different than those for Windows Vista Home Premium, Business, or Ultimate. For this reason, you’ll need to memorize two sets of hardware requirements so that you’ll be ready for any hardware requirement question the exam may throw at you. Table 2-1 outlines the minimum hardware requirements for Windows Vista Home Basic. Table 2-2 outlines the minimum requirements for Windows Home Premium, Business, and Ultimate. Keep in mind that the hardware requirements for Home Premium, Business, and Ultimate assume that the user will want to use the Windows Aero interface (which you can learn more about in Chapter 4). However, keep in mind that you can still install and use Vista Home Premium, Business, and Ultimate without all of the graphics requirements, but you simply will not be able to use Windows Aero. Naturally, the idea of having a dual-processor computer just sings of power, and rightfully so. Dual processors can give you the power you need for today’s graphics-intensive programs and games. For the exam, however, you need to understand that while all editions of Windows Vista can support multiple-core CPUs, only Windows Vista Business, Ultimate, and Enterprise can actually support dual processors. Just remember that neither home version of Windows Vista supports this feature, and you’ll stay on track with the exam. Windows Vista Upgrade Advisor During setup, Windows Vista will use the Windows Vista Upgrade Advisor to check the computer’s hardware, as well as software applications, to determine whether there are incompatibilities. If you are considering an upgrade from TABLE 2-1 Windows Home Basic Minimum Requirements Component Minimum Requirement Processor 1 GHz 32-bit or 64-bit processor RAM 512MB Hard disk space 20GB hard drive with at least 15GB available space Graphics Support for DirectX 9 and 32MB of graphics memory DVD-ROM Windows-compatible DVD-ROM drive Internet access Any kind of Internet access
  • 36 Chapter 2: Install Windows Vista TABLE 2-2 Windows Home Premium, Business, and Ultimate Minimum Requirements Component Minimum Requirement Processor 1 GHz 32-bit or 64-bit processor RAM 1GB Hard disk space 40GB hard drive with at least 15GB available space Graphics Support for DirectX 9 graphics with ■ WDDM driver ■ 128MB of graphics memory (minimum) ■ Pixel Shader 2.0 in hardware ■ 32 bits per pixel DVD-ROM Windows-compatible DVD-ROM drive Internet access Any kind of Internet access Windows XP, you can even download the Windows Vista Upgrade Advisor first and check the system (visit microsoft.com/windowsvista), which is always a good idea. The upgrade advisor will scan your system and give you a report, as shown in Figure 2-1. You should also take inventory of the computer’s hardware, such as the sound card, video card, modem, and related components, and check the Windows XP Hardware Compatibility List (HCL) found at www.microsoft.com/whdc/hcl/default.mspx. Hardware that is not explicitly listed on the HCL is not recognized as compatible; however, this does not mean that the hardware will not work—it just has not been tested by Microsoft. If you have some questionable hardware, you should check the hardware manufacturer’s Web site for more information and possible driver updates or upgrade packs. You should acquire the new drivers, if possible, or updates before starting the installation of Windows Vista. SCENARIO & SOLUTION Can Windows Vista Home basic use the Aero interface as long as the hardware requirements are met? No. Aero is not available in Windows Vista Home edition. I want to make sure a sound card is compatible with Windows Vista before I upgrade. How can I check this? Run the Windows Upgrade Advisor. You can also check the Hardware Compatibility List.
  • Perform a Clean Installation of Windows Vista 37 FIGURE 2-1 Windows Upgrade Advisor CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 2.02 Perform a Clean Installation of Windows Vista A clean installation of Windows Vista is probably the easiest type of installation. With a clean installation, Windows Vista is installed in a newly formatted partition. The upside is that you do not have to deal with upgrade issues and potential upgrade problems. The downside is that a clean installation doesn’t keep any files, settings, or applications from whatever was previously installed on the PC. If you perform a clean install on a PC that has a previous version of Windows, that copy of Windows is erased when the partition is formatted. Naturally, you may need to perform an upgrade in order to keep your files and applications, but a clean install is typically the easiest installation scenario.
  • 38 Chapter 2: Install Windows Vista Running a Clean Installation For the exam, you simply need to know the steps and general setup routine you’ll see when performing a clean installation. As with any installation, you’ll need to ensure that the computer meets the hardware requirements in order to save yourself some time and frustration during actual setup. Otherwise, when you’re ready to begin a clean installation, the easiest way to begin is with the Windows Vista installation DVD. You can launch the setup program from the DVD from the existing operating system, or you can simply boot the computer from the DVD. Insert the DVD, restart the computer, and watch for a boot prompt allowing you to boot from the DVD. Once you start the setup routine, you basically follow the prompts at that point. Exercise 2-1 walks you through a typical clean installation. EXERCISE 2-1 Performing a Clean Installation of Windows Vista Once you start the DVD installation routine, the following steps walk you through the installation of Windows Vista: 1. If you start the installation from the DVD on the old operating system, you’ll see a simple Installation window where you can check compatibility or start the installation. It is always a good idea to check compatibility first so that you’ll know about any potential issues or conflicts. Otherwise, click the Install Now option.
  • Perform a Clean Installation of Windows Vista 39 2. The wizard prompts you to go online and get the latest updates for installation, which you should do to ensure that everything you may need for the installation is downloaded. 3. Enter the product key for activation. The product key is 25 characters and is not case sensitive. The wizard also adds the hyphens between groups of key values. If you booted from the DVD, the installation routine will not prompt you for this key until later in the installation. Instead, the routine will ask if you want to upgrade or run a clean installation.
  • 40 Chapter 2: Install Windows Vista 4. The license agreement appears. Read the agreement, click the check box to accept the terms, and click Next. 5. The next screen asks if you want to upgrade or perform a Custom (advanced) installation. This is the clean installation option, so select it to continue. 6. Next, choose where on your computer you want to install Windows Vista. Select the desired partition and click Next. Windows Vista must be installed on a partition formatted with NTFS.
  • Perform a Clean Installation of Windows Vista 41 7. The file copy process where files are copied from the DVD begins at this point. If you booted from the DVD and choose to format a partition, the formatting process is also performed. These actions may take quite a bit of time to complete. If you choose to create or adjust a partition, the setup routine will provide you with the following options: ■ Select An Existing Partition Or Unallocated Space You can simply select an existing partition, or you can create a partition using unallocated space. Simply choose the option and click Next. Windows will create a partition from unallocated space as selected and format it with NTFS.
  • 42 Chapter 2: Install Windows Vista ■ Delete An Existing Partition If you have a partition scheme from an older Windows version, you may want to take this opportunity to simply delete old partitions, which then creates unallocated space you can use to create a new partition. A strong warning, though: this action will destroy all data on the partition, and the data will not be recoverable. ■ Expand Existing Partitions If you have an existing partition and you want to expand it so that it takes advantage of unallocated space, you can do so here. Just select the partition you want to extend, click Extend, and follow the instructions. 8. Once setup completes the installation, you’ll need to follow a few rudimentary screens asking for a user account, a computer name, Automatic Update settings, Date and Time settings, a network location, and any other necessary data. Windows Vista then configures the new operating system with these settings, and you are able to log on for the first time. INSIDE THE EXAM Windows.old If you select a partition that has a previous version of Windows already installed, the setup routine will disable the Windows folder and store it in a folder named Windows.old. You will be able to access the information from the folder, but you will not be able to use the previous version of Windows. This is a radically different approach to setup than we saw in previous versions of Windows, where your only option was to upgrade the existing operating system or trash it with a clean install. The good news is the clean install will still keep the old system, and you can access it via the Windows.old folder. Looking for some old forgotten files that were on the previous system? No problem, you can still find them in the Windows.old folder. You can access old system and driver files from within Vista by looking in the Windows.old folder. These files usually are not users’ data files (such as Word or Excel documents) but are system and driver files. The good news is you can breathe a little easier knowing that you still have access to old data while still performing a clean installation. So, if you encounter exam scenarios that ask how to retrieve old files after a clean installation of Windows Vista, the Windows .old folder is your answer.
  • Perform a Clean Installation of Windows Vista 43 Windows PE The Windows Vista client exam tests your ability to support Windows Vista in medium to small environments. For this reason, the questions you are likely to encounter concerning installation do not involve massive deployments in an enterprise environment. Nonetheless, you may run across a question where you need to use Windows Preinstallation Environment (PE) to create an image of another Windows Vista installation so that you can use the image to install Vista on several other identical computers. Windows PE was originally designed for Windows XP deployments, but it can also be used to deploy Windows Vista as well. With Windows PE, the IT staff can build custom solutions that speed deployment through automation, enabling them to spend less time and effort keeping desktops updated. Windows PE contains tools that enable you to prepare images and deploy them, as well as other tools used in testing. You don’t need to know more about Windows PE for this exam than what I’ve mentioned here, but if you’re interested, you can read more at www.microsoft .com/whdc/system/winpreinst/WindowsPE_over.mspx. Rolling Out an Image with Windows PE For the exam, you need to know how to use Windows PE to create an image from a certain computer, and then deploy that image to other identical computers. As such, you simply need to memorize these steps in Exercise 2-2 for the exam: EXERCISE 2-2 Creating an Image with Windows PE Follow these steps to create an image with Windows PE: 1. Use Sysprep to seal the master. Sysprep prepares a currently installed Windows Vista operating system to be created into an image you can place on other computers. Sysprep removes some computer-specific information, such as the workstation’s Security Identifier (SID). 2. Boot the master with a Windows PE CD. 3. Use ImageX within Windows PE to create the image file. ImageX is a Windows PE tool that is used to capture and apply operating system images.
  • 44 Chapter 2: Install Windows Vista SCENARIO & SOLUTION I have an older version of Windows on a PC that I don’t particularly care to keep. Is it better to upgrade or to do a clean install? A clean install is always the safer way to go because you don’t have older files or potential conflicts from an upgraded system. With that said, however, Windows Vista is very good at upgrading and resolving problems that you may have noticed in upgrades from the past. After a clean installation, I want to get some old personal files back from My Documents in Windows XP, which was previously installed on the PC. Can I do that? You can access the Windows.old folder, which still holds all of your old files and settings from the previous Windows XP installation. You can then navigate to the My Documents folder within Windows.old and locate your files. To see more recovery instructions using the Windows.old folder, access http://support.microsoft.com/kb/932912/. 4. Boot the target computer where you want to place the image using the Windows PE CD. You can then use Diskpart to format the drive if necessary. 5. Use ImageX to apply the master image to the new computer. You can repeat these steps on additional computers as needed. CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 2.03 Upgrade a Previous Version of Windows to Windows Vista Upgrading to Windows Vista is easier in some ways than previous upgrades from the past, simply because you can only upgrade to Windows Vista from a 32-bit version of Windows XP running Service Pack 2. That’s the first thing you should remember for the exam. Older versions of Windows, such as Windows 2000, need not apply— you’ll need to perform a clean install in those cases. As with any installation, you can only upgrade using a partition that is formatted with NTFS, and there must be enough free disk space for the upgrade, typically 15GB. Naturally, the upgrade path you have available depends on the version of Windows XP that you are running. Table 2-3 outlines the available upgrade paths, and you should commit this table to memory for the exam.
  • Upgrade a Previous Version of Windows to Windows Vista TABLE 2-3 45 You Can Upgrade To… Windows XP Home Windows Vista Home Basic, Home Premium, Business, and Ultimate Windows XP Media Center Windows Vista Home Premium or Ultimate Windows XP Professional Windows Vista Business or Ultimate Windows XP Tablet PC Windows Vista Upgrade Paths Current Operating System Windows Vista Business or Ultimate If you want to install a 64-bit edition of Windows Vista, there is no upgrade path with Windows XP. You’ll need to perform a clean install. Likewise, if you want to install a version of Windows Vista over a non-upgrade path version of Windows XP or earlier operating system, you’ll need to perform a clean installation as well. Getting Ready for an Upgrade As you think about upgrading an operating system to Windows Vista, there are a few planning and preparation steps you should take first. Proper planning is the key to reducing the likelihood that you will experience an installation failure. The following steps give you a good upgrade planning checklist that you should perform before an upgrade. Keep these items in mind for the exam as well: 1. Verify that the PC meets the hardware requirements for the Vista version you want to upgrade to. If not, consider hardware upgrades first. Remember to use Windows Upgrade Advisor and also the HCL if necessary. 2. Verify that you have the latest drivers installed. You can access the latest device drivers using Windows Update or via the device manufacturer’s Web site. 3. Make sure that your computer has the most current BIOS. An older BIOS may cause you problems with power management features or device configuration, and the upgrade itself may fail. 4. Spend a little time removing old files and applications that you no longer want. Now is the perfect time to clean out the closets of your PC. 5. Perform a complete backup including all personal files and configuration files. 6. Run ScanDisk, Disk Defragmenter, and an antivirus scan before the upgrade. This action helps to ensure that disk errors and performance problems are corrected and that there are no viruses on the PC.
  • 46 Chapter 2: Install Windows Vista Running the Upgrade To perform the upgrade, simply insert the installation DVD while you are booted into the current operating system. You’ll then follow a similar setup wizard as with a clean installation, but you’ll see fewer steps. You essentially choose the upgrade option and enter a product key; the installation takes over automatically from that point. Setup will run a compatibility test to ensure that there is an upgrade path and the system is compatible. This is very similar to the Windows Upgrade Advisor, so follow any steps or recommendations that you see to ensure a smooth upgrade. If the installation fails for any reason, the setup routine automatically rolls the PC back to the previous version of Windows, removing any Windows Vista installation files and images. This is a great feature that ensures you are not left with a trashed PC. Setting Up a Dual-Boot Configuration A dual-boot, or multiboot, operating system is a system that provides access to two or more different installations. Typically, you would set up a dual-boot configuration between Windows XP and Windows Vista so that you can use either one, or even Windows Vista and an older version of Windows, such as Windows 2000. Environments that have custom applications may choose this approach to use older operating systems with applications written for them. If you want to set up a dual-boot system with Windows XP and Windows Vista, you should first back up all data just to be safe. If the computer already has Windows XP installed, you need to use a third-party disk management program, such as PartitionMagic, to create a partition of at least 20GB formatted with NTFS. Then, you can simply start the Windows Vista installation and choose the new partition. Once the installation is complete, you will be able to choose between booting Windows XP or Windows Vista when you start the PC. You’ll see the boot menu for about 30 seconds by default, but you can adjust this parameter for more or less time if you like. Open System in Control Panel and click the Advanced System Settings link in the Tasks pane. On the Advanced tab that appears, click the Settings button under Startup And Recovery and adjust the value for Time To Display List Of Operating Systems. You can also change the default operating system that starts if you make no other selection from the menu, as shown in Figure 2-2. You can also make this change using the command-line tool, Bcdedit.exe.
  • Upgrade a Previous Version of Windows to Windows Vista 47 FIGURE 2-2 Advanced tab What if you have a PC with no operating system and you want to install both Windows XP and Windows Vista for a dual-boot scenario, or even additional operating systems for a multiboot scenario? The same instructions apply, but here’s the rule: Always install the downlevel operating system(s) first and Windows Vista last. If you install Windows Vista first, the downlevel installations are likely to fail, and even if they install, then you will not be able to boot into Windows Vista, because downlevel versions use Boot.ini to boot, while Vista uses the BCD database. So, you must install Windows Vista last. Windows Vista will maintain backward compatibility with the older operating system.
  • 48 Chapter 2: Install Windows Vista User State Migration Tool Windows Vista includes two tools that enable you to migrate files and settings from another installation. The first is Windows Easy Transfer. You can use it to migrate all of your files (including e-mail) and settings to Windows Vista. I’ve personally used it to move years of files and stored e-mail from a Windows XP Professional SP2 laptop to a new Windows Vista Ultimate laptop via my home network with no problems. The process was slow, but precise. However, what if you are in an environment where you need to migrate large numbers of users in a more automated way? Windows Vista also provides the User State Migration Tool (USMT). The USMT is highly configurable through XML files— a network administrator can specify which files and settings should be transferred. The USMT is also scriptable and flexible; you can access it via command-line tools. You are likely to see an exam question concerning the USMT, and the following sections tell you what you need to know without plunging you into high-level network administrator problems. USMT Tools The USMT contains two executable tools called ScanState.exe and LoadState.exe. USMT also includes some preconfigured XML files that are used to define basic migration rules. A Config.xml file allows administrators to specify what should be migrated and what should not. ScanState.exe is a tool that collects user data and settings information files. This data is then stored as an image named USMT3.mig. So, think of ScanState as a tool that scans the “state” of the system and creates an image of that state. The second tool, LoadState.exe, takes the USMT3.mig file and places it on a new computer running Windows Vista. Through this process, the images of the desired files and settings (as specified by Config.xml) are transferred to the new PC with little administrator overhead. Using the USMT Tools Like Windows Easy Transfer, the basic process of USMT involves the collection of data and the movement of data to a new PC. For the exam, you need to have a basic understanding of how you would perform this process, which is rather simple. Exercise 2-3 outlines the process for you, and you should commit this process to memory for the exam.
  • Upgrade from One Version of Windows Vista to Another 49 SCENARIO & SOLUTION I want to upgrade a PC that currently runs Windows 2000 Professional. What do I need to do? You must clean install the system. You cannot directly upgrade from any operating system except certain versions of Windows XP. Can I have a multiboot configuration using Windows 98, Windows XP, and Windows Vista? Yes, assuming that the hardware and drivers you need are compatible with all the three operating systems. This shouldn’t be a problem with XP and Vista, but you may have device driver problems with Windows 98 if the hardware is a newer hardware. EXERCISE 2-3 Using USMT Tools 1. On the source computer, run ScanState.exe. This process will copy the user state data and place it on removable media or a network share as desired, such as a CD, DVD, or flash drive. Any media used must have enough storage space to hold all of the files. In a network environment, this collection process would normally occur through an automated script or link that runs on each user’s computer. 2. Install Windows Vista on the target computer as you normally would. 3. On the target computer, run LoadState.exe. LoadState will then access the removable media or network share in order to transfer the data. CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 2.04 Upgrade from One Version of Windows Vista to Another You can upgrade from one version of Windows Vista to another. You may think, “That must be complicated, since it is an exam objective.” Not true, though. This objective primarily helps you recognize and remember a new tool included in
  • 50 Chapter 2: Install Windows Vista Windows Vista called Windows Anytime Upgrade. However, not every upgrade path is supported. You can ■ Upgrade from Windows Vista Home Basic to Windows Vista Home Premium or Ultimate. ■ Upgrade from either Windows Vista Business or Windows Vista Home Premium to Ultimate. However, you cannot upgrade from Home Basic to Business, and you cannot upgrade from Home Premium to Business without the purchase of a new license, a clean install, and using Windows Easy Transfer to move your files and settings. Otherwise, you can upgrade from Vista to Vista using the Windows Vista DVD and a new product key. Just start the DVD from Windows Vista and choose the Upgrade option. You’ll follow installation procedures as usual. Windows Anytime Upgrade However, if you have version of Windows Vista that can be upgraded (which is all of them except Ultimate), you have the Anytime Upgrade option already built into the system. Just open System in Control Panel and click the Upgrade Windows Vista link, or you can access the option from the Welcome Center. Either way, you end up at the Windows Anytime Upgrade page, shown in Figure 2-3. To start the upgrade process, click the Upgrade option as shown in Figure 2-3. You’ll then purchase a license from an online vendor. Then, you’ll download a product key for the new edition. Then, you’ll insert your Windows Vista DVD and begin the installation as normal from that point. The upgrade, though, is not a cheap work-around to get a higher Vista version. At the time of this writing, the upgrade from Windows Vista Home Premium to Ultimate is $179. This tool simply gives you an easy way of doing it—not an inexpensive one, unfortunately. SCENARIO & SOLUTION Can I not use Windows Anytime Upgrade to upgrade from Home Basic to Ultimate? No. You’ll need to make a clean install in this case and make sure the PC meets the hardware requirements of Vista Ultimate. Are there any upgrade paths that are free? Unfortunately, no. You’ll need a new license key for any upgrade, which must be purchased through the Anytime Upgrade.
  • Upgrade from One Version of Windows Vista to Another 51 FIGURE 2-3 Windows Anytime Upgrade CERTIFICATION SUMMARY In this chapter, we explored Windows Vista installation. Due to advancements in Windows, installation of Windows Vista tends to be much easier and more automated than it was in the past. Naturally, the PC must meet the Vista hardware requirements, which are different for the Home Basic edition and all other editions. In order to use the Aero interface, the graphics card and memory must also meet hardware requirements outlined in this chapter. Be sure to memorize the hardware requirements for the exam. You can install Windows Vista as a clean installation or an upgrade. If you clean install, the old operating system and all files are removed from the installation partition and placed in a Windows.old folder. You can still access the files from the
  • 52 Chapter 2: Install Windows Vista old folder, but you can no longer use the old operating system. You can also upgrade the 32-bit version of Windows XP to various versions of Windows Vista. See the chart earlier in this chapter for the upgrade paths and make sure you memorize the upgrade options. Keep in mind that no operating system can be upgraded to the 64-bit version of Windows Vista—this requires a clean installation. You can also upgrade from one version of Windows Vista to another. You can upgrade from Home Basic to Home Premium or Ultimate. You can also upgrade from Business or Home Premium to Ultimate. Use the Windows Anytime Upgrade on the installation DVD or from System in Control Panel. You must pay for the upgrade license and install the upgrade.
  • Two-Minute Drill ✓ 53 TWO-MINUTE DRILL Identify Hardware Requirements ❑ Windows Vista Home Basic requires ❑ 1 GHz 32-bit or 64-bit processor ❑ 512MB RAM ❑ 20GB hard drive with at least 15GB available space ❑ Support for DirectX 9 and 32MB of graphics memory ❑ Standard peripherals and Internet access ❑ All other versions of Windows Vista require ❑ 1 GHz 32-bit or 64-bit processor ❑ 1GB RAM ❑ 40GB hard drive with at least 15GB available space ❑ Support for DirectX 9 graphics with a WDDM driver, 128MB of graphics memory (minimum), Pixel Shader 2.0, and 32 bits per pixel ❑ Standard peripherals and Internet access ❑ If the graphics hardware for all versions other than Windows Vista Home Basic are not met, you can still install the operating system, but you will be unable to use Windows Aero. ❑ Use Windows Upgrade Advisor to check the system for compatibility. You can also inspect the Hardware Compatibility List for additional information about specific device compatibility. Perform a Clean Installation of Windows Vista ❑ A clean installation of Windows Vista removes the old operating system and any files or settings. ❑ You can start the DVD from the current operating system that is to be re- moved, or you can boot from the DVD and follow the setup instructions to determine a partition. You can reconfigure existing partitions at this point during setup.
  • 54 Chapter 2: Install Windows Vista ❑ If there is an older operating system present, setup removes it and all files to a folder named Windows.old. You can access the folder and files stored there, but you can no longer run the operating system. Upgrade a Previous Version of Windows to Windows Vista ❑ You can upgrade to Windows Vista from any 32-bit Windows XP installation. No other downlevel Windows versions are supported as upgrade paths. You must make a clean install over those earlier operating systems. ❑ You cannot upgrade to the 64-bit version of Windows Vista. A clean installa- tion is required. ❑ You can configure dual- or multiboot scenarios using Windows Vista and downlevel versions of Windows. Always install the downlevel versions first, installing Vista last. Each installation requires its own partition. Upgrade from One Version of Windows Vista to Another ❑ You can upgrade from Home Basic to Home Premium or Ultimate. ❑ You can also upgrade from Business or Home Premium to Ultimate. ❑ Use the Windows Anytime Upgrade on the installation DVD or from System in Control Panel. You can pay for the upgrade license and install the upgrade.
  • Self Test 55 SELF TEST The following questions will help you measure your understanding of the material presented in this chapter. Read all the choices carefully because there might be more than one correct answer. Choose all correct answers for each question. Identify Hardware Requirements 1. You want to install Windows Vista on a particular PC. The PC has 1GB of RAM, a 1 GHz processor, a 20GB hard drive, and 32MB of graphics memory. Which operating systems can you install? (Choose all that apply.) A. Windows Vista Home Basic B. Windows Vista Home Premium C. Windows Vista Business D. Windows Vista Ultimate 2. You want to install Windows Vista Home Premium on a certain PC. You want to make sure the PC will be able to handle the demands and requirements of Aero. Which of the following does not meet the hardware requirements? A. WDDM Driver B. 32MB graphics memory C. Pixel Shader 2.0 D. 32 bits per pixel 3. You have just purchased a PC that contains dual processors. You would like to install Windows Vista on this PC. Which operating systems can you install? (Choose all that apply.) A. Windows Vista Home Basic B. Windows Vista Home Premium C. Windows Vista Business D. Windows Vista Ultimate 4. You want to install Windows Vista Ultimate on a PC that previously ran Windows XP Professional. You are unsure if all of the hardware is compatible, and you would also like to keep most of the current applications. What should you do before installing Windows Vista to answer these questions? A. Run a full Windows Defender scan. B. Turn off Windows Firewall.
  • 56 Chapter 2: Install Windows Vista C. Download and run the Windows Vista Upgrade Advisor. D. Review MSINFO. 5. You want to upgrade a particular PC that runs Windows XP Home edition to Windows Vista Home Basic. The PC has an older sound card and TV tuner card, and you would like to find out if these devices are compatible with Windows Vista or not. How might you find this information? A. View MSCONFIG. B. Check the manufacturer’s Web site for updated drivers. C. View the HCL. D. Review MSINFO. Perform a Clean Installation of Windows Vista 6. You want to perform a clean install on a PC. You have already backed up your files, and while you are installing, you want to reconfigure the existing drive so that there are two partitions. What do you need to do? A. Use Computer Management to reconfigure the drives before the clean install. B. Boot from the Windows Vista installation DVD. C. Use a third-party utility to reconfigure the drive first. D. Boot into the current operating system and start the installation DVD. Choose the upgrade option. 7. You recently performed a clean install from a PC that had Windows XP Professional, SP2. After the upgrade, you discover that some of your files from the XP operating system were not backed up. What is the best way to recover these files after the clean installation? A. Access the Windows.old folder. B. Use the Previous Versions tab of the folder’s properties pages to access the shadow copy. C. Use a third-party recovery tool. D. The data cannot be recovered. 8. You have a Windows XP Professional computer. You want to perform a clean install of this PC. As you prepare for the installation, which of the following actions should you first take? A. Run Windows Upgrade Advisor. B. Update all drivers. C. Review the HCL. D. Identify applications that may not be compatible.
  • Self Test 57 9. You have 50 computers on the business network you manage. The company owners have decided to purchase new PCs that are identical. Your task is to install all 50 identical computers with Windows Vista Business. Every computer should be configured in the exact same way. You would like to use Windows PE to roll out this installation in order to save time. Arrange the following actions in the proper order to complete these tasks. ❑ Boot the master with a Windows PE CD. ❑ Use ImageX to apply the image to the new computer. ❑ Use Sysprep to seal the new build. ❑ Boot the new computer with a Windows PE CD. ❑ Use ImageX on the master to create the image file. Upgrade a Previous Version of Windows to Windows Vista 10. Which operating systems can be upgraded to Windows Vista? (Choose all that apply.) A. Windows 98 SE B. Windows 2000 Professional C. Windows XP Home edition with SP2 D. Windows XP Professional edition with SP2 11. Concerning upgrading Windows XP to Windows Vista, which of the following upgrade scenarios are not valid? A. Windows XP Home to Windows Vista Home Basic, Business, Home Premium, or Ultimate B. Windows XP Media Center to Windows Vista Home Basic or Ultimate C. Windows XP Professional to Windows Vista Business or Ultimate D. Windows XP Tablet PC to Windows Vista Business or Ultimate 12. Which of the following describes a correct method for installing a dual-boot PC running Windows XP Professional and Windows Vista Ultimate? A. Install both Windows XP Professional and Windows Vista Ultimate in the same partition. Install Windows Vista first. B. Install both Windows XP Professional and Windows Vista Ultimate in the same partition. Install Windows XP first. C. Install Windows XP Professional and Windows Vista each in its own partition. Install Windows XP first. D. Install Windows XP Professional and Windows Vista each in its own partition. Install Windows Vista first.
  • 58 Chapter 2: Install Windows Vista 13. You multiboot a PC containing Windows 2000 Professional, Windows XP Professional, and Windows Vista Ultimate. Windows Vista is the default operating system that boots unless you select a different operating system from the boot menu that appears. You need to change this so that Windows XP is the default. What two methods can you use to change the default system? (Choose two.) A. Bcdedit.exe B. Software Explorer C. System properties D. System | Advanced System Settings 14. You need to migrate 50 user settings and files from Windows XP Professional to 50 new Windows Vista Ultimate computers on your business network. What is the best way to perform this action? A. USMT B. Bcdedit.exe C. Windows Easy Transfer D. Netstat 15. You want to use USMT to migrate user files to a 100 PC rollout of Windows Vista. You only want to migrate user files and not other settings, such as Internet Explorer favorites. How can you configure USMT to only migrate the data you want? A. Edit Statedata.xml. B. Use ScanState.exe to record the data, and then edit the image. C. Run LoadState.exe with the -R switch. D. Edit Config.xml. 16. You have a PC that runs a 32-bit version of Windows XP Professional. You need to upgrade this PC to the 64-bit version of Windows Vista Ultimate. The PC meets the necessary hardware requirements. You want to ensure that you do not lose your personal data during the upgrade. What do you need to do? A. Simply upgrade the system. No other action is necessary. B. Copy the data using USMT and install the upgrade. C. Back up the data, use Windows PE to start the installation, and then restore the data. D. Back up the data, perform a clean install, and restore the data.
  • Lab Question 59 Upgrade from One Version of Windows Vista to Another 17. You would like to upgrade Windows Vista Business to another version of Windows Vista. What versions could you choose? (Choose all that apply.) A. Windows Vista Home Basic B. Windows Vista Home Premium C. Windows Vista Ultimate D. Windows Vista Business 18. Concerning Windows Anytime Upgrade, which statements are true? (Choose all that apply.) A. You must have the Windows Vista DVD. B. You must purchase a license for the upgrade. C. You can start the upgrade from the Administrative Tools folder in Control Panel. D. You can’t use the feature on Windows Vista Ultimate. LAB QUESTION A manager in your company has a desktop computer that has been custom-built. The computer runs Windows 2000 Professional. The manager would like this computer upgraded to Windows Vista Ultimate, but he would like to keep as many settings as possible and keep all of his files intact. You have copies of Windows XP Professional at your disposal. Additionally, the manager has a laptop that runs Windows XP Professional. The manager has just purchased a new laptop that runs Windows Vista Ultimate. He would like all of his files and settings moved to the new laptop from the old one. How can you meet the manager’s goals with these changes to Windows Vista?
  • 60 Chapter 2: Install Windows Vista SELF TEST ANSWERS Identify Hardware Requirements ✓ 1. ® A. The only operating system you can install is Windows Vista Home Basic. All other versions of Windows Vista require a 40GB hard drive. ® B, C, and D are incorrect because you cannot install these operating systems on a drive ˚ under 40GB. ✓ 2. ® B. You need 128MB of graphics memory, not 32MB. ® A, C, and D are all incorrect because these options meet the hardware requirements. ˚ ✓ 3. ® C and D. Dual processors are supported on Windows Vista Business, Ultimate, and Enterprise editions. ® A and B are incorrect because neither Home edition of Vista supports dual processors. ˚ ✓ 4. ® C. Download and run the Windows Vista Upgrade Advisor. Since you need to know about hardware and software compatibility, this is the only correct answer. ® A and B are incorrect because Windows Defender and Windows Firewall will not resolve ˚ the questions at hand. D is also incorrect because MSINFO will give you current configuration information, but it will not answer questions concerning compatibility. ✓ 5. ® C. Begin by taking a look at the Hardware Compatibility List for known issues. You can then investigate each device via the manufacturer’s Web site, but your first look should be the HCL. ® A, B, and D are incorrect. These actions will not give you information about compatibility. ˚ Perform a Clean Installation of Windows Vista ✓ 6. ® B. If you boot from the DVD, you’ll be given the option to reconfigure the drive partitions as desired. Sine you have already backed up your data, you simply need to start the installation and configure the drive as desired. ® A, C, and D are incorrect because none of these actions are necessary. ˚ ✓ 7. ® A. Access the Windows.old folder to recover the files. ® B, C, and D are all incorrect because the files can be recovered from the Windows.old ˚ folder. ✓ 8. ® A. You should first run the Windows Upgrade Advisor. ® B, C, and D are incorrect. Although these actions may be necessary, the Windows Upgrade ˚ Advisor may answer some of these questions without the additional sleuthing work on your part. Always begin with the Windows Update Advisor.
  • Self Test Answers 61 9. The correct order is as follows: ❑ Use Sysprep to seal the master. Sysprep prepares a currently installed Windows Vista operating system to be created into an image you can place on other computers. Sysprep removes some computer-specific information, such as the workstation’s Security Identifier (SID). ❑ Boot the master with a Windows PE CD. ❑ Use ImageX within Windows PE to create the image file. ImageX is a Windows PE tool that is used to capture and apply operating system images. ❑ Boot the computer where you want to place the image using the Windows PE CD. You can then use Diskpart to format the drive if necessary. ❑ Use ImageX to apply the master image to the new computer. You can repeat these steps on additional computers as needed. Upgrade a Previous Version of Windows to Windows Vista ✓ 10. ® C and D. Only 32-bit Windows XP versions with SP2 can be upgraded to Windows Vista versions. ® A and B are incorrect because downlevel operating systems earlier than Windows XP ˚ cannot be upgraded to Windows Vista. ✓ 11. ® B. You cannot upgrade Windows XP Media Center edition to Windows Vista Home Basic edition. ® A, C, and D are all incorrect because these are valid upgrade paths. ˚ ✓ 12. ® C. Each operating system must be installed in its own partition. You should always install the downlevel operating system first, and then install Windows Vista last. ® A, B, and D are incorrect. A and B are incorrect because you cannot install both operating ˚ systems in the same partition. D is incorrect because you should install Windows XP first. ✓ 13. ® A and D. You can change the default system that will boot by using the Bcdedit.exe command-line tool, and through System | Advanced System Settings. ® B and C are incorrect because you cannot change the default system using either of these ˚ tools. ✓ 14. ® A. The User State Migration Tool (USMT) is the best tool to use when you need to migrate larger numbers of user settings and files. ® B is incorrect because Bcdedit.exe is used to edit boot order. C is incorrect because ˚ Windows Easy File Transfer is too slow and cumbersome for large migrations. D is incorrect because Netstat is a networking tool.
  • 62 Chapter 2: Install Windows Vista ✓ 15. ® D. Config.xml is a configuration file where you can determine what data is collected by ScanState.ext when using USMT. ® A, B, and C are incorrect. You cannot use ScanState or LoadState for this purpose. ˚ Statedata.xml is a not a real file used by USMT. ✓ 16. ® D. There is no upgrade path for the 64-bit edition of Windows Vista. So, simply back up the data, perform a clean install, and then restore the data as desired. ® A, B, and C are all incorrect because you cannot upgrade a 32-bit operating system. ˚ Upgrade from One Version of Windows Vista to Another ✓ 17. ® C. You can upgrade Windows Vista Business to Windows Vista Ultimate. ® A, B, and D are incorrect. You cannot upgrade Windows Vista Business to Windows Home ˚ Basic, to Home Premium, or to itself. ✓ 18. ® A, B, and D. All of these statements are true. ® C is incorrect. You can start the upgrade from System in Control Panel or the Welcome ˚ screen. LAB ANSWER There is no upgrade path from Windows 2000 to Vista. In this scenario, you can back up all of the data and upgrade the computer, but you will still lose a lot of settings. One solution would be to spend some time verifying the hardware for the upgrade, and then upgrade the custom desktop to Windows XP Professional first. Verify all of the settings again, and then upgrade to Windows Vista Ultimate. Although a bit time-consuming, this is likely the easiest solution that will keep as many files and settings intact as possible. Concerning the laptop, you simply need to use Windows Easy Transfer. The transfer will take several hours to complete, but it works well and will give you the results you’re after. You can start the file transfer process from the new Windows Vista laptop by clicking Start | All Programs | Accessories | System Tools | Windows Easy Transfer.
  • 3 Manage PostInstallation Issues CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVES 3.01 Configure and Troubleshoot User Account Control 3.02 Configure and Troubleshoot Parental Controls 3.03 Install and Configure Windows Drivers 3.04 ✓ Q&A Troubleshoot Installation and Post-Installation Configuration Issues Two-Minute Drill Self Test
  • 64 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues A t last, you have Windows Vista installed! Now what? Once installation is complete, you have some initial post-installation issues you should pay attention to, such as solving any immediate problems you see, installing and configuring drivers for hardware devices, and according to Microsoft, making sure you configure the new User Account Control feature and set up parental controls to control user access to the Internet and programs. All of these options are considered post-installation issues. Naturally, there may be many more post-installation configuration issues you need to tackle, but since the exam is focused on these, we’ll do the same. In this chapter, we’ll consider the configuration and troubleshooting tactics for User Account Control and parental controls, and then we’ll take a look at installing and managing drivers as well as troubleshooting problems that may occur after an installation. As with all chapters in this book, make sure you follow along on Windows Vista and practice the configuration items you find in this chapter. Be sure to perform all labs as well. CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 3.01 Configure and Troubleshoot User Account Control Windows Vista includes a new feature called User Account Control, or UAC, as we’ll call it from now on. UAC is a feature that is designed to help reduce the possibility of spyware or malware installing on or making configuration changes to your computer. Since UAC is a new feature in Windows Vista, you can certainly expect an exam question or two. Be sure that you know this section well before taking the test! Using UAC UAC is a user account specific setting; by default, the UAC is turned on whenever you create a new account. If you open User Accounts in Control Panel, select an account, and then click Turn User Account Control on or off, you see a simple window where UAC is enabled along with a recommendation to leave UAC turned on, as you can see in Figure 3-1. So, there’s not much to UAC in terms of initial configuration—it is already turned on by default. But the bigger question is, what does UAC actually do? UAC is designed
  • Configure and Troubleshoot User Account Control 65 FIGURE 3-1 UAC setting to prevent unauthorized changes to your computer. Essentially, the entire feature is designed to help prevent malware or spyware from changing or installing anything on your computer because installation or configuration changes require a UAC prompt and an OK from the user in order to continue. The User Account Control dialog box tells you that Windows needs your permission to continue, and it tells you what action is being taken so that you can continue or cancel the operation. The idea is that if malware or spyware tries to “silently” install anything on your PC, you’ll get a notification allowing you to cancel the action before it takes place. By default, all accounts on Windows Vista, beyond the initial administrator account, are standard accounts with restrictions. Rather than getting an “access denied” message when you try to do something beyond the standard account’s privileges, you get a UAC dialog box. If you are logged on as a standard user, you must provide an administrator password. If you are logged on as an administrator, you get to simply see a “permission” dialog box where you need only click Continue. The UAC dialog box sits on top of what is called a “secure desktop,” meaning that no bogus dialog boxes from malware can get in front of it and redirect you.
  • 66 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues INSIDE THE EXAM part of Windows needs your permission to start. This program has a valid digital signature that verifies its name and publisher, so both you and Windows know the program is what it claims to be. Once again, this can be annoyance because you’ll need to click Continue in order for the program to run. UAC Alerts UAC provides several different alerts, depending on what is happening with your system. Yet, you may have noticed only one or two, so for the exam, you should at least be familiar with all of the possible alerts you may receive from UAC. You may see UAC alerts used in a variety of scenario-based questions on the exam, so you should review the kinds of alerts that are possible, as explained in the following list: ■ ■ Permission to continue This alert is a security alert that tells you that something is accessing a function or program that can affect other users on the computer. Typically, that something is you, so the permission to continue UAC alerts is the primary annoyance because it pops up for all kinds of things, even opening many Control Panel applets. Nevertheless, it is a good security feature. Program needs permission This alert appears when a program that is not a ■ Unidentified program needs permission This alert is where UAC really pays off because you’ll get the alert when any program without a valid digital signature tries to start. The fact that the program doesn’t have a digital signature doesn’t mean there is a problem, necessarily, but it does mean you should pause and make sure the program is one you installed and you know where it came from. ■ Blocked program This alert simply tells you that a program has been blocked. In order to run the program, you’ll need to log on with an administrator account. The secure desktop ensures that only UAC dialog boxes can run in that space and you are seeing a real Windows prompt. That’s good, but the constant interruption by UAC is certainly a trade-off between security and annoyance. Any configuration button you see on Windows
  • Configure and Troubleshoot User Account Control 67 Vista with a shield on it (see later Figure 3-14) will trigger the UAC and require administrator privilege to access and configure. Managing UAC Alerts I mentioned in the preceding section that UAC alerts, although good, can be a serious annoyance. The good news is that you can edit the behavior of UAC alerts, and you should expect to see an exam question concerning this issue. For example, let’s say that your environment runs applications on every Windows Vista computer that are centrally preapproved and installed centrally. You know the programs are safe, and you don’t need a UAC prompt every time. However, what about other environments, where a corporate policy requires that credentials always be used for administrative tasks? In either scenario, you can edit the UAC alerts to meet your corporation’s needs. You can change the behavior of UAC for both standard users and local administrators in Admin Approval mode. You can do this by logging on with an administrator account and using the Security Policy MMC to edit the behavior of the UAC. You must do this separately for standard users and administrators in Admin Approval mode. Exercises 3-1 and 3-2 show how to configure both. EXERCISE 3-1 CertCam UAC Alerts for Admin Approval Mode To adjust the UAC alert behavior for administrators in Admin Approval mode, follow these steps: 1. Log on with an administrator account. Click Start. Type Run in the search dialog box and press ENTER. 2. In the Run dialog box, type secpol.msc in the Open box and click OK. 3. In the left console tree, click Local Policies to expand the container, and then click Security Options, shown in the following illustration.
  • 68 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues 4. In the right pane, scroll down and double-click “User Account Control: Behavior of the elevation prompt for administrators” in Admin Approval mode. 5. In the drop-down box that appears, shown in the following illustration, select one of the following options: ■ Elevate Without Prompting This setting allows applications that have been marked as administrator applications as well as applications that are detected during setup to run automatically with the full administrator access token. All other applications will automatically run with the standard user token. ■ Prompt For Credentials This setting gives content for an application to run with the full administrator token only if the user enters administrator credentials each time. This setting is designed to support compliance with Common Criteria or other corporate policies.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot User Account Control ■ Prompt For Consent 69 This is the default setting. EXERCISE 3-2 UAC Alerts for Standard Users To adjust the UAC behavior for standard users, follow these steps: 1. Log on with an administrator account. Click Start. Type Run in the search dialog box and press ENTER. 2. In the Run dialog box, type secpol.msc in the Open box and click OK. 3. In the left console tree, click Local Policies to expand the container, and then click Security Options.
  • 70 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues 4. In the right pane, scroll down and double-click “User Account Control: Behavior of the elevation prompt for standard users.” 5. From the drop-down menu that appears on the dialog box, choose one of the following: ■ Automatically Deny Elevation Requests With this setting enabled, administrator applications will not be able to run. The user will see an error message telling him that a security policy has prevented the application from running. ■ Prompt For Credentials This is the default setting. Administrator applications can run when administrator credentials are entered. Aside from these issues, there are a few other configuration options you should be aware of concerning the UAC, as described in the following sections. Application Setup Detection By default, UAC detects most applications automatically and treats them as applications that require elevation of the user’s security context, even if they haven’t been marked as such. This is why some applications will prompt a standard user for administrator privileges in order to run with full access to the system. However, in an environment where users are never expected to run installation or setup programs, users will see the UAC and then need assistance from technical support. This issue can be resolved because an administrator can disable the automatic setup detection by UAC. To do so, return to the Security Policy MMC as described in the previous exercises, double-click “User Account Control: Detect application installations and prompt for elevation,” then choose the Disabled option. Marking an Application to Require a Full Admin Token Some applications that are non-Microsoft applications or internal business applications require the full administrator access token to perform at least some of their tasks, without having been identified as administrator applications by the publisher. You can resolve this problem by marking the application to always require a full administrator access token. To do this, right-click the application executable and click Properties. On the Compatibility tab under Privilege Level, select “Run this program as an administrator” and click OK. If you don’t see the option, then application is blocked from always running with administrator credentials, the application doesn’t require admin credentials to run, or you are not logged on to the computer as an administrator.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Parental Controls 71 SCENARIO & SOLUTION I am an administrator on my computer, and I need to stop seeing the UAC permission message for configuration changes. What do I need to do? In this case, you simply need to change the security policy elevation prompt behavior for UAC Admin Approval mode. See Exercise 3-1 for instructions. This is a common situation and one you should keep in mind for the exam. Can’t I just turn UAC off and avoid all of these issues? UAC is a security strategy designed to prevent malware. Certainly, the feature can be turned off, but this leaves your computer vulnerable and is typically never going to be the right response to an exam question. The security policy options concerning UAC can be a bit confusing. Naturally, the exam will take advantage of this situation and give you convoluted questions that you’ll need to sort out. Just keep in mind the goal of the security policy change and make sure you choose the correct policy for what you want to accomplish. CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 3.02 Configure and Troubleshoot Parental Controls Parental controls are a great new feature in Windows Vista, and as a parent with young children who are just starting to use the computer and the Internet, I found this feature to be one of the more exciting ones. The interesting thing about parental controls is that they are not just an Internet filter and are not just for children—you can manage users on a small network with parental controls and even
  • 72 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues get reports about what the users are doing. Besides, parental controls are new in Windows Vista and you should expect to see some exam questions about them. First things first: what can you do with parental controls? Here’s a rundown of their features: ■ Parental controls are tied to each user account. You can create different user accounts for each user and configure different settings for each. ■ You can limit the user’s access to the Internet. ■ You can limit the hours the user can log on to the computer. ■ You can limit which games and programs the user can access. ■ You can override these settings at any time using your administrator account password. Before you start to configure parental controls, each child or user needs his or her own user account. That account must be a standard account because parental controls cannot be applied to an administrator account. So, for basic security, your administrator account should be password-protected with a password that no other user knows, so that other users can’t override the settings by using your password. Setting Up Parental Controls To set up parental controls, click Start | Control Panel | Parental Controls. Remember, you must be logged on with an administrator level account to configure these settings. In the Parental Controls window, choose the user account you want to configure, as shown in Figure 3-2. In the Parental Controls window, turn on parental controls by clicking the On radio button, as shown in Figure 3-3. You can also turn on Activity Reporting, so you can view a report of everything the user is doing on the computer. This feature gives you accurate information about how that person is using the computer, and I recommend you enable it, as well. Configure Web Restrictions One of the main features of parental controls is that you can configure restrictions for any user, essentially determining what he or she can do on the Internet. Because Internet usage tends to be a major area of concern for parents (and rightfully so) as well as employers, you certainly want to place some restrictions on your Internet use.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Parental Controls FIGURE 3-2 73 Choose the desired account. Click the Windows Vista Web Filter option in the middle of the Parental Controls interface. This opens the Web Restrictions window, shown in Figure 3-4. You can do the following: ■ Turn on the option to block some Web content by clicking the Yes button. ■ Under Control Specific Websites, choose to allow or block specific Web sites, as the following illustration shows. Simply type the desired Web site and click Allow or Block. The options here override other general settings, so you can strengthen the Web filter or override it for some sites. Also notice the check box option to “Only allow websites which are on the allow list.” This feature is helpful in the case of a child or user that is allowed to only visit specific Web sites.
  • 74 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues ■ Choose a restriction level. If you click a level of restriction, you’ll notice different content categories are selected. However, you can customize this option by simply clicking the categories you want to block. This setting causes parental controls to look at each Web site and block sites with this content, assuming the sites are rated. However, this feature is not foolproof, and if content is not rated, it is automatically blocked under the Medium and High settings. ■ Under Internet Access, you have the option to block file downloads or not. For younger children especially or to enforce network policies, this is a good setting to use.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Parental Controls FIGURE 3-3 75 Turn on parental controls. Configure Other Restrictions Aside from Web content controls, you’ll also find a few other restrictions that can be helpful in terms not only of parental controls but also of usage controls that can be an asset in a business environment as well. Make sure you keep the following options and features in mind for the exam. Set Time Limits If you click the Time Limits option, you see a simple interface where you can click and drag to allow time that the user can use the computer each day. White areas
  • 76 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues FIGURE 3-4 Web Restrictions options are blocked time, so the user will be unable to use the computer during blocked-out hours of the day, as Figure 3-5 shows. Control Games Click Game Controls to determine what types of games the user is allowed to play, as shown in Figure 3-6. You can first allow games, and then you can choose to set the game rating limits for your child, and block or allow specific games found on your computer. If you click the Set Game Ratings option, you see a window, shown in Figure 3-7, that enables you to allow or block games with no ratings. You can then
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Parental Controls FIGURE 3-5 77 Time limits choose rating levels your child can play, as well as any online game content. Choose the desired options here and click OK. Allow or Block Specific Programs You can allow your child to use programs on your computer, but you can also block any programs on your computer that you don’t want your child to play. Simply click the Allow Or Block Specific Programs option on the main parental controls interface and, in the provided window, restrict the programs your child can use to the allowed programs on the list (as shown in Figure 3-8). Make your selections and click OK.
  • 78 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues FIGURE 3-6 Games options Activity Reports At any time, you can return to the Parental Controls page and click Activity Reports to see the user’s Web browsing activity, file downloads, system events, and applications that were run. This report can be helpful in determining what the user is doing on your computer, but it can also be used to gather general information. If you expand the General System folder in the left pane, notice that you can see changes to settings, account changes, system clock changes, and failed logon attempts. These items can give you a global look at some important changes that have occurred, as shown in Figure 3-9.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Parental Controls FIGURE 3-7 79 Choose the desired game ratings EXERCISE 3-3 CertCam Configuring Parental Controls As you can see from the chapter, parental controls are rather intuitive and easy to configure. In terms of the exam, it is likely to give you a situation and ask what you need to do. For example, what if you have a user whom you want to restrict from using certain Web sites and programs, but nothing else? You can create this restriction using parental controls. Follow these steps: 1. Open Parental Controls and select the desired user. 2. Click the On radio button to turn on parental controls, and then click the Windows Vista Web Filter.
  • 80 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues 3. On the Windows Vista Web Filter, click Edit The Allow And Block List, and then enter the desired Web sites on the blocked list and click OK and OK again. 4. Click Allow Or Block Specific Programs. Click the option to use only programs you allow. 5. In the list of programs on the PC, check the programs that you want the user to be able to access and click OK. Then close Parental Controls. FIGURE 3-8 Choose the programs that can be used.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Parental Controls 81 SCENARIO & SOLUTION I want to use parental controls to log the activity of a user, but I don’t want to restrict anything. Can this be done? Yes, simply enable parental controls for the user’s account and choose to log activity. If you don’t configure anything else, there will be no restrictions placed on the user. I only want my daughter to be able to access a couple of Web sites. How can I configure this? Set up parental controls and open the Web Filter and enter the desired Web sites in the allowed list. Then, click the check box toward the bottom that will block all other sites except what is available in the allowed list. FIGURE 3-9 Activity Reports
  • 82 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 3.03 Install and Configure Windows Drivers A device driver is simply software that allows Windows Vista or any other operating system to interact with a hardware device. The driver determines communication parameters and essentially acts as a bridge between the operating system code and the device driver. The driver, then, allows the operating system to “drive” the device so that the operating system can control the hardware device, which you then manage through the operating system interface. Drivers are developed by hardware vendors, and from Microsoft’s point of view, how well a driver operates with Windows Vista is solely the responsibility of the hardware vendor. When Microsoft releases a new operating system, an updated device driver generally needs to be created so that the device can communicate with the new operating system. This is the primary reason that some devices fail to operate after an upgrade—the driver is incompatible with the new operating system. Managing Drivers Even though device drivers are the responsibility of hardware manufacturers, Windows Vista still maintains a generic database of drivers so that hardware can function with Windows Vista even if a manufacturer’s driver is not available. Under most circumstances, the manufacturer’s driver should be used if at all possible, since it is specifically developed for the hardware device’s interaction with Windows Vista. So, the short lesson here is to simply use hardware that is compatible with Windows Vista and make sure you are using the most current driver designed by the manufacturer, if possible. Driver Details Because driver configuration and management can be difficult, Windows Vista provides you with the Driver tab, found on each device’s properties pages, which can be accessed from Device Manager. The Driver tab, as you can see in Figure 3-10, gives you a few different options that you can use to manage the device’s driver. If you click the Driver Details button, you see information about the driver, such as the location, files used, provider, file version, copyright, and digital signer
  • Install and Configure Windows Drivers 83 FIGURE 3-10 Driver tab information, as shown in Figure 3-11. This data can be helpful when you simply want to gain basic information about the driver. For example, if you want to know which files to remove—if you ever need to manually remove them—they are listed in the Driver Files window. Device Manager You can take a look at Device Manager and see if there is a device that isn’t working. It will appear with a yellow exclamation point over the device. You can simply right-click the device at this point and click Update Driver so that Windows Vista can attempt to install a suitable driver for it. Updating Drivers Since drivers are updated periodically, you should strive to always use the most current one.To help with this process, Windows Vista uses the Hardware Update Wizard, which enables you to replace an older driver with a newer one. Exercise 3-4 walks you through the process of updating a driver.
  • 84 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues FIGURE 3-11 Driver Details EXERCISE 3-4 Updating a Driver To update a driver, just follow these steps: 1. In Device Manager, right-click the desired device and click Properties. Then, click the Driver tab. 2. On the Driver tab, click Update Driver. 3. The Hardware Update Wizard appears, as shown in the following illustration. Notice that you have two options. You can have Windows Vista install the new driver automatically at the online store and on your computer, or you can install from a specific list of drivers or locations. If you choose the Search option, Windows Vista searches your computer for a new driver and installs the driver once it’s found. If you want to update the driver manually, choose that option on the Welcome screen and click Next.
  • Install and Configure Windows Drivers 85 4. The next window gives you a selection list. You can choose the kind of device that you are using and allow Windows to try to match a driver from its database to the device. If you have an installation disk, you can also use the disk here. However, if you do have an installation disk, keep in mind that you can simply use the automatic installation method on the Welcome screen of the wizard (which is faster and easier). Make the desired selection and click Next. 5. The files for the driver are copied and installed. Click Finish. Windows Update delivers updated drivers as they become available. Assuming Windows Update is set for automatic updates, you should always have the latest drivers installed. However, if the exam gives you a situation where you’re having problems with a device and you want to make sure the device has the latest update, the answer is to run Windows Update.
  • 86 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues FIGURE 3-12 Uninstall confirmation Removing a Driver If you want to completely remove a driver, simply use the Uninstall button. You can also use the Roll Back Driver option to remove the current driver and use the previous one, which can be helpful in cases where you install a new driver that doesn’t work properly. If you choose to uninstall a driver, you’ll see a warning message that tells you that you are about to remove the device from your system, shown in Figure 3-12. When you uninstall the driver, the device is uninstalled as well. At this point, Windows Vista Plug and Play will detect the uninstalled hardware device as new hardware and attempt to reinstall it. In some cases, this can help you uninstall and reinstall a problematic device, especially if you are having driver problems. You can see an example of this process in Exercise 3-5. EXERCISE 3-5 CertCam Uninstalling and Redetecting a Hardware Device To uninstall a driver and redetect the device, follow these steps: 1. In Device Manager, expand the desired category and select the device that you want to uninstall. If you perform this exercise, choose a basic device, such as a standard network adapter, keyboard, mouse, or some other device that uses a simple generic driver. 2. Right-click the device and click Properties. Click the Driver tab. 3. Click Uninstall and click OK to the warning message that appears. 4. The device driver is uninstalled from your computer. Note that the device no longer appears in Device Manager.
  • Install and Configure Windows Drivers 87 5. To have Windows redetect and reinstall the device, on the menu bar click Action | Scan For Hardware Changes. 6. Windows scans the system and detects the device. A bubble message appears in the Notification Area telling you that a new device has been detected and is being installed. Once the installation is complete, the bubble message tells you so—and that is all there is to it! As in previous versions of Windows, you can launch the Add Hardware Wizard to help you install troublesome hardware.The wizard will detect the hardware and try to locate a suitable driver for it. One difference in Windows Vista is that the Add Hardware Wizard can now invoke custom installation programs so that you can install additional software that comes with the device driver(s). Verifying Drivers Aside from the driver management options found on the Driver tab, you can also verify driver signing in Windows Vista. Driver signing, first introduced in Windows 2000 systems, enables you to make certain that you are installing and using only drivers that have been “signed,” or certified, by Microsoft. This feature makes certain that the drivers have been tested and will work with specified hardware on Windows Vista. The signing feature, however, certainly does not mean that unsigned drivers are damaging to your system or will not work—it just means that Microsoft has not approved or tested them, and you are on your own in terms of testing, compatibility, and troubleshooting.
  • 88 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues Signed drivers have a digital signature stamp that cannot be altered without altering the entire driver package. The digital signature is basically a digital code that is able to verify that the driver package comes from a reliable source. This feature tells you that a signed driver is, in fact, a signed driver and that you can feel safe when using the driver on your system. Another advantage of signed drivers, especially with Internet downloads, is that a signed driver tells you that the package is actually a verified driver—not a virus or other malicious code acting like a driver. For downloads of drivers, the signed driver feature can certainly give you a measure of protection. The basic rule to follow is to use signed drivers if at all possible. With the signed driver, you can ensure that the driver has been tested and has received Microsoft’s seal of approval. Of course, in some cases, it may not be possible to use a signed driver. This is fine, but it leaves you doing your own homework to determine if the driver will work and if the driver is safe to use. You can also use the File Signature Verification utility to check existing files on your computer in order to make certain that they are digitally signed. Sigverif doesn’t test a file to see if it has been modified, but it does check all installed drivers and reports which ones are signed and which ones are not signed. For the exam, keep in mind that sigverif does not solve any problems. It only generates a report. You must review, analyze, and correct any perceived problems regarding unsigned drivers. So how does all of this work? Windows Hardware Quality Labs (WHQL) is the testing facility for signed drivers. Third-party developers supply the hardware device and the proposed driver (along with payment) to WHQL. If the driver doesn’t cause OS problems, MS embeds a digital certificate into the driver file itself that includes a hash of the file. This hash is like a fingerprint of the file. If there is even a single bit changed, the hash will be different and can be used to identify file modifications, virus infections, etc. This digital cert plus the hash become the digital signature used in driver signing. The point here is that drivers have to be submitted and developers have to pay for the testing, so don’t assume that all unsigned drivers are “bad”; they may just not have been tested by Microsoft. You can search for files, and you can also configure the tool to create a log file. Exercise 3-5 shows you how to use the File Signature Verification utility. EXERCISE 3-6 CertCam Using the File Signature Verification Utility To use File Signature Verification, just follow these steps: 1. Click Start. In the Start Search box, type sigverif and click OK.
  • Install and Configure Windows Drivers 89 2. The File Signature Verification utility appears, as shown in the following illustration. You can immediately start the utility by clicking Start, or you can click Advanced to configure options for the utility. Click Advanced. 3. You see a Logging tab. You can choose to save the results of the File Signature Verification utility to a log file, which is named sigverif.txt by default. You can choose to append the scan to the existing log or overwrite the existing log (which is the default option). Make any desired changes and click OK. 4. Click Start to begin the utility. When the utility begins, a file list is built, and then you’ll see a status bar as files are verified. Once the utility completes, you see a completion window. If any files are not digitally signed, they will appear in the dialog box.
  • 90 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues 5. Once the scan is complete, you can also easily view the log file by clicking Advanced and then clicking the Logging tab. Click View Log, and the log file appears in a simple text format, as shown in the following illustration: SCENARIO & SOLUTION I suspect there is a driver problem with a hardware device. What is the first thing I should do? Always go to Device Manager first. Device Manager will often report when there is a problem with a hardware device by displaying a yellow exclamation point over the device. From here, you can simply right-click the device and click Update Driver. I installed a new printer driver, and now the printer does not work. What do I need to do? Go to the Driver tab on the printer’s properties dialog box and choose the Roll Back Driver option. This will take you back to the previous driver.
  • Troubleshoot Installation and Post-Installation Configuration Issues 91 CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 3.04 Troubleshoot Installation and Post-Installation Configuration Issues When the exam mentions an objective like “post-installation configuration issues,” you may scratch your head and stare. After all, this objective seems to give the exam total license to ask you just about anything under the sun. After all, isn’t every possible problem you might experience on Windows Vista a “post-installation configuration issue?” Good point. However, the exam is likely to focus on only a few items from this objective, and frankly, it will spend more time quizzing you about installation and Windows Vista features than about a listing of problems. With that point in mind, I’m going to simply examine some different issues in this section that the exam is likely to ask you, as it is impossible to review every possible problem that can arise after installation (unless you want this book to be the size of a subcompact car). The good news is this: Windows Vista is very good at scanning your system before you install to make sure the system meets compatibility requirements. This fact alone solves many possible problems before they ever begin. For other issues to keep in mind for the exam, read on. Windows Experience Index Once installation is complete, the installation routine will scan your computer and give the computer a Windows Experience Index rating, which you can gather from the Performance Information and Tools applet in Control Panel. Since the Windows Experience Index rating will be explored in Chapter 10, I’ll not repeat that information here. However, do understand that the Windows Experience Index is one of those first places you should look after installation because it gives you information about how your computer ranks and what hardware device is likely the “weakest link” in terms of performance. So, if you come across a question that has you wondering about hardware and performance after installation is complete, the Windows Experience Index is the place to go. Problems with File Access One issue that may appear on the exam concerns multiboot systems. Keep in mind that some legacy Windows operating systems, such as Windows 95, 98, and ME, can’t read NTFS volumes. If you have a multiboot configuration with one of these
  • 92 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues operating systems and you notice that you can’t access some files from the downlevel system, the issue concerns NTFS. The needed files are likely on an NTFS drive, and those older systems can’t read data from them. I don’t think anyone in the real world would ever find themselves in this situation, although some businesses use older operating systems in order to maintain backward compatibility with custom applications. At any rate, just remember that older down-level systems cannot read NTFS. Issues with Temporary Files You may run across an odd question concerning writing files to a CD after installing Windows Vista. The issue here is not a problem per se, but rather that the drive that stores temporary recorded files may not have enough space. You find out if there is enough space for temporary recorded files by checking out how much space is available. See Exercise 3-7. EXERCISE 3-7 Temporary Recorded Files To find out how much space is available for temporary recorded files, follow these steps: 1. Click Start | Computer. 2. Right-click the CD / DVD drive and click Properties. 3. Click the Recording tab. Notice that you have a drive selection option in the middle of the tab. Here, you can take a look at the volumes available and choose one that has enough space. Generally, the volume should have at least as much free space as the CD / DVD will hold during a burning process. Keep in mind that you can view the properties of each drive in Computer to find out how much space is available.
  • Troubleshoot Installation and Post-Installation Configuration Issues 93 Issues with Standard Users One issue that tends to throw people off after installation concerns user accounts. Keep in mind that the administrator account is the first account created. After that, the Standard account is the default account for all others. So, let’s say that you configure a computer that dual-boots Windows Vista and Windows XP. You are able to install applications in Windows XP with no problem, but in Windows Vista, you get the UAC prompt for administrator credentials. In this case, you are simply using a standard user account in Windows Vista rather than an admin account. This behavior is normal. Problems with Older Applications Naturally, if you upgrade to Windows Vista, there is always the possibility that some custom or older applications will not work under Windows Vista. The good news is Windows Vista is typically good about identifying such programs before you upgrade, and
  • 94 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues once the upgrade is complete, you can invoke Compatibility mode for the application and probably get it up and running under Windows Vista. In many cases, the Program Compatibility Assistant will appear and help you resolve compatibility issues. (This is an automatic program and not one you can start.) However, if the Program Compatibility Assistant doesn’t help, you can use the Program Compatibility Wizard. Keep in mind that older antivirus programs or disk management utilities should never be used with the Program Compatibility Wizard—these programs must be upgraded. To use the Program Compatibility Wizard, click Control Panel | Programs | Use An Older Program With This Version Of Windows. Once the wizard starts, as you can see in Figure 3-13, you can walk through the process, select the program, and choose which version of Windows you want Windows Vista to emulate for the program. You can also access the Compatibility tab of the program’s properties dialog box. Just right-click the executable file (*.exe) of the program and select Properties. Here, you can also choose a down-level operating system and make some basic adjustments so that the program is more likely to run correctly, as shown in Figure 3-14. FIGURE 3-13 Program Compatibility Wizard
  • Troubleshoot Installation and Post-Installation Configuration Issues 95 FIGURE 3-14 Compatibility tab SCENARIO & SOLUTION Do all older programs need changes made on their Compatibility tabs? No. Many older programs will work fine under Windows Vista. Use the Compatibility tab to make changes only if you are experiencing problems running the program or using it as you normally would. Will there be any file access problems in a multiboot scenario with Windows XP and Windows Vista? Possibly, due to permissions. Windows XP uses NTFS just like Windows Vista. So, when dual-booting these operating systems, you may have Access Denied messages arising from permissions.
  • 96 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues CERTIFICATION SUMMARY Windows Vista includes a number of important tools and features that you may need to configure and troubleshoot after installation. First, you should have a thorough understanding of User Account Control, which is turned on by default in user accounts for all users. UAC allows the elevation of rights for standard users if an administrator password is provided, and it provides a “permission” dialog box for administrators. Changes to the default behavior of UAC can be configured in the Security Policy MMC. Parental Controls is a new feature in Windows Vista that enables you to place restrictions on any user with a standard user account. You can restrict Web surfing, computer use time, game use, and programs. You can also log activity so that you can review a user’s actions on a computer. You can manage post-installation driver problems using Device Manager, where you can attempt to install new drivers or access the properties dialog box for the device. On the Driver tab, you can get details about the driver, update it, uninstall it, or roll back the driver to the previous version. Use the File Signature Verification utility to make certain that all drivers on your computer are digitally signed. Other post-installation issues include misunderstandings with user accounts and UAC, file access when dual-booting with down-level systems on FAT drives, ensuring that the drive selected to hold temporary files when burning CDs / DVDs has sufficient space, and managing legacy program compatibility with Windows Vista. Be sure to keep these issues in mind for the exam.
  • Two-Minute Drill ✓ 97 TWO-MINUTE DRILL Configure and Troubleshoot User Account Control ❑ UAC is enabled for all user accounts by default. ❑ Some applications that are configured as administrator-only applications or processes will cause UAC to prompt a standard user for an administrator account password or it will prompt administrators for permission. ❑ UAC behavior can be configured via security policies in the Security Policy MMC. ❑ You can use the Security Policy MMC to determine whether or not the UAC prompt appears using the “User Account Control: Behavior of the elevation prompt for standard users” and “User Account Control: Behavior of the elevation prompt for administrators” settings in Admin Approval mode. Configure and Troubleshoot Parental Controls ❑ Parental controls can be applied by an administrator to any standard user account. ❑ Use parental controls to restrict Web site access, enforce time limits, or restrict the use of games and programs. ❑ You can use parental controls to log activity for the user as well as general activity on the system. Install and Configure Windows Drivers ❑ Each device on your computer uses a driver that enables it to communicate with the operating system. ❑ Drivers are updated periodically and can be downloaded through Windows Update in many cases. ❑ Use Device Manager to review the operation of hardware and access the device’s properties dialog box. ❑ Use the Driver tab to update, remove, or roll back a driver.
  • 98 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues Troubleshoot Post-Installation Configuration Issues ❑ Keep in mind that the two account types available in Windows Vista are the administrator account and the standard user account. After the initial administrator account is created, all other accounts are standard user accounts by default. ❑ Down-level operating systems such as Windows 9x cannot read NTFS drives. Keep this in mind in dealing with dual-boot scenarios and file access. ❑ You can change what drive temporary files waiting to be burned to a CD / DVD are stored on in the Recording tab of the CD/ DVD drive’s properties dialog box. ❑ You can use the Program Compatibility Wizard or a program’s Compatibility tab on the properties dialog box and configure Windows Vista to emulate an older operating system for backward compatibility.
  • Self Test 99 SELF TEST The following questions will help you measure your understanding of the material presented in this chapter. Read all the choices carefully because there might be more than one correct answer. Choose all correct answers for each question. Configure and Troubleshoot User Account Control 1. You manage a small network consisting of Windows Vista Ultimate computers. One of your users is a member of the local Administrators group on his computer. He frequently makes configuration changes to the PC for testing purposes, and the UAC prompt appears each time, asking for permission. You need to prevent this message from appearing when the user configures the computer. What do you need to do? A. Turn off UAC for the user. B. Change the behavior of the elevation prompt for administrators in the UAC Admin Approval mode security policy. C. Change the behavior of the elevation prompt for administrators in the UAC security policy to require applications to have a full security token. D. Configure Windows Defender to allow software changes for local administrators. 2. A user on your network complains that when he opens the date and time properties, he receives a UAC message telling him that he doesn’t have sufficient privileges to make changes. The user has a standard user account on the Windows Vista Business computer. The user needs to be able to make configuration changes like this. What do you need to do? A. Turn on UAC. B. Add the user to the local administrator group. C. Edit the security policy “UAC: Behavior of the elevation prompt for administrators” in Admin Approval mode. D. Turn on UAC. 3. You have a non-Microsoft application installed on Windows Vista that you need to mark as an administrator application so that it runs with a full admin token for security purposes. You access the application’s properties and on the Compatibility tab, you find that the option to mark it as an administrator application is grayed out. What are the possible explanations? (Choose all that apply.) A. You are not logged on with a local administrator account. B. UAC is turned off.
  • 100 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues C. The program does not require admin credentials to run. D. The application is blocked from always running elevated. E. The security policies are blocking the permissions. Configure and Troubleshoot Parental Controls 4. On your office network, you use parental controls to control the use of programs. However, a certain user can still access a particular program that should be blocked. You verify that parental controls are turned on for this user. What do you need to do? A. Change the user’s account to a standard account. B. Uncheck the program option in the program restriction section of Parental Controls. C. Remove the time restrictions. D. Turn on UAC. 5. Concerning parental controls, which statement is true? A. Parental controls can be configured for any standard user. B. Parental controls can be configured for any administrator. C. Parental controls can be configured for any standard user and administrator. D. Parental controls work only if UAC is enabled. 6. A user on your network accesses a Windows Vista Business computer. The user comes in to work early on a particular day, and when he attempts to log on, he receives a message telling him that his account has time restrictions that prevent him from logging on at this time. What is causing this problem? A. His password has expired. B. A Group Policy is restricting him from logging on with the current password. C. Parental controls are configured to prevent use at certain times. D. Remote Desktop is in use. 7. A user on your network is using a Windows Vista computer to access a particular Web site from another company. You want to prevent the user from accessing this Web site, but you don’t want to restrict anything else. How can you configure this? A. Block the site’s domain in Internet Explorer. B. Configure Windows Firewall to deny all IP addresses in the site’s IP address range. C. Use Windows Defender to block the Web site. D. Use parental controls to block the Web site.
  • Self Test 101 Install and Configure Windows Drivers 8. You install a new printer according to the manufacturer’s instructions, but the printer does not seem to work. You open Device Manager and notice a yellow exclamation point over the printer. What is the best solution to quickly resolve this problem? A. Unplug the printer and plug it back in. B. Right-click the printer icon in Device Manager and click Update Driver. C. Use the Add Hardware Wizard to reinstall the printer. D. Run Windows Update. 9. You install the driver for your new network card. However, the network card does not work. You need to transfer a number of files over the network and do not have time to troubleshoot problems with the new driver. You need to get the network card up and running as quickly as possible. What can you do? A. Use the Update Driver button on the Driver tab. B. Enable the driver in Device Manager. C. Use the Roll Back Driver button on the Driver tab. D. Use the Uninstall button on the Driver tab. 10. You need to install a device on your Windows Vista system. You want to ensure that the latest driver is used, and you want to also install some additional software that accompanies the device. What is the easiest way to do this? A. Windows Update B. Add Hardware Wizard C. Device Manager D. Windows Defender 11. You want to make sure that all driver files on your system are digitally signed, including some new drivers you have installed. What tool can you use to verify which drivers are signed and which ones are not? A. MSINFO B. Software Explorer in Windows Defender C. MSCONFIG D. Sigverif 12. For a particular hardware device, you want to check and see what company provided the driver. You have some suspicion about its origins. What is the easiest way to find this information? A. Driver Details button on the Driver tab B. MSCONFIG
  • 102 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues C. MSINFO D. Sigverif Troubleshoot Post-Installation Configuration Issues 13. You recently updated a Windows XP Professional computer to Windows Vista Ultimate. Although the computer meets the hardware requirements, you also want to determine what hardware component is the weakest in terms of performance so that you can consider any necessary hardware updates. How can you most easily determine this information? A. Reliability Monitor B. Windows Experience Index C. Device Manager D. Error Checking tool 14. You dual-boot Windows Vista with Windows 98 SE to maintain backward compatibility with some older custom business applications. You have created some files in Windows Vista that you need to access from Windows 98, but you are unable to access the drive containing the files. What is the most likely cause of the problem? A. The files are not stored in the Public folder. B. You are using a standard user account. C. UAC is turned off. D. The files reside on an NTFS partition. 15. On a new Windows Vista installation, you notice that you receive error messages concerning disk space availability when you try to write a larger amount of data to a DVD. You want to change the drive which is used for temporary recorded data. How can you most easily change this? A. Use Computer Management to expand the drive’s capability for recorded files. B. Use the Recording tab of the CD / DVD’s properties dialog box. C. Use Device Manager to move the CD / DVD to another drive. D. Increase the size of the Temp file. 16. You have a computer with a dual-boot configuration using Windows XP Professional and Windows Vista Business. You notice that within Windows XP, you can install applications with no problem. However, in Windows Vista, you receive a UAC prompt asking for an administrator’s password. What is causing this to happen? A. You are using fast user switching. B. You cannot install new software in a dual-boot configuration with Windows XP.
  • Lab Question 103 C. In Windows Vista, you are using a standard user account. D. Windows Firewall is blocking the installation. LAB QUESTION You recently upgraded to Windows Vista Business from Windows XP (SP2). You notice that a custom application now does not work correctly in Windows Vista. This custom application is important to your daily work, and you need the application to work under your current Windows Vista Business installation. What can you do to resolve this problem?
  • 104 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues SELF TEST ANSWERS Configure and Troubleshoot User Account Control ✓ 1. ® B. This is a common scenario where you need to change the UAC prompt so that it does not appear. You would open the security policy console and choose the “Elevate without prompting” for Admin Approval mode. ® A is incorrect because turning off UAC is a security breach. C is incorrect because editing ˚ this security policy will not elevate without prompting. D is also incorrect because the Windows Defender configuration does not affect UAC. ✓ 2. ® A. In this case, you simply need to turn on UAC. Once UAC is turned on, these requests will be elevated and the user will see the UAC continue box as normal. ® B, C, and D are all incorrect because none of these options will enable UAC. ˚ ✓ 3. ® A, C, and D. You may not be logged on as administrator, the program doesn’t need admin privileges to run properly, or it will not run with admin privileges. These are the three correct answers. ® B and E are incorrect. UAC is not turned off in this case, and the security policy is not ˚ the issue. Configure and Troubleshoot Parental Controls ✓ 4. ® B. When you configure parental controls, you can block access to programs. Clear the check box option next to the program to prevent the user from accessing it. ® A, C, and D are incorrect because none of these options will prevent the user from ˚ accessing the program. ✓ 5. ® A. Parental controls can be applied to any standard user account by an administrator. ® B, C, and D are all incorrect because these statements are false. ˚ ✓ 6. ® C. This question may seem a bit basic because you are studying a chapter about parental controls. However, mixed with other questions on a test, it can cause you to stop and think. Remember that any message about time limits tied to a user account is going to be a parental control issue. ® A, B, and D are incorrect because none of these issues would prevent a user from logging ˚ on at a particular time. ✓ 7. ® D. The easiest way to resolve this problem is to configure parental controls to block the Web site. This configuration will deny access to the Web site without making any additional restrictions. ® A, B, and C are incorrect because these options will not block the Web site or place too ˚ many blocking restrictions on the user.
  • Self Test Answers 105 Install and Configure Windows Drivers ✓ 8. ® B. Right-click the icon and click Update Driver. This will enable you to search for a suitable driver for the printer. ® A, C, and D are incorrect because none of these actions will immediately resolve the driver ˚ problem. ✓ 9. ® A. Set Windows Update to update automatically. This will ensure that the latest drivers available from Microsoft are downloaded and installed. ® B, C, and D are incorrect because none of these options will automatically update drivers ˚ on your system. ✓ 10. ® B. Use the Add Hardware Wizard to install the driver software. The Add Hardware Wizard can also install additional software that comes with the device drivers. ® A, C, and D are incorrect because none of these options will help you install the new ˚ hardware device. ✓ 11. ® D. Use the Signature Verification utility to verify that files on your system are digitally signed. ® A, B, and C are incorrect because these tools will not tell you if files are digitally signed. ˚ ✓ 12. ® A. Since you want to see the specifics of one particular driver, open the device’s properties dialog box, click the Driver tab, and click Driver Details. The dialog box that appears will give you the desired information. ® B, C, and D are incorrect because none of these options will give you the desired information. ˚ Troubleshoot Post-Installation Configuration Issues ✓ 13. ® B. Use the Windows Experience Index to see a report about your system’s index score as well as the subscores of individual components. This is the easiest way to access the desired information. ® A, C, and D are incorrect because these tools do not readily give you this information. ˚ ✓ 14. ® D. The Windows 98 OS cannot read NTFS drives, and since Windows Vista natively uses NTFS, this is the most likely problem with the file access issue. ® A, B, and C are all incorrect because none of these options are the most immediately likely ˚ cause of the file access problem. ✓ 15. ® B. You can change which drive is used for recording temporary files on the Recording tab of the device’s properties dialog box. ® A, C, and D are incorrect because none of these actions will resolve the problem. ˚ ✓ 16. ® C. Keep in mind that the first account created in Windows Vista is an administrator account. Afterward, the user accounts are standard accounts by default. When you try to install software, the standard account UAC will prompt you to enter an administrator password. ® A, B, and D are all incorrect because none of these issues are causing the problem. ˚
  • 106 Chapter 3: Manage Post-Installation Issues LAB ANSWER Some older applications will have problems working correctly under Windows Vista, since those programs were not originally written under Vista’s software guidelines. However, Windows Vista can help resolve this problem in one of two ways. First, you can run the Program Compatibility Wizard and configure Windows Vista to emulate Windows XP (SP2) when you use this program. More easily, you can open the program’s properties dialog box and click the Compatibility tab. Here, as shown in the following illustration, you can choose to run the program in Compatibility mode and choose Windows XP (Service Pack 2) from the drop-down list of options.
  • 4 Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVES 4.01 Configure Internet Explorer 4.02 Configure Dynamic Security Settings in Internet Explorer 7 4.03 Configure and Troubleshoot Windows Aero ✓ Q&A Two-Minute Drill Self Test
  • 108 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer I nternet Explorer 7 is one of the best IE upgrades we’ve seen in years. It looks smarter, provides tabbed browsing, and has better security than previous versions of IE. As a realworld IT professional, you’ll need to know virtually everything about configuring and managing IE itself along with IE security. The exam will drill you on these issues as well, and we’ll explore them in this chapter. Aside from the changes in IE, the first thing you ever heard about Windows Vista, way before it released, was something about its “glass” interface. Windows Vista’s new Aero interface, which gives a dramatic improvement to the look and feel of Windows over previous versions, is certainly interesting and fun. In fact, some of Windows Vista’s coolest features, such as Flip 3D, depend on the Aero interface. Yet, Aero has some strict hardware requirements and can cause problems on a system that doesn’t measure up, and as an IT professional, you can expect some real-world problems and issues regarding Aero as well as some exam questions. CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 4.01 Configure Internet Explorer You can start Internet Explorer by clicking the Internet Explorer icon on your Start menu. This action opens the Web browser and, if you have a dial-up connection to the Internet, probably launches the connection automatically. One thing you’ll notice right away about Internet Explorer is that it looks similar to any other folder on your computer. This is by design. Microsoft has made Windows Vista integrate closely with the Internet so that your computer can look and feel more like a Web page. The Internet Explorer browser, like your Vista folders, contains several menus across the top, toolbars, and a primary interface area, as shown in Figure 4-1. The Internet Explorer Interface At the top of the Internet Explorer window, you see your standard back and forward buttons, along with the address bar where you type in the Web address and also a box to search for a subject on Live. This option takes you to Windows Live, where
  • Configure Internet Explorer FIGURE 4-1 109 Internet Explorer you can browse for Web sites that contain the desired subject. Below this area, you have a toolbar containing several important options, some of them new in this version of Internet Explorer. The following sections explore these features. Favorites The Favorites Center contains a few folders of generic favorites that Microsoft configures for you. You’ll use this menu to add favorites that you want to keep. Just click the Add Favorites button (the Plus sign over the Star on the toolbar) to save
  • 110 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer INSIDE THE EXAM Settings and More Settings Over time, Internet Explorer has become a complicated piece of software. In its early days, it was nothing more than a simple utility that you used to surf the Internet. In the end, that’s still its primary purpose today. Yet, the Internet has changed a lot since those early days. Now, Web browsers must be able to handle great amounts of data and multimedia content, along with security management issues. All of those needs lead to a complicated piece of software. As you look through IE, you may get overwhelmed from an exam point of view. After all, you may be able to understand and configure all of the settings in IE, but can you remember all of them for the exam? No, but you’re not expected to. In truth, the exam is likely to focus on new issues and features. You don’t need to memorize the location of every feature in IE, but you need to focus on what is new in this version. This is especially true of the new features that help resolve security problems. You’ll notice in this chapter that I don’t dwell on everything you can do or configure in IE, but I stay focused on what you are likely to see on the exam. So, be sure to follow along in IE as you study this chapter and commit the new features as well as security features to memory. the Web page to your Favorites list. The next time you want to visit the page, just click the Favorites Center and click the page title you want to visit. You can also access Feeds (these are RSS, or Really Simply Syndication feeds, which are streams of data that are sent to you) you’ve subscribed to and view your surfing history within this interface as well, as you can see in Figure 4-2. Tabs Tabs are probably one of the best improvements in the usability of Internet Explorer that I have seen in a long time. In fact, I think the new tab feature is really going to make your Web surfing easier if you’ll put them to work. If you look on the lower toolbar next to favorites, you’ll see the current Web page title residing on a tab. However, you can open additional Web pages on other tabs so that you can toggle between them simply by clicking a tab, rather than surfing from page to page.
  • Configure Internet Explorer 111 FIGURE 4-2 Favorites Center As you can see in Figure 4-3, I currently have three Web sites tabbed. You can also see a fourth tab that is currently empty (there is always an empty tab available). I can simply click the empty tab and type a URL or click a link; the new site will be added as another tab. Once you place sites on tabs, simply click the different tabs to access the sites. If you want to close a site, simply click the little close X on the tab you have selected. You can add a new tab at any time by clicking the new tab and entering the URL, or you can press CTRL-T. Here are a few other things to keep in mind about tabs: ■ Press the CTRL key while clicking links or use your middle mouse button to open links on a new tab. ■ Click any tab with the middle mouse button (or wheel) to close it. ■ Press ALT-ENTER from the address bar or search box to open the result in a new tab. ■ Click the Tab List button to the left of your tabs on the toolbar to see a quick list of tabs, or . . .
  • 112 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer FIGURE 4-3 Tabs in Internet Explorer ■ Click the Quick Tabs button (CTRL-Q) to see a mini-view at each tab, as shown in Figure 4-4. You can click any of the Web pages in the Quick Tab interface to jump immediately to it. Home The Home button enables you to jump to your home page at any time, which is the page that opens when you first open Internet Explorer. However, you can also click the arrow for a drop-down menu that enables you to remove the current home page or change it to the currently selected tab. You’ll see a small Change Home Page
  • Configure Internet Explorer FIGURE 4-4 113 Quick Tabs dialog box, shown in the following illustration, where you can make your choice. Note that you can have more than one home page. Once you add pages, you can simply use the Home drop-down menu to select the one you want.
  • 114 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer Feeds and Print The Feeds button enables you to access any current Internet feeds you have subscribed to, and just as with the Home option, you can click the drop-down menu to manage current feeds and add new ones. A feed, which can also be called an RSS feed, an XML feed, syndicated content, or a Web feed, is frequently updated content published by a Web site. It is usually used for news and blog Web sites, but can also be used for distributing other types of digital content, including pictures, audio, or video. Feeds can also be used to deliver audio content that you can listen to on your computer or MP3 player. This is referred to as podcasting. You can also print any Web page by clicking Print. If you click the Print button drop-down arrow, you can access Print Preview and Page Setup as well. Page The Page button enables you to open the currently selected Web page in a new window, but you can also access some additional features here. If you have selected something on a Web page, use this menu to access standard cut, copy, and paste functions. You can save the Web page, send it to someone via e-mail, or open the HTML code in Notepad, where you can edit it. Additional features are Zoom and Text Size, as well as the View Source, Security Report, and Web Page Privacy Report features. Be sure to spend some time looking through the Page menu options, and notice that there is a zoom control pop-out menu. Let’s say that the exam asks you about a user whose Web pages in IE are smaller than they should be compared to the rest of the interface. Your first natural thought might be of display resolution settings, but it’s much simpler than that. The Zoom setting is probably lower than 100 percent. So, simply go to this setting on the Page menu and change the zoom percentage—that’s the answer! Tools The Tools drop-down menu gives you access to several options, many of which are repeated in Internet Options (which are explored in the next section). The following page lists what you can access on the Tools menu.
  • 115 Configure Internet Explorer Delete Browsing History This option deletes all history items. This is the fastest way to delete the history in IE. Diagnose Connection Problems Use this option to let Windows diagnose a possible reason for connection problems if you’re having problems surfing the Internet. Pop-Up Blocker This option enables you to stop pop-up windows. You can use the option here to turn this feature on or off or access Pop-Up Blocker settings. Phishing Filter Phishing is a technique people use on the Internet to trick users into revealing personal or financial information through an e-mail message or Web site. The spoofed Web sites look like legitimate Web sites that you would normally log in to and where you would reveal such information. The phishing filter works to identify these pages as false Web sites in order to keep your personal information safe. The phishing filter is turned on by default, and you should leave it turned on. Manage Add-ons You may use some add-ons to Internet Explorer from various Web sites, including ActiveX controls and additional toolbars, and you can manage them here. Work Offline This feature enables you to work without an Internet connection. Access Windows Update directly for possible updates to Full Screen See Internet Explorer in full-screen mode (you can also press access Full Screen). f Windows Update Internet Explorer. 11 to Toolbars Use this option to adjust Internet Explorer’s default toolbars or create a custom toolbar. Internet Options Many other configuration options and features are available through Internet Options, which are explored in the next section.
  • 116 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer Configuring Internet Options You can configure Internet Explorer through Internet Options, which is found in your Tools menu. When you open Internet Options, you find seven different configuration tabs, and the following sections show you what you can do on each tab. You’ll need to understand these options carefully and know where to access them for the exam, so make sure you work with these options on Windows Vista as you study this section. General Tab The General tab, shown in Figure 4-5, contains five major categories—Home Page, Browsing History, Search, Tabs, and Appearance. The home page is simply the Internet site to which you want Internet Explorer to connect as a default site. Whenever you open Internet Explorer, it will always connect to this site first. If you want to change the site, type a new URL in the FIGURE 4-5 General tab
  • Configure Internet Explorer 117 Address field. If you don’t want to use a home page, click Use Blank. Also, if you are currently visiting the Web page you want to make your home page, click the Use Current button on the General tab (which keeps you from having to type the URL). The Browsing History section enables you to determine how temporary Internet pages are stored. When you surf the Web, your computer stores pages that you visit in a Temporary Internet Files folder (including all of the graphics and photos from that page). This speeds up your access to those pages when you revisit them. You can change the default options by clicking Settings. Doing this opens a Settings dialog box, shown in the following illustration, where you can adjust how Internet Explorer uses the temporary pages. If you have a fast Internet connection, temporary Internet files are unnecessary; they’re designed to help speed up slow-connection Web surfing. By default, Internet Explorer automatically checks for new material. This setting ensures that you are looking at the most current version of the Web page, and I recommend you leave this default setting. You also see that you can adjust the amount of disk space that is used for temporary Internet files. You can increase this
  • 118 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer setting if you like, but the default setting is probably all the space you need. You can also use the buttons at the bottom of the Settings dialog box to view your temporary Internet files and objects, and you can move the Temporary Internet Files folder to a different location on your computer (which doesn’t help anything, so it’s best just to leave it alone). You see a Search option on the General tab as well. You can click Settings and change the default search engine, which is Live Search by default. To add search providers, click the Find More Providers link toward the bottom of the dialog box. Under the Tabs section, you can make some changes to the way tabs behave and function in Internet Explorer. Just click the Settings tab and see the check box options as shown in the following illustration. The options you see here are selfexplanatory, and generally speaking, the default options are all a typical user needs. At the bottom of the General tab, you see several buttons: Colors, Fonts, Languages, and Accessibility. These options enable you to change the way Internet Explorer looks and displays Web pages. These options are self-explanatory, so check them out if you want to make appearance changes.
  • Configure Internet Explorer 119 Security and Privacy Tabs The Security and Privacy tabs are a part of Internet Explorer’s security features. You can expect the exam to zero in on the security issues in Internet Explorer, and you can find out more information about the Security and Privacy tabs in the next section of this book. Content Tab The Content tab enables you to configure how Internet Explorer manages different kinds of content from the Internet, as well as information about you. This tab has five sections—Parental Controls, Content Advisor, Certificates, AutoComplete, and Feeds, as shown in Figure 4-6. You can configure Parental Controls that enable you to determine what Web sites your children are able to access, as well as other items on your computer. The Parental Controls button you see here simply opens Parental Controls in Windows Vista, which you can learn more about in Chapter 3. FIGURE 4-6 Content tab
  • 120 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer The Content Advisor enables you to manage how (and if) Internet Explorer handles different kinds of potentially offensive Web content. If you click Enable, you see a Content Advisor dialog box, shown here: You see different categories of potential offensive material. You can use the slider bar to adjust the level of offensive content that users are able to view. This feature is great if you have children who use the Internet on your computer. You can enable this feature to prevent accidental access to offensive Web content. However, these settings are not foolproof. Internet Explorer examines the requested Web site for keywords that provide clues about offensive content. Internet Explorer can also use a site’s rating system to determine whether it is safe. As you can see, a lot of this is up to the individual site, so don’t assume this system is entirely safe. Once you make some settings decisions, click Apply, and Windows Vista will prompt you to enter a password. This prevents other users of your computer from changing the content settings. Also note that you can access the Approved Sites tab to create a list of approved sites, and you can also make some basic changes on the General and Advanced tabs. Normally, however, you don’t need to use these tabs; if you do, you’ll find them self-explanatory. You also see a Certificates option in Internet Explorer. In some organizations, Internet Explorer is configured to use various digital certificates to verify certain
  • Configure Internet Explorer 121 Web site authenticity. In some circumstances, you might want to use a digital certificate to communicate with a highly secure Web site. If this is the case, you will need to follow that Web site’s instructions about obtaining and using a digital certificate. You can use the AutoComplete section of the Content tab to change or turn off AutoComplete. Internet Explorer tries to learn what Web sites and information you enter into Web pages. If Internet Explorer recognizes what you are typing, it will try to complete it for you. You may find this helpful or aggravating. At any rate, you can click the AutoComplete button to change the behavior. This button opens another window with some simple check box options you can consider. Also, you see a My Profile button, which you can click to change personal information about yourself that Internet Explorer keeps. To delete an item in the AutoComplete list, say a typo, or some private information, highlight the entry (don’t click it) in the AutoComplete list, and press DELETE. Finally, you see a Feeds section that helps you manage RSS feeds from various Web sites. You can click Settings to manage a default feed schedule. The AutoComplete options are helpful because they remember where you’ve been as well as username and passwords that are used to log on to sites. However, what if a different user needs to access the PC using the same account? Should you want to permanently remove the AutoComplete features, you can do so on the General tab. Under Browsing History, click Delete and then use the Delete All button. Notice that temporary Internet files, cookies, history, form data, and passwords are all deleted using this action. In the case of a shared computer, you may also want to use the General tab to disable the memorizing of passwords in IE, if this is a security concern. Connections Tab The Connections tab, shown in Figure 4-7, lists any Internet connections you have configured on your computer. You normally do not need to configure anything on this tab because you configure these options when you create a dial-up connection. However, you can use this tab to tell Internet Explorer what specific connection to use if your computer has multiple connections. If you are on a network where your computer accesses a proxy server to reach the Internet, you may need to perform some configuration via the LAN Settings button to configure IE to use the proxy server.
  • 122 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer FIGURE 4-7 Connections tab Programs Tab The Programs tab, shown in Figure 4-8, enables you to choose which programs on Windows Vista perform what options. For example, by default, Internet Explorer uses Windows Mail for Internet mail (in other words, if you are visiting a Web page and click a “send e-mail” link, Internet Explorer opens a Windows Mail message). However, you may want to use a different mail client you have installed on your computer. You can use this page to change the applications that Internet Explorer uses for HTML editing, e-mail, newsgroups, Internet calling, your calendar, and your contact list. If you plan to use both Internet Explorer and Windows Mail, you won’t need to change any of these settings. The Set Programs button takes you to the Default Programs interface, which is also directly available in Control Panel. This interface allows you to choose the default programs that should be used for different kinds of files and media.
  • Configure Internet Explorer 123 FIGURE 4-8 Programs tab Advanced Tab The Advanced tab contains a bunch of check box options for a variety of processes. For example, you can change some browsing behavior, multimedia settings, and Although you can change a lot of settings on the Advanced tab, it is easy to get back to the default settings. Should the exam mention that a user has changed a number of items here and now needs to have them fixed, all you need to do is go to the Advanced tab and click Restore Advanced Settings.This will put the Advanced settings only back to the default. What if the user has really done a number on IE? You can reset everything on the Advanced tab as well by clicking Reset.This action resets all changed settings, but it also deletes all temporary files and disables browser add-ons, so this option should be used as the last resort.
  • 124 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer printing settings (among others) just by checking or un-checking different options, as you can see in the following illustration. EXERCISE 4-1 Using Tabbed Browsing Get familiar with tabbed browsing! Not only are you likely to enjoy the feature, but you’ll be prepared should any exam questions come your way. 1. Log on to Windows Vista and open Internet Explorer. IE opens to the default home page. 2. Click the New Tab option (or press CTRL-T). In the address bar, type Osborne.com. 3. Click the New Tab option again. This time, type Amazon.com.
  • Configure Internet Explorer 125 4. You now have three tabs open. Simply click between them to switch from Web site to Web site. 5. Click the Quick Tabs button (or press CTRL-Q). Here you can see a mini-view of each tab. If you click a tab here, it opens to full screen. Notice that you can also close any tabs you don’t want here as well. 6. Click the Amazon.com tab with your middle mouse key/wheel. Notice that the tab is now closed. 7. Close Internet Explorer. Notice that you receive a message asking if you want to close all tabs. Click the Close Tabs button.
  • 126 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer SCENARIO & SOLUTION I want to perform a search using IE, but I don’t want to use the default search Web site. How can I quickly choose another? Use the drop-down arrow next to the search dialog box and simply choose a different provider. This does not permanently change the default search site. I am having problems reading the text on a particular Web site because it is too small. How can I quickly change the text size? Click the Page drop-down menu and access the Text Size submenu and choose a different size for the text. How can I quickly toggle a toolbar on or off? Click the Tools menu and point to Toolbars. Here, you’ll see a listing of toolbars that you can click to select or deselect. CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 4.02 Configure Dynamic Security Settings in Internet Explorer 7 As you might expect, security in Internet Explorer 7 is very important in the IT world, and you can expect several important exam questions about configuring the security features IE 7 brings to the table. The good news is that IE 7 makes some great strides toward a more secure browser, so you’ll need to know about these options and how to use them. The following sections explore these features. Tools Menu Features The Tools menu contains three important features for managing some potential security threats in IE 7. These features are already at work by default, but you’ll need to dig a bit deeper and understand how to configure them. The next three sections explore these features.
  • Configure Dynamic Security Settings in Internet Explorer 7 127 Configuring the Pop-Up Blocker The Pop-Up Blocker is nothing new in IE, but it is improved in IE 7 and easier to manage. If you click Tools and point to Pop-Up Blocker, you can turn off the Pop-Up Blocker or access Pop-Up Blocker settings. The Settings dialog box, shown in Figure 4-9, enables you to add exceptions to the Pop-Up Blocker. For example, let’s say that your company accesses another company’s Web site that has pop-ups. You want the pop-ups to work in IE 7 for this particular Web site. Simply access the Settings dialog box and add the Web site to the exceptions list. Toward the bottom of the Settings dialog box, notice that you can determine if a sound is played when a block occurs and whether that information appears on the Information bar. Also, you can choose a filter level. The Low level allows pop-ups from secure sites. The Medium level (default) blocks most automatic pop-ups, and the High level blocks all pop-ups. FIGURE 4-9 Pop-Up Blocker settings
  • 128 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer Phishing Filter The phishing filter helps identify bogus Web sites that are attempting to collect personally identifiable information from you. The filter is turned on by default. If you click Tools, you can access a submenu for the phishing filter. You can check the current Web site, turn off the phishing filter, report a Web site, or access phishing filter settings. This action simply opens the Advanced tab of IE properties, where you can turn on or off automatic Web site checking or disable the phishing filter altogether. The exam is likely to put you in a scenario where you need to check a suspect site or report one that you have discovered. Just remember that both of these options are available on the Tools tab. If you need to report a site, click the option on the Phishing Filter menu and a Web site will open, shown in the following illustration, where you can report it to Microsoft. Manage Add-ons You can install add-on toolbars and browser helpers as always. However, what if you want to disable one of them later? Use the Tools menu and click Manage Add-ons |
  • Configure Dynamic Security Settings in Internet Explorer 7 129 Enable Or Disable Add-ons. In the Manage Add-ons dialog box, shown in Figure 4-10, notice that you can select an add-on and click Disable to disable it. Also, an important feature here is the Show drop-down list. Here you can choose to view add-ons that have been used, that are currently loaded, or that run without requiring permission, as well as downloaded ActiveX controls. In other words, if the exam gives you a scenario where you need to view the add-ons that run without requiring permission, the Show menu will give you that information. Security Zones Internet Explorer offers four different security zones, which you can access by clicking the Tools menu in Internet Explorer and clicking Internet Options. On the Security tab, you see the Internet, Local Intranet, Trusted Sites, and Restricted Sites zones, as shown in Figure 4-11. If you select a zone, you can see the current security level of the zone in the lower portion of the dialog box. FIGURE 4-10 Manage Add-ons
  • 130 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer FIGURE 4-11 Security zones There are four preconfigured levels of security that you can select for each zone by simply moving the slider bar: ■ High Using this setting, all features that are less secure are disabled. This is the safest way to use the Internet, but it provides you with the least amount of functionality. All ActiveX content is disabled along with all downloads. Additionally, there are a number of restrictions on accessing data and requesting data. ■ Medium The medium setting does not allow the downloading of unsigned ActiveX controls, and you see the familiar prompt before downloading potentially unsafe content. Browsing is safe, yet functional under this setting, and in most cases, this is the best setting to use.
  • Configure Dynamic Security Settings in Internet Explorer 7 131 ■ Medium-Low The Medium-Low setting will run most content without prompts, but still does not allow unsigned ActiveX controls. This setting is safe for intranet use. ■ Low The low setting provides basic warnings and few safeguards. All active content can run. This setting is not recommended unless the site is one you completely trust. You can configure different settings for each zone by simply selecting the zone and moving the slider bar. However, you can also custom-create the settings by clicking Custom Level. This opens the Security Settings dialog box, as shown in Figure 4-12. You can scroll through the list of settings and choose the Disable, Enable, or Prompt option for each security setting. This enables you to create a custom security setting that invokes the features that you want instead of the default options. You can use the default settings, but you can also customize each zone to meet your needs. The following sections give you some pointers for customizing each security zone. FIGURE 4-12 Custom Level settings
  • 132 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer Internet and Intranet Zones The Internet zone is the place to strike a balance between functionality and security. In the same manner, the Intranet zone is typically the place you go for more functionality and less concern about security. As a general rule, the default settings that you see are best, but you can certainly customize them using the Custom Level button. If you decide to customize, keep the following points in mind: ■ For the Internet zone, keep in mind the highest security settings possible, but maintain good usage features. Low security settings may make browsing easier, but you are asking for trouble. As you customize, keep the concept of “balance” in mind and you’ll make the best decisions. The exam will expect to balance the security needs with the usage needs. ■ The default setting for the Intranet zone is Medium-Low. You can basically use the intranet in any way, but unsigned ActiveX controls will not be allowed. In some cases, you may even want to use the Low setting, if you are certain all of the content on your intranet is safe. If it is, then the Low setting will not prevent any active content from running. Trusted Sites Zone If you configure security settings, some content from some Web sites may get blocked. However, what if you use a site regularly that has content that would normally not be allowed by IE. No problem, you can configure the site as a “trusted site,” and in order to do that, IE gives you a Trusted Sites zone. When a site is added to the trusted sites list, then the Low security setting is used when that site is accessed. This allows you to freely use the site without any security restrictions. To add trusted sites to your Trusted Sites zone, follow these steps: 1. On the Security tab, click the Trusted Sites zone, and then click Sites. 2. In the Trusted Sites dialog box, enter the URL of the trusted site and click Add, as you can see in Figure 4-13. Repeat this process to add other sites. Note that you can remove sites at any time by using the Remove button, and you can also require server verification (if supported by the site) for sites in the zone. However, the Require Server Verification setting will slow down the performance of the Web site noticeably and cause failure to load Web pages if certificate errors occur. Click OK when you are done.
  • Configure Dynamic Security Settings in Internet Explorer 7 133 FIGURE 4-13 Trusted sites Restricted Sites Zone In the same way that you can configure a trusted site, you can also configure a restricted site. Sites listed in the Restricted Sites zone are given the High security level in order to protect the computer from harmful content. You can select the Restricted Sites zone and click Sites in order to add sites to the zone that might use harmful content. Select the Restricted Sites zone, click Settings, and enter the URL that you want to restrict. Understanding Protected Mode Protected mode is a new feature in Internet Explorer 7. Protected mode makes it more difficult for malicious software to install on your computer, including ActiveX controls and other software that modifies system settings without the user’s explicit permission. Protected mode is turned on by default in IE in the Internet, Intranet, and Restricted Sites zones. Protected mode will warn the user when a Web page tries to install or run certain software programs. This feature helps the user know what the Web site is trying to run, in the case of programs or add-ons, that might function outside of Internet Explorer and impact other settings in Windows. If you don’t want to see the warning dialog box, you can use the “Do not show me the warning for this program again” check box. However, if you want warnings in the future, you’ll need to reset Internet Explorer’s settings on the Advanced tab of Internet Options.
  • 134 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer Customizing Privacy Settings Privacy settings enable you to determine how cookies are handled in Internet Explorer. Cookies are small text files of data that are used with Web sites. It is important to realize from the start that cookies are not bad—in fact, many things that you love about the Internet would not work without cookies. Yet, cookies may contain personal information, and so there is always a privacy issue looming. In fact, cookies account for many different kinds of privacy invasions, including a lot of the spam you probably receive in your e-mail inbox. The good news is that you can use IE to configure how cookies should be handled, giving you the Internet functionality you want and need but also the best privacy you can get. In order to make the best attempt to protect your privacy, Internet Explorer uses a technology standard called the Platform for Privacy Preferences (P3P), which enables Internet Explorer to inspect cookies, determine how they will be used, and then make a decision about how to handle them. The feature is not perfect, but it is a big step forward in handling online privacy. Here are the important concepts you should understand: ■ Compact privacy statement A compact privacy statement tells how cookies are used on the site and the lifetime that a particular cookie is used. When you access a Web site, the compact privacy statement is contained in the HTTP header of the Web site and Internet Explorer can read the compact privacy statement when you first access the site. ■ First-party cookie A first-party cookie is a cookie that is generated and used by the site you are currently viewing. First-party cookies contain information about you and your browser, and are commonly used to tailor site content to your needs. First-party cookies are commonly used on online store sites. ■ Third-party cookie A third-party cookie is used by a site other than you are currently accessing, such as a banner ad or an advertisement. Third-party cookies can be a problem because you do not really know who is using them or what they will do with the personal information contained in the cookie. ■ Session cookie A session cookie is generated during a single session with a Web site and then deleted once the session has ended. In many cases, you cannot use a Web site unless a session cookie can be generated. ■ Implicit and explicit consent Implicit consent means that you have not blocked a site from using a cookie—in other words, you have not granted permission, but you have not denied it either. On the other hand, explicit consent means that you have acted to allow a Web site to use or gain personal information about you.
  • Configure Dynamic Security Settings in Internet Explorer 7 135 Internet Explorer uses some default privacy settings. If you move the slider bar on the Privacy tab, you see the various levels and kinds of protection that are used. Keep in mind that the more you move the slider bar toward the secure end, the more restrictive the use of cookies becomes. Once again, you are faced with choosing a balance between security and convenience. The standard privacy setting options that are available are described in Table 4-1. The Advanced button on the Privacy tab gives you the Advanced Privacy Settings dialog box, as you can see in Figure 4-14. The Advanced Privacy setting essentially allows you override how cookies are handled for this particular zone. As you can see, you can choose accept, block, or prompt for first- and third-party cookies, and you can also always allow session cookies. For some users, the automatic cookie handling settings do not provide the right support. In this case, you can override these settings and choose how you want to handle all first- and third-party cookies at all sites, regardless of the compact privacy policy. If you choose to use automatic cookie handling, you can override the privacy settings for certain Web sites. For example, let’s say that you regularly use a site that TABLE 4-1 Privacy Setting Options Privacy Setting Explanation Block All Cookies All cookies are blocked. Web sites cannot generate any new cookies, and no existing cookies can be read. High No cookies that use personally identifiable information can be generated without your explicit consent. Web sites that do not have a compact privacy statement cannot generate cookies. Medium High First-party cookies that use personally identifiable information are blocked without your implicit consent. Cookies are blocked from third-party Web sites that do not have a compact privacy statement. Also, third-party cookies that use personally identifiable information are blocked without your explicit consent. Medium First-party cookies that use personally identifiable information without your implicit consent are allowed, but they are deleted when you close Internet Explorer. Thirdparty cookies that use personally identifiable information without your implicit consent are blocked, as are third-party cookies that do not have a compact privacy statement. The Medium setting is the default Internet Explorer setting. Low The Low setting accepts all first-party cookies. Third-party cookies are blocked from sites that do not have a compact privacy statement. However, third-party cookies that use personally identifiable information are allowed without your implicit consent, but the cookies are deleted when you close Internet Explorer. Accept All Cookies All new cookies are allowed, and all Web sites can read existing cookies.
  • 136 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer FIGURE 4-14 Advanced Privacy Settings contains first- and third-party cookies. However, the site does not have a compact privacy policy, and your current cookie settings prohibit the use of first-party cookies on sites with no compact privacy policy. Rather than changing your entire policy, you can simply create an exception for the Web site. On the Privacy tab, click Sites. You see a Per Site Privacy Actions dialog box, shown in Figure 4-15. Simply enter the URL of the Web site and click the Block or Allow button. Web sites that you have added appear in the Managed Web Sites list, which you can edit and change at any time. SCENARIO & SOLUTION I need to ensure that ActiveX controls on our intranet are allowed to run in Internet Explorer. What do I need to do? By default, the Medium-Low setting is used in the Intranet zone. This essentially allows everything except ActiveX controls. If you need to allow them, change the setting to Low for the Intranet zone in Internet Options, Security tab. What setting do I need to ensure that first-party cookies that use personally identifiable information without implicit consent are allowed, but that they are deleted when I close Internet Explorer? Medium. The Medium cookie setting will allow cookies that use personally identifiable information without your consent, but they are deleted when you close IE. For a particular user, I want to make sure that IE is protected against malicious code so that system files or settings cannot be changed without the user’s explicit permission. How can I do this? Enable Protected mode on the Security tab of Internet Options. This will prevent COM objects from executing and changes to system files with permission.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Windows Aero 137 FIGURE 4-15 Per Site Privacy Actions CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 4.03 Configure and Troubleshoot Windows Aero Windows Aero is the new visual experience in Windows Vista. It’s a transparent, glassy-looking interface where the windows seem to hover over the desktop. Beyond the basic look, you also have some new features, such as Windows Flip 3D, which allows you to preview windows in a three-dimensional stack, and taskbar buttons that have live thumbnail-sized window previews. The figures and illustrations you see in this book are all taken from Windows Vista Ultimate with Aero turned on. There are a few important things you need to know about Windows Aero for the exam, and since it’s one of Vista’s new visual features, you can expect a few scenario questions where you are expected to configure it or solve problems. First things first, be sure to memorize the requirements for running Aero. Aero is an interface that makes heavy demands on hardware, so before running Aero, the PC must meet the hardware and OS requirements. The table on the following page shows the minimum requirements for running Aero; make sure you memorize this table for the exam.
  • 138 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer Windows Vista version Windows Vista Business, Windows Vista Enterprise, Windows Vista Home Premium, and Windows Vista Ultimate Processor 1 GHz 32-bit or 64-bit processor RAM 1GB Graphics card 128MB. Aero also requires a DirectX 9–class graphics processor that supports Windows Display Driver Model, Pixel Shader 2.0 in hardware, and 32 bits per pixel Turning on Configuring Windows Aero If the computer meets the OS and hardware requirements, you can turn on Aero and configure it to your liking. Open Control Panel and open Personalization, or just right-click the desktop and click Personalize to open the Personalization dialog box, shown in Figure 4-16. FIGURE 4-16 Personalization
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Windows Aero 139 Click the Window Color And Appearance option. Here, you can configure Aero as desired. Notice in Figure 4-17 that you can choose a glass color for Aero and adjust the color intensity as desired. You can even use the color mixer to personalize the glass color options. Also notice the Enable Transparency check box. To get the full effect of Aero, make sure this option is selected. If you don’t see the options here or the interface looks different, you probably have something other than Windows Aero selected. Click the “Open classic appearance properties for more color options” link, choose Windows Aero in the Color Scheme box, and click OK to see the dialog box shown in Figure 4-18. So let’s say that you want to turn on Aero and these settings still do not seem to work. There are few troubleshooting steps you should take to make sure the system is configured for Aero. Exercise 4-2 shows you what to do. FIGURE 4-17 Window Color and Appearance
  • 140 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer FIGURE 4-18 Classic Appearance Settings EXERCISE 4-2 CertCam Troubleshooting Windows Aero If Windows Vista meets the OS and hardware requirements for Windows Aero but still doesn’t seem to work, try these troubleshooting steps: 1. First, open Personalization | Window Color And Appearance and ensure that the Enable Transparency check box is selected. Click OK. 2. Open Control Panel | Personalization | Display Settings. 3. Make sure that the Colors drop-down menu, shown in the following illustration, is set to Highest (32 bit).
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Windows Aero 141 4. Click Advanced Settings and click the Monitor tab. 5. Make sure the screen refresh rate is higher than 50 Hertz, as shown in the following illustration. Click OK.
  • 142 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer Using Windows Flip 3D Windows Vista includes a new graphical feature called Flip 3D that enables you to rotate through open folders quickly. Using this feature, you can quickly preview all open windows without having to click each one on the taskbar. Rather, with Flip 3D, your windows are displayed in a stack and you can simply flip through the stack as you would a deck of cards, as shown in Figure 4-19. Flip 3D only works when Aero is turned on, which is the first thing you should remember for the exam. To use Flip 3D, press the Windows logo key and TAB to open the feature. Then, while holding down the Windows logo key, press TAB repeatedly (or use the mouse wheel) to rotate through the cycle of currently open windows, as demonstrated in Figure 4-20. You can also use the RIGHT or DOWN arrow key to cycle forward or use the LEFT or UP arrow key to cycle backward. Simply release the Windows logo key to display the front-most window in the stack, or click any part of the window in the stack to display that window. FIGURE 4-19 Windows Flip 3D
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Windows Aero FIGURE 4-20 143 Flip 3D rotation Some applications, especially custom applications, may have problems conforming to Windows Aero, and thus not work with Flip 3D.The result may be a locked-up 3D collection of folders. In this case, the custom app is the “problem” and all you need to do is close Flip 3D and open it again, preferably without the custom app.
  • 144 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer FIGURE 4-21 Quick selection option You can turn on Flip 3D so that you don’t have to hold down the Windows logo key by pressing CTRL-Windows Logo-TAB. Now you can release the keys and simply tab through your windows or use the arrow keys. If you want to quickly choose an open window, you can also press CTRL-ALT-TAB. This gives you a window option where you can view your open folders in a flat-screen format and simply tab through them to select the desired folder, as shown in Figure 4-21. All of these options simply make Windows easier to use, helping you find what you want in a hurry. SCENARIO & SOLUTION My Windows Vista Home Basic computer does not seem to have Aero—what can I do? Aero is only available in Windows Home Premium and higher Vista versions. You may want to consider an upgrade to Premium if your PC hardware can support it. How can I use Flip 3D without using Aero? Flip 3D is a Windows Vista feature that only works if Aero is enabled. You can’t use Flip 3D without Aero. My computer meets Aero’s OS and hardware requirements. My monitor properties are set to 32-bit, but Aero doesn’t work well. What else can I check? Make sure the monitor refresh rate is set to at least 50 MHz. Settings above 50 MHz, such as 85 MHz, are best.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Windows Aero 145 CERTIFICATION SUMMARY Internet Explorer is Microsoft’s Internet browser tool. After several years of revisions, IE 7 is now a rather secure browser that includes such security features as pop-up blocking, a phishing filter, add-on management, content and privacy configurations, and zone configuration as well. For the exam, you should especially be familiar with these security features and how to make changes to them and manage them. In addition to security, IE 7 provides a new streamlined interface that makes it easier to manage favorites and RSS feeds as well as tabbed browsing. Internet Explorer provides dynamic security features to help keep browsing safe. On the Tools menu, you have a pop-up blocker, a phishing filter, and a feature to help you manage add-ons to IE. You can also delete your browsing history directly from this menu. You can configure different security zones and manage protected mode (enabled by default) on the Security tab. Use the Privacy tab to manage cookie security—the medium setting is enabled by default. Windows Aero is the new transparent graphical interface available in Windows Vista Home Premium, Windows Vista Business, Windows Vista Ultimate, and Windows Vista Enterprise. It requires 1GB of RAM, a 1 GHz processor, and a graphics card that is WDDM compatible with 128MB of graphics memory. You can configure Windows Aero through the Personalization dialog box in Control Panel. Windows Flip 3D and live taskbar icons are available only in Aero.
  • 146 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer ✓ TWO-MINUTE DRILL Configure Internet Explorer ❑ Use tabbed browsing to view and manage several Web sites at one time. ❑ Use the Page menu to manage many different page viewing features, including page and text magnification. ❑ Access the Tools menu for a variety of tools and security features. You can also access Internet Options here. ❑ Use Internet Options to manage all aspects of Internet Explorer’s configuration. Keep in mind that the Advanced tab has an option to reset the browser or at least revert the settings back to the default. Configure Dynamic Security Settings in Internet Explorer 7 ❑ The Pop-Up Blocker allows you to block pop-ups from all Web sites except those you allow. ❑ The phishing filter allows IE to inspect a Web site and determine if it is legitimate. You can use the phishing filter to check a site and also report one. ❑ Manage add-ons from the Tools menu. Here you can disable add-ons and see which add-ons are considered secure. ❑ The security levels in IE determine what Web sites are accessible. The zones are Internet, Local Intranet, Trusted Sites, and Restricted Sites. ❑ Protected mode on the Security tab of IE prevents COM objects from modifying files and settings on your Windows Vista computer. ❑ You can delete the entire browsing history from the Tools menu. Configure and Troubleshoot Windows Aero ❑ The transparent visual style in Windows Vista is called Aero. Flip 3D and live taskbar thumbnail views are only available in Aero. ❑ To use Aero, the computer OS must be Windows Vista Business, Windows Vista Home Premium, Windows Vista Enterprise, or Windows Vista Ultimate. ❑ Aero requires 1GB of RAM and a 1 GHz processor.
  • Two-Minute Drill 147 ❑ The video card must be WDDM compatible with at least 128MB of graphics memory, supporting DirectX 9 and Pixel Shader 2.0. ❑ The color depth should be set to 32 bits if the monitor supports it. ❑ The monitor refresh rate must be greater than 50 MHz. ❑ Make sure the Enable Transparency check box option is selected in order to get the full Aero effect.
  • 148 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer SELF TEST The following questions will help you measure your understanding of the material presented in this chapter. Read all the choices carefully because there might be more than one correct answer. Choose all correct answers for each question. Configure Internet Explorer 1. In your organization, a user complains that the Web pages in Internet Explorer on her Windows Vista Business computer are too small. She says that the IE interface appears normally in terms of its size, but the Web pages don’t even take up two-thirds of the screen. What do you need to do? A. Use the Reset option on the Advanced tab of Internet Options. B. Use the Restore Advanced Settings option on the Advanced tab of Internet Options. C. Use the Page menu to change the magnification setting to 100%. D. Turn off the phishing filter. 2. A user in your company has changed a number of settings on the Internet Explorer Advanced properties page. Now, the browser is not working the way he needs it to. You need to quickly fix these problems in the browser. What do you need to do? A. Change the user’s account to a standard account. B. Open the Group Policy MMC and configure a group policy that prohibits the user from making changes to IE. C. Click the Restore Advanced Settings option on the Advanced tab of Internet Options. D. Click the Reset option on the Advanced tab of Internet Options. 3. You have four tabs open in IE. You want to ensure that the browser opens next time with these four tabs open. What do you need to do? A. Access the General tab and click Restore All Tabs. B. Access the Advanced tab and click Restore All Tabs. C. Close IE and you’ll receive a dialog box asking if you want to restore the tabs when IE opens the next time. D. Tabs cannot be restored after closing IE. 4. You want to change the default Search option in IE to a different search site. How can you do this? A. General tab, Internet Options B. Content tab, Internet Options C. Security tab, Internet Options D. Advanced tab, Internet Options
  • Self Test 149 Configure Dynamic Security Settings in Internet Explorer 7 5. Your company works with another company’s Web site. Users in your network are complaining that Internet Explorer 7 is blocking important pop-ups from this site. You verify that they are accessing the correct Web site. How can you stop the Pop-Up Blocker from blocking pop-ups from this site? A. Access the Pop-Up Blocker settings dialog box and enter the Web site as an exception. B. Disable the Pop-Up Blocker. C. Change the security zone for the Internet to Low. D. Create an exception for the Pop-Up Blocker on the Advanced tab of Internet Options. 6. You suspect a certain Web site of being a phishing site. How can you report this suspected site to Microsoft? A. Page menu B. General tab of Internet options C. Tools menu D. Advanced tab of Internet options 7. You want delete all browsing history on a Windows Vista computer as quickly as possible. What is the fastest way to do this? A. Click Tools | Delete Browsing History. B. Click Page | Delete Browsing History. C. Change the Security zone to Low. D. Access the General tab of Internet Options and delete the history. 8. How can you determine if Internet Explorer is actively preventing the installation of COM objects from the Internet? A. Check the firewall report. B. Make sure the phishing filter is turned on. C. Make sure the Internet zone is set to Medium. D. Ensure that Protected mode is on. 9. You installed an IE add-on on your Windows Vista Home Premium PC. Now, the add-on is causing problems. What do you need to do? A. Reset IE on the Advanced tab of Internet Options. B. Use the Programs applet in Control Panel to uninstall the add-on. C. Use the Manage Add-ons dialog box to disable the add-on. D. Drag the add-on from the IE interface to the Recycle Bin.
  • 150 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer 10. Consider the following dialog box: You need to determine what add-ons have been installed that will run without requiring permission. How can you find this information? A. Select an add-on and click Disable. B. Double-click the add-on in the list to see a properties report. C. Select the desired option from the Show menu. D. You cannot determine this information from this dialog box. 11. What IE security zone will run most content without prompts but still does not allow unsigned ActiveX controls? A. High B. Medium C. Medium-Low D. Low
  • Self Test 151 12. What IE security zone disables all downloads? A. High B. Medium C. Medium-Low D. Low 13. Which standard privacy setting would block all first-party cookies that use personally identifiable information without your implicit consent? A. High B. Medium-High C. Medium D. Low Configure and Troubleshoot Windows Aero 14. Which operating system does not support Windows Aero? A. Windows Vista Home Basic B. Windows Vista Home Premium C. Windows Vista Business D. Windows Vista Ultimate 15. Which item in the list does not meet Windows Aero’s minimum hardware and operating system requirements? A. 1 GHz processor B. 512MB RAM C. 128MB graphics memory D. Windows Vista Ultimate operating system 16. A user reports that her Windows Vista Business computer meets the hardware requirements to run Aero, but it still will not run. What are two other requirements that she should check? (Choose two.) A. 32-bit monitor support B. 80GB hard drive C. Internet Explorer 7 D. A monitor refresh rate greater than 50 MHz
  • 152 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer 17. You’re using Windows Aero. You would like to manually adjust the color of the Aero interface you chose. How can you manually adjust the color? A. Access Display properties and adjust the color settings. B. Use the Classic Appearance option on the Window Color And Appearance dialog box. C. Use the Color Mixer option on the Window Color And Appearance dialog box. D. Aero colors cannot be manually adjusted. 18. Your company uses a custom application. You have noticed that Flip 3D often stops working when this application is open. What do you need to do? A. Turn off Aero. B. Start the application in Safe mode. C. Disable the Enable Transparency option in Aero. D. Close and restart Flip 3D. LAB QUESTION You are an IT professional for medium-sized financial services group. You just installed Windows Vista Ultimate on four computers using a clean install. You need to configure Internet Explorer 7 to meet these requirements: ■ All pop-ups should be blocked except from www.comp1tx.net. ■ The phishing filter should be turned on. ■ Browsing history should be deleted every time IE is started. ■ Internet zone cookies that do not have a compact privacy policy should be blocked. How can you configure these options?
  • Self Test Answers 153 SELF TEST ANSWERS Configure Internet Explorer ✓ 1. ® C. Use the Page menu and simply change the magnification settings for the page. ® A and B are both incorrect because these actions will reset either the entire browser or ˚ the advanced options. While resetting the browser may resolve the problem, it is a drastic action that is not necessary. D is incorrect as well because the phishing filter will not affect the magnification level. ✓ 2. ® C. The only action you need to take in this scenario is to restore the advanced settings. This will fix the problems and requires only one mouse click. ® A and B are both incorrect because these changes will not fix the problem at hand. ˚ Remember that the answer that completes the problem or scenario is always the best answer. D is also incorrect because the Reset button will change all settings in IE to the default, which is not what you want in this case. ✓ 3. ® C. If you have tabs in use and want to restore them when you open IE, simply close IE and a dialog box will appear asking what action you want to take with the tabs. ® A and B are both incorrect because you cannot configure this option on the General and ˚ Advanced tabs. D is incorrect, since keeping the tabs is an available option. ✓ 4. ® A. There is a Search section on the General tab where you can change the default search site. ® B, C, and D are all incorrect because you cannot change the Search site option on these ˚ tabs. Configure Dynamic Security Settings in Internet Explorer 7 ✓ 5. ® A. In this scenario, you only want to allow pop-ups from a particular site. Therefore, all you need to do is access the Pop-Up Blocker’s settings dialog box and create an exception. ® B, C, and D are incorrect because none of these settings will deliver the desired outcome. ˚ ✓ 6. ® B. Access the Phishing Filter submenu from the Tools menu to report a suspected phishing site to Microsoft. ® A, C, and D are incorrect because none of these options enable you to report a suspected ˚ phishing site. ✓ 7. ® A is correct. The fastest way to delete the history is via the Tools menu. ® B and C are incorrect because you cannot delete history this way. D is incorrect because ˚ this is not the fastest way to delete the browsing history.
  • 154 Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer ✓ 8. ® D. Protected mode stops the installation of COM objects and other software from Web sites without the user’s explicit permission. You can ensure that it is running on the Security tab of Internet options. ® A and B are incorrect because the firewall report or phishing filter will not give you ˚ this information. C is also incorrect because you would not want to set the Internet zone to medium—this would create more potential security problems. ✓ 9. ® C. Use the Manage Add-ons interface from the Tools menu to disable the add-on. ® A is incorrect because you do not need to take the drastic action of resetting IE for this ˚ problem. B and D are also incorrect because these actions will not remove the add-on. ✓ 10. ® C. Use the Show menu and choose the option to see which add-ons run without requiring permission. ® A and B are incorrect because you cannot determine the information by disabling or ˚ double-clicking an add-on. D is incorrect because you can gain the desired information from this dialog box. ✓ 11. ® C. The Medium-Low setting will run most content without prompts but still not allow unsigned ActiveX controls. ® A, B, and D are incorrect because none of these settings meet the desired security criteria. ˚ ✓ 12. ® A. The High setting disables all downloads as well as all ActiveX controls. ® B, C, and D are all incorrect because these settings do not disable downloads. ˚ ✓ 13. ® B. The Medium-High setting blocks all first-party cookies that use personally identifiable information without your implicit consent. ® A, C, and D are incorrect because these settings will not provide the desired security ˚ setting. Configure and Troubleshoot Windows Aero ✓ 14. ® A. Aero is not included as an option in Windows Vista Home Basic. ® B, C, and D are all incorrect because these versions of Windows Vista all support Aero. ˚ ✓ 15. ® B. Aero requires 1GB of RAM. ® A, C, and D are incorrect because these items all meet the hardware and operating system ˚ requirements to run Aero. ✓ 16. ® A and D. Even if the computer meets the minimum hardware requirements, you may still experience problems with Aero if your monitor is not set to 32 bits and the monitor refresh rate is not higher than 50 MHz. ® B and C are incorrect because these answers are not requirements of Aero. ˚
  • Self Test Answers 155 ✓ 17. ® C. You can select an Aero color on the Window Color And Appearance dialog box. Just below the color selector, you can also click Color Mixer to adjust the color. ® A and B are incorrect because you cannot adjust the color options in Aero in these ways. ˚ D is also incorrect, since you can adjust the color using the Color Mixer. ✓ 18. ® D. Some custom applications may have problems working with Aero features, including Flip 3D. If this occurs, simply close Flip 3D and restart it. ® A is incorrect because if you turn off Aero, Flip 3D will not work. B is also incorrect ˚ because Safe mode will not resolve the problem. C is incorrect because disabling the Enable Transparency check box will not resolve the Flip 3D problem. LAB ANSWER You can configure the requirements of this scenario in Internet Explorer: ■ All pop-ups should be blocked except from www.comp1tx.net. Click the Tools menu and open the pop-up settings. Enter the URL as an exception and click Done. All other pop-ups are blocked by default. ■ The phishing filter should be turned on. The phishing filter is automatically turned on in IE 7, so there is nothing you need to configure here. ■ Browsing history should be deleted every time IE is started. Click Tools | Internet Options. On the General tab, click the Settings button under Browsing History and choose the “Every time I start Internet Explorer” radio button, shown in the following illustration. Click OK.
  • 156 ■ Chapter 4: Configure Windows Aero and Internet Explorer Internet zone cookies that do not have a compact privacy policy should be blocked. Open Internet Options and click the Privacy tab. Change the slider bar setting to Medium-High.
  • 5 Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVES 5.01 Configure Windows Defender ✓ 5.02 Configure Security Settings in Windows Firewall Q&A Two-Minute Drill Self Test
  • 158 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall S ecurity is a never-ending issue in the IT world. As computers and networking have become more complex over the years, so have the potential threats and problems. In today’s business world, Internet connectivity is virtually a must and even the smallest offices now have a local network where computers are left running 24×7 with an “always on” Internet connection. In short, we are much more available to be located, identified, and attacked by Internet threats. As such, the potential security threats both on the local network and especially from the Internet require serious consideration for any computer user or IT professional. In Windows Vista, Microsoft provides two important tools that help combat these threats: Windows Defender and Windows Firewall. Windows Defender is a software program designed to identify and remove spyware, while Windows Firewall is a software solution designed to identify and stop unauthorized access to the local computer, especially from the Internet. Both of these tools can greatly reduce potential security problems in Windows Vista. From an exam point of view, Microsoft considers these two tools to be an extremely important part of the security solution at the local level. You can expect the exam to ask you specific questions about their use and configuration and place you in situations where the appropriate configuration of these tools can help solve a problem. In this chapter, you’ll learn how to use these tools and configure them. CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 5.01 Configure Windows Defender Spyware is generally defined as software that can display advertisements such as pop-up ads, collection information about the user, and change system settings without the user’s permission. It has become an ever-growing problem on the Internet. Any time a user accesses the Internet, downloads information, and even installs programs from a CD, DVD, or any removable media, spyware can try to install itself without the user’s knowledge on any computer operating system. Therefore, the use of an antispyware program has become a must in today’s computing world. Windows Vista includes its own anti-spyware program called Windows Defender. First available as a downloadable product for Windows XP, Windows Defender has matured over the past couple of years to a full anti-spyware program that is simple and straightforward. In most cases, users do not have to do anything with Windows Defender—it simply runs in the background, constantly watching for potential
  • Configure Windows Defender 159 spyware attacks. You can make sure that it is running because of the icon that appears in the Notification Area. As with antivirus software, Windows Defender works by keeping up-todate definitions that help Windows Defender know when a piece of software is potentially spyware or at least unwanted software. The definitions are everchanging as the threats change, and Windows Defender automatically downloads the definitions through Windows Update. Once again, a typical user never has to interact with this process. Windows Defender can run regular scans of the computer in search of potential spyware, but it also provides real-time protection in that Windows Defender can alert you when spyware or potentially unwanted software attempts to install itself. In the following sections, you’ll learn how to configure Windows Defender and prepare yourself for related exam questions. INSIDE THE EXAM Tell-Tale Signs of Spyware The Windows Vista exam is more likely to give you a scenario than ask you a direct question. The scenario will typically give you a problem with symptoms or issues, and you’ll need to figure out what to do in order to solve the problem. As such, you need to know the typical symptoms and clues a computer will give you if it is infected with spyware. Be sure to keep these symptoms in mind for the exam: ■ You notice new toolbars, links, favorites, or even buttons in Internet Explorer that you did not put there. ■ You type a Web site address in your browser, but you end up at another Web site you didn’t want instead. ■ Your home page in your browser changes to a different home page. ■ ■ You see pop-up ads appear, even when you’re not using the Internet. Your computer starts to run much more slowly than normal. Spyware can come from any kind of software installation or download, but it most commonly gets on the computer by installing so-called “Free” software from the Internet, such as file-sharing software, screen savers, and utilities, or by adding new search toolbars to your browser. Spyware problems can range from inconvenience to someone being able to take over your PC and use for it malicious or even illegal purposes. It is a serious problem that must be managed!
  • 160 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall Windows Defender is located in the Windows Security Center, which you can find in Control Panel. Click Windows Defender in the left column of the Security Center and Windows Defender will open. As you can see in Figure 5-1, Windows Defender has a basic interface that is rather easy to navigate. In the following sections, you’ll see how to configure and use Windows Defender. Running a Scan Windows Defender is always at work, but you can run a scan manually by clicking the Scan button (see Figure 5-2). You can also click the drop-down menu next to Scan in order to run a quick scan, a full computer scan, or a scan of selected drives and folders. You can also check the History and see when the last scans were run and what spyware threats Defender has encountered. You need to know which scan option you should choose under different circumstances for the exam. Check out the scan types and commit them to memory. FIGURE 5-1 Windows Defender
  • Configure Windows Defender 161 FIGURE 5-2 Click Scan to run a complete scan Quick Scan The Quick Scan option scans several different locations on your computer where spyware is most likely to reside. It doesn’t check every nook and cranny of the computer, but it is the most effective and fastest way to check the areas of your computer where spyware is likely to end up. So, if an exam question wants to know how to scan the most likely places on your PC for spyware, the Quick Scan feature is your answer. Full Scan The Full Scan option scans the entire computer. You should use this option only when you want to scan every directory and every drive. While it checks everything, it is slow, so this is not the option you want when you need a faster scan that checks likely places for spyware. In that case, use the Quick Scan.
  • 162 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall Custom Scan If you want to scan particular directories or particular drives, then you should use the Custom Scan option. The Custom Scan feature scans only directories or drives that you specify, so in cases where a particular drive or directory is suspect, choose this option. When potential spyware is encountered, you have four options that you need to keep in mind for the exam. You can choose to Ignore the software. In this case, nothing is done and Windows Defender will flag it again the next time it runs. You can remove it from the computer, you can place it in quarantine, which is a holding area (and explained in more detail later in this chapter), or you can Allow it. If you choose to allow the software, it will be placed in the Allowed Items list and Windows Defender will not flag it again as long as it stays on that list. So, let’s say that your company uses a custom application. Windows Defender identifies it as potential spyware. You want to make sure that this action doesn’t happen again.The solution is to use the Always Allow option, not the Ignore option. This way, the software will never be flagged again when scans are run. Don’t get these two features confused on the exam. Configuring Options If you click the Tools option, shown in Figure 5-3, you can choose from a few important features. The exam is most likely to focus on the use of these features as well as the configuration options, so make sure you get some hands-on practice! The following sections outline these options. Standard Options The Options button enables you to configure several standard options and features that are self-explanatory for the most part, as shown in Figure 5-4. You can schedule when a scan should occur (a daily scan is recommended). You can also determine what the default actions should be for each kind of alert level. You can choose to use or not use real-time protection (you are recommended to leave this setting enabled), and you can choose to scan certain archived files and folders for potential threats. Finally, you also have some administrator options that enable Windows Defender and allow users that do not have administrator privileges to run a scan and manage any spyware found. You can make any desired changes and click the Save button.
  • Configure Windows Defender 163 FIGURE 5-3 Tools and Settings There are a couple of potential exam issues you should keep in mind on this interface. The first concerns automatic scanning and the default actions that are taken during an automatic scan. As you can see, Automatic scanning is the recommended setting, along with a daily frequency and default actions for high, medium, and low alert items. The Default action settings are definition-based, and in most circumstances, you should use the default settings. You should also select a time when the computer is running (otherwise, the scan will not run) and choose a time when you are not too active on the computer because you will notice a performance hit as the scan takes place. However, let’s say that you want to scan your computer each time without running any default actions. In other words, you want Windows Defender to prompt you for an action. In this case, you can continue to use the automatic scanning feature, but you need to clear the “Apply default actions to items detected during a scan” check box. This action will enable you to choose what you want to do with scanning results.
  • 164 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall FIGURE 5-4 Options Real-Time Protection Another potential exam issue you find within Options is Windows Defender’s realtime protection. If you scroll down the Options page, you’ll see a real-time protection category, shown in Figure 5-5. Real-time protection alerts you when spyware and other potentially harmful software attempt to install itself on your computer. This real-time protection helps catch spyware programs as they attempt to install rather than waiting for the next Windows Defender scan. Real-time protection works through the use of Monitoring Agents. Monitoring Agents are different categories or options of protection monitoring, such as Auto Start, Internet Explorer Add-ons, and Services and Drivers. As you can see on the Options page, these features are all selected so that you have complete real-time protection. Agents are active during file copy, during download, when you launch apps (directly or by extension association), and during browsing when Web sites run mobile code.
  • Configure Windows Defender A common exam question you may run into on the exam involves the monitoring of security-related settings in Windows. For example, let’s say that you want to make sure that real-time protection monitors hardwareor security-related settings in Windows so that unwanted software cannot change these settings. In this case, you simply want to ensure that the System FIGURE 5-5 Real-time protection 165 Configuration setting on the Options page is enabled, since this monitoring agent handles security-related settings in Windows. This option is typically enabled anyway, but this is one of those questions that can throw you off track. Just remember that there are several monitoring agents, but the System Configuration agent is the one that deals with security-related settings in Windows.
  • 166 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall Administrator Options Finally, keep in mind the Administrator options at the bottom of the options dialog, shown in Figure 5-6. Here, you can enable Windows Defender for all users (which is enabled by default), and you can also allow or deny access to Windows Defender by all users. In other words, if you disable this option, users who do not have administrator rights will not be able to scan the computer or choose any actions to take with unwanted software. Microsoft Spynet If you return to the Tools page and click the Microsoft Spynet option, you see a simple interface that gives you the option to join this online community. When you join Spynet, Windows Defender sends basic information to Microsoft about spyware that it detects on your computer. This information is then added to the community, FIGURE 5-6 Administrator options
  • Configure Windows Defender 167 where it can help others identify the same potential threat. The Join Microsoft Spynet page gives you a review of the differences between basic and advanced membership options, so I won’t review those here. However, what you do need to know regarding the exam is that Microsoft Spynet is the only way you can send information from your computer about spyware that is found to Microsoft. Working with Quarantined Items When Defender stops a program from installing or running, it is placed in quarantine, which is basically a holding area where it cannot install or run on your computer. If you click Quarantined Items in the Tools section, you can see what software is being held here. At this point, you can remove the desired items or even restore quarantined items that shouldn’t be there. From an exam point of view, just keep in mind how quarantined items work. For example, if an exam question says that you want to make sure that any spyware programs detected are put in a place where they cannot run or install, the answer is, of course, quarantine. On the other end of the spectrum, let’s say that Windows Defender identifies a custom piece of software as a potential threat and is placed in quarantine. You can take the item out of quarantine by simply restoring it from Quarantined Items. If you remove an item from quarantine, however, the software is removed from the computer, so keep the difference between removing an item and restoring an item straight in your mind. Software Explorer The Software Explorer, shown in Figure 5-7, is a helpful feature that enables you to examine every piece of software that is running on your computer at the moment. Simply scroll through the list, select a software item, and you can see details about it in the right information pane. You can remove software by clicking the Remove button or stop it from running by clicking Disable. One of the most helpful features of the Software Explorer is the Startup Programs option. Use the Category menu and choose Startup Programs. Here, you can see all programs that start when Windows starts, which you can also disable or remove. If your PC is acting suspicious and you want to see what programs are running at start-up that you may not be aware of, then the Software Explorer is the place you should look. This can be done to increase performance as well as identify malicious software. You can also check out www.processlibrary.com to identify and qualify any unrecognized processes and DLLs that are active on the system.
  • 168 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall FIGURE 5-7 Software Explorer Allowed Items and Windows Defender Web Site If you click Allowed Items in Tools, you can see what software items Windows Defender has allowed installation. There isn’t anything you can do here except view the items on the list. However, if you want Windows Defender to begin monitoring the item again, simply select it and click Remove From List. You can also click the Windows Defender Web Site option to get the latest tools and security information. EXERCISE 5-1 Configuring Windows Defender In this exercise we are going to use the features and options we have explored in order to use Windows Defender for a specific task. Let’s say that you are an IT
  • Configure Windows Defender 169 professional working for a small advertising agency. You are concerned about a particular Windows Vista computer. You believe it may be infected with spyware. You want to run a quick scan of the computer, but you want to control what Windows Defender does with any potentially harmful spyware that it locates. You can solve this problem by following these steps: 1. Open the Security Center in Control Panel. 2. Click the Windows Defender option in the right pane. 3. In Windows Defender, first click History and review the results of the last scan. This will tell you if anything was previously found and if anything has been placed in quarantine. 4. Click Tools, and then click Options. 5. In the Options dialog box, clear the “Apply default actions to items detected during a scan” check box option. 6. Now run a scan. Since you have Automatic Scanning enabled, Windows Defender will run a basic scan, but it will now prompt you to take actions regarding any spyware that is found instead of performing the default actions. SCENARIO & SOLUTION How do I take a piece of software out of quarantine so that it can be used? Quarantine holds software in a location within Windows where it cannot run or install. If you want to take a piece of software out of quarantine, access the quarantined items in Tools within Windows Defender, select the software in the list, and click the Restore button. I have a custom application that Windows Defender keeps flagging as spyware. How can I stop this behavior in Windows Defender? Should Windows Defender identify a software program that is safe, you can add it to the Allowed Items list. Future scans will not identify the software as a potential threat as long as the software stays in Allowed Items. What is the best way to view and manage programs that start when Windows Vista starts? One of the great features of Windows Defender is the Software Explorer. You can use the Software Explorer feature to view all programs that start when Windows Vista starts, and you can even disable them from the Software Explorer interface.
  • 170 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 5.02 Configure Security Settings in Windows Firewall Firewalls use various kinds of protocol tactics to check traffic as it flows in and out of the network. Based on rules configured by system administrators, certain kinds of traffic are allowed or not allowed, and some kinds of traffic can even be seen as threatening. In short, the firewall acts as a traffic cop who makes certain no one gets inside the private network. Firewalls are nothing new. They have been around for years, and most large, private networks today use some kind of firewall technology (and they spend thousands of dollars on it each year). As with previous versions of Windows, Windows Vista includes a new iteration of Windows Firewall to help protect your computer from malicious people when you’re on the Internet, and even on a network at work and home. You can think of the firewall found in Windows Vista as a personal firewall. The next question that may come to mind concerns the need for a firewall. After all, as a home user, you may have been connecting to the Internet for years without a firewall on your computer. Why do you need one now? Any time you are using the Internet, your computer is open to potential attacks. With a dial-up connection, the attacks are limited because you aren’t connected to the Internet all the time. However, with the explosive growth of broadband connections (such as DSL and cable), the need for a firewall becomes important, because these computers are always connected to the Internet, and therefore, they’re always exposed to danger. For this reason, Windows Firewall is included with Windows Vista and a part of the Security Center. Windows Firewall is a software solution in Windows Vista. A software solution means Windows Firewall uses code built into the Windows Vista OS to monitor and manage Internet and local network traffic. Windows Firewall is considered a stateful firewall, which means Windows Firewall works with your Internet connection and/or local area network (LAN) connection to examine traffic as it passes through the firewall, both to and from your computer/network. Because Windows Firewall is stateful, it examines traffic in terms of its live use. If something not allowed attempts to enter the firewall, Windows Firewall steps in and blocks the traffic from entering. Basically, no disallowed traffic ever passes the firewall. To use stateful inspection, Windows Firewall examines the destination of every piece of traffic coming from your computer or computers on your network.
  • Configure Security Settings in Windows Firewall 171 Whenever something is sent to the Internet (such as a URL request) or even a local request on your local network, Windows Firewall keeps a routing table to track your requests. When data comes to the firewall inbound, Windows Firewall inspects it to see if it matches with requests found in the state table. If so, it’s passed on to your computer or the requesting computer on your network. If it is an unsolicited inbound frame, it’s blocked from entering the firewall. The end result is this: any traffic you want from the Internet or your LAN can enter the firewall, and anything you haven’t requested is blocked. Windows Firewall is enabled by default when you install Windows Vista. You make sure it’s turned on and access additional Firewall settings by opening the Security Center, found in Control Panel. When you open the Security Center, you can click on Firewall and see Windows is actively defending your computer, as shown in Figure 5-8. FIGURE 5-8 Windows Firewall in Windows Security Center
  • 172 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall Configuring Windows Firewall Settings The default Firewall settings are typically all a user needs, but in some cases, you may need to change the normal way Windows Firewall works or even some advanced options to enable certain programs to work to reach a certain configuration goal. Naturally, the exam will expect you to be able to configure Windows Firewall to meet a number of different needs. In the Security Center, click Windows Firewall in the left pane, and then on the Windows Firewall page, click the Change Settings link. This takes you to the Windows Firewall property pages. Use the following sections to explore the options you find. General Tab The first tab you see is the General tab, shown in Figure 5-9. All you can do here is either turn the firewall On or Off or Block All Incoming Connections. This setting should be used when you’re connected to public networks, such as those found in airports, coffee shops, and such. When you use this setting, you can still surf most Web FIGURE 5-9 General tab
  • Configure Security Settings in Windows Firewall 173 sites, send and receive e-mail, and send and receive instant messages, but everything else is essentially blocked. This feature blocks any and all programs coming from the network, which is an additional security feature. Otherwise, you can leave this check box alone. In terms of firewall use, you should always leave the firewall enabled. Only disable the firewall if you’re using a third-party firewall solution instead. The Block All Incoming Connections option is a new feature designed to make Windows Firewall secure, but easy to use. Let’s say you are traveling with your laptop computer. You want to use a hotspot in an airport to check your e-mail. Before connecting, click the Block check box. When you use this option, all exceptions are ignored and every incoming connection is blocked. However, you can still surf most Web pages, send and receive e-mail, and send and receive instant messages. So, if you face an exam question that gives you a similar scenario, the Block check box feature is the one to use when you are connecting to less secure networks. Exceptions Tab If you open the Exceptions tab of the Windows Firewall dialog box, shown in Figure 5-10, you see settings that govern how Windows Firewall works and what kinds of applications and services it allows. Again, you typically don’t need to configure anything here if you’re simply using the Internet and accessing Internet mail. However, if you’re using certain applications or providing certain types of content to the Internet, you may need to configure some of these settings. The Exceptions tab provides a list of programs and services running on your computer or network that you are allowing Internet or network users to access. Essentially, the settings here either block or allow inbound traffic. For example, let’s say you want to use Remote Assistance on your Windows Vista computer. If Windows Firewall is in use, you need to check the Remote Assistance check box, so that a Remote Assistance expert can contact you. Selecting a check box unblocks the program. When you click this check box and then click OK, Windows Firewall reconfigures itself to allow certain kinds of content to pass through the firewall to meet these needs. Or, for example, let’s say you want to use Remote Desktop with someone on the Internet. By default, Windows Firewall won’t allow this kind of communication, but if you enable it here, Windows Firewall understands Remote Desktop should be allowed.
  • 174 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall FIGURE 5-10 Exceptions tab Customizing Exceptions However, you can customize the exceptions by adding a program to unblock or adding a port to unblock. For example, let’s say you have some application installed that uses the Internet in some way, but this application doesn’t seem to work. You click the Add Program button and Browse your computer to locate the program, and then click OK. Furthermore, you can be even more specific by clicking the Add Program button, locating and selecting the program in the Browse list, and then clicking the Change Scope button. Here, you can specify that any computer (including those on the Internet) can access the program, or you can limit it to your local network or even local computers on your network if you like, as shown in Figure 5-11. If you have a program that needs a particular port number open, you can click the Add Port button, give the exception name, and enter the port number. Certain programs use TCP or UDP ports on the network to communicate. Consult your program’s documentation to determine if this is something you need to do. However, be wary of opening ports. Ports are not program-specific, so any application that can use a certain TCP or UDP port that you open will be able to get through the firewall.
  • Configure Security Settings in Windows Firewall 175 FIGURE 5-11 Change Scope Be wary of exam questions that recommend opening ports for communication—there is often a more secure way by allowing certain program rather than ports. If you take a look at the Exceptions tab, you’ll see that a number of exceptions are enabled by default, such as Messenger, Network Discovery, Remote Assistance, and such. Depending on your computer’s networking configuration, File and Printer Sharing may also be enabled. Naturally, the exam will give you some scenarios and ask you what you need to do to enable certain programs and services to work. Two important exceptions to keep in mind: ■ If you need to allow Remote Procedure Calls (RPCs), enable the Remote Administration exception. ■ If you need to allow Remote Desktop connections, you’ll need to enable the exception as well. Advanced Tab If you click the Advanced tab, you can see which network connections Windows Firewall is protecting, as Figure 5-12 shows. If you want to allow more or less connections, select or deselect the check boxes as necessary. Remember, however, every network connection on your computer should be protected by the firewall.
  • 176 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall FIGURE 5-12 Advanced tab Configuring Windows Firewall Advanced Settings If you have used Windows Firewall’s previous versions, you may wonder where some additional features, such as ICMP settings and logging settings, are located. In Windows Vista, there is yet another interface you use to configure Windows Firewall Advanced Settings. Open Administrative Tools in Control Panel and then open Windows Firewall with Advanced Security. The Advanced Security interface, shown in Figure 5-13, allows you to configure both Inbound and Outbound rules, which you’ll need to do in order to complete some security requirements. As you can see, standard inbound and outbound rules are already enabled, but you can use this MMC to configure specific rules to meet specific needs. You must be logged in as an Administrator to make any changes to the Advanced Security features. First things first, you can click the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security option in the left tree pane to see an overview of your settings, shown in Figure 5-14.
  • Configure Security Settings in Windows Firewall 177 FIGURE 5-13 Windows Firewall with Advanced Security Notice that you have a domain profile, a private profile, and a public profile. Click the Windows Firewall Properties link in the center pane under the three profiles. This opens the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security on Local Computer properties dialog box. Notice that on the Domain Profile, Private Profile, and Public Profile tabs, you can examine the current firewall state, configure settings, and turn on and configure logging for that profile, shown in Figure 5-14. Domain Profile The domain profile determines the firewall’s settings when you you are connected to Windows network. connected to Windows domain domain network.The Private Profile determines the The private profile determines the firewall’s firewall’s settings when you are connected settings when you are connected to a to a private network location, the public private network location, and and the Public Profile determines the settingsyou profile determines the settings when when you are connected public network location. are connected to a to a public network location. you have you have a usernetwork Let’s say Let’s say a user on your on your network who needs her laptop computer’s who needs her laptop computer’s firewall firewall configured differently for a configured differently for a private network private network than the public network than the public network she accesses. You she accesses. You can use these tabs to can use these tabs to configure different configure different settings for the profiles. settings for the profiles.
  • 178 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall FIGURE 5-14 Profile tab options Enabling a Rule To enable a rule, select the Inbound or Outbound category, locate the rule, and double-click it. For example, let’s say that you want to allow Media Center Extenders so that Xbox can connect with your Windows Vista computer. Under Inbound rules, locate the Media Center Extenders option for the desired profile (domain, public, or private). On the General tab of the Properties dialog box that appears, shown in Figure 5-15, click the Enabled check box and click OK. Creating a Rule In some cases, you’ll need to create new rules that enable specific programs, ports, predefined options, or custom options. These settings are often necessary for custom applications and processes, or for ICMP settings. Keep in mind that ICMP commands such as Ping can be used in several Denial of Service (DoS) attacks, such as the Ping of Death and Smurf. It is disabled by default for this reason, so only enable it if you really need it. Exercise 5-2 shows you how to enable the Ping command (ICMP), which is not allowed by default in Windows Firewall.
  • Configure Security Settings in Windows Firewall 179 FIGURE 5-15 Rule properties dialog box EXERCISE 5-2 Enabling the Ping Command in Windows Firewall ICMP is made up of several commands that network administrators often use to test network connectivity and conditions between computers. The Ping command, which is a simple test you can run to determine if one computer can connect to another, is the most common. However, ICMP settings are disabled by default in Windows Firewall, so you’ll need to enable the options you want using the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security MMC. The following steps show you how. 1. Log on to Windows Vista with an Administrator account. 2. Open Control Panel | Administrative Tools | Windows Firewall with Advanced Security. 3. In the left console pane, select Inbound Rules. 4. In the Actions pane, click New Rule. 5. In the Rule Type dialog box, click the Custom option and click Next. 6. Click the All Programs button and click Next.
  • 180 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall 7. On the Protocols and Ports window, shown in Figure 5-16, for Protocol Type, select ICMPv4. Click the Custom button for Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) Settings. 8. On the Customize ICMP Settings dialog box, you can enable all ICMP types, or specific types. If you only want to allow incoming pings to your computer, click specific ICMP types and choose Echo Request and click OK, as shown in Figure 5-17. 9. Click Next. 10. Under Scope, click Next. 11. On the Action page, choose Allow The Connection and click Next. 12. On the Profile page, choose if you want to allow ping for the domain, private network, or public network (or any combination of the three), and click Next. 13. Name the rule, such as “ping command,” and click Finish. You’ll now see the rule in your Inbound Rules category. FIGURE 5-16 Choose ICMPv4 and click Customize
  • Configure Security Settings in Windows Firewall 181 FIGURE 5-17 Enable Echo Request SCENARIO & SOLUTION I need to log all firewall activity from the Internet to a user’s Windows Vista computer. How can I configure that? You’ll need to enable logging on the Public profile option of Windows Firewall Properties within the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security MMC. I have a user that travels with a laptop and often connects at hotspots in public areas, such as hotels and airports. How will I enable the user to access the Internet but provide the best security? On the Windows Firewall settings, General tab, choose the Block options. This feature overrides all exceptions and blocks all traffic. The user will still be able to send and receive e-mail, view most Web pages, and send and receive instant messages. I enabled the ping command on a Windows Vista computer as an inbound rule, but now I want to stop using it. What do I do? Open Windows Firewall with Advanced Security, click Inbound Rules, locate the rule you made, and double-click it. On the General tab, clear the Enabled check box and click OK.
  • 182 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall CERTIFICATION SUMMARY In this chapter, we explored two very important tools in Windows Vista’s arsenal of security features, Windows Defender and Windows Firewall. You can expect to face exam questions about these tools because Microsoft expects you, as an IT professional, to have a working knowledge of these tools needed for custom configurations and problem solving. Windows Defender is a built-in spyware and malware tool. Windows Defender is configured to perform automatic scans of the Windows Vista computer and identify potential software threats. These software threats can then be quarantined or deleted from the system. Keep in mind that you can access Tools and Options to configure several important configuration options, including the default behavior that scans take regarding potential threats, real-time protection, and administrative rights in terms of the use of Windows Defender. Additionally, you can use Windows Defender to manage quarantined items, you can add software to an allowed list, and you can join Microsoft Spynet, which sends information about the spyware your computer encounters to Microsoft. Keep in mind that the Software Explorer is an excellent tool to manage startup programs on your PC. Windows Firewall is designed to stop unauthorized traffic from the Internet or local network. You can enable, disable, or block traffic using the General tab of Windows Firewall properties. You can also enable and disable basic exceptions for programs, protocols, and ports. For more advanced options, open the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security MMC from Administrative tools in Control Panel. Here, you can manage profiles (domain, local, public) and you can enable inbound and outbound rules as well as create new rules. Keep in mind that logging and ICMP settings must be configured in the Advanced Security MMC.
  • Two-Minute Drill ✓ 183 TWO-MINUTE DRILL Configure Windows Defender ❑ Run a Quick Scan to check your computer for the most likely places spyware may be hiding. ❑ Run a custom scan to check certain directories or drives on your PC. ❑ You can configure Options by accessing the Tools feature. Here, you can choose whether or not to use automatic scanning and whether default actions are carried out for risky software. Your computer must be turned on for the scheduled scan to run. ❑ Real-time protection is enabled by default so that software that attempts to install is checked by Windows Defender. You can manage real-time protection settings within Options. ❑ You can take items out of quarantine so that they can be used by accessing the quarantined items within Tools and using the Restore button. ❑ Use the Software Explorer to review programs that start when Windows Vista starts. You can also disable these programs from within Windows Defender and view what processes are currently running that might be causing poor performance. ❑ If Windows Defender identifies a custom application as spyware, you can add it to the allowed list so that Windows Defender does not identify the software as a potential threat. Configure Security Settings in Windows Firewall ❑ Windows Firewall protects Windows Vista by blocking unsolicited inbound traffic. ❑ Windows Firewall can effectively block unsolicited inbound traffic from the Internet, or even a local area network connection. ❑ Use the Block All Programs feature on the General tab of Windows Firewall Advanced Properties to block all program access to the computer. This setting is ideal when you are connecting to an unsecured network or public area. With this setting, you can still send and receive e-mail, read most Web pages, and send and receive instant messages.
  • 184 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall ❑ You can configure programs within Windows Firewall with exceptions so that network traffic is always passed to those programs. ❑ You can configure Windows Firewall exceptions for protocols or TCP/UDP ports. ❑ By default, Windows Vista blocks all ICMP traffic. You will need to create a rule to allow ICMP traffic, such as echo requests (the ping command), using the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security MMC. ❑ You can configure different firewall settings based on domain, private, and public profiles in the Advanced Security MMC.
  • Self Test 185 SELF TEST The following questions will help you measure your understanding of the material presented in this chapter. Read all the choices carefully because there might be more than one correct answer. Choose all correct answers for each question. Configure Windows Defender 1. You are an IT professional working at a small publishing company. A user reports that his Windows Vista Ultimate computer is running very slowly. You reboot the computer and find that the computer is still very slow when performing tasks. You believe the computer may be infected with malware or spyware. You want to review the applications that run at start-up. What should you do? A. Check Programs in Control Panel. B. Use Task Manager to view the total CPU cycles. C. Use Windows Defender to see what programs run at start-up. D. Check MSINFO. 2. You want to configure Windows Defender so that Windows Defender will recommend actions to you when malicious software is detected so that you can choose what action you want to take. You also want to make sure that Windows Defender scans the most likely places on your computer where spyware is known to exist. You want Windows Defender to perform this action every day. Considering the Options settings in the following illustration, what do you need to do? (Choose all that apply.)
  • 186 A. B. C. D. Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall Clear the Automatically Scan My Computer option. Change the Scan Frequency setting from Daily to Automatic. Clear the “Apply default actions to items detected during a scan” option. Change the Signature Actions defaults to “always remove.” 3. You want Windows Defender to offer real-time protection on your PC. What option should you choose in order to specify an agent that monitors security-related settings in Windows? A. System Configuration B. Startup Services C. Windows Security Center D. Internet Explorer zone security
  • Self Test 187 4. You want to check your Windows Vista Business computer for spyware. You want to check areas of the operating system that are most likely to be infected by spyware. What do you need to do? A. Run a full scan. B. Run a quick scan. C. Run a custom scan so that only C:Windows is scanned. D. Run a custom scan and scan all hard drives. 5. You work for a company that has developed a custom program called ATR. When the program is installed on Windows Vista Ultimate, Windows Defender identifies the program as spyware. You need to configure Windows Defender so that the program will not detect the ATR program as spyware. What do you need to do? A. Click the Ignore option in the Action column on the Scan Results page. B. Select the Always Allow option in the Action column on the Scan Results page. C. Use Programs in Control Panel to configure the ATR program as a trusted program. D. Update Windows Defender’s spyware definitions. 6. When Windows Defender locates spyware on your computer, you want to make sure that the software is moved to an area of your computer where it cannot run. What option should you use? A. Remove B. Ignore C. Quarantine D. Always Allow 7. On a Windows Vista computer, you want to ensure that any spyware that is found is reported automatically to Microsoft. What should you do? A. Configure Windows Defender to run automatically. B. Make sure Windows Update is turned on. C. Set up a Windows Live account. D. Become a member of Microsoft Spynet. 8. You recently placed a suspicious program installed on Windows Vista in quarantine in Windows Defender. You have now discovered that this program is legitimate and needs to remain on the computer. What do you need to do? A. Reinstall the program. B. Restore the program from quarantine in Windows Defender. C. Use the Always Allow option in Windows Defender to allow the program to run. D. Run the program from quarantine.
  • 188 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall 9. You have a Windows Vista Ultimate computer. You share this computer with several members of your immediate family, each having an account. You have the only administrator account. You want to prevent all other family members from using Windows Defender to scan the computer and make decisions about potential spyware. What is the easiest way to configure this need? A. Give other users an administrator account. B. Use the Services applet in Control Panel to stop the Windows Defender service from running. C. In Windows Defender Options, clear the Allow Everyone To Use Windows Defender feature. D. Nothing. Users without administrator accounts cannot access Windows Defender by default. Configure Security Settings in Windows Firewall 10. A user at your company will be traveling to a conference in a few days. She will carry her Windows Vista laptop and connect to a public hotspot at the hotel. You want to ensure that the user’s laptop will be safe from any unauthorized access via the network. However, the user needs to be able to send and receive e-mail at the conference. What is the easiest solution to this problem? A. Block all traffic on the General tab of Windows Firewall Advanced Properties. B. Disable Windows Firewall on the Windows Firewall Advanced Properties. C. Close all ports except the HTTP port. D. Disable all ICMP settings. 11. What types of possible threats does Windows Firewall effectively block? A. Unauthorized access from the Internet B. Unauthorized access from a local network C. Unauthorized access from program to program on the local computer D. Unauthorized access to a Windows domain controller from the local computer 12. On a Windows Vista Business computer, you run a ping test to see if there is connectivity to another computer running Windows Vista Ultimate. When you run the ping test, you see the following results:
  • Self Test 189 Before you conduct further tests, you want to ensure that Windows Firewall is not blocking the ping request on the Windows Vista Ultimate computer. What do you need to do? A. On the Windows Vista Business computer, add the Ping program to the exceptions list. B. On the Windows Vista Business computer, create a rule to allow inbound Echo Requests. C. On the Windows Vista Ultimate computer, add the Ping program to the exceptions list. D. On the Windows Vista Ultimate computer, create a rule to allow inbound Echo Requests. 13. You are an IT professional for a real estate agency. One of the agents uses a Windows Vista Ultimate computer using the company’s required firewall rules. The agent needs to use the computer at the office using the required firewall rules, but she needs a different set of firewall rules when she works from home. File sharing must also be allowed at home. How can you configure this? (Choose two. Each correct answer presents part of the solution.) A. Create a different profile on the network’s domain controller. B. Enable the HTTP option on Windows Firewall’s exception list. C. Use the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security MMC to create an inbound rule allowing file sharing for the private profile. D. Use Windows Firewall with Advanced Security to change the private profile settings to allow for inbound connections.
  • 190 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall 14. You need to enable Windows Firewall to allow Remote Procedure Calls (RPCs). What do you need to do? A. Enable ICMP traffic. B. Enable the RCP exception in Windows Firewall. C. Enable the Remote Service Management exception in Windows Firewall. D. Enable TCP port 1592. 15. What two kinds of protocols can you allow using the Add a Port utility in Windows Firewall? (Choose two.) A. TCP B. ICMP C. RDP D. UDP 16. Your Windows Vista computer is a laptop computer you use to connect to the Internet in various locations. You want to ensure that no computer from the Internet can access your computer while you are directly connected to the Internet, regardless of any existing firewall rules that allow the connection. What should you do? A. No action is required. B. Use the Windows Firewall Advanced Security MMC to block all connections on the public profile. C. Use the Windows Firewall Advanced Security MMC to block all connections on the private profile. D. Use the Windows Firewall Advanced Security MMC to block all HTTP traffic. 17. You created a new rule in the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security MMC that allows echo requests on the private profile. You now want to stop allowing this feature. What do you need to do? A. Enable the Block option on the General tab of Windows Firewall properties. B. In the Advanced Security MMC, use the Block option on the Private Profile tab of Windows Firewall properties. C. In the Advanced MMC, select Inbound Rules and double-click the Echo Request rule you created. Clear the Enabled check box. D. In the Advanced MMC, create a rule disallowing all ICMP requests.
  • Lab Question 191 18. You want to turn on logging when a user accesses the Internet within Windows Firewall. However, you do not want to log Firewall events from the domain or private network. What do you need to do? A. Create a firewall rule to allow logging in the Advanced Security MMC. B. In the Advanced Security MMC, disable logging for the domain profile and private profile. C. In the Advanced Security MMC, enable logging of dropped packets and log successful connections in the public profile. D. Do nothing. This configuration is enabled by default. LAB QUESTION You are an IT professional for an advertising firm. A certain user needs to use his Windows Vista Ultimate computer on the local network at the office, but also needs to use the laptop on the road to access public hotspots. You want to maintain typical Windows Firewall settings while connected to your private network, but block all connections when the user is accessing the Internet at a public hotspot. You also need to make certain that HTTP-Streaming-in Media Center Extenders are allowed on the domain profile. How can you configure these options?
  • 192 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall SELF TEST ANSWERS Configure Windows Defender ✓ 1. ® C. Use Windows Defender and review the Software Explorer feature to see what programs are configured to run at start-up. ® A is incorrect because the Programs applet will not tell you what programs run at start-up. ˚ B is incorrect because a Task Manager program review of CPU usage will not report information about startup programs. D is incorrect as well. MSINFO is a tool that records system information, but it will not give you a list of startup programs. ✓ 2. ® C. Since you want Windows Defender to prompt you for action, you only need to clear the “Apply default actions to items detected during a scan” option. ® A is incorrect because you want the software to automatically scan the computer. B is also ˚ incorrect because you want scans to run daily (the default setting). D is also incorrect because this action would not prompt you for a decision. ✓ 3. ® A. Real-time protection will alert you immediately if any spyware attempts to install on your computer. This real-time protection is offered through monitoring agents. To specify an agent that monitors the system, you need to select System Configuration under Real-Time Protection options on the Options page in Windows Defender. ® B, C, and D are all incorrect answers because none of these options have anything to do ˚ with Windows Defender configuration settings. ✓ 4. ® B. A quick scan checks areas of the system that are most likely to be infected with spyware. ® A is incorrect because this option will run a complete scan of the entire computer. C and ˚ D are also incorrect because a custom scan will check only specified areas of the computer, not necessarily all areas where spyware may reside. Other directories beside C:Windows may be infected as well. ✓ 5. ® B. Use the Always Allow option in the Action column on the Scan Results page to make sure that Windows Defender always allows the program in subsequent scans. ® A is incorrect because this Ignore option tells Windows Defender to ignore the program ˚ during this scan only. It will still be identified as spyware in subsequent scans. C is incorrect because this option does not exist in Programs. D is also incorrect because updated definitions will not solve the problem of incorrect detection with this custom program. ✓ 6. ® C. When you use the Quarantine option, you move the software to another location on the computer that prevents it from running until you choose to permanently remove it or restore it. ® A is incorrect because this action will permanently remove the software from your ˚ computer. B is incorrect because the Ignore option will allow the software to run. D is also incorrect because this action will allow the software to always run.
  • Self Test Answers 193 ✓ 7. ® D. In Windows Defender, you can set up a membership with Microsoft Spynet so that any spyware found on your PC is reported to Microsoft. ® A, B, and C are all incorrect because none of these options will report spyware to Microsoft. ˚ ✓ 8. ® B. When a program is placed in quarantine in Windows Defender, you can take the program out of quarantine by using the Restore option in Windows Defender. ® A is incorrect because there is no need to reinstall the program. C is also incorrect because ˚ you cannot use the Always Allow option if the program is in quarantine. D is also incorrect because you cannot run a program held in quarantine. ✓ 9. ® C. You can stop any user who is not an administrator from using Windows Defender by clearing the Allow Everyone To Use Windows Defender check box feature in Options. ® A and B are incorrect because these actions would not prevent the users from accessing ˚ Windows Defender. D is also incorrect because users can access Windows Defender by default. Configure Security Settings in Windows Firewall ✓ 10. ® A. The Block option on the General tab provides the needed solution. The Block feature blocks all incoming traffic, but the user will still be able to send and receive e-mail, surf most Web pages, and send and receive instant messages while connected to the public network. ® B is incorrect because if you disable the firewall, the user will have no protection at all, ˚ which is the opposite of the desired result. C is incorrect because with HTTP allowed, the computer is still vulnerable to an attack from the Internet. D is also incorrect because disabling ICMP exceptions will have no effect on this issue. ✓ 11. ® A and B. Windows Firewall can block unauthorized access from the Internet or a local network. ® C and D are incorrect. C is incorrect because Windows Firewall doesn’t filter information ˚ between programs on a local computer. D is incorrect because a local Windows Vista computer cannot impact security settings on a Windows domain controller. ✓ 12. ® D. Ping is an ICMP routine and is therefore not allowed by default. You’ll need to create a rule that allows echo requests. ® A and B are both incorrect because you do not need to do anything on the Windows Vista ˚ Business computer. You need to allow ICMP on the Ultimate computer. C is also incorrect because only receiving programs need to be added to the exception list. Since you need to send data, this configuration would not solve the problem. ✓ 13. ® C and D. For this solution, you’ll need to use the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security MMC to configure the private profile so that file-sharing traffic is allowed. Profiles, such as this one, can only be configured from the Advanced Security MMC. ® A and B are incorrect because these settings are not affected by a domain controller. Also, ˚ HTTP is allowed through the firewall by default, assuming the traffic is authorized.
  • 194 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall ✓ 14. ® C. Remote Procedure Calls can be allowed to pass through Windows Firewall by enabling the Remote Service Management exception. ® A, B, and D are all incorrect because none of these actions will enable RPCs. ˚ ✓ 15. ® A and D. TCP and UDP are the protocols for which you can open incoming connections to Windows Firewall. ® B and C are incorrect because these protocols are a part of the TCP/UDP stack of protocols. ˚ ✓ 16. ® B. Since you only want to block connections from the Internet, even if there are exceptions allowed, you’ll need to use the Advanced Security MMC to configure the option. Use the Inbound Rules, Public Profile tab. ® A, C, and D are all incorrect because these options will not provide the desired security ˚ level when connected to the public network. ✓ 17. ® C. Since you created the rule to allow echo requests in the Advanced Security MMC, all you need to do is return to the rule and disable it. You can simply leave the rule disabled until you need to allow pinging in the future; then you can enable it again. ® A, B, and D are incorrect because all of these actions will block more connections than ˚ desired. You only need to disable the rule you created for echo requests. ✓ 18. ® C. Logging is not enabled by default, so you’ll need to access the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security on Local Computer dialog box within the Advanced Security MMC. On the Public Profile tab, choose Yes for Log Dropped Packets and Log Successful Connections. ® A is incorrect because you cannot create a rule to allow logging. B is also incorrect because ˚ logging is not enabled by default, so you could not disable logging for the domain and private profiles. D is incorrect because logging is not enabled by default on the public profile (or any other profile).
  • Lab Answer 195 LAB ANSWER You can configure the requirements of this scenario in the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security MMC. First, you can enable the HTTP-Streaming-in Media Center Extender Rule for the domain. Follow these steps: 1. Open the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security MMC from Administrative tools in Control Panel. Make sure you are logged on with an Administrator account. 2. Under Inbound Rules, locate the Media Center Extenders (HTTP-Streaming-in) Rule for the Domain profile, as you can see in the following illustration:
  • 196 Chapter 5: Configure Windows Defender and Windows Firewall 3. Double-click the rule and click the Enabled check box on the General tab, shown in the following illustration, and click OK. Next, you need to change the public profile option so that all connections are blocked. Follow these steps: 1. Open the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security MMC from Administrative tools in Control Panel. Make sure you are logged on with an Administrator account. 2. Select Windows Firewall with Advanced Security in the left console pane. 3. Under the Overview section in the center pane, click the Windows Firewall Properties link. 4. Click the Public Profile tab.
  • Lab Answer 197 5. Under Inbound Connections, change the setting to Block All Connections, shown in the following illustration. Click OK.
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  • 6 Network with Windows Vista CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVES 6.01 Configure Networking by Using the Network and Sharing Center 6.02 Troubleshoot Connectivity Issues 6.03 Configure Remote Access ✓ Q&A Two-Minute Drill Self Test
  • 200 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista W ithout question, networking is one of the most important features of any computer system today, and networking has come a long way. In the past, networking was reserved for computer engineers at larger corporations, and there was no need for the average user to know a thing about networking.Yet, in the connected world today, more and more people have a home network, and even the smallest of businesses have a network of at least a few computers. With Internet connectivity and the ability to share files and information becoming commonplace, operating systems that make networking easy and robust are a must. The good news is Windows Vista makes networking easier than it ever has been before. Networks are easy to set up and configure, and in many cases, Windows Vista can solve network connection problems itself without any help from the user. Yet, as an IT specialist, you’ll need to know how to configure network connections in Windows Vista, how to troubleshoot those connections, and how to use Windows Vista’s remote access features. Naturally, the subject of networking can be a book in and of itself, but in this chapter, we’ll stay focused on networking with Windows Vista and the issues that you are likely to see on the exam. As with all chapters in this book, it is very important that you get some hands-on practice with Windows Vista’s networking features, so turn on Windows Vista and get ready to tackle the networking questions on the exam! CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 6.01 Conf igure Networking by Using the Network and Sharing Center In an attempt to make all networking components and features available in one centralized location, Windows Vista now includes a component available from Control Panel called the Network and Sharing Center. This feature is listed as a subobjective on the exam, so you can expect that the exam will ask you questions about this feature and expect you to know how to use and configure it. The good news is the Network and Sharing Center is designed to be straightforward and intuitive, which is good news for you in the real world and the exam.
  • Conf igure Networking by Using the Network and Sharing Center 201 Exploring the Network and Sharing Center If you open the Network and Sharing Center from Control Panel, shown in Figure 6-1, you see a simple interface that gives you information about your current network connection, if one exists, and what your computer is configured to do on the network. As usual, you also see a Tasks pane listing several important tasks that you can access in order to set up a network connection or use an existing one. The following sections explore the Network and Sharing Center. Network Map The Network Map feature provides you with a graphical map showing how your computer connects to the network and the Internet. Typically, the map you see here isn’t particularly helpful, but if you click the View Full Map link, you’ll see additional network devices and how they are connected as well. This feature can be helpful when you need to troubleshoot connection problems on your network. As you can see in Figure 6-2, not all discovered network devices appear on the map, and there are some reasons why this can happen. We’ll explore those reasons when we discuss troubleshooting issues later in this chapter. FIGURE 6-1 Network and Sharing Center
  • 202 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista FIGURE 6-2 Network Map Network In the middle of the Network and Sharing Center, you see a Network section, listing Access and Connection. Access shows you what you can access via the network, such as the local network and Internet, and Connection shows you how you are connected, such as through a local area connection or a wireless connection. You can customize the network here, making changes to the current configuration, and you can also view the current status of the network connection, as shown in Figure 6-3. If you are using a wireless connection, you’ll also see a signal strength icon and a link to disable the connection. If you click the Customize link, you see a simple dialog box that enables you to change the location type of the network to either a public or private network. It is important that you understand these two types, so commit the following bullet points to memory.
  • Conf igure Networking by Using the Network and Sharing Center 203 FIGURE 6-3 Set Network Location ■ Public A public network is a network that exists in a public area, such as an airport or coffee shop. You can connect to the network, but discovery of other devices as well as your computer will be highly restricted and some programs will not work on this network. Use the public network option when your computer resides in a place where you don’t want other computers around you to see your computer. This is a security feature so that you can still use the public network with limited risk to your computer. When you are using Public, you will not see a network map in the Network and Sharing Center. ■ Private A private network is a home or office network where other computers around you can see your computer and devices and vice versa. Your computer is discoverable on the private network, and this is the setting you want to use in most networking scenarios so that your computer has full access to network resources and others can access shared resources on your computer. To change the network location type, simply select the desired radio button and click Next. UAC will appear for you to grant the change, and then the change will be made.
  • 204 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista Notice that you can also click Merge Or Delete Network Locations. If you have multiple network locations and you need to merge or remove one of them, click this link to access a simple dialog box where the change can be made. Having problems seeing a Windows Vista computer on your network, or do you find that it is listed as discoverable but does not appear on the network map? The computer is likely set to a Public location type, which occurs with some default network configurations. You simply need to change the network location type to Private in this scenario. Sharing and Discovery Settings The Sharing and Discovery Settings essentially define how a computer can be used on the network. Think of this section as your one-stop place to configure the network connection so that it meets your particular networking needs. You have several settings here that you can turn on or off, and you’ll need to know these for the exam. The following sections explain these options. Network Discovery Discovery is a network setting that determines a few important characteristics about your computer on the network. If Discovery is turned on, then your computer is “discoverable” to other computers and devices on the network. More specifically, when discovery is turned on, your computer is visible to other computers and devices, you can access shared devices and files on other computers on the network and computers and devices can be shared from your computer, and the right security settings are applied to your computer to accomplish these goals. There are two Discovery settings, On and Off, as you can see in Figure 6-4. As previously mentioned, when Discovery is turned on, your computer can be seen on the network. When Discovery is turned off, it cannot be seen, you cannot access shared devices and files, and no one can access files and devices on your computer. In most computing scenarios, Discovery needs to be turned on so that your computer is accessible on the network. The only time you would not want Discovery enabled is in the case of a public network where you do not want your computer seen by other computers and devices on the public network. As with all of the settings under Sharing and Discovery, you can click the toggle arrow to access the On or Off radio buttons, as you can see in Figure 6-4.
  • Conf igure Networking by Using the Network and Sharing Center 205 FIGURE 6-4 Network Discovery settings File Sharing As the name suggests, the File Sharing settings (On or Off) enable your computer to share files and printers from your computer so that people on your network can access them. This setting must be turned on for there to be any access to shared files or printers by people on your network. Note that if your computer is configured to Sleep during inactivity periods, the Sleep state will prevent users from accessing your shared files or printers. In this case, you may want to access Power Options and turn Sleep off so that your computer’s resources will always be available to others. Public Folder Sharing Windows Vista has a Public folder where you can put any kind of file for others on your network to access, if Public Folder Sharing is turned on here. This is a quick and easy way to share files without having to share individual files and folders. You can simply place documents in the Public folder and they become readily accessible on the network.
  • 206 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista You have three setting options, shown in Figure 6-5. You can turn on sharing so that anyone with network access can open files in the Public folder, or can open, change, and create files in your Public folder. Or, you can turn off this feature, preventing anyone on the network from accessing the Public folder (people logged on to your local computer can still access the folder, however). The main question here is, do you want users to only be able to access your files, or to access, change, and create files in your Public folder? The answer, of course, all depends on your networking needs. Printer Sharing You can use this option to share your printer over the network or not. You see a simple “turn on” or “turn off” option here. When you turn on printer sharing, people on your network can see your shared printer, connect to it, and print documents on your printer. Password Protected Sharing In some cases, you may want your shared files and printers to be discoverable on the network but only accessible by those who FIGURE 6-5 Public Folder Sharing
  • Conf igure Networking by Using the Network and Sharing Center 207 have a user account and password on your computer. In this case, you can turn on password-protected sharing, which will require a user who wants to connect to your resources to enter a username and password that is configured in User Accounts on your computer. All other users will be denied access without this user account and password. If you want to use this kind of restriction, simply click the Turn On option here. Media Sharing The Media Sharing feature enables your computer to share music, photos, and videos, and when this setting is turned on, your computer can access shared media resources on the network as well. If you click Change, you see the Media Sharing dialog box, shown in Figure 6-6. This dialog box shows you where your media are shared to, and in some cases of network access, you can select who they are shared to and deny access or customize, if the option is available. If you click Settings, the Default Settings dialog box appears, as shown in Figure 6-7. Here, you can choose a name for your shared media and determine the type, star rating, and parental rating of media that are shared from your computer. You can also allow access to new devices and computers automatically, if desired. Tasks Options In the Network and Sharing Center, you see a Tasks pane on the left side of the window. The Tasks pane gives you access to different features and related FIGURE 6-6 Media Sharing
  • 208 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista FIGURE 6-7 Media Sharing – Default Settings configuration options. You can even configure a new network here. The following sections show you what you can do. Viewing Computers and Devices The first task option you see is to View Computers And Devices. If you click this link option, the Network window appears, listing all of the computers and devices on your network, as shown in Figure 6-8. You can double-click each network resource to access it. Notice also that you can add a printer or wireless device directly from the toolbar. Connect to a Network If you click the Connect To A Network option, you can connect to any network that Vista is able to detect. If you are already connected and Vista doesn’t find other network connections, then you’ll see a window, shown in Figure 6-9, where you can access other link options that can help you troubleshoot the problem should an additional network be available to you. Set Up a Connection or Network This option enables you to begin the connection or network setup wizard, which is easy to use because Vista does most of the work for you. When you click the link option, the Set Up a Connection or Network Wizard appears, shown in Figure 6-10. Initially, you choose the kind of connection you want to create, such as a connection
  • Conf igure Networking by Using the Network and Sharing Center FIGURE 6-8 209 Network to the Internet via wireless, broadband, or dial-up; the initial setup of a wireless router or access point; a dial-up connection; or a connection to a workplace through a dial-up or Virtual Private Network (VPN) connection. The configuration options you see at this point vary depending on what selection you have made. Essentially, you’ll provide the necessary information for each kind of connection and Vista configures the option. The instructions from the wizard are straightforward. If you choose to set up a wireless network or router, you’ll be given the opportunity to save the settings, which you can save to a USB flash drive. When you choose this option, the settings and a small setup utility are written to the flash drive, which you can then simply insert into another Windows Vista computer to set up the network. So, if you face an exam question about needing to configure 20 Windows Vista computers with the same wireless network settings, the fastest way to accomplish this goal is to configure one, save the settings, and then use the USB flash drive to automatically set up the rest.
  • 210 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista FIGURE 6-9 Connect to a network FIGURE 6-10 Choose a connection option
  • Conf igure Networking by Using the Network and Sharing Center 211 Manage Network Connections If you click the Manage Network Connections link, you’ll see the Network Connections folder, shown in Figure 6-11. Here, you see a listing of each connection you have configured on your computer. If you double-click a connection, you’ll see either a status dialog box or a connect dialog box in the case of a dial-up connection that is not currently connected. The status dialog box, shown in Figure 6-12, is a helpful feature because you can get immediate information about the connection, click Details for more information, access properties, disable the connection, and diagnose problems with it, all directly from the status dialog box. You can click Properties to access the properties dialog box, where additional networking services and protocols can be configured for the network connection. FIGURE 6-11 Network Connections
  • 212 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista FIGURE 6-12 Connection Status SCENARIO & SOLUTION Do I have to turn on Public Folder Sharing in order to share folders on my PC? No. Public Folder Sharing is a setting that shares the Public folder on Vista. If you don’t want to share the Public folder, don’t enable this option. You can still share other folders as you normally would. In what cases would I configure a network connection as a public connection? The public connection is designed for network connectivity in public locations, such as airports, coffee shops, hotels, and other public access or hotspot areas. The public connection isn’t discoverable, meaning other users will not be able to see your computer on the public network.
  • Conf igure Networking by Using the Network and Sharing Center 213 INSIDE THE EXAM Getting to Know IPv6 Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) is a network protocol standard that is used on almost every kind of network today, including the Internet. TCP/ IP is a routable protocol where each computer has a specific IP address along with subnet mask address that helps route data from one computer to another. TCP/IP is a rather difficult subject, but the Vista exam will not ask you direct questions about networking issues with TCP/IP. It will use the configuration of TCP/IP issues for troubleshooting purposes, rather than asking you how to determine the subnet mask of a network. Keep in mind that Windows Vista automatically establishes an IP address for itself based on your network settings. In the case of a Windows domain, the IP address and subnet mask are typically provided by a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server. What you should be aware of for the exam concerns the new TCP/IP standard, version 6, which is supported under Windows Vista. Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is a set of protocols that computers use to exchange information over the Internet and over home and business networks. IPv6 allows for many more IP addresses to be assigned than IPv4 did. It does this by using eight groups of hexadecimal characters, giving more addressing options than provided in IPv4. The groups are separated by a colon; therefore, a typical IPv6 address will look like this: 3ffe:ffff:0000:2f3b:02aa:00ff: fe28:9c5a. IPv6 addresses can also be made to appear shorter than this by compressing zeros in the address with multiple colons. In this case, an address with compressed zeros would look like this: fe80::2aa:ff:fe9a:4ca2. The double colon represents zeros that have been compressed. You do need to remember two things for the exam: The first concerns loopback address testing. In IPv4 networks, you can run a loopback test to see if your network adapter is working by pinging the loopback address, which is 127.0.0.1. If you want to test your adapter for connectivity on an IPv6 network, the loopback address is 0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1. Should you see a question asking you how to test for connectivity in an IPv6 network, the loopback address is your answer. The second concerns a unicast address. If you’re working on an IPv6 network, but you need to use a unicast address in order to communicate on the Internet, which is still primarily IPv4, what do you need? In this case, you need a global unicast address. Although there are other unicast types, such as link-local, APIPA, and such, still, you need a global unicast address in this case. Just keep these points in mind for the exam.
  • 214 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 6.02 Troubleshoot Connectivity Issues In any network, problems with connectivity to the network or between computers and devices is likely to be your greatest concern because connectivity is likely to be your greatest problem. Although Vista is very good at detecting connections and applying the correct settings, the operating system is certainly not perfect, and you should expect to see some troubleshooting problems on the exam concerning connectivity to the network. In these troubleshooting cases, you’ll need to determine what is most likely the cause and then determine what action to take or what tool you should use to at least troubleshoot the problem. In this section, we’ll explore connectivity problems and examine the tools and troubleshooting action you should know for the exam. Vista’s Diagnostic Tool Windows Vista includes a diagnostic tool that can help you identify problems when a computer has problems connecting to the network. In many cases, Vista can solve the problem, or at least help you understand what is causing the problem (including unplugged network cables), so this is your first action when there is a problem with connectivity from a computer to the network. You can access the diagnostic tool from the Tasks pane of the Network and Sharing Center, or from the connection’s Status dialog box. When you click the Diagnose And Repair option, the tool will run and give you a result with a recommended action. In Figure 6-13, you see that the network adapter is disabled FIGURE 6-13 Diagnose and Repair
  • Troubleshoot Connectivity Issues 215 and all you have to do is click the Enable option to enable it so that the connection can be set up again. If there is nothing wrong with the connection, the tool will tell you so, meaning that you’ll need to troubleshoot further. Other than this, there isn’t much else to say about the tool, except that it is your first line of defense when you are troubleshooting connection problems. Using the Network Map The Network Map feature in the Network and Sharing Center may not seem too exciting, but it can be an initial problem solver for you. If there is a connectivity problem, take a look at the network map and it will show you if the computer is not connected in some way, as you can see in the following illustration. What you may not realize here is the red X is clickable. If you click it, the same diagnostics routine runs to help you identify the cause of the problem and to offer instructions or clickable options to repair it. In the end, this is simply another way to access the network diagnostics tool, but it should be one of the first things you inspect if there are connectivity problems.
  • 216 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista Troubleshooting TCP/IP Settings Aside from the diagnostic tool, you’ll find yourself needing to dig deeper from time to time to solve problems, and in a Windows network, this will put you in the murky land of TCP/IP. Once again, I’ll assume you are up-to-date on your TCP/IP skills—if not, you’ll find a wide variety of introductory-level books at any bookstore. As you are working with Windows Vista, it’s important to remember that all of the old TCP/IP rules apply. Each client on your network needs a unique IP address, an appropriate subnet mask, and possibly a default gateway if the client’s requests must travel to a different subnet. The good news is that Windows Vista can configure this addressing automatically if you are one of the following: ■ On a home or small office network with no domain controllers ■ In a Windows 200x network that has DHCP up and running Let’s consider the first option. Windows Vista is designed to use TCP/IP in a small workgroup or office setting. Because the users in this type of setting are typically not IT professionals who can configure TCP/IP, Windows Vista can configure it automatically through the Automatic Private IP Addressing (APIPA). When APIPA is used, an IP address from the address range of 169.254.0.0 to 169.254.255.255 is used, along with a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0. Afterward, Windows Vista checks the network for the presence of a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server that can lease an IP address to it. This process is backward from Windows XP, which first looks for a DHCP server to provide an address. The reversal in Windows Vista comes in an effort to get the computer up and running on the network more quickly. Windows Vista automatically assigns itself an IP address from this range so that it can participate on the network. Before assigning itself a random IP address from this range, the client broadcasts a network message to see if another APIPA client is already using that same IP address. Of course, if a different range of IP addresses or subnet masks is used on the network, the client still may not have IP connectivity with other clients. The point here is that Windows Vista can use APIPA in environments where no DHCP server is used and where static IP address configurations are not used. The end result is that a user can have a home network running TCP/IP without even knowing what TCP/IP is or that it even exists—and that’s the real beauty of APIPA.
  • Troubleshoot Connectivity Issues APIPA assigns only the IP address and subnet mask—not a default gateway. APIPA assumes that communication is limited to the local subnet. Again, this feature is great in home or small office networks or in the case of 217 a DHCP server failure, but it is not designed as a large networking solution. In most home networking solutions, a router is supplied by an ISP, and this router will typically provide DHCP services to the home network. In the same way that Windows Vista can automatically assign itself an IP address, Windows Vista is configured to search for a DHCP server so that it can lease an IP address. DHCP is a Windows 200x Server service. Administrators can configure DHCP with a pool of IP addresses that can be leased to network clients. The client receives a unique IP lease and keeps that lease for a specified period of time, after which the lease must be renewed. If the lease cannot be renewed, then the client can receive a new IP address. The end results are a system that is relatively easy to configure, unique IP addresses that all clients receive, and for administrators, the freedom from having to worry about unique IPs. By default, Windows Vista configures itself for APIPA if a network adapter card is present in the computer. For the exam, however, you should also know the correct setting that APIPA and DHCP use. Fortunately, the configuration is a single radio button, and you learn how to set it in Exercise 6-1. EXERCISE 6-1 CertCam Using APIPA or DHCP To configure TCP/IP to use APIPA or DHCP, follow these steps: 1. Click Start | Control Panel | Network And Sharing Center | Manage Network Connections. 2. Right-click the Local Area Connection and click Properties.
  • 218 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista 3. On the Networking tab, shown in the following illustration, select Internet Protocol Version 4 (TCP/IP) in the list and click Properties. 4. On the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties General tab, ensure that the Obtain An IP Address Automatically and the Obtain DNS Server Address Automatically radio buttons are selected, as shown in the following illustration:
  • Troubleshoot Connectivity Issues 219 Configuring a Static IP Address APIPA and DHCP are designed to provide automatic IP addressing so that configuration never needs to be static. By static, I mean that you manually enter an IP address, a subnet mask, and a default gateway if necessary. In the past, this manual form of IP addressing was required, and a simple keystroke error could cause a number of connectivity errors. As you can imagine, for this reason TCP/IP was known as a “high overhead” protocol. With automatic addressing mechanisms, however, you will typically not perform manual assignment. However, there are cases in which clients may want a workgroup to have a certain IP address range and subnet masks. When a handful of computers are used (or even up to 100), you can reasonably perform a manual assignment if necessary, and the exam expects you to know how to configure a Windows Vista computer with a manual IP address. Not to sound like a broken record, but let me again say that you are unlikely to see IP addressing and subnet mask configurations on this exam. You might see a network configuration and the IP addresses of certain clients in order to troubleshoot a problem, but the important point to remember is that each client must have a unique IP address but all clients must have the same subnet mask when they are on the same subnet. Keep in mind that in order for a client computer to find its way off the local subnet, a default gateway must be configured. Also, you might consider manually entering the IP addresses of DNS servers on your network, since this information is typically provided by the DHCP server. Exercise 6-2 shows you how to manually configure a Windows XP Professional computer’s IP settings. EXERCISE 6-2 CertCam Manually Configuring TCP/IP To manually configure TCP/IP settings, follow these steps: 1. Click Start | Control Panel | Network And Sharing Center | Manage Network Connections. 2. Right-click the Local Area Connection and click Properties. 3. In the Local Area Connection properties dialog box, select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) in the list and click Properties. 4. On the Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) properties dialog box, shown in the following illustration, click the Use The Following IP Address radio button and manually enter the desired values for the IP address, subnet mask, and
  • 220 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista default gateway. If desired, you can also enter preferred and alternate DNS server IP addresses in the provided boxes. 5. If you click Advanced, you can configure some additional TCP/IP settings. On the IP Settings tab, you can add, edit, and remove IP addresses and default gateways for the computer, as shown in the following illustration. This feature enables you to use multiple IP addresses and default gateways on the same computer and may be especially helpful in the case of a laptop computer that you move from one network to the next.
  • Troubleshoot Connectivity Issues 221 6. On the DNS tab, you can enter the additional addresses of other DNS servers that can be used. You can also determine how DNS handles names that are unqualified. The default settings are typically all you need here.
  • 222 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista 7. On the WINS tab, you can add the names of WINS servers, if they are still in use on your network, and you can enable LMHOSTS lookups. 8. Click OK and OK again once you have configured these options. Helpful TCP/IP Troubleshooting Tools Troubleshooting TCP/IP connectivity and problems can be a moderately difficult task. The good news, however, is that there are several command-line tools that can help you. The following sections explore these troubleshooting tools, and you should spend some hands-on time with them as you prepare for the exam. Ping Ping is a network connectivity tool that allows you to test network connectivity against another computer or even your computer’s local network adapter card. Ping sends an ICMP echo request to the desired IP address or name and provides you with a response as to whether the ping was successful or the host was unreachable. At the Windows XP Professional command prompt, simply type ping ipaddress, such
  • Troubleshoot Connectivity Issues 223 as ping 10.0.0.1, or you can ping via a name such as ping computer7. You can also perform a loopback test against your computer’s network adapter card by typing ping 127.0.0.1. In the case of an IPv6 network, you would type ping 0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1. To see all of Ping’s options, type ping -? at the command prompt. Figure 6-14 shows you an example of a successful ping test. Keep in mind that Windows Vista blocks ICMP echo requests by default, so if you want to use the ping test against a Vista computer, you’ll need to enable ICMP echo requests in Windows Firewall. Ipconfig Ipconfig reports the IP configuration of your computer. At the command prompt, simply type ipconfig and press ENTER. You’ll see the IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway for the local area connection. If you type ipconfig /all, you can see a more detailed list of the computer’s IP configuration, shown in Figure 6-15. Ipconfig also gives you some additional command-line parameters, which you can review by typing ipconfig /?. Netstat and Nbtstat Netstat is a connectivity tool that displays all connections and protocol statistics for TCP/IP. You can use a number of switches with Netstat, which you can view by typing netstat ?. For example, you can view the protocol local address, the foreign address, and the current state of the connection. Similarly, Nbtstat is helpful in cases where you need to troubleshoot NetBIOS naming and connectivity problems. This tool checks the status of NetBIOS over TCP/IP connections and can give you information about the NetBIOS caches, the current sessions, and statistics. There are a number of switches, which you can view FIGURE 6-14 Successful ping test
  • 224 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista FIGURE 6-15 Ipconfig /all by simply typing nbtstat at the command line. The –RR switch (ReleaseRefresh) was first introduced in Windows NT 4.0 in order to send name release packets to WINS and then perform a refresh. Tracert Tracert is a simple utility that traces the route from one host to another. You can trace routes over the local network, or even to a Web site, such as www.osborne .com, as shown in Figure 6-16. You can also view a listing of Tracert switches by simply typing tracert at the command line.
  • Troubleshoot Connectivity Issues 225 FIGURE 6-16 Tracert Pathping First appearing in Windows 2000, Pathping combines the functionality of Ping and Tracert. You can ping an address or DNS name and see the actual route of the ping, including percentage information on the packets lost. This troubleshooting tool can be useful in a large network environment with connectivity problems. The Pathping utility can help you isolate where the connectivity problem is so that it can be repaired. Route The Route command can be used to view local routing tables and change them if there are errors present. This troubleshooting tool can be used to verify correct routing information and correct IP routing data in the host’s routing table. You can view all the switches available for Route by typing route at the command prompt. Nslookup Nslookup is used to look up IP address–to–DNS mappings in a DNS database. Of course, this tool is mainly used in domain environments where DNS is in use. You can gain the DNS server’s name and IP address by simply typing nslookup at the command prompt. To see a listing of available switches, type nslookup so that the DNS server is found; then simply type ? to see the options available to you. Troubleshooting Virtual Private Network Access Virtual private network connections have been around for some time now, and with good reason. VPN connections enable you to use an existing public network, such
  • 226 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista SCENARIO & SOLUTION There are two subnets on my network. What must be done to enable communication between the two? There has to be physical connectivity between the two IP subnets, and then you’ll need to configure the clients with a default gateway. This can be done manually in small environments but is typically handled by DHCP in larger environments. In a workgroup setting, how does APIPA function? After all, since the computers are auto-assigning themselves an IP address, couldn’t two have the same IP? No. When APIPA is used, the computer that is about to auto-assign itself an IP address broadcasts the autogenerated IP address on the network to determine if that IP address is already in use. Can you ping a host name? Yes, you can ping a host name, such as www.osborne .com, a computer name, or an IP address. as the Internet, freely and in a way that is private. When a VPN connection is used, the actual network data that you are transferring is encapsulated in a Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol packet (PPTP) or a Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) packet. The packet has a typical header destination for a typical PPP packet traveling the Internet. The PPTP or L2TP packet can traverse the Internet as a PPP packet. When the packet reaches the destination network, the PPTP or L2TP encapsulation is stripped away, and the true data is revealed. The end result? You can connect to segments of your network using the Internet without paying WAN link charges. This feature works great for a company that has a satellite office where a few people need to send data over the VPN connection each day. Of course, the VPN connection is not designed for high levels of traffic, but in many situations it is an easy and costefficient solution. I mentioned that PPTP and L2TP are used in VPN connections. Let’s consider these two protocols in a bit more detail. First, PPTP allows tunneled traffic through an IP network, such as the Internet. The second type, L2TP, provides more functionality. For example, PPTP can be used only on IP networks, whereas L2TP can be used on any type of PPP packet network, such as ATM or X.25. Also, L2TP supports header compression and tunnel authentication, as well as the use of IP security (IPsec). PPTP does support encryption, whereas L2TP supports encryption only when IPsec is used. The end result is that L2TP gives you more options and functionality than PPTP, but both are highly effective VPN protocols.
  • Troubleshoot Connectivity Issues 227 You can configure Windows Vista to make VPN connections or to allow incoming VPN connections. Exercise 6-3 walks you through the process of configuring Windows Vista to make VPN calls. EXERCISE 6-3 CertCam Configuring VPN Connectivity To set up a VPN connection, follow these steps: 1. Click Start | Control Panel | Network And Sharing Center. Click the Set Up A Connection Or Network link in the left pane. 2. In the Network Connection Type dialog box, click Connect To A Workplace and click Next. 3. You can choose to create a new connection, or you can use an existing connection. Make your selection and click Next. For this exercise, I’ll assume you’re just going to use an existing connection.
  • 228 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista 4. Enter the Internet address, such as the domain name or IP address, and the destination name, and also choose any desired connection options, such as connecting with a smart card. Then click Next. 5. Enter the username and password required to connect to the VPN server at work. 6. Click Connect to make the connection. Once the connection has been made, you can open Network Connections and manage the VPN connection just as you would any other connection. The VPN connection’s properties pages are basically the same as for a typical dial-up connection. You have the same security-setting options, calling options, and so on. The General tab lists the host name or IP address of the destination and the dial-up connection that should be used to generate the VPN connections. It is important to keep in mind that VPN connectivity can be managed with authentication protocols, just like a typical dial-up connection. This feature enables you to use VPN solutions without compromising network security standards.
  • Conf igure Remote Access 229 CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 6.03 Conf igure Remote Access Remote access is nothing new in Windows Vista, but it has become more and more important as users and networking have become more mobile. Windows Vista continues to provide Remote Assistance and Remote Desktop support. The first, Remote Assistance, allows you to access another person’s Windows Vista computer remotely, such as over the Internet or a WAN, so that you can help the user troubleshoot and solve problems. The second, Remote Desktop, enables you to open a terminal session with a Windows Vista system so that you can use the computer remotely. Both of these remote access features are important, and you can expect to see a couple of exam questions concerning them. The following sections show you how to set up and configure Remote Assistance and Remote Desktop. Configuring Remote Assistance Let’s say you have a cousin in New York, but you live in San Diego. How can you help your cousin solve his computer problems? Sure, you can use the phone, but if you could actually see his desktop, you could fix the problem yourself. Let’s say you are technician in a Help center for a large international company. A user in Toronto calls you for help, but you are in Houston. What if you could access her computer and fix the problem yourself without those painstaking verbal steps over the telephone? The solution to both of these scenarios is the goal of Remote Assistance. With Remote Assistance, a user can access another user’s computer over a WAN, such as the Internet, and actually configure the other user’s computer. Remote Assistance works only with Windows Vista, Windows XP, or Windows 2003 Server computers, with some flakey behavior between Vista and XP or Server computers. In other words, you can’t use Remote Assistance from your XP computer and assist someone using a Windows Me, 2000, or 98 machine, or even some nonWindows computer. Also, each computer must use Windows Messenger or an MAPIcompliant e-mail account like Outlook or Outlook Express, or you can send the RA invitation via a file. The two computers must be configured for Remote Assistance, and both must have connectivity at the same time in order for Remote Assistance to work. Enabling Remote Assistance To enable Remote Assistance, open System in Control Panel and click the Advanced System Settings link. Click the Remote tab, shown in Figure 6-17.
  • 230 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista FIGURE 6-17 Remote tab Click the Remote Assistance check box to enable the feature on your Windows Vista computer. When you do, Windows Firewall is configured to allow Remote Assistance traffic and the Teredo services, which allow your expert to connect to your computer using most routers that perform Network Address Translation (NAT). This service contacts a Microsoft Teredo server in order to get an IPv6 address. This is a new feature in Windows Vista, so watch out for it on the exam. Next, click Advanced. You will see a Remote Assistance Settings dialog box. Ensure that the “Allow this computer to be controlled remotely” check box is selected if you want your computer to be controlled remotely. Next, you see a maximum amount of time that invitations can remain open. Remote Assistance works with If you want to connect invitations. You send an invitation to another to a computer from behind a firewall, expert, who can then access your computer via a network administrator must allow the invitation. This setting places a time limit communication over TCP port 3398. on the invitation, which is 6 hours by default. Sending an Invitation Once the computer is ready for remote assistance, the next step is to simply send an invitation to a desired user or accept an invitation from a user. Exercise 6-4 walks you through this process.
  • Configure Remote Access 231 EXERCISE 6-4 Using Remote Assistance To use Remote Assistance, follow these steps: 1. To send a Remote Assistance invitation, click Start | Windows Help And Support. Click Windows Remote Assistance link under Ask Someone. 2. Click the “Invite someone you trust to help you” link. 3. You can send an invitation using an e-mail message or by saving the invitation to a file for use with Web-based e-mail or via a network share. Select the desired option. 4. Follow the instructions that appear. You can enter additional message text as desired, set the message expiration date, and establish a password that the user will enter in order to access your computer. You must give the password to the user so that he or she can open it. Click Finish.
  • 232 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista Although you can access the novice's computer and make configuration changes via the remote connection, the novice always retains control of the connection and can forcefully terminate it at any time by pressing the ESC key on the keyboard. Configuring Remote Desktop Remote Desktop, which is built on Windows terminal services, enables you to connect to and use another computer from a remote location. As you might imagine, this capability has a number of benefits. For example, let’s say that you have a desktop system at your office, but you travel to branch offices a lot with a laptop. You can use Remote Desktop to connect to your desktop computer as needed. Let’s say you have a desktop system at home and one at work. You could use Remote Desktop to access your home computer. You could even work on collaborative applications with another user on the same desktop. All of this assumes you have administrative or Remote Desktop group permissions on the computers. Remote Desktop allows multiple sessions on the same PC, so you could even have a number of users connected to one computer, collaborating on a project. As you can see, the potential uses of Remote Desktop are many. In order to use Remote Desktop, you need two Windows Vista or XP computers. Note that Remote Desktop is not available on Windows Vista Starter or either of the Home editions. Yet, you can also connect to a Windows 9x, 2000, NT, or Me computer by installing the Remote Desktop client on those down-level systems, which is available on the Windows Vista installation CD-ROM. You can connect computers that are on the same network, and you can use the Internet or VPN connection as well. To set up Remote Desktop, you access System | Remote tab and click the “Allow users to connect remotely to this computer” check box under Remote Desktop connections (refer back to Figure 6-17). Notice that you have the option to allow any Remote Desktop connection, or only those using Network Level Authentication, which is a more secure option. If you’re not sure if the other computer is running Windows Vista, do not use the second option.
  • Configure Remote Access 233 Click the Select Remote Users button. In the Remote Desktop Users window, click Add and select the user(s) to whom you want to give access to your computer remotely. Any members of the local Administrators group can automatically connect without assigning permission here. Simply add the users you want to give access to, and if no account currently exists for the user, create one using User Accounts in Control Panel or in Computer Management. An important item to note concerns passwords. In Windows Vista, you can allow users to log on locally without a password. However, Remote Desktop requires the user to have a password, so make sure you configure a password for each user so that access via Remote Desktop will be available. Establishing a Connection Once your computer has been configured to support Remote Desktop, you can establish a Remote Desktop Connection. Exercise 6-5 shows you how to establish the connection. EXERCISE 6-5 Creating a Remote Desktop Connection To create a Remote Desktop connection, follow these steps: 1. Click Start | All Programs | Accessories | Remote Desktop Connection. 2. In the Remote Desktop Connection window that appears, shown in the following illustration, enter the computer name, user name, password, and domain (if necessary). At this time, you can simply click Connect if you like, or you can configure additional options as described in the following steps.
  • 234 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista 3. If you click the Display tab, shown in the following illustration, you can choose the style and color depth of your remote desktop. Remember that higher-resolution settings may cause the connection to run more slowly. 4. On the Local Resources tab, you can choose to use the remote computer’s sound and keyboard combinations, and you can connect your local devices to the remote computer. These local devices include your printers, clipboard cache, smart card devices, serial ports, disk drives, and supported Plug and Play devices. Connecting local devices to the remote computer can greatly simplify the administration of remote computers; however, this can also expose your local computer to virus infection and other forms of attack. 5. On the Programs tab, you can choose to start a program when the connection is made. This feature is helpful if you connect via Remote Desktop primarily to run a certain application. 6. On the Experience tab, shown in the following illustration, you can choose the connection speed from the drop-down menu to see what features are used. You can select them individually via the check boxes. Keep in mind that
  • Configure Remote Access 235 these features are bandwidth intensive, so if you are on a slow connection, you might consider removing some of these. 7. Once you are done, simply click Connect. Once you have finished with a remote desktop session, you can click the Save As tab on the General tab to save your work. The configuration settings are saved as an .rdp file, and you can simply open this file next time you want to connect. Keep in mind that both computers in the RDP session using Windows Firewall, as well as any firewalls between the RDP computers, must be configured to allow Remote Desktop traffic (TCP port 3389). Configuring the Remote Desktop Web Connection Remote Desktop Web Connection is a Web application made up of an ActiveX control and sample ASP pages. It is designed to be deployed on a Web server. Once it’s deployed, users on the network can create a remote desktop connection to another computer within Internet Explorer. With this feature, users of other operating systems can generate remote desktop connections without the
  • 236 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista Remote Desktop software being installed. Also, operating systems not supported by the Remote Desktop software can use the Web connection feature, providing crossplatform capabilities. In order to set up and use the Remote Desktop Web Connection, you must be working on a network with a Web server available, such as IIS. Once the Remote Desktop Web connection is set up on the Web server, clients can connect to the Web server and the Remote Desktop Web Connection directory on the Web server using the http://servername/directoryname convention. When this connection is used, an HTML page appears. In the Server dialog box, enter the name of the computer you want to connect to and click Connect. The Remote Desktop session will then begin within Internet Explorer. SCENARIO & SOLUTION Using Remote Assistance, what can I do with the other user’s computer? Remote Assistance is designed for individuals to provide assistance to another person’s computer. With the user’s permission, you can use your mouse and keyboard to make changes to the user’s computer, thus making it possible to solve problems. I want to use Remote Desktop to access my home computer via a DSL connection. Can I do this? Yes. Your home computer must be configured to allow Remote Desktop communication through Windows Firewall. If you are using another personal firewall, you’ll need to see if you can enable the necessary ports to allow communication.
  • Configure Remote Access 237 CERTIFICATION SUMMARY In an effort to streamline network configuration, Windows Vista includes a Network and Sharing Center. Using the Network and Sharing Center, you can configure and troubleshoot network connection settings. You can use the Network Map to look at a graphical representation of your network, and you can also examine the network connections, access status and properties of those connections, create a new network connection, and diagnose problems. For the exam, keep in mind that network connections can be public or private. Public connections do not use network discovery, so your computer will not be visible to other users on a public network. For most home and office networks, you should use the private setting in order to take full advantage of network discovery and resource sharing. Windows Vista is designed for networking in Microsoft Windows domains, as well as in peer-to-peer networks. TCP/IP is installed automatically on Windows Vista computers and is the protocol of choice for today’s Microsoft networks. Windows Vista supports APIPA and is able to assign itself an IP address in a workgroup setting. Windows Vista can also receive the IP address assignment from DHCP, or you can configure the IP settings manually. Windows Vista also supports VPN connections, where Windows Vista can connect to a VPN server using PPTP or L2TP. You can set the same levels of security on VPN connections as you can for dial-up connections. Remote Assistance and Remote Desktop are features of Windows Vista that enable you to connect to another computer. Using Remote Assistance, a user can answer a help invitation and connect to another computer over the Internet in order to assist in troubleshooting problems with the remote computer. Using Remote Desktop, you can connect to a remote Windows Vista computer or to a down-level client that has Remote Desktop software installed. Once the connection is made, you can use the remote computer as though you were locally accessing it.
  • 238 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista ✓ TWO-MINUTE DRILL Configure Networking by Using the Network and Sharing Center ❑ Use the Network and Sharing Center to configure network connections and sharing abilities for those connections. ❑ Networks can be either public or private. Public network configuration does not allow discovery, so your computer stays hidden on the public network. For home and office networks, the private setting should be used. ❑ Use the network map and the Diagnose and Repair tool to understand connections on your network and resolve problems. ❑ From the Network and Sharing Center, you can examine the status of each network connection, access its properties, create new connections, and remove or merge connections as needed. Troubleshoot Connectivity Issues ❑ Windows XP Professional is designed for TCP/IP networking. TCP/IP settings can be configured automatically via APIPA or via a DHCP server. You can also configure them manually. ❑ Connectivity in TCP/IP networks depends on a properly configured IP address, subnet mask, and an optional default gateway (if there is more than one subnet). ❑ You can troubleshoot IP connectivity and functionality via a number of command-line tools. Common command-line tools include Ping, Ipconfig, Netstat, Nbtstat, Tracert, Pathping, Route, and Nslookup. ❑ Windows XP Professional supports PPTP and L2TP for secure VPN connections. Windows XP Professional can receive VPN connections as well. Configure Remote Access ❑ Remote Assistance provides a way for a Windows Vista computer to connect to another Vista computer over the Internet, allowing a user to assist in troubleshooting a remote user’s computer. With the user’s permission, you can manage and configure the system remotely.
  • Two-Minute Drill 239 ❑ Remote Assistance uses invitations. A user who would like assistance sends an invitation via e-mail or a file. ❑ Remote Desktop enables you to connect to another computer remotely over the Internet or a local LAN. In order to connect, you must have an administrator account on the local computer or you must be a member of the Remote Desktop Users group. ❑ Windows Firewall must be configured to allow Remote Desktop communication. ❑ Remote Desktop also provides a Web connection via IIS so that remote connectivity can be accomplished using a Web browser over port 443, a commonly available port. This feature resolves compatibility issues and is an excellent choice for cross-platform environments.
  • 240 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista SELF TEST The following questions will help you measure your understanding of the material presented in this chapter. Read all the choices carefully because there might be more than one correct answer. Choose all correct answers for each question. Configure Networking by Using the Network and Sharing Center 1. Consider the following illustration. For this network connection, you notice that no other computers on the network are able to connect to your computer. You need to be able to share a printer from your computer and you need that printer to be discoverable by other network computers. What do you need to do?
  • Self Test A. B. C. D. 241 Click the Customize link and click the Private option. Turn off Media Sharing in order to share the printer. Turn off Public Folder Sharing in order to share the printer. You must manually share the printer first, then turn on printer sharing in this window. 2. Consider the following illustration: You need to make sure that users on your network can connect to your shared resources and printer. What do you need to do? A. Change the network to a public network. B. Configure user accounts that can access your shared resources. C. Turn on network discovery. D. Configure and share the desired resources.
  • 242 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista 3. You have a laptop connected to your network that has a shared printer attached to it. People regularly use the shared printer. Yet, people are complaining that when you are away from your computer, they cannot print to it. You return to your laptop and discover that it seems to be turned off. What is the problem? A. Windows Firewall is blocking access. B. Network discovery is not turned on. C. The users do not have local accounts. D. The computer is configured to sleep. 4. On your Windows Vista computer, you want to share music and videos that reside on your hardware with people on your network. However, you want music and videos that rank at least 3 stars to be shared. How can you configure this? A. Configure media sharing to prompt for a rating before sharing. B. Configure media sharing to only share media ranked with 3 stars. C. Share on those particular items. D. Turn off network discovery. 5. You want to disable a particular network connection on your Windows Vista computer. How can you do it? A. Use Device Manager and remove the drivers for the device. B. Open Network Connections from the Network and Sharing Center. C. Turn off network discovery from the Network and Sharing Center. D. Active network devices cannot be disabled. Troubleshoot Connectivity Issues 6. APIPA assigns IP addresses in the 169.254.0.0–169.254.255.255 range. What default gateway address is assigned when APIPA is used? A. 169.254.1.1 B. 131.107.2.200 C. 10.0.0.1 D. The default gateway is not assigned. 7. You want to manually configure the IP addresses and subnet masks for a certain PC. Where can you configure this? A. Local Area Connection Settings. B. You must set up third-party firewall software. C. By running the noipprot / b command. D. By accessing the advanced IP properties, Options tab.
  • Self Test 243 8. A user reports a problem with her Windows Vista computer. The computer is unable to contact any network resource. You attempt to contact resources and cannot do so. What command should you run first? A. Ping 127.0.0.1 B. Ipconfig /x C. Ping 131.107.2.200 D. Tracert 9. A particular WINS server seems to have the wrong “NetBIOS name to IP” mapping for your computer in its database. You need to issue a command so that the computer can release name mappings and perform a refresh. What do you need to do? A. Netstat -t B. Nslookup C. Nbtstat -RR D. Ipconfig /all 10. You work in a WAN environment. You verify that the clients and the server both have network connectivity. Clients report some problem accessing a remote server. You want to test the connection over a time period of several minutes and then have statistics generated on success and failure of packets. What tool will help you do this? A. Nbtstat B. Tracert C. Ipconfig D. Pathping 11. You need to view some DNS mappings on a DNS Server. What command-line tool will allow you to do this? A. Nbtstat B. Route C. Nslookup D. Pathping 12. What are the two VPN protocols that are supported in Windows Vista? (Choose two.) A. PPP B. PPTP C. L2TP D. APIPA
  • 244 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista Configure Remote Access 13. You need to instruct a user on a remote network to enable Remote Assistance on a Windows Vista computer. Where can you enable Remote Assistance? A. Internet Options, Advanced tab B. System Properties, Remote tab C. Connection Properties, Remote tab D. Network Properties, Advanced tab 14. You want to send a remote assistance invitation using Outlook. However, you want the invitation to expire in 3 days. What do you need to do? A. Nothing. Invitations automatically expire after 3 days. B. On the Remote tab of System Properties, click the Advanced button under Remote Assistance and change the expiration time to 3 days. C. On the Remote tab of Internet Options, click the Advanced button under Remote Assistance and change the expiration time to 3 days. D. Edit the e-mail invitation from 30 days to 3 days. 15. You want to use Remote Desktop to connect to a Windows Me computer using your Windows Vista computer. Which statement is true concerning this connection? A. Windows Me natively supports Remote Desktop. B. You must download a security patch from Microsoft.com. C. You must install IIS on the Windows Me computer. D. You must install the Remote Desktop client software on the Windows Me computer. 16. Your LAN uses a third-party firewall. You need to use Remote Desktop to connect to a computer on the Internet via the firewall. By default, the network firewall does not allow this kind of traffic. What TCP port will the firewall administrator need to open so that Remote Desktop traffic can pass? A. 80 B. 21 C. 3398 D. 54 17. You are using Remote Desktop to connect to a computer on the Internet using a 56K modem. You notice that performance is very slow. You access the connection’s properties. What can you change that will help increase performance? A. Run the remote -fb command. B. Change the display to true color.
  • Lab Question 245 C. Change the options on the Environment tab to Modem. D. You cannot increase performance over this kind of connection. 18. You want to use Remote Desktop to connect your office computer to your home computer. Both computers run Windows Vista Ultimate. The home computer uses a modem that is configured to receive calls. Windows Firewall is used on your home network. You call the computer, but the Remote Desktop does not work. What do you need to do? A. Windows Firewall does not work with Remote Desktop. Disable it. B. Turn on Internet Connection Sharing. C. Configure the Services tab of ICS to allow Remote Desktop. D. Configure the Exceptions tab of Windows Firewall to allow Remote Desktop. LAB QUESTION On a particular Windows Vista Ultimate computer, you need to configure the local area connection so that the following parameters are met: ❑ The computer must be discoverable. ❑ The computer must be able to share files. ❑ The Public folder must not be shared. ❑ A printer must be shared. ❑ Users who access the resources must log on with a username and password. ❑ You want to share music that is rated 3 stars or higher but you do not want to share unrated music. What do you need to do to set up this computer so that the local area connection meets these parameters?
  • 246 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista SELF TEST ANSWERS Configure Networking by Using the Network and Sharing Center ✓ 1. ® A. The network type is configured as Public. This will prevent your computer and shared resources from being discoverable. In this case, you need to click the Change link and change the network type from Public to Private. ® B and C are incorrect because you do not have to turn certain sharing off before sharing a ˚ printer. D is incorrect because you do not have to share a printer before enabling printer sharing. ✓ 2. ® C. In this illustration, network discovery is not turned on. Although the network settings are configured for a private network and resources are shared, you still need to enable network discovery. ® A, B, and D are all incorrect. None of these actions will enable network discovery. ˚ ✓ 3. ® D. Since the users have access at times when you are working on your computer and the computer seems turned off when you return, then the computer is configured for sleep. Sleep will disrupt network access and prevent network users from accessing shared resources. ® A, B, and C are incorrect because none of these issues would cause access failure ˚ intermittently. ✓ 4. ® B. When you turn on media sharing in Network and Sharing Center, you can configure media to be shared based on their star rating. ® A, C, and D are incorrect because none of these options will provide the desired result. ˚ ✓ 5. ® B. Simply open the Network and Sharing Center, click Manage Network Connections, and then right-click the connection and click Disable. ® A, C, and D are all incorrect because these actions are not the best way to disable a device. ˚ Troubleshoot Connectivity Issues ✓ 6. ® D. APIPA is designed for small workgroups using a single IP subnet. No default gateway is auto-assigned with APIPA. ® A, B, and C are incorrect. No default gateway is assigned. ˚ ✓ 7. ® A. Access the local area connection properties. You can select Internet Protocol, click Properties, and then adjust the addressing. ® B, C, and D are incorrect. You cannot adjust a connection’s properties in any of these ways. ˚ ✓ 8. ® A. If there is no connectivity, first check the computer’s network adapter card by running the loopback test, which is ping 127.0.0.1. ® B, C, and D are incorrect. There is no ipconfig /x command, so B is incorrect. Pinging a ˚ network IP address is not the first action, so C is also incorrect. Finally, Tracert will not help solve this problem, so D is incorrect.
  • Self Test Answers 247 ✓ 9. ® C. Nbtstat, which is NetBIOS over TCP/IP, is the tool you would use here, and the –RR (ReleaseRefresh) switch will do the job. ® A, B, and D are incorrect. These tools will not troubleshoot NetBIOS over TCP/IP. ˚ ✓ 10. ® D. Pathping combines the output of Tracert and Ping, so you can determine where network packets are being lost. ® A, B, and C are incorrect. These tools will not help you solve this particular problem. ˚ ✓ 11. ® C. Use Nslookup to view DNS mappings. ® A, B, and D are incorrect. These tools will not enable you to view DNS mappings. ˚ ✓ 12. ® B and C. PPTP and L2TP are the supported VPN protocols. ® A and D are incorrect. PPP is not used over VPN connections, and APIPA is not a ˚ transport protocol. Configure Remote Access ✓ 13. ® B. You can enable Remote Assistance by clicking the check box on the Remote tab of System Properties. ® A, C, and D are incorrect. You cannot enable Remote Assistance in these locations. ˚ ✓ 14. ® B. On the Remote tab of System Properties, click the Advanced button under Remote Assistance. You can change this value using the drop-down menus. ® A, C, and D are incorrect. You can change the invitation time only on the Remote ˚ Assistance Settings dialog box, which is available on the Remote tab of System Properties by clicking the Advanced button under Remote Assistance. ✓ 15. ® D. Windows Me can be used with Remote Assistance, as can with Windows 9x, NT, and 2000, by installing the Remote Desktop client software. ® A, B, and C are incorrect. These answers are incorrect because the Remote Desktop ˚ software must be installed. ✓ 16. ® C. Remote Desktop uses TCP port 3398. ® A, B, and D are incorrect. These are not the correct port numbers. ˚ ✓ 17. ® C. The Environment tab gives you a number of options that help you improve performance. In this case, use the drop-down menu and select 56K so that Windows XP’s intensive graphics will not be used. ® A, B, and D are incorrect. None of these actions will help increase performance. ˚ ✓ 18. ® D. Windows Firewall does not allow Remote Desktop communication by default. However, you can enable it on the Exceptions tab of Windows Firewall Settings. ® A, B, and C are incorrect. Windows Firewall must have Remote Desktop enabled. ˚
  • 248 Chapter 6: Network with Windows Vista LAB ANSWER To achieve the desired configuration, open the Network and Sharing Center in Control Panel and configure the local area connection as follows: ■ Ensure that the network is configured as a Private network (not Public). ■ Ensure that network discovery is turned on. ■ Turn on file sharing. ■ Ensure that Public Folder Sharing is turned off. ■ Turn on Printer Sharing. ■ Turn on Password Protected Sharing. ■ Turn on Media Sharing and click Change, then click Settings. Under Media types, uncheck pictures and video. Under Star Ratings, change Only to 3 stars and clear the Include Unrated Files check box, as shown in the following illustration.
  • Lab Answer 249 Once you’re done, the local area connection in the Network and Sharing Center should be configured as it is in the following illustration.
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  • 7 Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVES 4.01 ✓ Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications Two-Minute Drill Q&A Self Test
  • 252 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications L et’s face it: Studying for and taking Microsoft exams is no fun.You didn’t buy this book so that you would have a good time, but you bought this book to help you accomplish a goal. However, I’ll say that this chapter is likely to be more fun than grueling because most of us enjoy playing with media on our PCs. That’s good news. Windows Vista is a true media operating system. It is easier and more fun to manage and use media than ever before. With that said, you’ll notice that this chapter contains only one exam objective. You’ll also notice that this chapter is long. This is due to the simple fact that the objective “configure and troubleshoot media applications” is so broad that Microsoft can ask you essentially any question about the media applications that are built into Windows Vista. With this thought in mind, you need to have a solid command of the media applications available, and as you work through this chapter, you certainly need to get some hands-on experience with these applications. Hands-on experience will make your retention level go up, and you are much more likely to answer mediarelated questions correctly if you have some hands-on experience. The good news in all of this is that the media application questions are typically not too difficult. You just need some practical experience using and configuring them. This chapter will provide that practical experience, so warm up Windows Vista and get ready to explore Vista’s media applications. CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 7.01 Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications From music to movies to television, Windows Vista provides several applications that can help you use, manage, and even create media. That’s good news because media seem to drive our lives and even much of the content on the Internet. In the following sections, you’ll explore the media applications that ship with Windows Vista. I’ll provide a higher-level overview of the applications and their use and drill down on only the test details you really need to remember. Windows Media Player Windows Media Player (now in version 11) has been around since the stone age of Windows. Of course, it has changed a lot over the years and has become a rather
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 253 complicated piece of software. I think this current version is probably the best. It is more powerful, easier to use, and more intuitive than what we’ve seen in the past. Out of all of the media applications in Vista, you are more likely to run in Media Player questions on the exam than the others, so be sure to know this application well. You can start Windows Media Player by choosing Start | All Programs | Windows Media Player. Depending on your system configuration, you may also see a shortcut to Media Player on your desktop or on your taskbar. Once you open Media Player, you’ll see a default interface. The default interface provides you with a primary media area, along with a list of buttons on the top bar of Media Player (called features). If you click a button, you can see the contents displayed in the window. Figure 7-1, for example, shows my Library. You use Media Player by accessing the features on the top of the Media Player interface. Each feature does something different, of course; the following sections explore the primary features and other aspects of working with Media Player. FIGURE 7-1 Windows Media Player
  • 254 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications Now Playing Now Playing is your media play area and the primary area you will use—it lists or shows whatever type of media you are currently playing. When you insert most types of media into your PC, Windows Media Player will automatically launch. For example, let’s say you want to listen to your favorite CD. All you need to do is put the CD into the CD-ROM drive; then Windows Vista scans the CD, recognizes it as a music CD, and launches Windows Media Player. Media Player begins playing the CD, and information about the CD appears in the Now Playing area, as shown in Figure 7-2. You can change and configure the Now Playing interface. Because the primary purpose of Now Playing is to provide a quick and easy interface to view and play multimedia, specific configuration options for the media cannot be changed here; instead, you can adjust what is displayed in the Now Playing area and how the display looks. FIGURE 7-2 Now Playing
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 255 If you click the Now Playing drop-down menu, you see a few important options: ■ Show Enhancements This option turns on an enhancements interface that begins with a graphic equalizer, as shown next. However, if you click the Next button in the upper-left corner, you can also access a media link for e-mail, play speed settings, quiet mode, SRS WOW effects, video settings, color chooser, and crossfading and auto–volume leveling. All of these settings help you customize your media experience. ■ Show List Pane The list pane, which appears on the right side of the Now Playing area, gives you additional information about the media you are viewing, such as the album name and songs, or information about the DVD. You can toggle this feature on or off here. ■ Visualizations A visualization is a graphical display that moves with the music you are playing. You can use the pop-out box here to choose a different visualization or access options for them. ■ Plug-ins A plug-in is additional software that works with Media Player. If you have plug-ins for Media Player, you can manage them here. ■ Options This feature opens a tabbed properties interface that has a lot of settings. We’ll explore it later in this chapter. ■ Help You can access the Media Player help file here. Use the standard control buttons in the lower area of Media Player to play the media, stop playing the media, skip tracks forward and back, adjust the volume, and use related stereo or video controls. At the bottom right of the interface, you also see button options to switch to compact mode and full-screen mode. You can change the Media Player skin by first turning on classic menus. Right-click an area of the toolbar (such as the empty space next to Now Playing) and click Show Classic Menus (if they are not already turned on). Click View | Skin Chooser.
  • 256 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications Library All of your saved music and video files are stored in the Library under different categories so that you can easily access them, as shown in Figure 7-3. On the left side of the interface, you see various categories with plus- and minus-sign boxes next to them. Click a category, and you can see the songs or videos in your library for that category. For example, when I expand Album, I can select an album and see a list of songs I have copied to my computer from that album in the right pane. Just doubleclick a song or video clip to hear or see it. Keep in mind that the Library’s purpose is to help you keep track of files that you want. The Library is able to detect the type of multimedia you are using and add it to the appropriate category. You can search your Library by clicking the Search button at the top of the interface, and you can perform standard add, remove, and delete functions. You can also use the Library to create a playlist of your favorite tunes or videos. To add a new item to the Library, you’ll switch from the Library to the Rip tab, where you can copy a CD or certain songs to the library. We’ll explore the Rip option in an upcoming section. You can create playlists of songs in your library by mixing and matching them. This task is easy, as you can see in Exercise 7-1. FIGURE 7-3 Library
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 257 EXERCISE 7-1 CertCam Creating a Playlist To create a playlist, follow these steps: 1. In Library, click the Playlists option to expand it and click Create Playlist. 2. Type a name for the playlist. Then, browse the library for the desired songs you want on the playlist. When you find a song you want to add, right-click it and use the Add To option to add it to your playlist, or you can simply drag the song to the playlist and drop it. 3. As you add items to the playlist, they appear in the list pane on the right side of the interface. You can right-click a song in the list to move it up or down in the list, or you can remove a song you’ve added this way. When you’re done, just click Save Playlist. Rip The Rip feature, shown in Figure 7-4, gives you information about the music CD you are currently listening to so that you can rip, or copy, the songs to your Library. If you are connected to the Internet, you’ll see the names of the songs, artist name, and album name. If not, the tracks are simply listed as Track 1, Track 2, and so on. Choose the songs you want to rip by checking the boxes next to the songs (or unchecking them if you don’t want certain songs ripped). Next, simply click the Start Rip button found on the lower-right portion of the screen. The ripping process will take a few minutes, depending on how many songs you are ripping from a CD. Keep in mind that your ripped songs are added to your library. Burn The Burn interface allows you to choose songs or playlists that you want to burn to a CD. First, though, your computer must have a CD-RW drive in order to burn CDs. Click the Burn button on the toolbar and drag items to the right pane that you want to burn, such as individual songs or whole albums. Once you are done, place a CD-R disk in your CD-RW drive and click Start Burn, as you can see in Figure 7-5. If you want to burn a data CD instead of an audio CD, used for backing up songs, click the Burn drop-down menu and choose Data CD or DVD.
  • 258 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications FIGURE 7-4 Rip FIGURE 7-5 Burn
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 259 INSIDE THE EXAM Configuring CD Audio Options You can control how songs are recorded and managed in Media Player by choosing Rip | More Options. You see a Rip Music tab, shown in the following illustration. Under most circumstances, the default options configured on this tab are all you need, but at times you may want to change the default behavior. The following options are found on this tab: ■ Rip Music To This Location By default, the location is My Documents My Music. If you want to change this default location, click Change and select a different folder on your computer’s hard drive. ■ an Audio Quality setting by adjusting the slider bar. The higher the quality of the copy, the more hard drive space is consumed. Even at a lower quality, several megabytes of storage space will be needed for only a few songs. Rip Settings You can choose to copy music in either the Windows Media format or MP3. The Copy Protect Music check box simply means that Windows Media Player is keeping a license for you to copy the music and play it on your computer. It is illegal for you to e-mail copies of music to other people, however, or redistribute it by any other means. The other options are obvious. You can choose Sync The Sync interface looks almost exactly like the Burn interface, except you use this interface to synchronize songs with a portable device instead of burning them to a CD. Simply drag the songs or albums you want to sync with your device to the right pane, make sure your device is connected and turned on, and then click Start Sync.
  • 260 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications Media Player Configuration Options In addition to all the fun and frills of Media Player, you can do a few things that are more substantial. Click any toolbar button menu and choose More Options. If you have Classic Menus turned on, you can also choose Tools | Options, and you’ll see several different tabs with a number of options on each tab. The following list tells you what is available on each tab: ■ Player This tab contains a number of basic check boxes. By default, your Media Player checks the Media Player Web site weekly for updates to Media Player. ■ Rip Music This tab enables you to make setting adjustments concerning the copying of CD music. ■ Devices This tab, shown next, lists all devices found on your computer that can be used for media playback, such as your CD-ROM or DVD drive. If you select a drive and click Properties, a window appears, where you can choose whether to use analog or digital playback and copy. Typically, this tab
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 261 is set to digital; but if you’re having problems, you can try the analog setting. The Error Correction feature, available only with digital playback, allows Windows to attempt to resolve problems found in the digital media. This setting can be used, but you may notice a negative effect on the performance of your system—so I recommend you skip it unless you’re having problems with digital media. ■ Performance These settings affect how Media Player uses your Internet connection. You do not need to configure anything here, but I will note that, by default, Windows Media Player can detect your connection speed to the Internet. This allows Media Player to determine how best to handle media downloads. Make sure you leave this setting as is, because Media Player will perform better if it can detect your Internet connection speeds. ■ Library By default, Library gives other applications that tap into it readonly access, and no access is granted to anyone on the Internet. You should leave these settings alone.
  • 262 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications ■ Plug-Ins This tab allows you to manage plug-ins by adding or removing them and accessing any available properties sheets. ■ Privacy The Privacy settings are designed to keep you anonymous while you are connected to the Internet. You can peruse this list and make any changes concerning what Media Player can and cannot do, but in most cases, the default settings are all you need. ■ Security The Security settings you have with Media Player simply determine whether or not Media Player can run scripts from the Internet and what Internet Explorer zone Media Player should use. Generally, you do not need to change these settings. ■ DVD This tab enables you to set playback restrictions and language settings for DVDs. ■ Network This tab contains protocol usage settings and proxy server enabler settings. You typically don’t need to change anything on this tab. INSIDE THE EXAM Digital Rights Management Digital Rights Management (DRM) refers to a part of a protected file, such as a song or video that you purchase and download from the Internet. The purpose of DRM is to ensure that a computer is licensed to play a particular song or video, a tactic that helps prevent digital media piracy. Often times, the content provider will allow you the right to play a particular digital file a certain number of times, play it on a certain number of computers, sync it a certain number of times, or burn it to a DVD a certain number of times. All in the name of “rights,” naturally. The DRM attached to a file varies according to the service from which you bought or subscribed to it. For the exam, just keep in mind that your PC must have the rights to use digital content. When you open the digital content in Windows Media Player, the player will attempt to acquire those rights via the Internet by default. You can stop this behavior by accessing the Options dialog box, Privacy tab, and clearing the “Download Usage rights automatically when I play or sync a file” check box.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 263 SCENARIO & SOLUTION How do I get to a typical File, Edit, and View menu as in previous versions of Media Player? These menus are still available, but they are hidden by default. Just right-click an area of the taskbar and click Show Classic Menus. You can turn the menus back off in the same way. Can I rip songs from a CD and have them automatically convert to MP3 in Media Player? Yes. Access Rip settings (Rip | More Options) and choose the desired file format. Windows Movie Maker and Windows DVD Maker Windows Movie Maker is another older application that gets a facelift in Windows Vista. It is easier and more intuitive than it has been in the past. Windows DVD Maker is a new application. It provides a basic interface to burn your movies or photos. While not overly exciting, it works well and is a new application (which is always a hint that you should pay attention for sake of the exam). I’ll provide a highlevel overview of using Movie Maker: the odds of your seeing direct exam questions about it are not high, but you should know the basic functions because you use it to create video clips for the DVD Maker. Then, we’ll walk through the creation of a DVD using Windows DVD Maker. Using Windows Movie Maker You can open Windows Movie Maker by clicking Start | All Programs | Windows Movie Maker. The Movie Maker interface, shown in Figure 7-6, provides you with a few important and distinct work areas: ■ Menu Movie Maker contains a standard menu of options, including File, Edit, View, Tools, Clip, Play, and Help. You’ll use these menus to access Movie Maker features as you create movies. ■ Toolbar The toolbar provides quick and easy access to common features. The toolbar options you see change depending on your current task. ■ Tasks The Tasks pane, located on the left side of the interface, is your quick and easy access point for all kinds of functions and features. The content of the Tasks pane changes, depending on what you are working on at the moment.
  • 264 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications FIGURE 7-6 Windows Movie Maker ■ Monitor Area The Monitor enables you to watch your movie in progress and also manage your clips. ■ Storyboard / Timeline The Storyboard and Timeline views enable you to assemble your movie and work with various pieces of it. Windows Movie Maker will look for and expect to find both a video and sound card or other capture device. If it doesn’t find these, you’ll receive a message telling you that your computer does not meet the Movie Maker requirements.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 265 Importing Digital Data You can import digital video and photos directly from your video camera or from your computer if the files already reside there. You can also import music to use in your movie in the same way. Windows Movie Maker can recognize all kinds of movie files, such as asf, avi, mpeg, wmv, and so forth. Additionally, it can recognize and use essentially all kinds of picture and audio files as well. You can import directly from your DV camera. Simply connect your camera to your computer and turn it on. Then, in the Tasks pane click Import From Digital Video Camera and click Import. If you already have video files and/or picture files on your computer, you can import them directly into movie maker. In the Tasks pane under Import, choose Videos, Pictures, or Audio or Music, and then simply browse for the desired files. Once you have imported video footage, you can spend a few minutes editing it. You can split clips, trim them, and combine clips so that the footage of your video is what you want and more manageable. These tasks are outside of the exam scope, but if you’re interested, just access Windows Movie Maker help for step-by-step instructions. Just because the digital video from your camera is in a supported format, that does not necessarily mean that you will have a problem-free transfer from the camcorder. Your camcorder has to connect with Windows Vista, and depending on the make and model as well as available drivers, you may have problems. The thing to remember is that your camcorder probably shipped with instructions or even an installation DVD that you can use to install the necessary drivers. Also, you may need to download new drivers from the manufacturer’s Web site. Be sure to check out these items as your first troubleshooting step. Creating a Storyboard You can use the Workspace to create a storyboard or to sequence your clips together. You’ll drag clips onto the Workspace area to create the storyboard. Begin by dragging the first clip in your movie to the video area of the Workspace. Once it is in position, you see the first frame of the video displayed in the Monitor. If you change to Timeline view, you can see how much time is consumed by the clip. By using the timeline, you can connect pieces of clips while monitoring the time frame of the whole movie. However, you will probably find that Storyboard view, shown in Figure 7-7, is initially easier to use when you are assembling your movie. The zoom in and zoom out buttons at the top of the Workspace let you see more detail concerning the timeline (click the Storyboard drop-down menu and choose
  • 266 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications FIGURE 7-7 Storyboard view the Timeline option to see the view shown in Figure 7-8). While zoomed out, the storyboard is shown to you in increments of 10 seconds. You can zoom in and zoom out more to see the clips in whatever time measure you want. Adding Transitions Windows Movie Maker provides several transitions that you can use between clips. For example, let’s say your movie contains clips of your vacation in Hawaii. You can use Movie Maker to assemble the clips and place transitions between them so that the flow from clip to clip is more natural and less choppy. You can easily create transitions in the Storyboard. Follow these steps: 1. In the Workspace, make certain that Storyboard view is enabled. 2. In the Tasks pane under Edit, click Transitions. You can see the available transitions in the content area of the interface. 3. A transition box appears between each clip/photo on the storyboard. Drag a desired transition to a transition box on the storyboard. Each time you place FIGURE 7-8 Timeline view
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 267 a transition, an icon will appear in the transition box between each clip, as shown here: 4. Click Play in the Monitor to see your movie play with the transitions. Adding Effects Movie Maker also includes a number of effects you can add to any clip or photo. Effects cover all kinds of video/photo effects, such as blurring features, lighting features, and even an old-age film effect. These features are not necessary, of course, but they can add some cool features to your movies. To add an effect, just follow these steps: 1. In the Tasks pane, choose Effects under Edit. You’ll see the effects options in the collections area. 2. Scroll through the effects and locate one that you want to use. 3. Drag the effect to the star icon on the desired clip in the storyboard. Repeat this process for other clips to which you want to add effects. 4. Click Play in the Monitor to see your effect in action. Adding Audio to Your Movies Once you have placed clips on the storyboard, trimmed and transitioned as desired, you can add audio to your movie. For example, you can add narration, background music, or even additional background noise. If it’s an audio file, you can add it to your movie. If you switch to the Timeline view, you’ll see an Audio/Music section on the Timeline. You can drag and drop music clips to this area to use in your video. (Remember that you import audio files in the same way you import photos and video clips.) The following illustration shows the Timeline with an audio clip added:
  • 268 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications Just as when trimming a video clip, you can click and drag the audio file on the timeline to trim off the beginning or end. To adjust the level of the audio volume, click Tools | Audio. To record your voice or some background music or sounds, click Tools | Narrate Timeline. You should already have your computer microphone connected and tested, or make sure that any other sound input device that you want to use to record is ready. Adding Titles and Credits You can easily add a title to the beginning of the movie, titles before or on a selected clip, and credits at the end of the movie. In the Tasks pane, click Titles And Credits under the Edit category and your workspace changes so that you can select the kind of title that you want to add. Saving and Publishing As you’re working on your movie, you can save and close the entire project. When you’re ready to begin working again, you can open the project and continue. When your movie is finished, you can save it as a movie file so that Windows Media Player and other media software can read and play the movie. To save the movie, choose File | Save Movie File. Once you save the movie, you can view it with Windows Media Player. Once you are finished with your movie, you can publish it. When you publish your movie, you can save it to your computer, burn it to a DVD or recordable CD, save it in a smaller format so that you can e-mail it to someone, or record it back to your digital video camera. In the Tasks pane, simply click the desired option and follow any saving instructions that appear. Note that if you want to burn your movie to a DVD, the Windows DVD Maker appears. You can find out how to use the Windows DVD Maker in the next section. SCENARIO & SOLUTION Is there a way to make a film clip look like an old movie film clip? Use the Effects option and choose the aged film effect. You can simply drag and drop this effect onto the desired clip. How can I control the volume of background music verses narration? You can control volume levels for all music, background noise, video sound, and so forth directly on the Timeline.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 269 Using Windows DVD Maker Windows DVD Maker is a new application in Windows Vista, and for this reason, you should work through the application once or twice and make a DVD just for background knowledge. As with Movie Maker, the odds of your seeing direct exam questions on Windows DVD Maker are not high, but as with all Microsoft exams, you never know what you’ll get. You can start Windows DVD Maker from Start | All Programs. It will also start automatically if you choose to burn a DVD from Windows Movie Maker. Your first look is essentially a welcome screen, shown in Figure 7-9. Click Choose Photos and Videos. When you first open Windows DVD Maker, you see a basic interface with no content, as shown in Figure 7-10. Before using the DVD Maker, you may want to change one of the options that determines how the DVD Maker works. Notice the Options link in the lower righthand corner. Click this link to open the DVD-Video Options dialog box, shown in FIGURE 7-9 Windows DVD Maker welcome screen
  • 270 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications FIGURE 7-10 Add window Figure 7-11. Notice that you can choose how your DVD is played back. You have the option to start with a DVD menu (this is the default), play a video and end with a DVD menu, or play a video in a continuous loop. In most cases, starting with a menu is the easiest way to use a DVD, and it is the standard DVD format you’re already used to any way. You don’t need to change the DVD aspect ratio or Video format. When you’re done, click OK. Adding Movies or Photos to a DVD The first thing you need to do is add media items to your DVD. First things first, if you’re using a movie you created with Windows Movie Maker, just click DVD under Publish in Movie Maker and it will send your movie to the Windows DVD Maker. However, you can also add other items, or you can mix video and photos from scratch as well. Click the Add Items button on the toolbar. This opens a standard folder interface where you can browse for your movies, video clips, or photos. Windows DVD Maker can read and use most standard file formats. Locate and select your items and click Open.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 271 FIGURE 7-11 DVD-Video Options The new items will appear in the DVD Maker. Note that if you choose photos, they will be placed in a folder called “Slide Show” within the DVD Maker interface, as you can see in Figure 7-12. You can double-click the folder to see the photos. When you’re done, just click the Back To Videos button on the toolbar. As you’re working on adding items, notice that you can use the toolbar buttons to remove items, or you can select an item and move it up or down in the list. Make sure the order of the items is as you want because the order you see here is the order for the DVD. If you’re using a Slide Show and you want to change the order of the photos, double-click the folder to see the photos. Then use the Move Up or Move Down button to re-order the photos. When you’re done, just click Back To Videos. Also notice that there is a Disc Title text box toward the bottom of the window. By default, the title is set by today’s date. However, you can change the title to whatever you would like. Now that everything is added and ordered the way you want, click Next.
  • 272 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications FIGURE 7-12 Video and slide show photos Configure the Menu In the next window, you’ll see the option to burn your disc. However, before doing so, you have some additional options that you need to configure. The first is the DVD menu, which is what you’ll see when you put the DVD into a DVD player. To create a menu, simply follow the steps in Exercise 7-2. EXERCISE 7-2 CertCam Configuring the DVD Menu To create a DVD menu, follow these steps: 1. In the right Menu Styles pane, click through the menu items to locate the one that you want. When you click a menu style, you can see it in the interface. Notice that the menus will use pieces of your DVD content, as shown on the next page.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 273 2. As you might imagine, you’ll want to change some things about the menu, and you can easily do so. First, click the Menu Text button on the toolbar. Choose the Font option and then adjust the labels for the Disc Title, Play button, Scenes button, and Notes button (if desired). Note that once you
  • 274 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications make your changes, you can click Preview to see your changes. Click Save when you’re done. 3. Now click the Customize button on the toolbar. You can use the provided dialog box and buttons to adjust the Foreground and Background video, Menu audio, Motion menu, and Scenes button. The Video option allows you to pull in other videos or photos to use within the menu so that the video looks just like you want. Make any desired changes here and click Save.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 275 Configuring Your Slide Show If your DVD includes a folder of photos for a slide show, you can click the Slide Show button on the toolbar and make some adjustments as to how the slide show looks when it is played. You’ll see a slide show settings window, shown in Figure 7-13, where you can make the following choices: ■ Music Click Add Music to add any music stored on your computer or a device connected to your computer to the slide show. You’ll see a standard Open interface where you can browse and select the music. ■ Slide Show Length You can change the slide show length to match the music clip you’re using, and you can change the picture length so that each photo is displayed for a desired number of seconds. Typically, 7 to 10 seconds is enough.
  • 276 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications FIGURE 7-13 Choose the slide show settings and click Save. ■ Transition You can choose a transition between the photos. Use the dropdown menu to make your selection. The transition you choose applies to all photos. In other words, you can’t assign different transitions to different photos. ■ Pan And Zoom You can use this feature so that your photos appear to have movement with a panning and zooming feature. Previewing and Burning Your DVD Now that you have your settings and content configured, click the Preview button on the toolbar to see a preview of your DVD. After the preview, you’ll still be able to make changes to the menu and slide show if necessary. When you click Preview, DVD Maker will generate the movie and begin playing from the menu. Use the standard controls on the interface to view your movie.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 277 When you have finished previewing your movie and you have made any final changes, you are ready to burn your DVD. Make sure you are happy with your DVD before burning because you cannot stop the burn process to make changes. When you’re ready, simply click Start Burn. The interface disappears and you see a Burning dialog box. The burning process will take some time and will take longer if your content is long. Windows Photo Gallery Another new application in Windows Vista is Windows Photo Gallery. This program makes managing the plethora of photos most people end up with on their PCs easier in terms of both organization and basic photo management. As with Windows Movie Maker and DVD Maker, a 10-minute walk through of the interface will suffice for the exam—you basically need to know what you can do with the photo gallery and in what situations the gallery can help you manage photos. Click Start | All Programs | Windows Photo Gallery. The gallery appears, as you can see in Figure 7-14. If you click the File menu and choose Add Folder To Gallery, you can then browse for a desired folder of photos or videos that you can add to the gallery for viewing and management purposes. Note that this doesn’t change your original folder of photos. That folder stays the same and stays in the same place on your computer. The gallery simply allows you to manage those photos. Notice also that you can use the File menu to import photos directly from a scanner or camera. If you choose this option, you’ll see a window where you can choose a device to import the photos from. Use the Control Bar If you take a look at the bottom of the Windows Photo Gallery, you notice a control bar where you can perform some basic actions with your photo. As you can see here, the control bar gives you the following controls: ■ Change The Display Size Use this slider bar to quickly change the display size of the photos you see in the gallery. ■ Reset Thumbnails To Default Size If you make a change to the display size using the slider bar, you can quickly click this button to return the photos to the default viewing size.
  • 278 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications FIGURE 7-14 Windows Photo Gallery ■ Previous Photo ■ Play Slide Show ■ Next Photo Click this button to move to the previous photo. Click this button to play a slide show of your photos. Click this photo to go to the next photo in the gallery. ■ Rotate Counterclockwise And Clockwise Use these two buttons to rotate photos. ■ Delete Use this button to move a selected photo to the Recycle Bin. Fix a Photo If you select a photo and click the Fix button on the toolbar, you’ll see an enlarged version of the photo and a control pane that gives you some basic photo fixing options, as you can see in Figure 7-15.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications FIGURE 7-15 279 Fix options You have the following adjustment options: ■ Auto Adjust Click this button and the gallery will automatically attempt to adjust the color tones in the photo. In some cases, this feature can help instantly fix a photo, while in others, you may not like the adjustment. If you don’t like the fix, just click the Undo button at the bottom of the control pane. ■ Adjust Exposure If you click this option, the control pane gives you two slider bars to adjust the brightness and contrast of the photo. You can move these around and see the impact that they have on the photo. ■ Adjust Color If you click this option, you see slider controls for color temperature, tint, and saturation. Move these around to see the changes that are made on your photo.
  • 280 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications ■ Crop Picture If you click the Crop Picture option, a crop box appears on the photo and a proportion control appears on the pane, as shown next. You can choose the original option so that you can crop in any way that you want, or you can choose a preset, standard print size, such as 4x6. This feature enables you to crop the photo but keep a standard print ratio so that the photo will print normally. Make a selection and then drag the crop box around as needed, then simply click Apply to crop the photo. ■ Fix Red Eye You can easily remove red eye from a photo. Red eye is a common photo problem that occurs typically in lower light settings. You can fix this easily with the gallery. Click the Fix Red Eye option, and then drag your mouse over the red eyes. The gallery will automatically fix the color.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 281 Add Info to a Photo If you click the Info button on the toolbar, you can add a rating to the photo and add tags. The rating and tags essentially enable you to add some information to the photo so that you can search for the photo in the future and find it more easily. For example, you can search for “four star” photos or photos that have certain tags. Once you click Info, notice that you can click in the stars and assign the photo a general rating. This feature enables you to assign a rating to the photo. If you are consistent, this feature can help you determine what photos in your collection are 5-star photos, 4-star photos, and so forth. Next, you can add tags. Tags are basically labels that are assigned to a photo, enabling you to browse through the tabs in the gallery and see the photos with those tags, or you can search for photos with the tags you’re looking for. To add a tag, click the Add Tags option and type the name of the tag. Also notice that you can add a caption to the photo. Simply click the option and type the caption that you want to see with the photo. Print, E-Mail, and Burn Your Photo You can use the gallery to print your photo. If you click the Print button on the toolbar, you’ll have the option to print locally or order prints on the Internet. If you click the Print option, the Print Pictures window appears, as shown in Figure 7-16. Here you can choose the size of your photo, copies, the printer you want to use, and so forth in order to print your photo to your specifications. If you choose to order prints online, a dialog box appears where you can select a printing company to connect to and upload your photos. This process is selfexplanatory. If you click the E-Mail button on the toolbar, you’ll see a dialog box that enables you to choose the size of your photo and attach it to an e-mail message. Since large photos can be difficult and slow to e-mail to other people, you can adjust the size and see how large in terms of bytes the photo will be for transmission. Typically, 800 × 600 is a good size to consider for sending over e-mail. If you click the Burn button on the toolbar, you can choose whether you want to burn a data disc (CD) or a video DVD. You’ll need to insert the CD or DVD and simply follow additional instructions that appear.
  • 282 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications FIGURE 7-16 Print Pictures options Windows Media Center Windows Media Center is now a built-in component of Widows Vista, giving you more flexibility with digital content, especially watching and recording television. Media Center is a rather intuitive, simple interface, so you’ll have no trouble getting SCENARIO & SOLUTION How can I manage the order in which photos and video content appear on the DVD? Use the Add page to adjust the order of the content. You can also open folders of photos and adjust the order of the photos. The photos are displayed as they are ordered in the folder. If I have ratings assigned to photos and I only want to share photos that have a certain rating, is there a way to do so? Yes. You can control what multimedia are shared on a network by rating. You use the Network and Sharing Center to configure this option. See Chapter 2 for details.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 283 used to using it. In this section, I’ll give you an overview and make sure you get some hands-on practice! Since Media Center is a built-in part of Windows Vista, you’ll find it in Start | All Programs | Windows Media Center. When you first start the Media Center, you’ll see a Welcome screen asking you to set it up. This “set up” routine will only take a minute as it downloads files from the Internet, so go ahead and choose Express Setup and click OK, as shown in Figure 7-17. Once you’ve set up Media Center, you arrive at the Start page, shown in Figure 7-18. Notice that if you point to the center selection area, you see a scroll-down arrow. This allows you to flip through all of the available features in Media Center. While you’re FIGURE 7-17 Express Setup option
  • 284 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications FIGURE 7-18 Choose what you want to do from the start screen. doing this, look to the right. Notice the right arrow as well. This selection arrow enables you to scroll through options for whatever feature you select. Using these two arrows, you can access anything that you want in Media Center. Click through the options using the down arrow and then click Settings. This will take you to a general settings page for the different features you use in Media Center—such as TV, Pictures, Music, and so forth. If you simply click a category, you can choose additional subcategories to access settings. For example, Figure 7-19 shows the General settings, Startup and Window Behavior. A few settings are selected by default, but you can enable others if you want. You can click through the different settings and categories to get a feel for how Media Center is configured and make any desired changes. Naturally, you may want to return to the setting options and make additional changes once you’ve used Media Center’s features a bit.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 285 FIGURE 7-19 Use settings options to make configuration changes. Use the Pictures + Video Feature The Pictures + Video feature enables you to look at and use a pictures library and/or a video library. Essentially, each feature gives you a way to look at and use your media. If you select the Pictures + Video option on the Start page, you can then click the Picture Library to get started. When you first select the Picture Library, it will ask if you want to add other folders to the library from your computer (such as personal photo folders and such). Just follow the screen prompts to do so. Once you’re done, you can look at your library of photos in three different views: ■ Folders This view shows you the folders of photos on your PC. You can click a folder to open it and view the photos or the subfolders. This is the default view selected. ■ Tags You can also view photos by tags, shown next. If photos have been tagged with names and keywords in Windows Photo Gallery, those tags
  • 286 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications show up in Media Center and you can browse your photo collection by keywords. ■ Date Taken You can click the Date Taken option to see the photos in the library by the date. Aside from taking a look at your collection, you can also click Play Slide Show to see all of your photos as a slide show. Notice that if you move your mouse to the lower right-hand corner, you can access some standard controls so that you can manually move around in the slide show. You can make some changes to the way the slide show plays. Go back to the Settings menu and choose Pictures. Then, you can scroll through the list of options, choosing transition times, types, whether or not to play music during the slide show, and so on. These settings are self-explanatory. The Video Library option works the same way as Photos. You can open the Video Library and see videos through folders or by the date they were taken. Then, you can simply click the desired video that you want to see. Use Music in Media Center If you click the Music option on the Start page, you can access the Music Library, Internet radio, or you can use a search feature to find what music you are looking for. As with all things in Media Center, these options are easy to use.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 287 If you open the Music Library, you see all of the music that is in the Library in Windows Media Player, so start in Media Player to add items to the library. You can then use Media Center to look through your library and start playing songs or playlists. As you can see in Figure 7-20, you can look for music by albums, artists, genres, songs, playlists, or composers in much the same way you can look for songs within Media Player. If you choose the album feature and select an album, you’ll see options to play the album, add music from the album to the queue, burn album to a CD, edit the album’s info, or delete it from the library. You can also locate individual songs and add them to the queue as well. You can also access Internet radio and listen to radio stations on the Internet. While you’re listening to music, you can also see a visualization on the screen for entertainment purposes, much as you would with Windows Media Player. You can turn on the visualization feature and choose a visualization by accessing the Settings feature and choosing the Music category. FIGURE 7-20 Use the Music Library to look through songs and playlists.
  • 288 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications Watch and Record Live TV You can use Windows Media Center to watch and record live television, but before you can do that, you’ll need to purchase and install a TV tuner card. If you purchased a Media Center–based PC, your PC may already have a TV tuner card, but the odds are that you’ll need to purchase and install one. Most TV tuner cards are PCI cards, meaning that the device attaches to an internal slot on your computer. Most TV tuner cards cost 50–100 dollars, and you’ll be able to find one at your local computer store, or you can shop online at Windows Market Place, which is available in the Welcome Center in Windows Vista (click Start | Windows Vista). You’ll need to follow the information that comes with the card concerning installation. Once the card is installed correctly, just attach your cable television to the card and you’re all set! The first thing you’ll need to do is allow Media Center to configure the TV Tuner. Click Start | Windows Media Center. On the Start screen scroll to select TV + Movies and then choose the Set Up TV option, shown in Figure 7-21. Media Center will configure itself to work with television, so simply follow any prompts that appear. If Windows Media Center cannot locate your TV tuner card, you’ll see a message telling you so. In this case, you’ll need to check the instructions about installing your card again. Finding Movies on TV Once Media Center is set up for television, you’ll see a Movie Guide option when you access TV + Movies on the Start screen. You can use the guide to search for movies on your television channels by rating, what is currently on, on next, or by genres. Once you find a movie that you want to view, just click Watch. For a more narrow search, just access TV + Movies on the Start screen and click Search. Using the search window, you can look for movies by title, keywords, categories, actors, or even directors. The search will give you movies that are currently playing as well as possible future showings. Watching and Pausing Live TV To watch live TV, access TV + Movies on the Start screen and click Live TV. You can see information about the program you are watching by right-clicking the TV show and clicking Program Info. Click Watch to return to the program. As with any music or movie playback in Media Center, you’ll see a control bar at the bottom of your screen (just hover your mouse there to make it reappear if you
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 289 FIGURE 7-21 Set Up TV in Media Center don’t see it). You can use the controls, including the channel controls, to adjust the volume and even change the channel. If you have a Media Center PC, you can also use your remote control for this purpose. When you’re not using the controls, they disappear from sight, giving you a true TV experience without any visual interruptions. Figure 7-22 shows you an example of a movie playback. So, let’s say you’re in the middle of your favorite show and someone comes to the door. You can avoid missing your show by simply pausing live TV. When you pause live TV, Windows Vista records the show to a file. When you return, you can start watching where you left off until you eventually catch back up with the live TV. You can do all of this without jumping through a bunch of configuration hoops or anything like that. When you want to pause live TV, just press the Pause button on the control bar. When you return to watch, just use the Play button to continue watching. You can also use the fast forward or rewind buttons as well. This way, you can simply fast forward through commercials until you can catch back up with live TV.
  • 290 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications FIGURE 7-22 Watching TV on Windows Vista Recording and Using Playback While Windows Vista can be a real boon to watching television because of its live pausing feature, you can also just record a show or movie and watch it later. You can record a show that is playing at the moment, or you can choose a show or movie that will play at a later time and record it as well. Unfortunately, you can’t record one show and watch another at the same time. In order to do this, you would need at least two TV tuners installed on your PC—one to record the show and one to watch the different show. This is a limitation of the TV tuner. You can find out more about using multiple TV tuners on your Windows Vista PC by accessing Windows Help. To record a movie or show that is currently playing, just start watching the show or movie and click the Record button on the control bar that appears at the bottom
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 291 of your screen. This is a great way to record the rest of a show or movie if you start watching it but get interrupted. If you want to record a show or movie that has not aired yet, you have a few options you’ll enjoy: ■ Access the movie guide to record an entire series. Just right-click the series and click Record Series. ■ To record by channel or time, access TV + Movies and click Recorded TV. Click Add Recording and then click Channel And Time. Enter the channel and time information, or start and stop times, and then click Record. ■ To record only the new episodes of a series, access the Start screen and choose Tasks | Settings | TV | Recorder and then click Recording Defaults. Under Series Only Recording Defaults, select First Run to record only shows that have an original broadcast date of less than a week and are not marked as reruns. After you record a show or movie, you can access TV + Movies and access recorded TV. Here, you’ll see a list of movies or shows that have been recorded. You can look through your list of movies or shows by the date they were recorded or by title. To play a movie or show, click it and you’ll see a Movie Details screen. Click Play to start playing the movie, or you can get more information about the movie, delete it, or burn it to a CD or DVD. Using Windows Media Center Extenders The odds are quite good that you will see an exam question about Windows Media Center Extenders. Windows Media Center Extenders are necessary for interoperability between Media Center and external devices, such as Xboxes and network-capable TVs and DVD players. Essentially, a Media Center Extender (MCE) device enables you to watch or record TV, listen to music, or view pictures or videos without being at your computer. Since Windows Vista now includes Media Center, these features, formerly available in only Media Center PCs in the days of Windows XP, are now available as a part of your PC.
  • 292 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications For the exam, you need to know the general steps to set up an MCE device. Exercise 7-3 shows you how. EXERCISE 7-3 CertCam Configuring an MCE Device To set up an MCE device, follow these steps: 1. Make sure Windows Vista is connected to your network. 2. Turn on the MCE device and ensure that it is also connected to the network. 3. On the Windows Vista computer, open Media Center and go to Tasks | Add Extender. 4. Prompts will appear asking you to enter the eight-digit Setup Key provided by the MCE device. 5. Complete the additional prompts and click Finish. When you set up an MCE device, the MCE service (mcx2svc) will start and Windows Firewall will be configured to allow MCE communication with Windows Vista. Keep in mind that if you need to cross a third-party firewall, the firewall will have to be manually configured to allow MCE traffic. For the exam, you don’t need to worry about which TCP or UDP ports need opening, but just bear in mind that third-party firewalls will need to be manually configured. SCENARIO & SOLUTION What are the typical problems that can happen with an MCE device? Make sure you go through setup correctly so that the firewall is configured. Also, make sure your computer is on—not in a sleep state. Why will third-party firewalls need to be configured for MCE? When you run the setup routine, Windows Firewall is configured to allow MCE traffic. Naturally, this setup routine cannot configure a third-party firewall.
  • Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 293 CERTIFICATION SUMMARY Windows Vista includes several applications that enable you to both create and manage digital content. Windows Media Player (version 11) is a part of Windows Vista. With a more organized, streamlined look, you can easily view media; manage them in the library; burn, sync, or rip them; and access only stores. Keep in mind that you can manage most of Media Player’s configuration by clicking any drop-down menu and clicking More Options. Windows Vista includes a new version of Movie Maker. You can import digital video and photos into Movie Maker and assemble movies. You can also import sounds, create narration, and include transitions as well as effects. Once you’re done, you can save your movie for a variety of purposes and you can create a DVD with your movie using Windows DVD Maker. Essentially, the new Windows DVD Maker is a basic wizard interface that enables you to organize the media, create a menu, and burn the media to a DVD disk. Windows Photo Gallery is an effective tool to organize and manage photos as well as perform basic editing of those photos. Keep in mind that you can apply tags to photos to help identify them for searching and for sharing purposes. Windows Media Center is included with Windows Vista, giving you the ability to watch movies, play music, view photos, and play and record live TV via the Media Center. You can also configure Media Center Extender (MCE) devices to interoperate with Media Center over your local network, such as Xboxes, network-enabled TVs, and DVDs.
  • 294 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications ✓ TWO-MINUTE DRILL Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications ❑ Windows Media Player consists of a series of tabs that enable you to play and manage media. They are: Now Playing, Library, Rip, Burn, and Sync. ❑ Digital Rights Management governs how many times songs are played, copied, or burned to CDs and how many computers can play them, according to the rights settings built into the media file from the supplier. ❑ Most necessary configuration changes to Media Player can be made by clicking any of the tabs and clicking More Options. Here, you can adjust a number of different features and functions, including playback options, codecs, security, networking, and so forth. ❑ Windows Movie Maker allows you to import digital media and organize it into a “movie.” You can organize digital content on the Storyboard or work with it in more detail on the Timeline. ❑ You can publish your movie in a common file format, or you can use Windows DVD Maker to burn it to a DVD. ❑ Windows DVD Maker is a wizard-type program that enables you to organize digital content and burn it to a DVD. You can also create a menu and manage the order of the DVD as desired. ❑ Use Windows Photo Gallery to manage photo collections, assign descriptive tags, and perform basic photo editing, printing, and e-mailing. ❑ Windows Media Center is an effective tool to view all kinds of media, such as movies, photos, and television, as well as music. ❑ Media Center Extender devices can be used with Media Center so that you can access these resources via the devices away from your PC.
  • Self Test 295 SELF TEST The following questions will help you measure your understanding of the material presented in this chapter. Read all the choices carefully because there might be more than one correct answer. Choose all correct answers for each question. Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 1. In Windows Media Player, you need to adjust the video settings for a DVD that you want to play. Where can you adjust these settings? A. Access the Options dialog box and configure the feature on the Security tab. B. Click the Now Playing menu and choose Show Enhancements. C. Click the Now Playing menu and click Plug-ins. D. Click the Now Playing menu and click Show List Pane. 2. In Windows Media Player, you insert a CD by a favorite artist into the CD player. You want to rip the songs to Media Player. However, when you click the Rip tab, the tracks on the CD are simply listed as Track 1, Track 2, and so forth, rather than song title. What is the most likely cause of this problem? A. You need to click Now Playing first. B. The Rip tab of More Options is not configured correctly. C. The computer is not connected to the Internet. D. The CD is damaged. 3. You want to change the default location where ripped music is stored in Windows Media Player from My Music. You have created a new folder where you want the music stored. However, when you rip music in Media Player, it is still stored in My Music. How can you change Media Player’s default storage location? A. Click More Options. On the Storage tab, click Change. B. Click More Options. On the Rip tab, click Change. C. Click More Options. On the Security tab, click Change. D. The default storage location cannot be changed. 4. You purchased a song from an Internet download site. You can play the song in Windows Media Player, but when you try to burn it to a CD, a message appears telling you that you do not have permission to do so. What is the cause of this problem? A. You are logged on as a standard user. B. There are Digital Rights Management settings configured.
  • 296 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications C. Your user account does not have permission to burn CDs. D. The file is corrupt. 5. In Windows Movie Maker, you would like to add narration to a video track, but the background music that already exists on the track is very loud. How can you adjust the volume of the background music? A. Re-import the music and adjust the volume via the viewer. B. Use the controls on the Storyboard. C. Use the controls on the Timeline. D. The volume cannot be adjusted on an original track. 6. In Windows Movie Maker, you are editing audio segments on the Timeline. However, the segments are so compressed in terms of their time that you are having problems editing them. What can you do? A. Click the View menu and change the visibility percentage to 100. B. Switch to the Storyboard. C. Expand the overall running time of the movie. D. Use the zoom controls on the timeline. 7. You have created a sales movie for a trade show in Movie Maker. You now want to use Windows DVD Maker to create a DVD so that you can play the movie on any standard DVD player. However, you would like the DVD to play as a loop at the trade show. How can you configure this using Windows DVD Maker? A. On the menu page, choose the None option. B. On the menu page, choose the Loop option. C. Access Options and choose the Loop option. D. You cannot create this kind of DVD. 8. You are creating a DVD using Windows DVD Maker. You have added a folder of photos, but you want those photos to appear on the DVD in a particular order. How can you configure the order the photos will appear? A. Use the menu page and change the appearance order. B. Access Options and adjust the slide show order. C. Open the folder and move the photos around so that they are in the desired order. D. Photos are randomized and cannot be reordered. 9. You are creating a DVD using Windows DVD Maker. You want to adjust the button design that is used on menu. How can you edit these buttons? A. Click Menu and change the button style. B. Use the import option and import new button graphics.
  • Self Test 297 C. Click Options and change the button style. D. The menu buttons cannot be changed. 10. You have a folder of photos you are managing with Windows Photo Gallery. Several of the photos need to be rotated so that they are not sideways. How can you do this? A. Use the Rotate buttons on the control bar. B. Use the edit function to crop the photos. C. Open the folder and drag the photos to rotate them. D. You cannot rotate photos in Windows Photo Gallery. 11. You have taken a photo with a digital camera, and you now use Windows Photo Gallery to manage it. However, you need to make sure the photo will print at a 4x6 printing size. The photo needs to be cropped. What can you do? A. Only crop the edges of the photo. B. Choose the 4x6 printing size when you crop. C. Use the print feature to ensure that the photo prints at 4x6. D. You cannot edit photo dimensions. 12. You have a collection of photos that have ratings applied. Which statement is true concerning ratings sharing? A. You can choose to share the photos by rating. B. You cannot choose to share photos by rating. C. You can only share photos that have a rating. D. You can only share photos that do not have a rating. 13. Using Windows Media Center, you want to watch one television show and record another. What does your Windows Vista PC need? A. One TV tuner card B. Two TV tuner cards C. Three TV tuner cards D. You cannot record and watch two different shows 14. You use Windows Vista over a wireless network. You also have an Xbox. You would like to be able to access music from Windows Media Center and play those files on your Xbox. What do you need to do? A. Share the Xbox. B. Drag the music to the Public folder on Windows Vista. C. Configure an MCE. D. Place the files in the Public folder of the Xbox.
  • 298 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications 15. Your company has two subnets. You need to connect a network-enabled DVD player with Windows Media Center. The two items reside on different subnets. What do you need to do to enable communication across the two subnets? A. Manually configure the firewall. B. Acquire a secondary security key. C. Configure a new wireless network. D. You cannot configure the two across two subnets. LAB QUESTION You have a network-enabled TV. You have MCE configured with Windows Media Center. Earlier in the day, you watched a movie from Media Center. Later, you decide to watch another movie, but there seems to be no connection to the Windows Vista computer. What is the most likely cause of the problem?
  • Self Test Answers 299 SELF TEST ANSWERS Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications ✓ 1. ® B. You can adjust video settings by clicking Show Enhancements. ® A, C, and D are incorrect. You cannot configure video settings in any of these ways. ˚ ✓ 2. ® C. Media Player must be connected to the Internet in order to retrieve song titles from a CD. This is the most likely cause of the problem. ® A, B, and D are all incorrect because these options are not likely causes of the problem. ˚ ✓ 3. ® B. Access More Options. On the Rip tab, next to Rip Music To This Location, click the Change button. ® A, C, and D are incorrect because you cannot configure the storage location in any of these ˚ ways. ✓ 4. ® B. Digital Rights Management is controlling the use of the file for which digital rights were purchased. ® A, C, and D are incorrect because none of these options would prevent you from burning ˚ the song to a CD. ✓ 5. ® C. Use the Timeline to adjust the volume for all tracks or video sound. ® A, B, and D are all incorrect because you cannot adjust the volume in these ways. ˚ ✓ 6. ® D. The zoom controls allow you to zoom in by 10-second increments. This makes the running time of the timeline more visible. ® A, B, and C are incorrect because none of these actions will enable you to zoom in on the ˚ timeline. ✓ 7. ® C. Access Options to create a DVD that plays in a continuous loop. ® A, B, and D are incorrect because you cannot create a looped DVD in any of these ways. ˚ ✓ 8. ® C. Photos are displayed in the order in which they appear in the folder. So, simply open the folder and change the order as desired. ® A, B, and D are incorrect because none of these options will enable you to change the ˚ order of the photos. ✓ 9. ® A. Click the Menu option and adjust the button styles as desired. ® B, C, and D are incorrect because none of these options will enable you to adjust the ˚ menu styles. ✓ 10. ® A. You can rotate photos by selecting them and using the rotate buttons on the control bar. ® B, C, and D are incorrect because none of these options enable you to rotate the photos. ˚
  • 300 Chapter 7: Configure and Troubleshoot Media Applications ✓ 11. ® B. You can choose a preset cropping size when you choose to crop a photo. ® A and C are incorrect because neither of these options will enable you to crop the photo ˚ correctly. D is incorrect because you can crop the photo. ✓ 12. ® A. You can share photos according to their ratings if you use the Network and Sharing Center. ® B, C, and D are incorrect because none of these statements are true. ˚ ✓ 13. ® B. Windows Vista would need two tuner cards—one to watch the desired program and one to record the desired program. ® A, C, and D are incorrect because you need two TV tuner cards. ˚ ✓ 14. ® C. You need to configure a Media Center Extender so that the Xbox and Windows Media Center can communicate. ® A, B, and D are all incorrect because these actions will not enable you to share music. ˚ ✓ 15. ® A. Since there are two subnets, you’ll need to configure the third-party firewall to pass MCE traffic. ® B, C, and D are incorrect because none of these actions will resolve the problem. ˚ LAB ANSWER The computer has probably gone to sleep. Since you watched a movie earlier in the day, there should be no problems with connectivity or MCE. More than likely, the computer is configured to sleep after a certain period of inactivity.
  • 8 Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVES 8.01 Configure Windows Mail 8.02 Configure Windows Meeting Space ✓ Q&A Two-Minute Drill Self Test
  • 302 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space A pplications that come directly to the user through Windows Vista are important. After all, the more applications and features that an operating system includes, the less need there is to buy third-party software, which in turn saves money and hopefully reduces compatibility problems. As you have probably noticed so far, the Vista exam is heavily focused on built-in applications and new features within Windows Vista. As an IT professional, you’ll need to be a product expert not only in the operating system, but also in the applications that come along for the ride. This chapter explores two of those applications, Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space. Both of these applications are considered primary applications in Vista because Microsoft expects most people using Vista to use Windows Mail and Microsoft expects Windows Meeting Space to be an important virtual meeting solution. The good news is that both of these applications are easy to use—you just need to learn the features and the ins and outs of configuring them. This chapter is designed to do that and to get you ready to tackle Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space questions that will come your way on the exam! CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 8.01 Configure Windows Mail Good-bye Outlook Express and hello Windows Mail, which you’ll probably see as a big improvement. Windows Mail is sleeker, cooler, and easier to use and configure. As with all applications in Vista, you need to get your hands on the application and start using it. You can access Windows Mail by clicking Start | All Programs | Accessories. To use Windows Mail, you will need to set up your mail account so that Windows Mail will know how to connect to a mail server to send and receive e-mail. This information is available from your ISP. Naturally, Windows Mail is not a requirement—you are free to use any e-mail client that is compatible with Windows Vista or any Web mail clients as well. However, Windows Mail only works with POP3 or IMAP. You cannot access HTTP mail within Windows Mail. For more information about these protocols, see the Inside the Exam sidebar on the following page. Setting Up a Windows Mail Account When you open Windows Mail for the first time, you see the basic Windows Mail interface for a moment, but then a wizard appears prompting you to set up an account. If you close the wizard, you can start it again by choosing Tools | Accounts.
  • Configure Windows Mail 303 INSIDE THE EXAM Understanding Mail Protocols Windows Mail supports POP3 and IMAP, which are industry-standard e-mail protocols. POP3, or Post Office Protocol, is a standard method computers use to send and receive e-mail messages, typically within a client program such as Windows Mail, Outlook, Eudora, or Mozilla Thunderbird. POP3 messages are typically held on a mail server until you download them to your computer via one of these applications. Afterward, the mail server deletes the messages from the server because they are now locally located on your PC. On the other hand, IMAP, or Internet Message Access Protocol, typically leaves the messages on the mail server after they have been downloaded to your computer. You can organize, delete, and manage the mail before it is ever downloaded, and you can leave copies on the server. You tend to see IMAP in business environments. POP3 is typically the most common kind of e-mail you are likely to use. POP3 messages are typically held on the mail server until they are downloaded to your computer. You may also be familiar with SMTP, or Simple Mail Transfer Protocol, as well. SMTP servers handle the sending of e-mail messages to the Internet. SMTP handles outgoing mail and works in conjunction with POP3 or IMAP messages. Thus in many configurations, outgoing mail is considered SMTP mail, while incoming mail is POP3 or IMAP. Windows Mail also supports NNTP (Network News Transfer Protocol), which is used to read news and post messages to newsgroups, as well as LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol), which is used to access online directory services. However, Windows Mail does not support the HTTP protocol used to access Web-based e-mail, such as Hotmail or Yahoo. Click the Add button on the right side of the window, and then click E-Mail Account and click Next. The software will lead you through a series of steps in which you will enter your name, your e-mail address, your server type, and your e-mail username and password. Have this information ready, and then follow these easy steps to complete the wizard: 1. Enter your display name. This is the name that you want other e-mail users to see when you send mail. Click Next when you’re done. 2. In the next window, enter your e-mail address and click Next. Remember that Webmail accounts are not compatible, and if you enter a Webmail
  • 304 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space address here, you’ll see a message telling you so. However, some typical Webmail services, such as Yahoo, also offer a POP3 account if you pay extra for it. So, be sure to check with your service provider for information. 3. In the next window, you’ll need to enter your e-mail server information, as shown in Figure 8-1. Almost all e-mail servers use POP3 (Post Office Protocol version 3) to manage incoming e-mail messages and SMTP for outgoing messages. Check your ISP documentation. Then, enter the incoming mail server name and the outgoing mail server name. Typically, both of these names will be in the form of mail.mydomain.com. You’ll need to check your ISP documentation to know for sure. Oddly, if you use the incoming e-mail FIGURE 8-1 Set up e-mail servers
  • Configure Windows Mail 305 server-type drop-down menu, it will list HTTP as an option. Yet, if you select it, the program tells you that it is not supported, which seems strange. Regardless, enter the correct information, and then click Next. 4. In the next window, enter your logon name (typically your e-mail address) and your password. Check your ISP documentation to make certain you are entering the correct information—and do remember that passwords are casesensitive. Click Next and then click Finish. Windows Mail has the capability to support multiple accounts for the same user. For example, let’s say you have a primary ISP with an e-mail address of myaddress@myisp .com. However, you also have an e-mail account at youraddress@yourdomain.com. Can you use Windows Mail to access information on both of those accounts? Sure! All you need to do is configure both mail accounts using the previous steps. When you check your mail, Windows Mail will check both accounts. Configure Account Options When you create an account, you can manage it, along with any other accounts you create, by clicking Tools | Accounts. On the dialog box you see, select the desired account and use the buttons to remove it or access the account’s properties. Notice that you can also create new accounts or import / export accounts as well. If you access an account’s properties, you essentially see tabs that allow you to reconfigure the account. In other words, you can change the account options you configured when you first created account. Do, however, notice the Advanced tab, shown in the following illustration. Here, you can set up secure connections if your mail server requires them (SSL), and you can also choose to leave a copy of messages on the server when you download them. This feature can be helpful if you need to download messages to more than one computer or if you want to delete server e-mail when you delete messages from the Deleted Items folder. By default, POP3 and SMTP send username and password in clear text over the Internet. SSL (Secure Sockets Layer), if your ISP supports it for your account, will encrypt this information, along with all e-mail messages transferred between your computer and the ISP’s mail server. SSL requires special configuration that you will need to get from your ISP. Typical SSL port numbers are 25 or 465 for
  • 306 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space SMTP and 995 for POP3, but get these numbers from your ISP to ensure they are correct. Configuring Windows Mail Interface Windows Mail provides an easy-to-read and easy-to-use interface where you can quickly view e-mail messages. By default, Windows Mail uses four major panes, or views, to separate different mail components. These four panes make working with mail easy, and you can customize this interface as well (I’ll show you how later in this chapter). Figure 8-2 gives you a look at the default Windows Mail interface. Menu Options Let’s first take a look at your menu options. At the top of the Windows Mail window, you see common menus: File, Edit, View, Tools, Message, and Help. You have the standard options on these menus, such as Open, Save, Cut, and Paste, but you also have quite a few options that are specific to Windows Mail. The following list highlights the most important features:
  • Configure Windows Mail 307 FIGURE 8-2 Windows Mail ■ File Using this menu, you can perform standard open and save functions, and you can create additional mail folders in which you can store mail. You can also import and export mail settings, messages, and address books to and from other e-mail programs. For the exam, keep in mind that Windows Mail can export messages to Microsoft Exchange, and you perform that action here on the File menu. ■ Edit The Edit menu contains typical editing functions. Use the Edit menu to delete e-mail, move e-mail between folders, mark e-mail messages in various ways, and perform other standard editing tasks. ■ View You use this menu to change how current messages are viewed, as well as how the entire Windows Mail interface appears. See the section “Change Windows Mail Views” later in this chapter for more information. ■ Tools The Tools menu enables you to send and receive e-mail, configure message rules, customize Windows Mail, manage Windows Contracts, and access Calendar. All of these items are explored in more detail later in this chapter.
  • 308 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space ■ Message The Message menu contains typical message functions, most of which you can perform by clicking a toolbar button. You can also use this menu to block senders, create message rules, and “watch” messages or discussions. You can use Windows Mail to connect to newsgroups and flag messages so that you can watch the message and all the replies. ■ Help Get help from the Windows Mail Help files or on the Microsoft Web site. Below the menu bar, you see the standard Windows Mail toolbar. You’ll use this toolbar quite a bit when working with Windows Mail. You have the following standard buttons: ■ Create Mail Click this button to start a new mail message. ■ Reply, Reply All, and Forward If you select a message, you will see these options appear. You can reply to a message, reply to all message recipients, and forward a message to someone else. ■ Print Select a message and click this button to print the message. ■ Delete Select a message and click this button to delete a message. ■ Stop the Current Operation Stops whatever action is happening at the moment. ■ Send/Receive Click this button to see a drop-down list of choices. You can Send and Receive, Receive All, and Send All. ■ Contacts Click this button to open the Address Book. ■ Windows Calendar Access Windows Calendar directly. ■ Find Click this button to find specific messages. You can search by sender, message subject, or keywords. ■ Folder List Click this button to see your list of Windows Mail folders. The final part of the Windows Mail interface is composed of the three primary panes: ■ Folders The top-left pane shows your Windows Mail folder structure. You can easily move between your Inbox, Outbox, Sent Items, and Deleted Items, as well as additional folders that you can create using the File menu. ■ New Message The top-right pane contains a message list. These are messages that you have received but not deleted or moved into another folder. ■ Preview The bottom-right pane contains the text of the selected message. This is an easy preview that allows you to skim through your messages without actually opening them.
  • Configure Windows Mail 309 Mail View Options The Windows Mail three-pane option is the default, but you can change it easily. To change the appearance of the Windows Mail interface, choose View | Layout. A dialog box appears with a single Layout tab, as shown in Figure 8-3. As you can see, two sections appear—Basic and Preview Pane. You can select or clear the various check boxes to display the panes that you want. You can try different settings to find the ones that you like best. Also, if you click Customize Toolbar, you can add other toolbar icons or remove icons that you don’t use, as shown in Figure 8-4. In addition to using the Layout feature, you can also customize the current view, which enables you to determine which messages are displayed and which are hidden. You can use different views by choosing View | Current View. You can then select a desired option from the pop-up menu. As with an appearance configuration, you may need to play around with the settings to find the ones that are right for you. FIGURE 8-3 Layout
  • 310 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space FIGURE 8-4 Customize Toolbar Sending and Receiving E-Mail Once you have set up an account, you can send and receive e-mail. Sending and receiving e-mail is very easy in Windows Mail, and if you have ever used Outlook or Outlook Express, you’ll see that the basic interface design is similar. Review the following sections. Send an E-Mail To send a new e-mail message, click the Create Mail button on your toolbar. A new mail message appears, as shown in Figure 8-5. To send a new mail message, type the recipient’s e-mail address in the To line and any additional e-mail addresses in the Cc line (if you want other individuals copied), enter a subject, and then type your message in the provided message box. Windows Mail supports advanced messageediting features. As you type your new message, notice that you have bold, italic, bulleted lists, and other button features on the message toolbar. You can also cut, copy, and paste message text as well. You can use the Format menu to use different color styles in your message and even use a background picture or graphic with the Message menu. You can also check your message for spelling errors by choosing Tools | Spelling, or just click the Spelling button. All of these features are nice, but do be aware that not all mail clients can receive these formatting features. Even though you style your text and add a background, some of your recipients may see only plain text, depending on their mail server rules and e-mail client configuration. When you’ve finished with your message, click Send. If you are currently connected to the Internet, the message is immediately sent; if not, the message is
  • Configure Windows Mail 311 FIGURE 8-5 New Mail message You can attach a priority to your message as either High, Normal, or Low.The default selection is Normal, but you can change when you create the e-mail message by clicking Message | Set Priority. You can also use the Tools menu to request a read receipt and encrypt the message to the recipient or digitally sign a message. stored in the Send folder until a connection to the Internet is present. If you are not currently connected to the Internet, click the Send/Receive button on your Windows Mail toolbar. Doing this launches an Internet dial-up connection so that the message can be sent. Attach a File to an E-Mail If you want to send an e-mail with an attachment, which is just a file of some kind, you can easily do so. Click the Create Mail button on your Windows Mail toolbar and follow these steps. To attach a file, choose Insert, and choose either File Attachment or Picture. You can also choose to include the text from a file, which enables you to browse for the file and copy and paste the text
  • 312 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space from it, although this is technically not an attachment. You can also click Attach. An easier and faster method is to shrink your message window so that you can see your Desktop, and then locate the file you want to include. Drag the file into the message portion of the window. Its name will appear in the Attach line, and the file will be attached to the e-mail. Receive Messages When you are ready to check for messages, open Windows Mail. You can click the Send/Receive button on your toolbar, but simply opening Mail automatically triggers Send/Receive by default. If necessary, an Internet connection is launched, so mail can be downloaded to your computer. New e-mail messages appear in the New Message pane. If you click each message, you can read its text in the Preview pane, but do not assume that you see all of the message text in the Preview pane; scroll down with the slider bar to view the entire message. To open a message, double-click it. Doing this enables you to read the message in its own message window. Once you have received and read your messages, you can delete them, leave them in the Inbox, or drag them to a desired folder for safekeeping. Any attachments that are sent to you are automatically downloaded with the mail message. Messages with attachments have a small paper clip beside them in the New Message pane. In the Preview pane, you see a larger paper clip on the right side of the window. If you click the paper clip, a pop-out menu appears where you can choose to either open the attachment or save it to your computer (such as in the Documents folder or your Desktop). Messages that you delete are held in the Deleted Items folder. You can select this folder and locate a previously deleted message and even drag it back to your Inbox or another folder if it was deleted by accident.You can also rightclick the Deleted Items folder and choose Empty Deleted Items folder.This action permanently deletes the items in the folder. Managing Mail Windows Mail gives you a few important mail management features that can help you manage mail that you want to receive as well as junk e-mail. The following sections show you these features and focus on what you need to know for the exam.
  • Configure Windows Mail 313 Create Message Rules Message rules enable you to control how various messages are handled by Windows Mail. Message rules are most helpful to people who receive a lot of e-mail or who receive a lot of spam, or junk e-mail. You can set up rules to help you manage messages so that Windows Mail can automatically delete certain unwanted messages or move certain messages to other folders. As you can imagine, this is an important feature, and you are likely to face an exam question that requires you to create a message rule. Exercise 8-1 shows you how to create a message rule in Windows Mail. EXERCISE 8-1 CertCam Creating a Message Rule 1. In Windows Mail, choose Tools | Message Rules | Mail. 2. The New Mail Rule dialog box appears. In the top portion of the window, select a condition for your rule. Scroll through the list and select the check box next to the desired condition.
  • 314 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space 3. In the second portion of the window, select an action for your rule. Scroll through the list and select the check box next to the desired action. 4. Depending on your selection, you may need to enter a rule description or perform some editing. If a link appears (blue underlined wording), click it to enter some additional information that is needed for the rule. For example, in the previous illustration, I need to click the Contains People link. Once I do this, a Select People dialog box appears where I can enter e-mail addresses or choose from my list of contacts, as shown in the following illustration. 5. In the bottom of the window, give the rule a friendly name and then click OK. Once you create message rules, you can manage them from the same Message Rules interface. Choose Tools | Message Rules | Mail. A window appears, listing your current rules. You can use the provided buttons to create new rules, delete existing rules, edit existing rules, and perform related management tasks. This interface is very easy to use and self-explanatory. Blocking Senders The Blocked Senders option enables you to create a list of e-mail addresses that you want to block from your inbox. This feature is helpful if you get mail from a certain person that you would rather not read. To use the Blocked Senders option, select the message from the sender that you want to block, choose Tools | Junk E-Mail Options,
  • Configure Windows Mail 315 and then click the Blocked Senders tab. A simple window appears. Click Add, enter the e-mail address of the sender you want to block, and click OK. The sender appears in the Blocked Senders list, shown in Figure 8-6. You can modify this list at any time. You can also use the Message menu to add a new person to your Blocked Senders list immediately (and easily). When you get a message from someone and you know you don’t want any more messages from that sender, just select the message and then choose Message | Junk E-Mail | Add Sender To Blocked Senders List. That’s all you have to do; any mail sent in the future from this sender will be removed automatically. Additionally, you can use the Message menu to create a rule from the message. Select the message, choose Message | Create Rule From Message, and you’ll see the New Mail Rule window appears. These options give you quick and easy access to the Message Rules and Blocked Senders features of Windows Mail. FIGURE 8-6 Blocked Senders list
  • 316 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space Managing Junk E-Mail Junk e-mail is a never-ending problem. Windows Mail makes some additional efforts to help you manage the plethora of junk e-mail that you probably get on a daily basis. These features are not cures for junk e-mail, but they will at least help, and you should watch out for exam questions about the junk e-mail management features that are available. Click Tools | Junk E-Mail Options to configure how Windows Mail handles junk. Options On the Options tab, shown in Figure 8-7, you can choose a protection level. You can go from no automatic filtering to a Safe List Only setting where only people placed on your safe list are allowed to send mail to your inbox. Typically, the Low or High setting is best for most people, although some normal mail may end up in the junk e-mail folder if you use the high setting. Just remember to keep a check on the junk e-mail folder—you can drag any normal mail messages that get caught by the filter from the junk e-mail folder back to the Inbox. FIGURE 8-7 Junk E-Mail Options
  • Configure Windows Mail 317 Safe Senders Just as you can block a sender, you can also add a sender to a safe list so that this sender’s e-mail always ends up in your inbox and not the junk e-mail folder. Typically, you can use the safe senders list to add a person whose e-mail sometimes goes to the junk e-mail folder. This action will prevent this from happening. There is an important check box setting toward the bottom of the tab. You can choose to have any e-mail address you send mail to added to the safe senders list. This option, though not enabled by default, can be useful because it automatically adds the people you communicate with to the safe senders list. International The International tab option, shown in Figure 8-8, enables you to block top-level domains and encoding lists. Some junk e-mails you receive may be from other countries in other languages. You can use the button options here to block entire country code domains as well as messages encoded with a character set that is not English. This feature can give you an additional level of protection if you know that messages you receive should not be from foreign country domains or other languages. In the end, this feature is just another way to filter more stuff away from your inbox. FIGURE 8-8 International tab
  • 318 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space Phishing Filter As with Internet Explorer, Windows Mail contains a phishing filter, which helps identify messages that have bogus, or phishing, links, designed to get you to give up personally identifiable information, such as account numbers, names, e-mail addresses, and even credit card numbers. In Windows Mail, the phishing filter is turned on by default. There is only one additional setting on this tab, which enables you to move phishing e-mail to the Junk Mail folder automatically. Customizing Windows Mail Windows Mail contains quite a few customization options that you can access by choosing Tools | Options. You’ll see several tabs, but the good news is that each tab is rather easy to use. Most present a list of check box options you can choose from. The following list gives you an overview of what you can do on each tab. Remember that you can try different settings and change them later if you don’t like them, and one of the best ways to find the settings that work for you is to experiment. In terms of the exam, you should globally remember what general options you see here. For example, if an exam question mentions that you need to change the way messages are sent, the answer is Options. Here’s a quick review and make sure you look through the tabs on your Windows Vista computer. ■ General This tab contains information about the way your computer receives messages. Most of the default options on this tab are all you need. If you want Windows Mail to check for messages automatically by launching a dial-up connection at specified intervals, you can select the option on this tab and enter the amount of time you want to pass between checks (such as 30 minutes or so). Keep this option in mind for the exam. ■ Read This tab contains settings for messages you have received. You can choose to view messages in various colors and fonts. ■ Receipts Some messages you receive (or send) can request a receipt—a return e-mail notification that the message was opened. Use the tab to enable this feature and determine how it should be used. ■ Send This tab contains basic settings for sending messages. Almost all options are enabled by default, and you should probably keep these options enabled for the best functionality. ■ Compose Use this tab to select font settings and business card settings and to attach stationery to your e-mail messages. Remember that not all mail clients can read these style features.
  • Configure Windows Mail 319 ■ Signatures You can automatically add a signature—such as your name and phone number—to all new messages you type. Use this tab to enter the text you want for the signature. ■ Spelling Use this tab to enable automatic spell checking and spell checking settings. ■ Security You have some important security settings available here. See the next section for more information about security in Windows Mail. ■ Connection This tab contains information about your dial-up connection. One item of interest here is that you can tell Windows Mail to hang up the dial-up connection automatically once mail has been sent and received. If you use the General tab to dial a connection automatically to get mail, you should use this option on the Connection tab so those dial-out sessions will be terminated automatically (unless you want your computer tying up the phone line all day). ■ Advanced This tab contains options for contact attachment conversion, IMAP settings, message threats when using news services, and such. You have some important settings regarding maintenance for stored messages, which you can find out more about in an upcoming section. Security Features in Windows Mail Windows Mail has two primary security features you should be aware of. Click Tools | Options | Security. You see options for virus protection, downloaded images, and secure mail, shown in Figure 8-9. The following sections review these features. Virus Protection The heading “virus protection” on this tab is misleading. Windows Mail doesn’t provide any real virus protection. You need a standard antivirus software package to scan, locate, and deal with viruses. What this option does is use Internet Explorer security settings, which you can choose from the Internet zone or Restricted Sites zone. By default, the Restricted Sites zone and the check box option provide a warning when an application tries to send mail as you (the user). Although not virus protection in the literal sense, these settings go a long way in preventing viruses and Trojan horses because Windows Mail follows the security restrictions in Internet Explorer. Notice also that by default, suspicious attachments are not allowed either. These settings do provide certain levels of security, and they should be kept enabled as they are by default.
  • 320 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space FIGURE 8-9 Security options Downloading Images By default, all images in an e-mail message are blocked. You can see the images by right-clicking the image and choosing to show the image. Since images and other external content can harbor viruses, this protection level prevents you from downloading items you don’t choose to—and in the case of Internet pornography and other such content, this setting protects your privacy. Secure Mail Windows Mail supports digital IDs and encryption. A digital ID or certificate is a document that allows you to prove your identity when you send an e-mail, and that the message hasn’t been modified since you sent it. The digital ID is sent along with the message as evidence that the message really did come from you. Notice on the Security tab that you can manage your digital IDs by clicking the Digital IDs button, but you must purchase one or more of them first by clicking the Get Digital ID button.
  • Configure Windows Mail 321 This action will take you to a Microsoft Web site that will refer to other sites that sell digital IDs. Once you have the ID, you can then digitally sign your e-mail using your digital ID by clicking Tools | Digitally Sign in the New Mail Message dialog box. When purchasing your digital ID, be sure that the certificate you’re purchasing can be used with Microsoft Mail, since these certificates are used for many different purposes and applications. Notice that you can also encrypt contents of outgoing messages and attachments and choose the option here to always digitally sign outgoing mail. If you click Advanced, you see some Advanced Security Settings, shown in Figure 8-10, that provide some standard encryption and digitally signed message settings. The default settings here are the most commonly used. Message Maintenance There are a few message maintenance settings you should be aware of. Click Tools | Options | Advanced tab. Click Maintenance to open the Maintenance dialog box, shown in Figure 8-11. The options you see here are self-explanatory, but you should keep all of them in mind for the exam. For example, should an exam question ask you how you can delete everything from the Deleted Items folder every time you exit Windows Mail, the check box option on this tab is your answer. Review these options and keep them in mind for the test. FIGURE 8-10 Advanced Security Settings
  • 322 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space FIGURE 8-11 Maintenance SCENARIO & SOLUTION I e-mail a select number of people and I have my junk mail filter set to high. I want to ensure that anyone I e-mail never sends a message that ends up in the junk e-mail folder. How can I do this? Click Tools | Junk E-Mail Options and click the Safe Senders tab. At the bottom of the tab, choose the “Automatically add people I e-mail to the Safe Senders list” check box option. I want to ensure that all deleted messages are permanently deleted from Windows Mail every time I shut down the application. How can I configure this? Click Tools | Options | Advanced tab | Maintenance. On the Maintenance dialog box, click the “Empty messages from the Deleted Items folder on exit” check box and click OK. I notice that messages I receive in Windows Mail automatically have the graphics blocked. I want to stop this behavior. How can I do this? Click Tools | Options | Security and clear the “Block images and other external content in HTML e-mail” check box. I have a digital signature configured for using in Windows Mail. I am writing a message I want to digitally sign. How can I do this? In the New Message window, click Tools | Digitally Sign.
  • Configure Windows Meeting Space 323 CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 8.02 Configure Windows Meeting Space I know a thing or two about sitting through meetings—you probably do too. And yet meetings typically require you to be at a certain place at a certain time in order to “meet” with the other meeting participants. But what if meetings could be held in a virtual space? A place where computers connect with each other to form the meeting without you ever having to set foot into a boardroom? This is the goal of Microsoft’s new Windows Meeting Space application. For the most part, Windows Meeting is a simple utility that helps you connect with other people and easily share documents, programs, and even your desktop anytime, anywhere. In other words, you can create a virtual meeting room right on your computer and invite up to 10 people to join in. In this section, I’ll show you how Windows Meeting Space works and prepare you for a few exam questions that may get tossed your way. Setting Up Windows Meeting Space With Windows Meeting Space, you can collaborate on and share documents and programs as well as your desktop with the people invited to the meeting. The other computer users must be using Windows Vista, but their computer can reside on your local network, it can be somewhere on the Internet, or you can even create an ad hoc wireless network between wireless computers. No matter how they are connected, you can use Windows Meeting Space. In other to begin using Windows Meeting Space, Windows Vista must first turn on the People Near Me feature, enable file replication, and configure Windows Firewall for Windows Meeting Space. Fortunately, Windows Vista can do all of these things for you automatically. Click Start | All Programs | Windows Meeting Space. You’ll see a dialog box appear, shown in Figure 8-12, asking if you are ready to set up Windows Meeting Space. Click Yes to continue. In the People Near Me dialog box, choose a display name and whether or not you want to sign in when Windows starts. People Near Me is a Windows Vista networking feature that identifies other computers near you and allows them to send you invitations from various programs, such as Windows Meeting Space. As you can see in Figure 8-13, you can choose to allow invitations from anyone, trusted contacts, or no one. Typically, the Anyone setting is fine here.
  • 324 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space FIGURE 8-12 Setup Message Once your system is configured, the Windows Meeting Space dialog box appears, shown in Figure 8-14. As it is, the dialog box is not too exciting, but you have to start using it for meeting space to be something worthwhile. FIGURE 8-13 People Near Me
  • Configure Windows Meeting Space 325 FIGURE 8-14 Windows Meeting Space Setting Up a New Meeting Now that you’re set up and ready to use Windows Meeting Space, your first task is to start a new meeting. In Windows Meeting Space, click Start A New Meeting. Type a name for the meeting and enter a password, which must be at least eight characters long, as shown in Figure 8-15. Click the Options link. In the Options dialog box, shown in Figure 8-16, you can choose whether or not you want other people near you to be able to see this meeting or not (which essentially makes the meeting public or private). By default, any people near you who have Windows Meeting Space open are automatically invited to the meeting. This feature saves you the trouble of having to actually invite people near you. However, you may not want everyone near you to see the meeting, in which can you can use the private option and simply invite the participants you want to attend. If you’re not connected to a network, you’ll also see the option to create a private, ad hoc wireless network as well.
  • 326 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space FIGURE 8-15 Choosing a meeting name and password FIGURE 8-16 Options dialog box
  • Configure Windows Meeting Space 327 FIGURE 8-17 Meeting Space When you’re done, click the “create a meeting” button to create the meeting. Once the meeting is created, you’ll see the meeting space, shown in Figure 8-17. Invite People to the Meeting Once you have your meeting space created, you can now invite people to your meeting. In the Meeting Space, click the Invite People icon. There are three ways that you can invite people: ■ If you already have people near you, they will appear in a dialog box once you click Invite People. Just click the check boxes next to their names and click Send Invitations. ■ If you want to invite people who are not near you, you can do so with an e-mail message. Click Invite Others in the Meeting Space. Choose the Send An Invitation In E-Mail option. This will open an e-mail message with the meeting file attached so that others can join the meeting, shown in Figure 8-18. ■ Finally, you can also create an invitation file and get it to meeting recipients in another way. Just click Invite People | Invite Others | Create An Invitation File | Save. You can now share the meeting invitation file in any way necessary.
  • 328 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space FIGURE 8-18 Invitation e-mail Share Items at the Meeting Now that you have invited people to your meeting, you can share files, programs, and even your desktop if you like. Click the Share A Program Or Your Desktop icon in the Meeting Space, or click the Share button on the toolbar. Click OK to the message about others seeing your desktop. You’ll then see a dialog box, shown in Figure 8-19, where you can choose a program, share your desktop, or use the Browse button to browse for a file to open and share. FIGURE 8-19 Sharing items
  • Configure Windows Meeting Space 329 FIGURE 8-20 Shared item in the Meeting Space Make your selections. The appropriate programs will be opened and items you have selected will be shared. As you can see in Figure 8-20, the item you are now sharing appears listed in the meeting space. Notice that you can see how the shared session looks on other computers and you can also stop sharing the item at any time. Add a Handout to the Meeting You can add a handout to the meeting. When you add a handout, a copy of the file you choose to use for a handout is copied to each meeting participant’s computer. This is a quick and easy way to share copies of file with other users, which they will keep once the meeting has ended. Click the Handout icon in the Meeting Space, then simply browse for the item you want to share. As Figure 8-21 shows, the handout item will then appear in the Handouts section of the Meeting Space and will be copied to other meeting participants’ computers. FIGURE 8-21 Handouts at this meeting
  • 330 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space Note that participants can make changes to the handout. Those changes are then copied to the other participants’ handouts so that everyone always has the same handout. This is a great way to brainstorm together. However, the original handout is not affected by this editing process. During a meeting, you always maintain control of your desktop and programs. You can pass control to someone else temporarily by clicking Give Control, but you can always take it back by clicking Take Control or pressing the Windows logo key-ESC. Keep these options in mind for exam questions that place you in a situation where you need to quickly gain control of your desktop or programs. Troubleshooting Windows Meeting Space There are a few common problems you may encounter when using Windows Meeting Space, and you need to be aware of the troubleshooting solutions for the real world as well as the exam. The following sections give you the typical problems and solutions. I Can’t See a Meeting or Join One This problem typically happens because someone is not invited who should have been, the meeting attendee is typing the incorrect password to the meeting, or the person who is setting up the meeting doesn’t have the correct computer configuration. If everyone who needs to attend can’t see or join, you may need to configure Windows Firewall on the meeting computer. Open Windows Firewall properties, click the Exceptions tab, and then select Windows Meeting Space and click OK, as shown in Figure 8-22. I Don’t See a Certain Person in the Invite People Dialog Box This problem most often occurs because you are not signed in to People Near Me. Open People Near Me in Control Panel and sign in. It is important to note that People Near Me only works for computers on the same subnet. If your computer resides within a network that has different subnets, you can’t use People Near Me to invite the person. However, you can still send that person an e-mail invitation to join the meeting.
  • Configure Windows Meeting Space 331 FIGURE 8-22 Enable Windows Meeting Space in Windows Firewall I’m Having Problems Connecting to a Meeting or Others Can’t Connect to My Meeting There are a few different reasons connection problems like this may occur: ■ Other people may not have Windows Firewall configured to allow Windows Meeting Space ■ Other people may not be signed in to People Near Me. ■ Make sure the people you want to attend your meeting are all on the same subnet, or use an e-mail invitation if they are not. ■ People residing in other corporate networks may have firewall controls or group policies preventing the connection. These controls are put in place by the company’s network administration. ■ There could be problems with services. In other to use Windows Meeting Space, the Peer Name Resolution Protocol, Peer Networking Grouping, Peer Networking Identity Manager, and DFS Replication services must be running. You can verify that these services are running by opening the Services console in Administrative Tools folder in Control Panel.
  • 332 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space If you choose to create an ad hoc wireless network in order to have a meeting, you’ll lose your network connection.This is a normal issue because you can be connected to only one wireless network at a time. Once you leave the meeting, you can reconnect to your wireless network as normal. Keep this issue in mind for the exam! Other Quick Troubleshooting Issues Keep these quick problems and solutions in mind as well: ■ You can’t share Encrypting File System (EFS) files. ■ If meeting participants see black areas on their screens covering your shared desktop or a program, you have another window open over these programs that is not shared. Minimize any additional windows during a sharing session to resolve the problem. ■ Windows Meeting Space makes a duplicate version of any handout that you share. Changes made to that duplicate are not saved to your original document. To save the handout changes, drag the documents to a place you want to save them on your computer. ■ IPv6 must be enabled on at least one network adapter in order for Windows Meeting Space to work. You can verify this configuration using IP properties. EXERCISE 8-2 Verifying Firewall Settings and Services If you’re having problems with Windows Meeting Space, you should verify that Firewall settings and services are enabled and configured. Follow these steps to verify those items: 1. Click Start | Control Panel | Security Center. 2. Click Windows Firewall and then click Change Settings. 3. Click the Exceptions tab and verify that Windows Meeting Space is selected in the list of programs. If not, select it and click OK. Close Firewall Settings. 4. Click Start | Control Panel | People Near Me. Click the Sign In tab and sign in so that people can see you on the network, as shown here:
  • Configure Windows Meeting Space 333 5. Click Start | Control Panel | Administrative Tools. Double-click Services. 6. In the Services console, shown next, verify that Peer Name Resolution Protocol, Peer Networking Grouping, Peer Networking Identity Manager, and DFS Replication services are all running.
  • 334 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space SCENARIO & SOLUTION I am having a meeting with people in my workgroup, but there is one person who works from home via a DSL connection. Can I include that person in the meeting? Yes. The People Near Me option works only with people on your subnet/workgroup, but you can send an e-mail invitation to anyone on your network or the Internet. I have some files with an .efs extension that I want to make available during a meeting. However, I can’t seem to use these files with Windows Meeting Space. Why? Files that have an .efs extension are Encrypting File System (EFS) files. Since they are encrypted, they cannot be used with Windows Meeting Space. You would need to decrypt the files first. CERTIFICATION SUMMARY In this chapter, you explored two important Windows Vista applications. Windows Mail is the included Web mail client included with Windows Vista. Windows Mail, which replaces Outlook Express, supports both POP and IMAP mail, but HTTP mail is not supported. When you first open Windows Mail, you are prompted to create an initial account. However, you can create additional accounts, edit accounts, or delete accounts by clicking Tools | Accounts. You can also adjust the Windows Mail interface, and change the panes as desired. In an effort to reduce spam and other junk mail, you can create message rules within Windows Mail. There is also a phishing filter and virus protection, as well as protection against downloaded images. Windows Mail also supports digital IDs and mail encryption. Windows Meeting Space is a new application in Windows Vista that enables you to hold virtual meetings for the purpose of discussion, sharing documents, applications, and even your entire desktop. You can use Windows Vista’s People Near Me feature in order to invite people to the meeting, but all meeting participants must have Windows Vista configured for Windows Meeting Space, which enables several services and allows the Windows Meeting Space application to function through Windows Firewall. You can invite people through People Near Me on your local subnet or workgroup, but you can also invite others from any network location, including the Internet, through the e-mail invitation feature.
  • Two-Minute Dril ✓ 335 TWO-MINUTE DRILL Configure Windows Mail ❑ Windows Mail supports POP and IMAP protocols. HTTP mail is not supported. ❑ Within Windows Mail, you can set up multiple e-mail and news accounts. You can click Tools | Accounts to edit, create, or remove accounts. ❑ You can format messages in a variety of ways using the text editing tool. You can also assign a priority to the message using the Message menu. ❑ You can create message rules by clicking Tools | Message Rules. ❑ You can create blocked and allowed senders lists to further manage spam. ❑ Choose Tools | Options to configure many different Windows Mail features. The Advanced tab enables you to configure attachment conversion, and message maintenance options. ❑ Windows Mail provides virus protection through Internet Explorer zones. This is a security feature, but it should not be mistaken for real antivirus protection. ❑ Windows Mail supports digital IDs and encryption. Configure Windows Meeting Space ❑ Windows Meeting Space enables you to hold a virtual meeting, including file and application sharing as well as access to your desktop. ❑ You can connect with a meeting via People Near Me or through an invitation file. People Near Me only works on the same subnet or workgroup. ❑ You can prevent People Near Me from seeing the meeting session by choosing the Do Not Allow option when you create the meeting. Then, you’ll need to invite people to the meeting that you want to attend. ❑ You can create an ad hoc wireless meeting as well, but this will disrupt your existing wireless network connection until the meeting has ended because you can have only one wireless connection at a time. ❑ You can take control of your applications or desktop at any time during the meeting. ❑ Windows Firewall must be configured to allow Windows Meeting Space. This is one of the first troubleshooting steps you should take if someone is having problems connecting to a meeting. ❑ All users not on your subnet that you want to invite to a meeting can be invited via an e-mail invitation.
  • 336 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space SELF TEST The following questions will help you measure your understanding of the material presented in this chapter. Read all the choices carefully because there might be more than one correct answer. Choose all correct answers for each question. Configure Windows Mail 1. You use Windows Mail on Windows Vista Home Premium. You need to configure Windows Mail so that it retrieves your Hotmail account mail, allowing you to send and receive Hotmail e-mail from within Windows Mail. How can you configure this? A. Choose Tools | Options and create a new HTTP account. B. Choose Tools | Options and create a new IMAP account. C. Configure Windows Mail to send and receive HTTP mail via POP3. D. Windows Mail does not support HTTP, and therefore Hotmail cannot be used with Windows Mail. 2. You have created a new mail message as shown in the illustration. You need to send this message with a high priority because you need the recipient to read the message as soon as possible. What can you do? A. Right-click the Send button and click High Importance. B. Open Tools | Options and configure mail to be sent with High Importance.
  • Self Test 337 C. Use the Message menu and point to Set Priority to choose the High Priority setting. D. Encrypt the message to send it as a high-priority message. 3. A user at a client site sends you a lot of work related e-mails. You have created a folder for this user in Windows Mail, and you would like Windows Mail to automatically place incoming mail from this user into the folder, rather than holding it in your inbox. How can you configure this? A. Add the user to the Safe Senders list. B. Create a message rule. C. Turn off the phishing filter. D. Use Tools | Options to create an account for the user within Windows Mail. 4. Your network uses Microsoft Exchange Server. One of your users was on a business trip for a month and used Windows Mail to access messages on the Exchange Server. Upon returning, the user expected to still find all of his messages on the Exchange Server, but they are not there. He still has his messages in his inbox in Windows Mail, but he needs the messages on the Exchange Server so that he can access them via Microsoft Outlook. You need to solve this problem. What should you do? A. Forward all of the messages from the inbox back to the user’s e-mail address for the Exchange Server. B. Export the messages as a .pst file, and then import them back into Exchange. C. Use the Export to Exchange feature. D. The messages cannot be recovered on the Exchange Server because of the POP/IMAP configuration in Windows Mail. 5. You have a certain account configured in Windows Mail. The mail servers for this account have recently changed. They now require all POP3 mail to be accessed using SSL. Without the SSL configuration, you will not be able to receive your mail. You need to reconfigure the account to require SSL. What do you need to do? (Choose two.) A. Open Tools | Accounts. Select the account and click Properties. B. Open Tools | Accounts. Select the account and click Delete. C. Re-create the account, requiring an SSL connection for POP3. D. In the Properties dialog box, choose the option requiring a secure connection for incoming mail. E. In the Properties dialog box, choose the option requiring a secure connection for outgoing mail. 6. On your network, a user runs Windows Mail. This user reports that she is receiving a lot of junk e-mails from the foreign domain, .au. For her business, she has no reason to ever receive e-mail from this domain and she would like the domain blocked so that all .au messages are
  • 338 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space sent automatically to her junk e-mail folder. Further, the user wants to make sure that no other messages, besides the .au domain messages, are identified as junk e-mail. What do you need to do? (Choose all that apply.) A. Click Tools | Junk E-Mail and click the International tab. Choose to block the .au domain. B. Click Tools | Junk E-Mail. On the Safe Senders list, add all users that should not be blocked. C. Click Tools | Junk E-Mail. On the Safe Senders list, add the .au domain. D. Configure the junk e-mail protection level to No Automatic Filtering. E. Configure the junk e-mail protection level to High. 7. A user on your network will be traveling with her Windows Vista laptop and checking mail remotely using Windows Mail. The user wants to leave a copy of all messages on the mail server until she returns and can manage her mail via Microsoft Outlook. She has asked you to help her configure Windows Mail so that copies are left on the mail server. What do you need to do? A. Click Tools | Options | Advanced. Choose the option to leave a copy of messages on the server. B. Click Tools | Accounts. Select the account, click Properties, click Advanced, and choose the option to leave a copy of messages on the server. C. Choose File | Export and choose to export the messages to Microsoft Exchange. D. Before sending the message, use the Copy button in the new e-mail message. 8. You use Windows Mail. You receive a number of sensitive e-mails, and when you shut down Windows Mail, you would like any messages that have been added to the Deleted Items folder to be automatically and permanently deleted from your computer. How can you do this? A. Click Tools | Options | Advanced. Select the Delete All Upon Exit option. B. Click Tools | Options | Advanced. Click the Maintenance button and click the option to have everything deleted from Deleted Items when you exit Windows Mail. C. Choose Tools | Options | Mail. Click the Maintenance button and click the option to have everything deleted from Deleted Items when you exit Windows Mail. D. Choose Tools | Options | Maintenance. Choose the option to have everything deleted from the Deleted Items folder when you exit Windows Mail. 9. You only use Windows Mail to e-mail a few people. Yet, you seem to still receive a lot of junk e-mails. You want all messages that come to your inbox to go directly to the junk e-mail folder except those few people that you e-mail. Furthermore, if you e-mail someone and that person e-mails you back, you want to ensure that the message does not go to the junk e-mail folder. How can you configure this? (Choose all that apply.) A. Add desired e-mail addresses to the Safe Senders list. B. Add all other e-mail addresses to the Blocked Senders list.
  • Self Test 339 C. For each person that is later e-mailed, add that person to the Safe Senders list as well. D. On the Safe Sender’s list, click the check box option that automatically adds any e-mail address to which you send mail to the Safe Sender’s list. E. Set the Junk Mail filter to Safe List. F. Set the Junk Mail filter to High. 10. On your Windows Vista computer, you notice that you are receiving a lot of e-mails asking you to update your account information at eBay and other e-commerce sites. You have even received e-mails telling you that you have inherited money from a foreign bank and you need to provide your banking accounts and credentials. You want to configure Windows Mail so that such messages are automatically sent to the junk e-mail folder without valid e-mail being identified as junk. What can you do? A. Create a message rule deleting such messages. B. Set the automatic filtering level to high. C. Add the users’ e-mail addresses to the blocked senders list. D. Configure the phishing filter so that e-mails identified as phishing e-mails are sent to the junk e-mail folder. Configure Windows Meeting Space 11. Which statement is not true regarding People Near Me in Windows Vista? A. The feature only works with users on your workgroup or subnet. B. The feature only works on Windows Vista computers. C. The feature will work with any user on your network, regardless of subnet. D. You must sign in for the feature to work. 12. You hold numerous meetings on your Windows Vista computer using Windows Meeting Space. You have a lot of people on your subnet who use People Near Me. You only want certain individuals to see meetings that are available, not everyone who has a Windows Vista computer configured with People Near Me. What can you do? A. Choose the option to send invitations to trusted contacts through People Near Me. B. Choose to e-mail the invitations rather than have them published via People Near Me. C. Choose to send People Near Me invitations using only your Address Book. D. Choose to block the meeting to users with no password. 13. You need to hold a meeting using Windows Meeting Space. You have made the meeting available using People Near Me. Everyone has been able to connect to the meeting. However, there is a user on your subnet who is having problems connecting via People Near Me. You need
  • 340 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space to get this user in the meeting and troubleshoot the connection problem later. What can you do to quickly resolve this problem? A. Send the user an e-mail invitation. B. Use Windows Mail to send the IP address information for the meeting. C. Configure the user’s Software Explorer in Windows Defender to allow People Near Me to start when Windows starts. D. Have the user log on with an administrator account. 14. A user at your company has started a Windows Meeting Space meeting. All users on the network use laptop computers that are connected to the same subnet via a wireless router. The user configures Windows Meeting Space to create an ad hoc wireless network for the meeting. Now, the user complains that her computer will not connect to the wireless network she normally connects to. What do you need to do to restore network connectivity? A. Use the Options dialog box and turn off the “Create a private ad hoc wireless network” option. B. Configure a manual TCP/IP address for the wireless network. C. Create a VPN to use the wireless network while using the ad hoc network. D. Create an alternative network connection. 15. A user on your network reports that all Windows Meeting Space connections are blocked on his computer. You need to enable Windows Meeting Space connections. What do you need to troubleshoot first? A. Ensure that People Near Me is turned on. B. Verify in the Services that File Replication is turned on. C. Verify that Windows Firewall is configured to allow Windows Meeting Space. D. Verify that IPv6 is in use. 16. During a Windows Meeting Space Meeting, you have given control of your desktop to another meeting participant. Now, you need to take control back. Which answer options are correct ways to take control? (Choose all that apply.) A. Click Revert Control. B. Click Take Control. C. Press SPACEBAR-ESC. D. Press Windows logo key-ESC. 17. You are having problems with a certain Windows Vista Ultimate computer and Windows Meeting Space. You verify that Windows Firewall has an exception allowing Windows Meeting Space. You also want to verify that other necessary services are running. You open the Services console in Administrative Tools in Control Panel. Which of the following services is not necessary for Windows Meeting Space?
  • Lab Question A. B. C. D. 341 Peer Name Resolution DFS Replication EFS Peer Networking Identity Manager 18. During a Windows Meeting Space meeting, several changes were made to a handout that you provided. After the meeting, you discover that none of the changes were saved to the original file. You need to save changes to files that are altered during a Windows Meeting Space meeting. What do you need to do at the next meeting? A. Choose the Update Original File option in Windows Meeting Space. B. Drag the documents you want to save to a location on your computer to save them. C. Create a copy of the original file and save it during the meeting. D. Use an EFS file. LAB QUESTION A user on your network has a Windows Vista Ultimate computer. The user needs her Windows Mail configuration to meet a set of specific options. You need to configure Windows Mail to ■ Use an SSL connection on the outgoing mail ■ Leave a copy of the messages on the mail server ■ Hear a sound when a new mail message arrives ■ Digitally sign all outgoing messages How can you configure these options?
  • 342 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space SELF TEST ANSWERS Configuring Windows Mail ✓ 1. ® D. Windows Mail does not support HTTP mail. Therefore, a typical Hotmail account cannot be configured within Windows Mail. ® A, B, and C are all incorrect because Windows Mail does not support HTTP mail. ˚ ✓ 2. ® C. You can assign a Low, Medium, or High setting to a message using the Message menu. ® A, B, and D are all incorrect because none of these options will enable you to send a high˚ priority message. ✓ 3. ® B. You can create a message rule that will cause Windows Mail to automatically place e-mail from the user into the desired folder. ® A and C are incorrect answers because neither of these options will provide the desired ˚ configuration. D is incorrect because you cannot create a “user” account within Windows Mail. ✓ 4. ® C. If you click File | Export, you see that Windows Mail can export messages in your inbox (or any folder) directly back to Microsoft Exchange on an Exchange network. In this scenario, the user does not have POP3 configured to keep a copy of the message on the Exchange server; therefore, none are there. The only solution is to export the messages back to Exchange. ® A is incorrect because you don’t need to forward every message back—you can simply ˚ export them. B is also incorrect because you don’t need to use a PST file with Exchange. D is incorrect, since there is a solution to this problem. ✓ 5. ® A and D. POP3 is the protocol used for incoming mail. Since you need to change the configuration to require an SSL connection, simply open Tools | Accounts and choose the option to require a secure connection for incoming mail. ® B, C, and E are all incorrect because these actions will not resolve the problem. ˚ ✓ 6. ® A and D. Use the International tab to block the .au domain. No messages with the .au domain will be allowed in the user’s inbox. Then, turn off automatic filtering. This ensures that no other messages are filtered to the junk e-mail folder. ® B, C, and E are incorrect because none of these options will provide a solution to the ˚ problem. ✓ 7. ® B. You can access account properties, and then click the Advanced tab. Under the Delivery heading, click Leave A Copy Of Messages On Server. ® A, C, and D are all incorrect because none of these options will enable you to leave a copy ˚ of the messages on the server.
  • Self Test Answers 343 ✓ 8. ® B. Click Tools | Options | Advanced. Click Maintenance. Here, you can choose an option to have all messages in the Deleted Items folder deleted when you exit Windows Mail. ® A, C, and D are incorrect because none of these answer options enable you to configure the ˚ desired outcome. ✓ 9. ® A, D, and E. Add all desired e-mail addresses to the Safe Sender’s list, but also click the check box toward the bottom of the window allowing any address you e-mail to be added automatically to the Safe Sender’s list. Then, change the filtering setting to Safe List. This action will send all e-mail directly to the junk e-mail folder except e-mail from people on the Safe List. ® B, C, and F are incorrect because none of these options will provide the desired ˚ configuration. ✓ 10. ® D. These kinds of phishing messages can be identified by the phishing filter. You can also choose to have the filter automatically move messages identified as phishing messages to the junk e-mail folder. ® A, B, and C are incorrect because none of these options will identify phishing e-mail and ˚ automatically handle it. Configure Windows Meeting Space ✓ 11. ® C. The People Near Me feature only works on your local subnet or workgroup—not an entire network with multiple subnets. ® A, B, and D are incorrect; these are actual features of People Near Me. ˚ ✓ 12. ® B. In this case, you should e-mail the invitations instead of making the meeting available via People Near Me. ® A, C, and D are incorrect because none of these options will enable you to invite the ˚ desired users. ✓ 13. ® A. If a user has problems connecting to a meeting, or if the user resides on a different subnet or the Internet, simply send the user an e-mail invitation that the user can access in order to connect to the meeting. This is the fastest solution. ® B, C, and D are all incorrect because none of these options will provide a solution. ˚ ✓ 14. ® A. Since the users are all connected to the same wireless network, you don’t need an ad hoc network for this meeting. In cases where an ad hoc network is necessary, connectivity to the initial wireless network will be lost because there cannot be two wireless connections. ® B, C, and D are incorrect. None of these options provide a real networking solution, since ˚ Windows Vista will not support two wireless connections at the same time. ✓ 15. ® C. The first thing you should do is verify that Windows Firewall is not blocking Windows Meeting Space. Check the Exceptions tab to ensure that Windows Meeting Space is allowed. ® A, B, and D are incorrect. Although all of these options are possible troubleshooting issues, ˚ the first thing you should check is Windows Firewall, since all connections are blocked.
  • 344 Chapter 8: Configure Windows Mail and Windows Meeting Space ✓ 16. ® B and D. If you need to take control of your desktop back, just click Take Control or press the Windows logo key-ESC. ® A and C are not options that are actually available. ˚ ✓ 17. ® C. The Encrypting File System is not a necessary part of Windows Meeting Space. In fact, files that use EFS cannot be shared in a Windows Meeting Space meeting. ® A, B, and D are incorrect because all of these services are necessary. ˚ ✓ 18. ® B. When you use a document in a meeting, a copy is made of the original. Changes made to the copy are not saved to the original, so if you want to save the changes, simply drag the document to a location on your computer in order to save it. ® A and C are incorrect because these are not actual options you can configure. D is incorrect ˚ because you cannot use EFS files with Windows Meeting Space. LAB ANSWER Follow these steps to achieve the desired configuration: 1. Click Start | Windows Mail. 2. Click Tools | Accounts. Select the account and click Properties. 3. Click the Advanced tab and select the option “This server requires a secure connection (SSL)” under Outgoing Mail (SMTP).
  • Lab Answer 345 4. Also on the Advanced tab (see previous illustration), select “Leave a copy of messages on server.” 5. Click Tools | Options. 6. On the General tab, click “Play sound when new messages arrive,” as shown here: 7. Click the Security tab and click Digitally Sign All Outgoing Messages. You’ll need to purchase a digital certificate for this feature to work.
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  • 9 Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVES 9.01 Configure Windows Sidebar 9.02 Configure Windows Calendar 9.03 Configure Windows Fax and Scan ✓ Q&A Two-Minute Drill Self Test
  • 348 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan W indows Vista is an operating system full of different features that are useful to the home user as well as the office user. Microsoft expects you, as an IT professional, to have a working knowledge of these different features—how to use them, how to configure them, and how to troubleshoot various problems that might arise. You can expect the MCTS exam to have the same focus. In this chapter, we’ll consider three of these features, Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan. Windows Sidebar is a new feature in Windows Vista that enables you to have dynamic content directly on your desktop. It’s a fun feature, but it can also be quite useful in a number of situations. Windows Calendar is a good addition to Windows Vista. With options for appointments and calendar sharing, it’s a built-in feature that the typical home or office user will find helpful. Finally, Fax and Scan continues to appear in Windows Vista, but with a new interface and easier, more flexible, options. The exam may ask you a variety of questions from these features. More likely, the exam will put you in a situation where there is an issue or a problem you need to solve, or at least a configuration need that you are required to perform. We’ll consider these issues throughout this chapter, and as with all aspects of Windows Vista, make sure you get some hands-on practice with these important tools. CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 9.01 Configure Windows Sidebar One of the new features you’ll see immediately in Windows Vista is the Windows Sidebar. The Sidebar is the strip you see running along the right side of your desktop. It probably came to you configured with some default icons, which are called gadgets. They are essentially mini-programs, many of which can bring dynamic content to the desktop. The good news is the Sidebar is customizable: you can make it hold all kinds of things that are useful to you, and you can make it look and behave the way you want it to. The Windows Sidebar, shown in Figure 9-1, gives you easy access to different kinds of gadgets, some of which are essentially tools that you might use over and over again. For example, I like keeping a calculator on the Sidebar because this is a basic tool I use all of time. By default, the Sidebar appears on the right side of your screen and it always starts up whenever you start Windows. When you work with
  • Configure Windows Sidebar 349 FIGURE 9-1 Windows Sidebar is the long vertical bar you see when you start Windows Windows Vista, other windows can cover up the sidebar by default, but this is a behavior that you can change. Configuring the Sidebar You can customize the sidebar by changing its basic properties. However, there are only a few basic properties you can change. Click Start | Control Panel | Windows Sidebar. You’ll see a basic properties dialog box appear, shown in Figure 9-2. You can also access this dialog box by right-clicking an empty area of the Sidebar and clicking Properties.
  • 350 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan FIGURE 9-2 Windows Sidebar options You have the following options: ■ Start Sidebar When Windows Starts This option is enabled by default and is typically the best setting because you’ll see your Sidebar content as soon as you start Windows. If you don’t want the Sidebar to start with Windows, however, just clear the check box. ■ Sidebar Is Always On Top Of Other Windows This option will always keep the Sidebar on top of any window that is open. This feature is good in that it keeps the Sidebar content visible to you, but you may find that it gets in the way as you work with Vista and other programs, depending on the size of your monitor. The good news is you can try this setting and always change it back if you don’t like it. Click the check box to enable it. ■ Display Sidebar On This Side Of Screen You see a right or left radio button option. By default, the sidebar starts on the right side of the screen, but you can change it here if you like. Notice that the sidebar is a not an
  • Configure Windows Sidebar 351 old-style Windows toolbar. You can’t drag it around the screen: it either resides on the right or left side, depending on your choice here. ■ Display Sidebar On Monitor This option is useful for people that are using a multiple monitor configuration. By default, the setting here is 1 because Vista assumes that you’re using one monitor. However, if you’re using a multiple display, you can have the Sidebar appear on whichever monitor you prefer. ■ View List Of Running Gadgets You can click this button to see the gadgets that are currently on the Sidebar. You’ll see an additional dialog box appear listing the gadgets, shown in Figure 9-3. You can select one and click the Remove button to remove it from the Sidebar. Note that removing a gadget from the sidebar doesn’t remove the gadget from your computer: you can always put the gadget back on the Sidebar later if you like. FIGURE 9-3 Select a gadget and click Remove to remove it from the Sidebar.
  • 352 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan Keep the Sidebar’s properties in mind for the exam. The exam may give you a situation where the Sidebar stays on top of windows that you open, thus preventing you from closing those windows, since the controls are covered. You simply need to change the properties settings here to resolve the problem. Unfortunately, you can’t minimize and maximize the sidebar as you can other windows—it is either open or closed. If you want to close the Sidebar, right-click the Windows Sidebar Notification Area icon and click Exit. The Sidebar will restart once you restart Windows. Adding, Removing, and Detaching Gadgets You can easily add, remove, and detach gadgets on the Sidebar at any time and in any way that you want. You can also download more gadgets from the Internet to your computer. If you right-click an empty area of the Sidebar and choose Add Gadgets, a window appears listing all of the gadgets currently on your computer. You can also click the plus sign (+) toward the top of the Sidebar to open the gadgets window as well, as shown in Figure 9-4. FIGURE 9-4 Click the Plus sign to add gadgets.
  • Configure Windows Sidebar 353 You can scroll through the gadgets and even search for one in particular using the search dialog box. Notice that if you select a gadget, a short summary of what the gadget does appears in the bottom half of the window, as you can see in Figure 9-5, if you click the Show Details icon. Once you’ve found the gadget that you want to add, simply drag it to the Sidebar. You can also double-click a gadget to install it to the Sidebar as well. Notice that you can drag the gadget to any location on the Sidebar that you want. If you rightclick a gadget, you’ll notice a Move option. Use the Move feature if you can’t drag a gadget to a new location on the Sidebar. Once you choose Move, you’ll be able to move the gadget around as desired. You can also remove a gadget from the Sidebar at any time. This action doesn’t remove the gadget from your computer—it simply removes it from the Sidebar. You can always return to the Gadgets window and add the gadget again. To remove a Gadget, simply right-click it and click Remove. FIGURE 9-5 Locate the desired gadget.
  • 354 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan FIGURE 9-6 Detached gadgets are often larger and easier to work with. Detaching a Gadget from the Sidebar Keep in mind that gadgets are mini-programs. Since this is the case, you may want to detach a gadget from the sidebar and use it on your desktop for a period of time. This is especially helpful for gadgets that you want to interact with. For example, in Figure 9-6, I have detached the weather gadget. Now it appears on my Desktop and expands to a larger version so that I can work with it more easily. Once I’m done, I can simply put it back on the Sidebar. To detach a gadget from the Sidebar, simply right-click the gadget and click Detach From Sidebar. You can re-attach the gadget to the Sidebar by right-clicking it and clicking Attach To Sidebar or simply by dragging it back to the Sidebar. An alternative use here is to detach a particular gadget and close the Sidebar. Let’s say that I really want to keep the calculator gadget on my desktop at all times, but I don’t want the sidebar on the desktop. All you need to do is detach the gadget and close the Sidebar. Detached gadgets stay on the desktop, even if you close the sidebar. Customizing Gadgets Some gadgets give you the ability to customize certain things about them, depending on the gadget. If you right-click a gadget on the Sidebar and see a Settings button, then the gadget has some customizable features you can explore. Since every gadget has its own setting options, we’ll not explore each setting available (and besides, most of them are self-explanatory); however, let’s take a look at the clock gadget as an example. As you can see in Figure 9-7, I have accessed the options for the clock. The clock options give you the option to choose a clock style by clicking through the selection arrows. You can then give the clock a name, choose your time zone, and decide if you want to show the second hand on the clock or not. Once you’re done, simply click OK to apply your settings. You have a few gadgets that are installed with Windows Vista by default. However, you can find many additional gadgets on the Internet. If you right-click the Sidebar and click Add Gadgets, you can click the Get More Gadgets Online link.
  • Configure Windows Sidebar 355 FIGURE 9-7 Options for the clock gadget This will take you to the Windows Vista Gadgets gallery, as you can see in Figure 9-8. Here, you can scroll through the available gadgets, search for a particular gadget, and download any gadget that you want to your computer. You can then use it as you would any other gadget. You can also access www.microsoftgadgets.com to find additional gadgets and download them as well. Since a gadget is essentially a miniprogram, make sure you only download gadgets from trusted sources; otherwise, they could contain malware. The word “opacity” means the degree to which something is opaque. If you right-click a gadget, you’ll see an option for Opacity on the menu, which then provides a pop-out menu where you can choose the opacity level in terms of a percentage. If you choose a higher opacity level, the gadget will appear more opaque on the Sidebar—at least until you hover your mouse over it.This setting is good if you want the Sidebar in use, but you want the gadgets less noticeable when you’re not actually using them. So, if you face an exam question about a gadget that is very “dim,” all you need to do is adjust the opacity setting.
  • 356 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan FIGURE 9-8 Find more gadgets online EXERCISE 9-1 Adding, Configuring, and Removing a Gadget In this exercise, you’ll walk through the steps of adding, configuring, and removing a gadget. For this exercise, we’ll work with the clock gadget, which is available in Windows Vista by default: 1. Click the Gadgets button on the Sidebar, or just right-click an empty area of the Sidebar and click Add Gadgets.
  • Configure Windows Sidebar 357 2. In the Gadgets window that appears, drag the clock from the selection list to the Sidebar. The clock is added to the Sidebar. 3. Right-click the clock gadget and click Options. 4. On the Clock’s options dialog box, choose a clock style. Give the clock a name if desired and choose whether to show the second hand or not, and then click OK. 5. Now, click and drag the clock with your mouse and drag it off the Sidebar to your desktop. Notice that you can move the clock around to any location on the desktop that you like. Now, drag the clock back to the Sidebar. 6. To remove the clock from the Sidebar, click the Close button that appears next to it when you hover your mouse over the gadget, or right-click it and click Close Gadget. SCENARIO & SOLUTION I have several windows open, but I need to see the gadgets for a moment. Is there an easy way to get to them? Right-click the Windows Sidebar icon in the Notification Area and click Bring Gadgets To Front. This will put the gadgets on top of the currently open windows for easy access. How can I have gadgets on the Sidebar but make them less noticeable against the background? Right-click each gadget and adjust the opacity level until you have a percentage that you like. The lower the opacity percentage, the more “see-through” the gadgets become until you hover over them with your mouse. I want the Sidebar to always stay on top of other windows I open. How can I configure this option? Right-click an empty area of the Sidebar and click Properties. On the Sidebar properties dialog box, click the “Sidebar is always on top of other windows” check box and click OK.
  • 358 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 9.02 Configure Windows Calendar Windows Calendar is a simple but powerful calendar application. Home as well as network users will find its features useful, and the exam will expect you to answer a few important questions about its configuration. You can open Windows Calendar by clicking Start | All Programs | Windows Calendar. As you can see in Figure 9-9, Windows Calendar provides you with a simple interface that you’ll be able to use in no time. You have the following general areas: ■ Menu bar The menu bar contains typical Windows menus, such as File, Edit, View, Share, and Help. You can access these menus to use your calendar and configure it. ■ Toolbar The toolbar contains items that you’ll typically use, such as a New Appointment button, a New Task button, and so forth. FIGURE 9-9 Windows Calendar
  • Configure Windows Calendar 359 ■ Navigation pane On the left side of the interface, you see the Navigation pane, which contains the current month’s calendar, a list of additional calendars you have created (if any), and a list of any tasks you have made (if any). ■ Day column In the day column, you see the current day selected on the calendar to the left. Here, you’ll see appointments and tasks for the day. You can switch from day view to work week, week, or month by clicking the View menu on the toolbar. ■ Details pane On the right side of the calendar, you see a details pane for the current calendar, including color options and sharing options. Create Appointments and Tasks One of the main features of Windows Calendar is appointments and tasks. You can create appointments and tasks, and have the calendar remind you of them as they get close. Both of these tasks are easy and quick, and the following two sections show you how to create appointments and tasks. To create a new appointment, click the New Appointment button on the toolbar. The Details pane now displays the new appointment options. Simply work through the fields on the details pane and enter the correct information for your appointment. Make sure you choose start and end times for your appointment and choose a recurrence or reminder option if desired. As you can see in Figure 9-10, I have created an appointment. When you’re done, you’ll see the appointment appear as a block of time on the day column in the center of the interface, shown in Figure 9-11. Whereas appointments are meetings and events that you need to attend, tasks are simply another kind of appointment to help you remember to get certain things done. You can create a new task by clicking the New Task button on the toolbar. When you do, the details pane now changes to task information that is essentially very similar to the appointment details. Simply complete the fields and give the task a name; it will appear in the Tasks section on your calendar. As you can see in Figure 9-12, I have added a task to my day. Using Multiple Calendars Windows Calendar will let you have more than one calendar. Let’s say you want a calendar for home appointments and tasks and another for business-related appointments or tasks. No matter why you need an additional calendar, you can create multiple calendars and simply click to manage them as needed. To create
  • 360 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan FIGURE 9-10 Create an appointment. FIGURE 9-11 The new appointment appears on the calendar.
  • Configure Windows Calendar 361 FIGURE 9-12 Tasks appear in the Tasks section of the Navigation pane. a new calendar, click File | New Calendar. The new calendar appears in the Calendars section on the Navigation pane. Type a name for the calendar and then choose a calendar color in the Details pane. As you can see in Figure 9-13, I now have two calendars. Simply click the calendar you want to select, and then add appointments and tasks as necessary. You can toggle between calendars easily, since each calendar can have a different color. You can also create calendar groups. If you have a number of calendars, a group can be used to organize them. For example, you might create a group for your personal calendars and another for your shared calendars. Just click File | New Group to create a calendar group. Then, just use your mouse to drag existing calendars into the group. FIGURE 9-13 You can create additional calendars.
  • 362 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan Configuring Calendar Options If you click File | Options, you can choose a few default features of your calendar, as shown in Figure 9-14. The following list gives you a few pointers: ■ By default, the first day of the week is Sunday and the start time for the day is 8 . You can change these defaults to whatever you want using the dropdown menus. m.a ■ By default, reminders appear in Windows Vista with sound, even if Windows Calendar is not running. This is probably the best setting because you will not have to have Windows Calendar open for it to work with your appointments and tasks. ■ By default, the appointment length is one hour and there are no default reminders. You can change this so that the default generally meets your needs (naturally, you can change it to whatever you want in the calendar interface every time you create a new appointment). ■ By default, completed tasks are never hidden, there is no default reminder time, and overdue tasks are color-coded in red. You can change any or all of these options as desired. FIGURE 9-14 Calendar options
  • Configure Windows Calendar 363 Sharing a Calendar Windows Calendar has a sharing feature that makes sharing your calendar or putting it on your Web site easy. If you click the Share menu option, you see that you can publish your calendar, subscribe to an existing Windows Calendar on a Web site, or send your calendar via e-mail. If you click the Publish option, you see a single window, shown in Figure 9-15, where you can choose a server location and choose to automatically publish changes to the calendar on the Internet. Naturally, the calendar doesn’t provide you with a Web site or permission to access the Web site; you’ll need to set this up or, in the case of a business Web site, get additional instructions and permissions from the Web site administrator. However, in the case of a small network, you can also publish your calendar to the Public folder in Windows Vista, which will enable users on the network to access the calendar in a secure manner. You may face an exam question that talks about a need to share a calendar with everyone on your workgroup, but you don’t want to give them any additional access to your computer. The answer is to simply publish the calendar to your public folder. You can also subscribe to other calendars that are published on the intranet or Internet. Click Publish | Subscribe and follow the steps by completing the FIGURE 9-15 Publish options
  • 364 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan requested information. Additionally, in terms of calendars on the Internet, you can also subscribe to many of them by visiting their Web sites, choosing to download the calendar, and answering a prompt that appears from Windows Calendar. You can’t publish a calendar that you have subscribed to. However, what if you subscribe to a calendar from your business’ Web site and now you need to publish the calendar in a different way? In this case, you need to select the calendar, choose File | Export, delete the calendar, and then use File | Import. Now, you “own” the calendar and can publish it.This is a common exam scenario, so keep this solution in mind. EXERCISE 9-2 CertCam Creating and Configuring a Calendar You can easily create multiple calendars and add appointments and tasks when needed. The following exercise walks you through this process: 1. Click Start | All Programs | Windows Calendar. 2. Click File | New Calendar. In the Calendars pane, type a name for the new calendar and choose a desired calendar color in the Details pane. 3. Click New Appointment on the toolbar. 4. In Details pane, configure the appointment by populating the fields as desired. 5. Click New Task on the toolbar. 6. In the Details pane, configure the task by populating the fields as desired. 7. If you right-click tasks and appointments on the calendar, you can delete the calendar, rename it, make it an all-day appointment, or even send it to someone via e-mail.
  • Configure Windows Fax and Scan 365 SCENARIO & SOLUTION I have several personal calendars and several department calendars from work I subscribe to. How can I better organize them? You can create calendar groups, which are essentially folders that hold calendars you add to the group. Choose File | New Group. The group will appear in the Calendars pane. Just drag the desired calendars to the group. How can I determine how often a subscribed calendar is updated? When you subscribe to a calendar, the series of subscription steps will ask you about updates. You can make your decision here. Later, you can adjust this setting by selecting the calendar and changing the update information in the Details pane. CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVE 9.03 Configure Windows Fax and Scan Windows Vista provides a new Windows Fax and Scan console that enables you to send and receive faxed documents on your computer without a fax machine. From the console, you can also print, e-mail, or save copies of your fax documents. In many ways, the Windows Fax and Scan works like an e-mail program where you can send and receive faxes and scans, and then organize and manage them in a folder structure, as you can see in Figure 9-16. Naturally, your computer will need a fax modem, and the fax modem will need to be connected to your phone line in order to send and receive faxes. You can find the Fax and Scan console in the Printers folder in Control Panel. To send a fax, click the New Fax button on the toolbar. The first time you do this, you’ll walk through a quick wizard where you choose the fax modem you’ll use for sending and receiving faxes and decide whether you’ll receive faxes automatically or not. This process then configures Windows Firewall to receive faxes according to your selections. Once you’re ready to send a new fax, you’ll see a New Fax dialog box that essentially looks like an e-mail message box (see Figure 9-17). Configure who the fax is to, type a subject, and enter the fax message. Notice that you can attach documents to be faxed from the toolbar, and you can also choose whether or not to include a cover page.
  • 366 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan FIGURE 9-16 Windows Fax and Scan FIGURE 9-17 New Fax
  • Configure Windows Fax and Scan 367 INSIDE THE EXAM As with an e-mail application, you can have multiple fax accounts. Click Tools | Accounts to see a simple Fax Accounts dialog box where you can add or remove accounts. Keep in mind that you can fax directly through your fax modem, but you can also fax through a fax server on your network (in which case your computer doesn’t need a modem - only a network connection). Notice that when you create a new fax account, you have the option to connect to your fax modem, or a fax server on your network, as shown next. Just keep the concept of accounts in your mind as you take the exam and remember that faxes can be sent locally through your modem or a fax server. In the same manner, you can scan documents by clicking Scan at the bottom of the left pane, and then clicking New Scan on the toolbar. If a scanner is connected to your computer, you can then scan the document as desired. Other than new faxes and scans, you can see that the interface is rather intuitive. You can receive faxes and scans, and then forward them as faxes, forward them as e-mail messages, save them, print them, and organize them using the folder structure provided. Fax Settings If you click Tools | Fax Settings, there are few important setting options you should keep in mind on the dialog box. Everything you see here is self-explanatory, but there are a few possible exam items you need to remember. First, on the General tab, shown
  • 368 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan FIGURE 9-18 General tab in Figure 9-18, you can allow the fax to automatically receive calls and answer after the desired number of rings (5 is the default). By default, the receive fax option is disabled, since most home users will send faxes but must share the same phone line with answering machines and other devices. Naturally, you may have set this up when you created the fax account, but keep in mind that you can adjust these settings here. On the Tracking tab, review the Notifications options. All the selections here are chosen by default, but you should remember where they are located. Under Notifications, you can show progress when faxes are sent or received, be notified of successes and failures for incoming faxes, and be notified of successes and failures for outgoing faxes. The Advanced tab has a few important settings to keep in mind, as shown in Figure 9-19. First, you can choose the number of redial attempts when sending a fax and the interval between the redial attempts. You can also configure start and end discount rates. Some telephone company services give you a better long-distance rate if you make calls during certain time periods of the day, such as late in the evening. You can choose start and end times for discount rates here. Then, when you send a fax, you click Tools | Options on the New Fax window and choose to send the fax when discount rates apply. Exercise 9-3 shows you an illustration of this option. This is the kind of configuration issue the exam loves to throw your way, so keep the discount rates option in mind as you move forward.
  • Configure Windows Fax and Scan 369 FIGURE 9-19 Advanced tab Fax and Scan Options The Fax and Scan Options are available on the Tools menu. For the most part, the options are few and rather unimportant. The only thing I want to call your attention to here is the Receipts tab, shown in Figure 9-20. Here, you can configure a delivery receipt for when you sent a fax, and the receipt can be e-mailed to you, along with a copy of the fax you sent as well. This is a great confirmation and record-keeping feature of this software, especially if you send a lot of faxes for business purposes. Keep the e-mail receipt option in mind for the exam. You can include a cover page with any fax, but you can also create a custom cover page (or several of them) so that you can choose what cover page to use. Click Tools | Cover Pages and then click New. In the word processing window that appears, you can create your cover page and save it. Then when you send a fax, you can choose the cover page you created by clicking the Cover Page drop-down menu on the New Fax dialog box (where you can also choose some generic fax cover pages if you like).
  • 370 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan FIGURE 9-20 Receipts tab EXERCISE 9-3 Creating a Fax Account and Sending a Fax This exercise will show you how to create a fax account and send an initial fax. This exercise can only be completed if you have a fax modem installed. 1. Click Start | Control Panel | Printers | Faxes. 2. In the Windows Fax and Scan console, click New Fax on the toolbar. 3. In the New Fax dialog box, click Connect To A Fax Modem. Type a desired name for the fax modem and click Next, as shown in the following illustration.
  • Configure Windows Fax and Scan 371 4. In the Choose How To Receive Faxes dialog box, choose whether you want automatic settings, a notification, or to choose later and move on. Click the desired option. 5. The New Fax dialog box appears. As you can see in the following illustration, the dialog box looks a lot like an e-mail message dialog box. On the toolbar, you can attach a document or a picture (or you can drag them to the dialog box as well). First, choose a cover page option from the Cover Page dropdown menu if you want to include a cover page. Include any cover page notes or information. 6. Click the To button to select a contact to send the fax to. If you have not created a contact with the appropriate phone information, you can create one in the Select Recipients dialog box by clicking New Contact. 7. Choose any necessary dialing rules by clicking the Dialing Rules drop-down menu. Once you’ve done this, all you need to do is type your message and your fax information. 8. There are some important options if you click Tools | Options. Here, you can have a receipt e-mailed to you, set a priority for the fax (which can help move your fax up in the sending order on a fax server), and schedule when
  • 372 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan the fax is sent, such as now, when discount rates apply, or at a specific time. Make a selection and click OK, and then click Send to send the fax. SCENARIO & SOLUTION I have a phone plan that gives me a long-distance discount rate between the hours of 9 P.M. and midnight. How can I configure the fax console so that it knows about the discount hours? In Fax and Scan, click Tools | Fax Settings | Advanced. Configure the discount rate time slots here. Then, when you are preparing a fax, click Tools | Options and choose to send the fax during discount hours. I need to create a fax, but I don’t want to send it until 2 P.M. How can I configure the fax console to hold the fax until that time? When you create the fax, click Tools | Options in the New Fax dialog box. You can click the radio button option and enter a desired time to send the fax. Then, click the Send button on the New Fax dialog box. Windows Fax and Scan will hold the fax in its Outbox until the appropriate send time.
  • Configure Windows Fax and Scan 373 CERTIFICATION SUMMARY Windows Sidebar is a new feature that enables you to use gadgets, which are miniprograms, directly on your desktop. You can add and remove gadgets and download new ones from the Web as needed. You can adjust whether or not the Sidebar resides on top of or behind windows that are open on the Windows Sidebar properties dialog box. In some cases, gadgets are configurable. If they are, you can right-click the gadget and click Options to see what configuration features are available. You can also adjust the opacity of each gadget by right-clicking the gadget and choosing an opacity level. Windows Calendar is a new feature in Windows Vista. You can create multiple calendars and view them together using different colors to keep calendar data straight. You can add appointments and tasks, and you can publish your calendar on your local network or to the Internet so that others can access it. Additionally, you can also subscribe to calendars on the Internet and use those calendars within Windows Calendar as well. The new Windows Fax and Scan console provides flexibility and an easy way to manage faxes and scans. You can fax documents through your computer’s fax modem or through a network server, or you can configure both through different accounts. When you send a fax, you can have an e-mail receipt sent to you, and you can drag documents and photos to the New Fax dialog box, just as you would an e-mail message. When you send documents, you can also fax them or forward them as an e-mail message well. The Fax and Scan console can be configured to send faxes during discount periods of time to save on long-distance charges.
  • 374 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan ✓ TWO-MINUTE DRILL Configure Windows Sidebar ❑ Windows Sidebar enables the user to display gadgets, or mini-programs, on the desktop. ❑ You can configure the sidebar so that it always displays gadgets on top of other windows that are open. ❑ You can add and remove gadgets at any time and download additional gadgets from the Web. ❑ Some gadgets, such as the clock, have configurable options that can be chosen from their properties pages. ❑ You can detach gadgets from the Sidebar and place them directly on the desktop. ❑ You can adjust the opacity of each gadget by right-clicking the gadget and choosing an opacity level. Configure Windows Calendar ❑ You can use multiple calendars and view them at the same time. Calendar tasks are color-coded. ❑ You can publish a calendar by choosing the option from the Share menu. When you publish, you can publish to an intranet or Internet site. ❑ If a calendar is shared on an intranet or Internet site, you can subscribe to the calendar and use it. Choose the option on the Share menu. ❑ If you subscribe to a calendar, you cannot publish it. However, you can work around this issue by exporting the calendar, re-importing it, and then publishing it. ❑ Change default calendar features by clicking File | Options. ❑ You can share your calendar on your local network by publishing it to the Public folder in Windows Vista.
  • Two-Minute Drill 375 Configure Windows Fax and Scan ❑ To send and receive faxes, you must set up a fax account. When you set up the account, you can determine if your modem will be allowed to receive faxes, and if so, whether you can receive them automatically. ❑ The Options dialog box, available from the Tools menu, enables you to configure various features for faxing and scanning, including fax receipts. ❑ You can specify discount time periods where it may be more economical to send and receive faxes in terms of your telephone plan. ❑ You can scan and forward documents to a fax or e-mail recipient.
  • 376 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan SELF TEST The following questions will help you measure your understanding of the material presented in this chapter. Read all the choices carefully because there might be more than one correct answer. Choose all correct answers for each question. Configure Windows Sidebar 1. You have upgraded a Windows XP Professional computer to Windows Vista. When you start Windows Vista, you discover that Windows Sidebar always stays on top of other windows you open. This is preventing you from closing those windows. What can you do so that Windows Sidebar stays behind open windows? A. Right-click each gadget and adjust the opacity level. B. Right-click the Sidebar and click Send To back. C. Minimize the Sidebar. D. Open the Sidebar’s properties dialog box and clear the “Sidebar is always on top of other windows” check box. 2. You are using the weather gadget. You want to change the weather gadget so that it reports weather from a different city. How can you configure this? A. Download the gadget for the desired city. B. Double-click the gadget to open its Options dialog box. C. Right-click the gadget and click Options. D. Close the gadget and restart it. 3. You use a multiple monitor configuration. You want the Windows Sidebar to reside on Monitor 2. How can you configure this? A. Drag the Sidebar to the second monitor. B. Access the Sidebar properties dialog box and choose monitor 2. C. Drag each gadget to the second monitor. D. Windows Sidebar must always reside on monitor 1. 4. You use Windows Sidebar with several gadgets. In order to improve the appearance of Windows Vista, you would like these gadgets to appear virtually see-through on the desktop until they are needed. How can you configure this? A. Right-click each gadget and choose an opacity level. B. Right-click each gadget and choose an opaque level. C. Right-click the Sidebar and choose an opacity level. D. Right-click the Sidebar and choose an opaque level.
  • Self Test 377 Configure Windows Calendar 5. You have a small office for a home-based business. You use four Windows Vista Ultimate computers and you have one full-time employee. The employee uses Windows Calendar to maintain a listing of meetings and tasks for each week. You would like to be able to access this calendar at any time, but you only want your employee to manage it. How can you configure it? (Choose two answers.) A. On the employee’s computer, publish the calendar to the Public folder. B. On your computer, publish the calendar to the Public folder. C. On the employee’s computer, share the calendars folder with Read permission. D. On your computer, subscribe to the calendar. 6. On a Windows Vista computer, you use Windows Calendar to manage several employees’ schedules. You also have several personal calendars as well. You would like the option to view the employee’s schedules together without your personal calendar’s involvement. How can you configure this? A. Publish the employees’ calendars. B. Subscribe to the employees’ calendars. C. Create a group and place the employees’ calendars in this group. D. Start two instances of Windows Calendar. 7. You subscribed to a calendar on the Internet. When you subscribed, you did not configure the subscription so that the calendar will be updated. Now, you want the calendar updated every week. What do you need to do? A. Delete the calendar and re-subscribe to it. B. Return to the Web site and choose a recurrence option. C. Select the calendar in Windows Calendar and adjust the Update information. D. Choose the Refresh option on the toolbar in Windows Calendar. 8. You subscribed to a Calendar from a major news site. You want to publish this calendar so that other people on your local network can access it. However, when you select the calendar and click the Share menu, the Publish option is grayed out. You need to publish this calendar. What do you need to do? A. Share the calendar in a folder configured with full control for the Everyone group. B. Group the calendar and then publish the group. C. Export the calendar to your desktop, and then import the calendar back into Windows Calendar as a new calendar. Then, publish the calendar. D. Select the calendar. In the Details pane, choose to publish the calendar.
  • 378 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan 9. You want to change your calendar so that the default first day of the week is Monday beginning at 8 A.M. How can you configure this? A. Monday at 8 A.M. is the default. No change is necessary. B. Recreate the calendar. C. Access calendar options and change the default. D. Access Calendar properties from the Share menu. Configure Windows Fax and Scan 10. Before you can send a fax, what must you do? A. Log on with an administrator account. B. Add your user account to the Fax Users group. C. Connect your computer to a fax server. D. Set up a fax account. 11. Which statement is not true concerning the receiving of faxes? A. Your computer can receive faxes automatically. B. Your computer can be configured for manual fax reception. C. Once you create an account, you cannot change how faxes are received. D. Faxes can be received through your computer’s modem or a fax server. 12. You need to scan an important document, and you need to send the document to a user in a small remote office on the other side of your city. The user has a Windows Vista Business computer, but the computer does not have a modem. Also, there is no fax server on the network or fax machine in the office. The user is connected to the Internet. The user needs the document immediately. What can you do? A. Recreate the document in Word and e-mail it to the user. B. Scan the document and post it to the company’s Web site. C. Scan the document and click the E-mail button option in Windows Fax and Scan. D. The user’s computer must be configured to receive faxes. 13. Your Windows Vista computer is configured to receive faxes. You notice that when a fax is being sent, the computer allows the phone to ring five times before it is answered. You receive a lot of faxes, and you would like the computer to answer after only two rings. You open the Windows Fax and Scan console. How can you change this setting? A. Click Tools | Options. Click the Receive tab and change the default number of rings. B. Create a new fax account and configure it to answer after only two rings. C. Click Tools | Fax Settings and adjust the number of rings on the General tab. D. Click Tools | Fax Settings and adjust the number of rings on the Advanced tab.
  • Lab Question 379 14. You send a number of important faxes to a client in Germany. You want to make sure that each fax is received at the client site. You would also like a copy of the fax e-mailed to you as well. How can you configure this? A. In the New Fax window, choose the e-mail receipt option. B. Click Tools | Options and configure the Receipts tab options. C. Configure Windows Mail to record outgoing faxes. D. Click Tools | Fax Settings and choose the e-mail receipt option. 15. You have configured Windows Fax and Scan with discount call settings so that faxes are sent between the hours of 7 and 10 P.M., when your company receives a better long-distance rate. However, you discover that when you send a fax, it is sent right away instead of waiting until the discount time period. What do you need to do? A. In the New Fax dialog box, click Tools | Options and choose the discount time option. B. Restart the Fax console. C. In the Fax and Scan console, click Tools | Fax Options. On the General tab, click “Always send faxes by schedule.” D. Faxes cannot be restricted to a certain time slot, but a specific time only. LAB QUESTION You need to configure Windows Fax and Scan so that it meets the following requirements: ■ You need an account for your fax modem, but you also need an account so that you can use a fax server on your network. ■ You need to use discounted time options. ■ You want an e-mail receipt from every fax that is sent, along with an e-mail copy of the fax. ■ You need to use a custom cover sheet. What steps do you need to follow to configure Windows Fax and Scan to meet these requirements?
  • 380 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan SELF TEST ANSWERS Configure Windows Sidebar ✓ 1. ® D. To make sure that the Sidebar resides behind other windows you open, right-click the Sidebar and click Properties. On the properties dialog box, clear the “Sidebar is always on top of other windows” check box. ® A is incorrect because adjusting the opacity will not move the Sidebar behind open ˚ windows. B and C are both incorrect because these options do not exist. ✓ 2. ® C. Configurable gadgets, such as the weather gadget, have an Options dialog box where you can choose different features available for that gadget. Just right-click the gadget and click Options to open the dialog box. ® A is incorrect because you can’t download a weather gadget specific for different cities. B is ˚ also incorrect because double-clicking a gadget doesn’t do anything. D is also incorrect because closing and restarting the gadget will not cause it to change to a different weather reporting city. ✓ 3. ® B. You can have the Sidebar appear on monitor 2 by choosing the monitor 2 option on the Windows Sidebar properties dialog box. ® A is incorrect because you cannot drag the Sidebar to the second monitor. C is incorrect ˚ because although you can drag the gadgets, you can’t actually drag the Sidebar to the second monitor this way. D is incorrect because this is a configurable option. ✓ 4. ® A. You can adjust the opaque value of each gadget by right-clicking the gadget and choosing an opacity percentage level. ® B and D are incorrect because there is no “opaque” setting. C is also incorrect because you ˚ cannot adjust the overall opacity of the entire Sidebar; you must adjust the opacity of each gadget. Configure Windows Calendar ✓ 5. ® A and D. Since you’re on a local network, the employee needs to publish the calendar to the Public folder on her computer. You can then subscribe to the calendar from your computer. This arrangement maintains security and enables the calendar to be updated on your computer as it changes. ® B is incorrect because you cannot configure this from your computer. C is also incorrect ˚ because you do not need to share an internal folder in order to publish the calendar. ✓ 6. ® C. Use the File menu to create a new group, and then drag the desired calendars to this group. Then you will be able to work with the calendars collectively. ® A and B are incorrect because publishing or subscribing will not resolve this issue. D is also ˚ incorrect because you cannot work with multiple instances of Windows Calendar in order to manage calendars.
  • Self Test Answers 381 ✓ 7. ® C. Simply select the calendar. In the Details pane, you’ll see an Update option where you can change the original update option you selected. ® A, B, and D are all incorrect because none of these options will update the calendar. ˚ ✓ 8. ® C. You can’t publish a calendar that you have subscribed to. In a case where you need to publish a calendar, you would need to export and then import it as a new calendar. Then, you can publish it. Of course, once you do this, it will not be updated any longer from the original source. ® A, B, and D are all incorrect because you cannot publish the calendar in any of these ways. ˚ ✓ 9. ® C. Click File | Options and change the default day from Sunday to Monday. ® A and B are incorrect because these actions will not change the setting. D is incorrect ˚ because there is no Calendar properties choice on the Share menu. Configure Windows Fax and Scan ✓ 10. ® D. Before you can fax anything, you must set up a fax account through your computer’s modem or through a fax server on the network. ® A, B, and C are all incorrect because none of these actions are necessary. ˚ ✓ 11. ® C. You can choose how you want to receive faxes when you create an account, but you also choose what receiving option you want later, and you can also change it. ® A, B, and D are all incorrect because all of these options are true. ˚ ✓ 12. ® C. In Windows Fax and Scan, you can scan a document and then fax it or e-mail it to a recipient. ® A and B are both incorrect because you do not need to recreate the document or post it to ˚ a Web site. D is also incorrect because there is a simple solution to this problem that doesn’t require faxing. ✓ 13. ® D. Click Tools | Fax Settings to adjust the number of times the phone rings before Fax and Scan console answers the call to receive a fax. ® A, B, and C are incorrect because you cannot configure the number of rings in any of these ˚ locations. ✓ 14. ® B. You can configure an e-mail receipt on the Receipts tab. You can also choose to have a copy of the fax e-mailed to you along with the receipt. ® A, C, and D are all incorrect because you cannot configure receipts in these ways. ˚ ✓ 15. ® A. Once you configure in Fax Options what the discount time is, you should decide which faxes use the discount time. When you create a new fax, click Tools | Options in the New Fax dialog box and choose to send the fax during discount hours. ® B, C, and D are all incorrect. None of these actions will resolve the problem. ˚
  • 382 Chapter 9: Configure Windows Sidebar, Windows Calendar, and Windows Fax and Scan LAB ANSWER To meet the desired configuration options, follow these steps: 1. Click Tools | Fax Accounts. On the Fax Accounts dialog box, click the Add button and follow the steps to create an account, shown in the following illustration. Then, click the Add button again to create a connection to the fax server on your network. When you’re done, you’ll have two fax accounts available—one for your local modem and one to a fax server. 2. Click Tools | Fax Settings. On the Advanced tab, configure the start and end times for the discount rate and click OK. 3. Click Tools | Options | Receipts. For a delivery receipt, click the E-Mail To option and enter an e-mail address. Then, click the Attach A Copy Of The Sent Fax check box option and click OK. 4. Click Tools | Cover Pages. In the Fax Cover Pages dialog box, when you click the New button, the cover pages editor appears. Here, you can use the editing tools, which essentially work like a mini word-processing application, to create your custom cover page. Once you’re done, you can choose to use this cover page when you send a fax. On the New Fax window, click the Cover Page drop-down menu and select the cover page you have created.
  • 10 Troubleshoot Reliability and Performance Issues CERTIFICATION OBJECTIVES 10.01 Troubleshoot Performance Issues 10.02 Troubleshoot Reliability Issues with Diagnostic Tools ✓ Q&A Two-Minute Drill Self Test
  • 384 Chapter 10: Troubleshoot Reliability and