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Transcript of "(70 270) installing, configuring, and administering microsof"

  1. 1. PUBLISHED BY Microsoft Press A Division of Microsoft Corporation One Microsoft Way Redmond, Washington 98052-6399 Copyright © 2005 by Microsoft Corporation All rights reserved. No part of the contents of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the written permission of the publisher. Library of Congress Control Number 2004117425 Printed and bound in the United States of America. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 QWT 9 8 7 6 5 4 Distributed in Canada by H.B. Fenn and Company Ltd. A CIP catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library. Microsoft Press books are available through booksellers and distributors worldwide. For further information about international editions, contact your local Microsoft Corporation office or contact Microsoft Press International directly at fax (425) 936-7329. Visit our Web site at www.microsoft.com/learning/. Send comments to moac@microsoft.com. Microsoft, Active Desktop, Active Directory, ActiveX, Authenticode, IntelliMirror, MSDN, MS-DOS, MSN, NetMeeting, Outlook, PowerPoint, Visual Basic, Win32, Windows, Windows Media, Windows NT, and Windows Server are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. The example companies, organizations, products, domain names, e-mail addresses, logos, people, places, and events depicted herein are fictitious. No association with any real company, organization, product, domain name, e-mail address, logo, person, place, or event is intended or should be inferred. Acquisitions Editor: Lori Oviatt Project Editor: Denise Bankaitis Technical Editor: James Causey Copy Editor: Ina Chang Production: Elizabeth Hansford Indexer: Julie Kawabata SubAssy Part No. X11-03252 Body Part No. X11-03253
  2. 2. CONTENTS AT A GLANCE CHAPTER 1: Introducing Windows XP Professional . . . . . . . . . . . 1 CHAPTER 2: Installing Windows XP Professional . . . . . . . . . . . .25 CHAPTER 3: Managing Disks and File Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 CHAPTER 4: Managing Devices and Peripherals. . . . . . . . . . . .119 CHAPTER 5: Configuring and Managing the User Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147 CHAPTER 6: Configuring and Managing Printers and Fax Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .183 CHAPTER 7: Configuring and Managing NTFS Security . . . . .219 CHAPTER 8: Configuring and Managing Shared Folder Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253 CHAPTER 9: Supporting Applications in Windows XP Professional. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .295 CHAPTER 10: Connecting Windows XP Professional to a Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .317 CHAPTER 11: Configuring TCP/IP Addressing and Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .353 CHAPTER 12: Managing Internet Explorer Connections and Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .381 CHAPTER 13: Managing Users and Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .419 CHAPTER 14: Configuring and Managing Computer Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .461 CHAPTER 15: Backing Up and Restoring Systems and Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .491 CHAPTER 16: Managing Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .521 Glossary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .551 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .565 iii
  3. 3. CONTENTS About This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvi Target Audience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii Prerequisites. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii The Textbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviii The Supplemental Course Materials CD-ROM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix Readiness Review Suite Setup Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix eBook Setup Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx The Lab Manual. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx Notational Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxi Keyboard Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxii Coverage of Exam Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxii The Microsoft Certified Professional Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvii Certifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvii MCP Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxviii About the Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxix For Microsoft Official Academic Course Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxix Evaulation Edition Software Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxx CHAPTER 1: Introducing Windows XP Professional . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Overview of Windows XP Professional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Windows XP Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Intelligent User Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Hardware Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Comprehensive Help and Support Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Pick a Help Topic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Ask for Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Pick a Task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Searching and Printing Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Windows XP Security Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Windows Firewall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Security Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Attachment Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Encrypting File System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Security Management Policies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Windows XP Organizational Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Workgroup Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Domain Networks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Logging On and Off Windows XP Professional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Review Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 v
  4. 4. vi CONTENTS Case Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Scenario 1.1: Securing Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Scenario 1.2: Assisting Remote Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 CHAPTER 2: Installing Windows XP Professional . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Preinstallation Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Verifying Hardware Compatibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Hardware Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Storage Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 File Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Domain or Workgroup Membership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Performing an Attended Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Windows XP Professional Setup Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Running the Setup Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Running the Setup Wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Completing the Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Installing over the Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Preparing for a Network Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Modifying the Setup Process Using Winnt.exe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Modifying the Setup Process Using Winnt32.exe. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Automating Installations Using Windows Setup Manager. . . . . . . . . . . 44 Installing Setup Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Using Setup Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Upgrading to Windows XP Professional . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Identifying Client Upgrade Paths . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Generating a Hardware Compatibility Report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Upgrading Compatible Windows 98 Computers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Upgrading a Windows 2000 Professional Computer. . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Migrating User Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Understanding Remote Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Installing and Configuring RIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Client Requirements for Remote Installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Creating Boot Floppies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Installing Windows XP Using RIS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Using Disk Duplication to Deploy Windows XP Professional. . . . . . . . . 58 Using the System Preparation Tool to Prepare the Master Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Installing Windows XP Professional from a Master Disk Image . . . 60 Applying System Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Windows Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Service Packs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Automatic Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Slipstreaming Service Packs and Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Slipstreaming Service Packs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Slipstreaming Windows Updates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
  5. 5. CONTENTS Using Windows Product Activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 How Windows Product Activation Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Activating Windows XP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Automating Windows Product Activation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Troubleshooting Windows XP Professional Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Resolving Common Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Setup Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Review Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Case Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Scenario 2-1: Dual-Booting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Scenario 2-2: Automatic Updates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 CHAPTER 3: Managing Disks and File Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Understanding Disk Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Understanding Basic Storage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Understanding Dynamic Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Working with Simple Volumes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Working with Spanned Volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Working with Striped Volumes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Adding Disks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Changing the Storage Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Using Refresh and Rescan Disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Managing Disks on a Remote Computer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Managing Removable Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Using the Removable Storage Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Managing Compression. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Using Compressed Folders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Using NTFS Compression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Increasing Security with the EFS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Understanding the EFS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Using the Cipher Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Using a Recovery Agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Managing Recovery Agents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Disabling the EFS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 EFS Best Practices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Managing Disk Quotas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Understanding Disk Quota Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Setting Disk Quotas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Determining the Status of Disk Quotas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Monitoring Disk Quotas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Best Uses for Disk Quotas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 vii
  6. 6. viii CONTENTS Using Disk Defragmenter, Chkdsk, and Disk Cleanup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Defragmenting Disks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Using Disk Defragmenter Effectively . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Using Chkdsk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Using Disk Cleanup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Review Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Case Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Scenario 3-1: Storage Choices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Scenario 3-2: Disk Quotas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 CHAPTER 4: Managing Devices and Peripherals. . . . . . . . . . . .119 Using Device Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Configuring and Troubleshooting Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Viewing Hidden and Phantom Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Managing and Troubleshooting I/O Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Scanners and Cameras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Mouse Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Modems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Game Controllers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 IrDA and Wireless Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Keyboards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Understanding Automatic and Manual Hardware Installation . . . . . . 128 Confirming Hardware Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 Troubleshooting Device Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Installing Hardware Manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Viewing and Configuring Hardware Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Understanding Hardware Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Creating or Modifying a Hardware Profile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Activating a Hardware Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Viewing Hardware Profile Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Driver Signing and File Signature Verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Configuring Driver Signing Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Checking System File Signatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Using the File Signature Verification Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Configuring Computers with Multiple Processors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 Multiprocessor Scaling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 Managing ACPI Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Forcing Installation of a Specific HAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Troubleshooting ACPI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Review Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Case Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Scenario 4-1: Managing a Hardware Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Scenario 4-2: Troubleshooting Problems with the HAL. . . . . . . . . 145
  7. 7. CONTENTS CHAPTER 5: Configuring and Managing the User Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147 Configuring and Managing Desktop Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Configuring Display Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Using Multiple Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 The Taskbar and Start Menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160 Configuring Power Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Selecting a Power Scheme . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Configuring Advanced Power Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Enabling Hibernate Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 Configuring Advanced Power Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Advanced Configuration and Power Interface (ACPI) . . . . . . . . . . 168 Configuring an Uninterruptible Power Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Configuring User Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Local and Roaming User Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 User Profile Storage Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Configuring Multiple Languages and Locations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Configuring Accessibility Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Configuring Keyboard Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174 Configuring Sound Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 Configuring Display Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Configuring Mouse Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Configuring General Tab Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Other Accessibility Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 The Magnifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 The Narrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Review Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Case Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 Scenario 5-1: Time for Hibernation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 Scenario 5-2: Power Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 CHAPTER 6: Configuring and Managing Printers and Fax Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .183 Introduction to Windows XP Professional Printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Adding a Local Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 Adding a Printer Connected to a Print Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 Types of Print Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 Connecting to a Printer on a Windows Print Server . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Using the Search Assistant to Find a Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191 Adding a Network Interface Printer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 Standard TCP/IP Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 LPR Port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 Connecting to an Internet Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 How Internet Printing Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 ix
  8. 8. x CONTENTS Using Windows XP as a Print Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 Requirements for Network Print Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 Sharing Printers During Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Sharing an Existing Printer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Installing Additional Print Drivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 Creating Printer Pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 Managing Printer Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 Managing Printer Priority. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 205 Scheduling Printers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 Managing Printers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207 Assigning Forms to Paper Trays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207 Setting a Separator Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Administering Printers with a Web Browser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Managing Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Pausing, Restarting, and Canceling a Document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Troubleshooting Common Printing Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 Examining the Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 Common Troubleshooting Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 Printing Troubleshooters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213 Additional Troubleshooting Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 Configuring and Managing Windows XP Fax Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 The Fax Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Fax Printers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 Review Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 Case Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Scenario 6-1: Printing in a Small Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Scenario 6-2: Printer Wars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 CHAPTER 7: Configuring and Managing NTFS Security . . . . .219 Understanding the NTFS File System. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220 Understanding NTFS Permissions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 Components of NTFS Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 NTFS Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 NTFS Permissions Inheritance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228 Managing NTFS Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230 Best Practices for Assigning Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230 Setting NTFS Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 Using Command-Line Tools to View and Modify Permissions . . . 236 Assigning Multiple NTFS Permissions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 Auditing NTFS Object Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 Enabling Auditing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 Monitoring Security Event Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244 Troubleshooting NTFS Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244 Problems with Effective Permissions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244 Problems with Denied Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 Problems with Permission Inheritance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245
  9. 9. CONTENTS Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 Review Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248 Case Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 CHAPTER 8: Configuring and Managing Shared Folder Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .253 Understanding Shared Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 Shared Folder Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 Guidelines for Shared Folder Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 How Shared Folder Permissions Are Applied . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 Planning Shared Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 Requirements for Sharing Folders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 257 Shared Application Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 Shared Data Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 259 Administrative Shared Folders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260 Sharing a Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 Sharing Folders in Computer Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 Sharing Folders in Windows Explorer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264 Using the NET Command to Share Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 Sharing a Folder on a Remote Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268 Managing Shared Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268 Assigning Shared Folder Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268 Creating Multiple Share Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270 Modifying Shared Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270 Connecting to Shared Folders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271 Combining Shared Folder Permissions and NTFS Permissions . . . . . . 273 Monitoring Access to Shared Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 Reasons for Monitoring Network Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 Requirements for Monitoring Network Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 Monitoring Shared Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 Using Offline Folders and Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278 Understanding Offline Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279 Configuring Your Computer to Use Offline Folders and Files . . . 280 Managing Internet Information Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 Installing IIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 Using IIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 Sharing Web Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 NTFS Permissions and Web Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287 Using Web Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289 Review Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290 Case Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292 Scenario 8-1: Shared Folder Tree. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292 Scenario 8-2: Command-Line Nirvana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292 xi
  10. 10. xii CONTENTS CHAPTER 9: Supporting Applications in Windows XP Professional. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .295 Understanding Windows Installer Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296 Windows Installer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296 Windows Installer Packages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296 Deploying Software Using Group Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302 Overview of Group Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302 Software Installation Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302 Removing Software Installation Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 Understanding Application Compatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 Windows Logo Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 Causes of Application Incompatibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306 Application Compatibility Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 Advanced Compatibility Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 Troubleshooting Application Compatibility Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . 310 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312 Review Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312 Case Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314 Scenario 9-1: Windows Installer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314 Scenario 9-2: Irreconcilable Differences? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 315 CHAPTER 10: Connecting Windows XP Professional to a Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .317 Configuring TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318 The OSI Reference Model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318 The DARPA Reference Model. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320 The TCP/IP Protocol Suite. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323 Understanding IP Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323 Managing Network Bindings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 330 Troubleshooting TCP/IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331 Connecting to a Wireless Ethernet Network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335 Understanding Wireless Specifications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335 Connecting Windows XP to a Wireless Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336 Configuring Other Network Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 337 Client Service for NetWare. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338 Installing the NWLink Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338 Installing Third-Party Clients and Protocols . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 339 Connecting to Computers UsingDial-Up Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . 340 Connecting to the Internet Using Dial-Up Networking . . . . . . . . 340 Connecting to a Network at Your Workplace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341 Configuring and Troubleshooting Internet Connection Sharing (ICS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342 Using Remote Desktop and Remote Assistance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344 Remote Desktop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 344 Remote Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 346
  11. 11. CONTENTS Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348 Review Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 348 Case Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351 Scenario 10-1: Small Office Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351 Scenario 10-2: Help! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351 CHAPTER 11: Configuring TCP/IP Addressing and Security . . .353 Understanding IP Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354 Binary Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 354 Decoding IP Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 359 Local vs. Remote Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360 Using Subnet Masks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 361 Subnetting and Supernetting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362 Securing IP Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365 Internet Threats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365 Protective Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 366 Monitoring Internet Communications Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378 Review Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378 Case Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380 Case Scenario 11-1: A Growing Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380 Case Scenario 11-2: Security on a Shoestring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380 CHAPTER 12: Managing Internet Explorer Connections and Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .381 Managing Internet Explorer Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 382 Using the New Connection Wizard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 382 Managing Connection Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 383 Connecting to Resources Using Internet Explorer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387 Uniform Resource Locators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387 Connecting to Web Site Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389 Accessing FTP Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389 Accessing Web Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 390 Connecting to Web Server–Based Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391 Managing Internet Explorer Security Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391 Overview of Internet Explorer Security Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 391 Managing URL Actions for Web Content Zones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 393 Web Content Zones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 399 Advanced Internet Security Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 402 Managing Internet Explorer Privacy Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 404 Cookies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 404 Pop-Up Blocker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 407 Managing Internet Cache and History Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 408 AutoComplete and Internet Explorer Password Caching . . . . . . . 411 Using Add-On Manager to Control Add-On Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . 412 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414 Review Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 414 xiii
  12. 12. xiv CONTENTS Case Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416 Scenario 12-1: Getting Online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 416 Scenario 12-2: Managing Internet Explorer Security and Privacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 417 CHAPTER 13: Managing Users and Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .419 Overview of User Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420 Users and Groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420 User and Group Account Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 420 User Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421 User Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421 Built-In User Accounts and Groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 421 Implicit Groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422 Service Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 423 Domain User Accounts and Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 424 Tools for Managing Users and Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 425 Planning User Accounts and Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 429 Mapping Out a User and Group Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 429 User Account Naming Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 430 Setting Requirements for Complex Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 431 Changing the Way Users Log On or Log Off. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 432 Creating and Managing User Accounts with Local Users and Groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 434 Creating User Accounts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 434 Managing User Account Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 434 Managing User Permissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 436 Managing User Rights Assignment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 437 Creating and Managing Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 438 Creating and Managing Groups Using Local Users and Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 438 Managing Groups Using Command-Line Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 441 Creating and Managing User Accounts with the User Accounts Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 442 User Account Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 442 Creating a New User Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 443 Changing an Account . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 444 Best Practices for User Account Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 446 Managing User Account–Related System Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447 Managing User Rights with Group Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 447 Managing User Account Settings with Group Policy . . . . . . . . . . . 451 Using Cached Credentials in Windows XP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 454 Understanding Cached Credentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 454 Managing Cached Credentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 454 Troubleshooting Cached Credentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 455 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 456 Review Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 456
  13. 13. CONTENTS Case Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 458 Scenario 13-1: Designing Accounts for a Field Office . . . . . . . . . . 458 Scenario 13-2: Protecting Files on a Military System . . . . . . . . . . . 459 CHAPTER 14: Configuring and Managing Computer Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .461 Understanding Security Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 462 Local Security Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 462 Domain Security Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 466 Managing Security Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467 Predefined Security Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467 Creating a Custom Security Policy Management Console . . . . . . 468 Viewing, Modifying, and Creating a Security Template. . . . . . . . . 470 Analyzing and Configuring Security Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472 Exporting Security Templates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 474 Managing Security Policy with Secedit.exe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 475 Managing Security Audit Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 476 Actions That Can Be Audited . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 476 Planning an Audit Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 478 Implementing and Managing an Audit Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 479 Monitoring Audit Logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 483 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 486 Review Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 486 Case Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 487 Scenario 14-1: Designing a Security Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 487 Scenario 14-2: Security Auditing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 488 CHAPTER 15: Backing Up and Restoring Systems and Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .491 Understanding the Windows Backup Utility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492 Features of the Backup Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 492 Planning a Backup and Recovery Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 494 Choosing a Backup Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 494 Determining What to Back Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 496 Selecting Backup Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 496 Choosing a Backup Schedule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 497 Planning for Disaster Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 498 Backing Up the System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 499 Creating a New Backup Job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 499 Modifying a Backup Job. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 501 Executing a Backup Job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 501 Performing an ASR Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 501 Restoring a System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 504 Determining Which Backups to Restore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 504 Creating a Restore Job . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 504 Using ASR to Recover a System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 505 xv
  14. 14. xvi CONTENTS Using System Restore to Recover Data and Settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 507 Configuring System Restore. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508 Creating a Restore Point Manually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 508 Restoring Settings and Data from a Restore Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . 510 Using Startup and Recovery Tools to Recover a System . . . . . . . . . . . . 511 Using the Recovery Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 511 Using the Last Known Good Configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 513 Starting a System in Safe Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 514 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 516 Review Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 516 Case Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518 Scenario 15-1: Backup Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518 Scenario 15-2: Power Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 519 CHAPTER 16: Managing Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .521 Designing a System for Performance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 522 Factors Leading to Poor Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 522 Determining Resource Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 523 Monitoring Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 523 The Performance Console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 525 Viewing Performance Charts with System Monitor . . . . . . . . . . . . 526 Using Histograms and Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 530 Using Performance Logs to Spot Trends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 532 Using Performance Alerts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 534 Monitoring Performance with Task Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 536 Improving Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 539 Memory Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 540 Disk Performance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 540 Adding CPUs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 545 Mobile System Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 546 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 547 Review Questions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 547 Case Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 548 Scenario 16-1: A Slow Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 548 Scenario 16-2: Spotting the Cause of Performance Issues . . . . . . 549 Glossary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .551 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .565
  15. 15. ABOUT THIS BOOK Welcome to Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Windows XP Professional (70-270), Second Edition, a part of the Microsoft Official Academic Course (MOAC) series. Through lectures, discussions, demonstrations, textbook exercises, and classroom labs, this course teaches the skills and knowledge necessary to plan, install, configure, and support Windows XP in standalone, small network, and corporate network environments. In 16 chapters, students will learn how to install Windows XP Professional, connect to and share network resources, configure Internet services and applications, manage security settings and auditing, and evaluate system performance. TARGET AUDIENCE This textbook was developed for beginning information technology students who want to learn to configure and manage Windows XP in a variety of environments so that they can provide corporate support and implementation of Windows XP on a direct-hire or consulting basis. Students who continue to study Microsoft server operating systems can go on to earn the Microsoft Certified System Administrator (MCSA) or Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE) credential. PREREQUISITES The prerequisites for taking this course are: ■ Familiarity with the use of Windows XP, including navigation and operation of major features. ■ A fundamental knowledge of computer hardware, network construction, and operating systems. ■ Prerequisite knowledge and course work as defined by the learning institution and the instructor. Completion of the Supporting Users and Troubleshooting Microsoft Windows XP (Microsoft Learning) course or equivalent experience is recommended. xvii
  16. 16. xviii INSTALLING, CONFIGURING, AND ADMINISTERING MICROSOFT WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL THE TEXTBOOK The textbook content has been crafted to provide a meaningful learning experience to students in an academic classroom setting. Key features of the Microsoft Official Academic Course textbooks include the following: ■ Learning objectives for each chapter that prepare the student for the topic areas covered in that chapter. ■ Chapter introductions that explain why the information is important. ■ An inviting design with screen shots, diagrams, tables, bulleted lists, and other graphical formats that makes the book easy to comprehend and supports a number of different learning styles. ■ Clear explanations of concepts and principles, and frequent exposition of step-by-step procedures. ■ A variety of reader aids that highlight a wealth of additional information, including: ❑ Note—Real-world application tips and alternative procedures, and explanations of complex procedures and concepts ❑ Caution—Warnings about mistakes that can result in loss of data or that are difficult to resolve ❑ Important—Explanations of essential setup steps before a procedure and other instructions ❑ More Info—Cross-references and additional resources for students ■ End-of-chapter review questions that assess knowledge and can serve as homework, quizzes, and review activities before or after lectures. (Answers to the textbook questions are available from your instructor.) ■ Chapter summaries that distill the main ideas in a chapter and reinforce learning. ■ Case scenarios, approximately two per chapter, that provide students with an opportunity to evaluate, analyze, synthesize, and apply information learned during the chapter. ■ Comprehensive glossary that defines key terms introduced in the book.
  17. 17. ABOUT THIS BOOK THE SUPPLEMENTAL COURSE MATERIALS CD-ROM This book comes with a Supplemental Course Materials CD-ROM, which contains a variety of informational aids to complement the book content: ■ An electronic version of this textbook (eBook). For information about using the eBook, see the section titled “eBook Setup Instructions” later in this introduction. ■ The Microsoft Learning Readiness Review Suite built by MeasureUp. This suite of practice tests and objective reviews contains questions of varying complexity and offers multiple testing modes. You can assess your understanding of the concepts presented in this book and use the results to develop a learning plan that meets your needs. ■ An eBook of the Microsoft Encyclopedia of Networking, Second Edition. ■ Microsoft PowerPoint slides based on textbook chapters, for notetaking. ■ Microsoft Word Viewer and Microsoft PowerPoint Viewer. A second CD contains a 120-day evaluation edition of Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 2. The 120-day evaluation edition of Windows XP Professional provided with this book is not the full retail product; it is provided only for the purposes of training and evaluation. Microsoft Technical Support does not support evaluation editions. NOTE Readiness Review Suite Setup Instructions The Readiness Review Suite includes a practice test of 300 sample exam questions and an objective review with an additional 125 questions. Use these tools to reinforce your learning and to identify areas in which you need to gain more experience before taking your final exam for the course, or the certification exam if you choose to do so. Installing the Practice Test 1. Insert the Supplemental Course Materials CD into your CD-ROM drive. If AutoRun is disabled on your machine, refer to the Readme.txt file on the Supplemental Course Materials CD. NOTE 2. On the user interface menu, select Readiness Review Suite and follow the prompts. xix
  18. 18. xx INSTALLING, CONFIGURING, AND ADMINISTERING MICROSOFT WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL eBook Setup Instructions The eBook is in Portable Document Format (PDF) and must be viewed using Adobe Acrobat Reader. Using the eBooks 1. Insert the Supplemental Course Materials CD into your CD-ROM drive. If AutoRun is disabled on your machine, refer to the Readme.txt file on the CD. NOTE 2. On the user interface menu, select Textbook eBook and follow the prompts. You also can review any of the other eBooks provided for your use. You must have the Supplemental Course Materials CD in your CD-ROM drive to run the eBook. NOTE THE LAB MANUAL The Lab Manual is designed for use in either a combined lecture and lab situation, or in a separate lecture and lab arrangement. The exercises in the Lab Manual correspond to textbook chapters and are for use in a classroom setting supervised by an instructor. The Lab Manual presents a rich, hands-on learning experience that encourages practical solutions and strengthens critical problem-solving skills: ■ Lab Exercises teach procedures by using a step-by-step format. Questions interspersed throughout Lab Exercises encourage reflection and critical thinking about the lab activity. ■ Lab Review Questions appear at the end of each lab and ask questions about the lab. They are designed to promote critical reflection. ■ Lab Challenges are review activities that either cover material in the text or ask students to perform a variation on a task they performed in the Lab Exercises, but without detailed instructions. ■ Troubleshooting Labs appear after a number of regular labs; they consist of medium-length review projects and are based on true-to-life scenarios. These labs challenge students to “think like an expert” to solve complex problems.
  19. 19. ABOUT THIS BOOK ■ Labs are based on realistic business settings and include an opening scenario and a list of learning objectives. Students who successfully complete the Lab Exercises, Lab Review Questions, Lab Challenges, and Troubleshooting Labs in the Lab Manual will have a richer learning experience and deeper understanding of the concepts and methods covered in the course. They will be better able to answer and understand the test bank questions, especially the knowledge application and knowledge synthesis questions. They will also be much better prepared to pass the associated certification exams if they choose to take them. NOTATIONAL CONVENTIONS The following conventions are used throughout this textbook and the Lab Manual: ■ Characters or commands that you type appear in bold type. ■ Terms that appear in the glossary also appear in bold type. ■ Italic in syntax statements indicates placeholders for variable information. Italic is also used for book titles and terms defined in the text. ■ Names of files and folders appear in Title caps, except when you are to type them directly. Unless otherwise indicated, you can use all lowercase letters when you type a filename in a dialog box or at a command prompt. ■ Filename extensions appear in all lowercase. ■ Acronyms appear in all uppercase. ■ Monospace type represents code samples, examples of screen text, or entries that you might type at a command prompt or in initialization files. ■ Square brackets [ ] are used in syntax statements to enclose optional items. For example, [filename] in command syntax indicates that you can type a filename with the command. Type only the information within the brackets, not the brackets themselves. ■ Braces { } are used in syntax statements to enclose required items. Type only the information within the braces, not the braces themselves. xxi
  20. 20. xxii INSTALLING, CONFIGURING, AND ADMINISTERING MICROSOFT WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL KEYBOARD CONVENTIONS ■ A plus sign (+) between two key names means that you must press those keys at the same time. For example, “Press Alt+Tab” means that you hold down Alt while you press Tab. ■ A comma (,) between two or more key names means that you must press the keys consecutively, not at the same time. For example, “Press Alt, F, X” means that you press and release each key in sequence. “Press Alt+W, L” means that you first press Alt and W at the same time, and then you release them and press L. COVERAGE OF EXAM OBJECTIVES This book is intended to support a course that is structured around concepts and practical knowledge fundamental to this topic area, as well as the tasks that are covered in the objectives for the MCSE 70-270 exam. The following table correlates the exam objectives with the textbook chapters and Lab Manual lab exercises. You might also find this table useful if you decide to take the certification exam. The Microsoft Learning Web site describes the various MCP certification exams and their corresponding courses. It provides up-to-date certification information and explains the certification process and the course options. See http://www.microsoft.com/learning/ for up-to-date information about MCP exam credentials for other certification programs offered by Microsoft. NOTE Textbook and Lab Manual Coverage of Exam Objectives for MCSE Exam 70-270 Objective Installing Windows XP Professional Textbook Chapter Lab Manual Content Perform and troubleshoot an attended installation of Windows XP Professional. Perform and troubleshoot an unattended installation of Windows XP Professional. ■ Install Windows XP Professional by using Remote Installation Services (RIS). Chapter 2 Labs 1 and 2 Chapter 2 Lab 2 Chapter 2 Not covered ■ Install Windows XP Professional by using the System Preparation Tool. Chapter 2 Not Covered ■ Create unattended answer files by using Setup Manager to automate the installation of Windows XP Professional. Chapter 2 Lab 2
  21. 21. ABOUT THIS BOOK Textbook and Lab Manual Coverage of Exam Objectives for MCSE Exam 70-270 Objective Installing Windows XP Professional Textbook Chapter Lab Manual Content Upgrade from a previous version of Windows to Windows XP Professional. ■ Prepare a computer to meet upgrade requirements. Chapter 2 Labs 1 and 2 Chapter 2 Labs 1 and 2 ■ Chapter 2 Not Covered Chapter 2 Lab 2 Chapter 2 Lab 2 Monitor, manage, and troubleshoot access to files and folders. ■ Configure, manage, and troubleshoot file compression. Chapter 7 Lab 7 Chapter 3 Lab 7 ■ Control access to files and folders by using permissions. Chapter 7 Lab 7 Optimize access to files and folders. Manage and troubleshoot access to shared folders. ■ Create and remove shared folders. Chapter 7 Chapter 8 Lab 3 Lab 8 Chapter 8 Lab 8 ■ Chapter 8 Lab 8 Manage and troubleshoot Web server resources. Connect to local and network print devices. ■ Manage printers and print jobs. Chapter 8 Lab 8 Chapter 6 Lab 6 Chapter 6 Lab 6 ■ Control access to printers by using permissions. Chapter 6 Lab 6 ■ Connect to an Internet printer. Chapter 6 Lab 6 ■ Connect to a local print device. Configure and manage file systems. ■ Convert from one file system to another file system. Chapter 6 Chapter 3 Chapter 3 Lab 6 Lab 3 Lab 3 ■ Chapter 3 Lab 3 Chapter 8 Lab 8 Migrate existing user environments to a new installation. Perform post-installation updates and product activation. Troubleshoot failed installations. Implementing and Conducting Administration of Resources ■ Control access to shared folders by using permissions. ■ Configure NTFS, FAT32, or FAT file systems. Manage and troubleshoot access to and synchronization of offline files. xxiii
  22. 22. xxiv INSTALLING, CONFIGURING, AND ADMINISTERING MICROSOFT WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL Textbook and Lab Manual Coverage of Exam Objectives for MCSE Exam 70-270 Objective Textbook Chapter Lab Manual Content Implementing, Managing, Monitoring, and Troubleshooting Hardware Devices and Drivers Implement, manage, and troubleshoot disk devices. ■ Install, configure, and manage DVD and CD-ROM devices. Chapter 3 Lab 3 Chapter 3 Lab 4 ■ Monitor and configure disks. Chapter 3 Lab 3 ■ Monitor, configure, and troubleshoot volumes. Chapter 3 Lab 3 Monitor and configure removable media, such as tape devices. Implement, manage, and troubleshoot display devices. ■ Configure multiple-display support. Chapter 3 Not Covered Chapter 5 Lab 5 Chapter 5 Not Covered ■ Install, configure, and troubleshoot a video adapter. Configure Advanced Configuration Power Interface (ACPI). Implement, manage, and troubleshoot input and output (I/O) devices. ■ Monitor, configure, and troubleshoot I/O devices, such as printers, scanners, multimedia devices, mice, keyboards, and smart card readers. Chapter 5 Labs 4 and 5 Chapter 4 Not Covered Chapter 4 Lab 4 Chapter 4 Lab 4 ■ Monitor, configure, and troubleshoot multimedia hardware, such as cameras. Chapter 4 Lab 4 ■ Install, configure, and manage modems. Chapter 4 Lab 4 ■ Install, configure, and manage Infrared Data Association (IrDA) devices. Chapter 4 Not Covered ■ Install, configure, and manage wireless devices. Chapter 4 Not Covered ■ Install, configure, and manage USB devices. Chapter 4 Lab 4 ■ Install, configure, and manage handheld devices. Chapter 4 Not Covered ■ Install, configure, and manage network adapters. Chapters 4, 10, and 11 Labs 4, 10, and 11 ■
  23. 23. ABOUT THIS BOOK Textbook and Lab Manual Coverage of Exam Objectives for MCSE Exam 70-270 Objective Textbook Chapter Lab Manual Content Implementing, Managing, Monitoring, and Troubleshooting Hardware Devices and Drivers Manage and troubleshoot drivers and driver signing. Monitor and configure multiprocessor computers. Chapter 4 Lab 4 Chapter 4 Not Covered Monitoring and Optimizing System Performance and Reliability Monitor, optimize, and troubleshoot performance of the Windows XP Professional desktop. ■ Optimize and troubleshoot memory performance. Chapter 16 Lab 16 Chapter 16 Lab 16 ■ Optimize and troubleshoot processor utilization. Chapter 16 Lab 16 ■ Optimize and troubleshoot disk performance. Chapter 16 Lab 16 ■ Optimize and troubleshoot application performance. Chapter 16 Lab 16 Configure, manage, and troubleshoot scheduled tasks. Manage, monitor, and optimize system performance for mobile users. Restore and back up the operating system, System State data, and user data. ■ Recover System State data and user data by using Windows Backup. Chapter 16 Lab 15 Chapter 16 Lab 16 Chapter 15 Lab 15 Chapter 15 Lab 15 ■ Troubleshoot system restoration by starting in Safe Mode. Chapter 15 Lab 15 ■ Recover System State data and user data by using the Recovery Console. Chapter 15 Lab 15 Configure and manage user profiles and desktop settings. Configure support for multiple languages or multiple locations. ■ Enable multiple-language support. Chapters 5 and 13 Chapter 5 Labs 5 and 13 Lab 5 Chapter 5 Lab 5 ■ Configure multiple-language support for users. Chapter 5 Lab 5 ■ Configure local settings. Chapter 5 Lab 5 ■ Configure Windows XP Professional for multiple locations. Chapter 5 Lab 5 ■ Configuring and Troubleshooting the Desktop Environment xxv
  24. 24. xxvi INSTALLING, CONFIGURING, AND ADMINISTERING MICROSOFT WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL Textbook and Lab Manual Coverage of Exam Objectives for MCSE Exam 70-270 Objective Textbook Chapter Configuring and Troubleshooting the Desktop Environment Lab Manual Content Manage applications by using Windows Installer packages. Lab 9 Chapter 9 Implementing, Managing, and Troubleshooting Network Protocols and Services Configure and troubleshoot the TCP/IP protocol. Connect to computers by using dial-up networking. ■ Connect to computers by using a virtual private network (VPN) connection. Chapters 10 and 11 Chapter 10 Lab 10 Chapter 10 Lab 10 ■ Create a dial-up connection to connect to a remote access server. Chapter 10 Lab 10 ■ Connect to the Internet by using dial-up networking. Chapter 10 Lab 10 Chapter 10 Lab 10 Chapter 12 Lab 12 Chapter 12 Labs 6, 8, and 12 Chapter 10 Lab 10 Chapter 11 Lab 11 Chapter 3 Lab 3 Chapter 14 Lab 14 ■ Configure and troubleshoot Internet Connection Sharing (ICS). Connect to resources by using Internet Explorer. Configure, manage, and implement Internet Information Services (IIS). Configure, manage, and troubleshoot Remote Desktop and Remote Assistance. Configure, manage, and troubleshoot an Internet Connection Firewall (ICF). Labs 10 and 11 Configuring, Managing, and Troubleshooting Security Configure, manage, and troubleshoot the Encrypting File System (EFS). Configure, manage, and troubleshoot a security configuration and local security policy.
  25. 25. ABOUT THIS BOOK Textbook and Lab Manual Coverage of Exam Objectives for MCSE Exam 70-270 Objective Configuring, Managing, and Troubleshooting Security Textbook Chapter Lab Manual Content Configure, manage, and troubleshoot local user and group accounts. ■ Configure, manage, and troubleshoot auditing. Chapter 13 Lab 13 Chapter 13 Lab 13 ■ Configure, manage, and troubleshoot account settings. Chapter 13 Lab 13 ■ Configure, manage, and troubleshoot account policy. Chapter 13 Lab 13 ■ Configure, manage, and troubleshoot user and group rights. Chapter 13 Lab 13 Chapter 13 Chapter 12 Not Covered Lab 12 ■ Troubleshoot cached credentials. Configure, manage, and troubleshoot Internet Explorer security settings. THE MICROSOFT CERTIFIED PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM The MCP program is one way to prove your proficiency with current Microsoft products and technologies. These exams and corresponding certifications are developed to validate your mastery of critical competencies as you design and develop, or implement and support, solutions using Microsoft products and technologies. Computer professionals who become Microsoft certified are recognized as experts and are sought after industry-wide. Certification brings a variety of benefits to the individual and to employers and organizations. MORE INFO For a full list of MCP benefits, go to http:// www.microsoft.com/learning/itpro/default.asp. Certifications The MCP program offers multiple certifications, based on specific areas of technical expertise: ■ Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) In-depth knowledge of at least one Windows operating system or architecturally significant platform. An MCP is qualified to implement a Microsoft product or technology as part of a business solution for an organization. xxvii
  26. 26. xxviii INSTALLING, CONFIGURING, AND ADMINISTERING MICROSOFT WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL ■ Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE) Qualified to effectively analyze the business requirements for business solutions and design and implement the infrastructure based on the Windows and Windows Server 2003 operating systems. ■ Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA) Qualified to manage and troubleshoot existing network and system environments based on the Windows and Windows Server 2003 operating systems. ■ Microsoft Certified Database Administrator (MCDBA) Qualified to design, implement, and administer Microsoft SQL Server databases. ■ Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician (MCDST) Qualified to support end users and to troubleshoot desktop environments on the Microsoft Windows operating system. MCP Requirements Requirements differ for each certification and are specific to the products and job functions addressed by the certification. To become an MCP, you must pass rigorous certification exams that provide a valid and reliable measure of technical proficiency and expertise. These exams are designed to test your expertise and ability to perform a role or task with a product, and they are developed with the input of industry professionals. Exam questions reflect how Microsoft products are used in actual organizations, giving them real-world relevance. ■ Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) candidates are required to pass one current Microsoft certification exam. Candidates can pass additional Microsoft certification exams to validate their skills with other Microsoft products, development tools, or desktop applications. ■ Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE) candidates are required to pass five core exams and two elective exams. ■ Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA) candidates are required to pass three core exams and one elective exam. ■ Microsoft Certified Database Administrator (MCDBA) candidates are required to pass three core exams and one elective exam. ■ Microsoft Certified Desktop Support Technician (MCDST) candidates are required to pass two core exams.
  27. 27. ABOUT THIS BOOK ABOUT THE AUTHORS The textbook, Lab Manual, pretest, testbank, and PowerPoint slides were developed exclusively for an instructor-led classroom environment by two authors, Dave Field and Owen Fowler. Dave Field is an author, trainer, and presenter. An MCSE on Windows NT 4, Windows 2000, and Windows 2003, Dave is an expert on networking technologies and support desk topics. He has written consumer computer books such as How To Do Everything with Windows XP Home Networking (Osborne/McGraw-Hill) and has designed courses for Microsoft and Osborne/McGraw-Hill for the Microsoft MCSE, MCSA, and MCDST certifications. Dave is also the systems engineer at Camp Snoopy, a theme park in the Mall of America in Bloomington, Minnesota. In this role, he has directed the installation of entire network infrastructures using technologies such as Active Directory, Microsoft Exchange, and Microsoft SQL Server. He has been the principal architect of point-of-sale implementations, ERP rollouts, and e-commerce initiatives. Owen Fowler has worked as a Tier II Support Agent for one of the largest electronic tax filing centers in the United States. He has also run his own computer consulting business, covering networking and operating system issues, in Colorado and Washington. In 2003, he assisted Verizon Wireless in consolidating its nationwide network into a single domain. Owen has been an author, technical editor, and development editor on many titles for Microsoft Learning. FOR MICROSOFT OFFICIAL ACADEMIC COURSE SUPPORT Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the material in this book and the contents of the CD-ROM. Microsoft Learning provides corrections for books through the World Wide Web at the following address: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/support/ If you have comments, questions, or ideas regarding this book or the companion CD-ROM, please send them to Microsoft Learning using either of the following methods: xxix
  28. 28. xxx INSTALLING, CONFIGURING, AND ADMINISTERING MICROSOFT WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL Postal Mail: Microsoft Learning Attn: Installing, Configuring, and Administering Microsoft Windows XP Professional (70-270), Second Edition, Editor One Microsoft Way Redmond, WA 98052-6399 E-mail: moac@microsoft.com Please note that product support is not offered through the above addresses. EVALUATION EDITION SOFTWARE SUPPORT A 120-day software evaluation edition of Windows XP Professional with Service Pack 2 is provided with this textbook. This is not the full retail product and is provided only for training and evaluation purposes. Microsoft and Microsoft Technical Support do not support this evaluation edition. It differs from the retail version only in that Microsoft and Microsoft Technical Support do not support it, and it expires after 120 days. For information about issues relating to the use of evaluation editions, go to the Support section of the Microsoft Learning Web site (http://www.microsoft.com/learning/support/). For online support information relating to the full version of Windows XP Professional that might also apply to the evaluation edition, go to http://support.microsoft.com. For information about ordering the full version of any Microsoft software, call Microsoft Sales at (800) 426-9400 or visit http://www.microsoft.com.
  29. 29. CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCING WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL Upon completion of this chapter, you will be able to: ■ Describe the support features of Windows XP Professional ■ Identify security technologies in Windows XP Professional ■ Identify the role of Windows XP Professional in the enterprise ■ Log on to a Windows XP Professional computer In this course, we introduce you to the installation, configuration, and management of Windows XP Professional. Students in this course are expected to come from all backgrounds and have varying levels of experience with Windows XP Professional. That said, you will get the most from this course if you have a good understanding of the Windows graphical environment. Those who have completed “Supporting Users and Troubleshooting Microsoft Windows XP” (Microsoft Official Academic Curriculum Course 70-271) will have a firm basis for understanding this material. We have a lot of information to cover, but plenty of excellent resources are available to help you understand this technology. Many will be provided with this textbook, and many more are available from your instructor or at Microsoft’s Windows XP Web site at www.microsoft.com/windowsxp. 1
  30. 30. 2 INSTALLING, CONFIGURING, AND ADMINISTERING MICROSOFT WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL OVERVIEW OF WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL Windows XP Professional is the Microsoft business-class desktop operating system. It is intended for those who require high performance, security, and reliable computer resources. It differs from the consumer-level Windows XP Home Edition in its support for enterprise computing architectures, multiple processors, advanced security, and manageability. It is found in business, desktop publishing, banking and finance, and manufacturing environments, as well as other areas that require reliable and secure computer performance. In this section, we will examine the features of Windows XP Professional and describe many of the elements of this operating system. Windows XP Architecture The Windows XP line of operating systems is based on the Windows NT kernel architecture. This architecture was designed to allow the central processes—those processes requiring the most privilege—to operate in a privileged environment, often referred to as the kernel (shown in Figure 1-1). This environment is insulated from direct manipulation by users or hardware resources. The kernel is also separated from the actual system hardware by the hardware abstraction layer (HAL). The HAL is a layer of code designed to interface the specific hardware with the more generic operating system. At one time, HALs existed for PowerPC and DEC Alpha processors, but today HALs mainly exist to support differing power management versions or multiple processors. User-mode applications run with less privilege, protecting the kernel from instabilities caused by failing or faulty applications. This separation of the critical processes allows the operating system to continue operation even when applications or noncritical hardware devices fail. Critical devices—such as disk drives or motherboard components—can still bring a system down, but the system most likely will not fail (for example, if a USB peripheral device fails). In addition, each application can be run in a protected memory space. This prevents a failing application from affecting other applications and the operating system itself.
  31. 31. CHAPTER 1: 32-bit Application INTRODUCING WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL 16-bit Application 32-bit Application 16-bit Application NTVDM Logon Process Security Subsystem Win32 Subsystem User Mode Kernel Mode I/O Manager IPC Manager Memory Manager Process Manager Plug and Play File Systems Security Reference Monitor Windows Manager Power Manager Graphics Device Drivers Object Manager Executive Microkernel Device Drivers Hardware Abstraction Layer (HAL) Hardware Figure 1-1 The Windows XP architecture FT01HT01.TIF Intelligent User Interface Windows XP represents Microsoft’s most advanced user interface. Building on the desktop metaphor of earlier Windows operating systems, Windows XP brings together the latest research in intuitive user interface design with new, attractive visual styles. The Start menu The Windows XP Start button (first seen in Windows 95) has been linked to an all-new Start menu that displays a great variety of options within a single space (as shown in Figure 1-2). Users can access frequently used applications, recent documents, favorite applications, system settings, help, and much more within the same menu. 3
  32. 32. 4 INSTALLING, CONFIGURING, AND ADMINISTERING MICROSOFT WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL Figure 1-2 Windows XP Professional Start menu FT01HT02.bmp The left column in the figure is divided into the pinned items list above and the frequently used programs list below. Initially these lists have a few default programs listed, but as users work with the computer, the frequently used programs list begins to learn which programs are used most frequently and ranks them for quick access. Users also have the option of pinning any program or document to the pinned items list. The right column of the Start menu contains a list of special purpose folders, the Help and Support area, and configuration tools. This list can be customized to hide or expose folders such as My Documents, My Music, and My Recent Documents. The system configuration items can also be customized to show or hide configuration tools, depending on the role of the user who is logged on to the system. Designated administrators can configure and lock down all Start menu settings by using the Group Policy management tools built into Windows XP and Windows Server products. The taskbar The Windows XP taskbar has the ability to group similar applications to reduce clutter. You can then manage these groups together to maximize, minimize, or even close all applications in the group at once. Figure 1-3 shows a user closing a group of Microsoft Office Word 2003 documents.
  33. 33. CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCING WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL Figure 1-3 Closing a group of Microsoft Office Word 2003 documents FT01HT03.bmp The taskbar can also hold toolbars such as Quick Launch or Media Player to provide quick access to these useful tools. You can copy icons to the Quick Launch bar so you can quickly launch applications or documents without having to open the Start menu. The Media Player toolbar activates a small Media Player control panel when Windows Media Player is minimized. Figure 1-4 shows the Quick Launch toolbar and the Media Player toolbar in use. Quick Launch Toolbar Media Player Toolbar Figure 1-4 Quick Launch and Media Player toolbars FT01HT04.bmp The right side of the taskbar is known as the notification area. This area—called the system tray in earlier versions of Windows—contains icons that represent operating system alerts, applications, or services that are running in the background on the system. Examples of these include an alert when operating system updates are available from Microsoft or an icon that represents a running antivirus application. Figure 1-5 shows the notification area with several icons displayed. Figure 1-5 The notification area FT01HT05.bmp The desktop Many people who are familiar with the previous versions of Microsoft desktop operating systems have found the default Windows XP desktop (the area above the taskbar in Figure 1-6) surprisingly bare. 5
  34. 34. 6 INSTALLING, CONFIGURING, AND ADMINISTERING MICROSOFT WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL Figure 1-6 Windows XP “Bliss” desktop with a lone Recycle Bin icon FT01HT06.bmp Desktops in previous versions of Windows featured icons for My Computer, My Network Places, Internet Explorer, and other applications. Each application that users installed also offered to add its own icons to the desktop. The result was a desktop with dozens of icons. Windows XP, by default, does not place any icon other than the Recycle Bin on the desktop. You can put your icons back on the desktop by customizing the desktop settings. The Windows Classic desktop When Windows XP was first released, many users were uncomfortable with the new desktop technology (code-named Luna). To accommodate these users, Microsoft created a desktop theme that mimics many of the features of the earlier Windows interfaces. In this way, those who can’t get a handle on the new interface can actually reinstate the entire Windows Classic theme. You get an interface similar to that of Windows 2000 Professional with all the colors and controls familiar to users of the older operating system (Figure 1-7). We will discuss desktop themes and how to configure them in Chapter 5. NOTE
  35. 35. CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCING WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL Figure 1-7 Selecting the Windows Classic theme FT01HT07.bmp Hardware Support Windows XP has better hardware installation and configuration support than previous Windows versions. Microsoft has combined the scalability, reliability, and performance of the corporate family of operating systems with the ease of configuration for many tasks of the consumer family of operating systems and formed a comprehensive driver model with the best traits of each. Enhanced device driver support Windows XP fully implements Microsoft’s Plug and Play technology to allow simple configuration of supported hardware devices. Driver signing Windows XP can be configured to require device drivers for new hardware to contain a digital signature from Microsoft’s Windows Hardware Quality Laboratory (WHQL). This ensures that devices and their drivers are tested and approved by an authoritative third party (in this case, Microsoft) before use. Device driver rollback If a driver is installed that causes a problem with the operating system or other hardware, it can be rolled back, effectively uninstalling it and returning the previous driver. This speeds recovery from incorrect driver installation. CD and DVD recording Windows XP natively supports reading and writing to CD-R and CD-RW media. Files and video can be written directly to these media without any third-party burning tools. For example, users can select a folder of images from a digital camera, drag it to the icon representing their CD-R drive, and then create a CD. They can also transfer more and larger files to a single CD instead of copying them to several smaller-capacity floppy disks. 7
  36. 36. 8 INSTALLING, CONFIGURING, AND ADMINISTERING MICROSOFT WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL This feature also provides options for original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) and independent software vendors (ISVs). OEMs can create branded applications that generate emergency boot CDs instead of emergency boot floppy disks and, by using function calls to the CD-ROM-burning features of the operating system, software vendors can offer a “burn to CD” option on their Windows applications. This can be a great feature, for example, in a graphics program that writes many large files to disk. Auto-Configuration for Multiple Network Connectivity The Auto-Configuration for Multiple Network Connectivity feature provides easy access to network devices and the Internet. It also allows a mobile computer user to seamlessly operate both office and home networks without manually reconfiguring Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) settings. You can use this feature to specify an alternative configuration for TCP/IP if a Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) server is not found. The alternative configuration is useful when a computer is used on multiple networks, one of which does not have a DHCP server and does not use an automatic private Internet Protocol (IP) addressing configuration. COMPREHENSIVE HELP AND SUPPORT OPTIONS Windows XP has an extensive collection of user assistance features. Among these are a new Help and Support Center found on the Start menu, Remote Assistance, and support Troubleshooters. Figure 1-8 shows the user assistance items we will introduce next. Figure 1-8 Help and Support Center FT01HT08.bmp
  37. 37. CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCING WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL Microsoft also allows manufacturers of computer systems to create their own custom-branded versions of the Help and Support Center (Figure 1-9). This helps them to promote their brand identity while providing their customers with integrated support options. Figure 1-9 Custom-branded Help and Support FT01HT09.BMP Pick a Help Topic This area of Help and Support contains topical advice on system usage, configuration, and troubleshooting issues. Users are directed to information on system features, instructions on setting up system components, and wizards to guide more advanced processes. Ask for Assistance The Ask for Assistance feature allows users to ask another user for help via the Remote Assistance feature or to communicate directly with Microsoft Product Support Services to resolve an issue. Remote Assistance The Remote Assistance feature allows a helper to remotely view and control a computer for any support task. It also enables chat and file transfers. If a user has a computer problem, another person can be invited to help over the Internet. The remote assistant can accept the invitation, chat with the user about the problem, 9
  38. 38. 10 INSTALLING, CONFIGURING, AND ADMINISTERING MICROSOFT WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL and view the desktop. With permission, the remote assistant can also get full control of the computer to perform any complex steps needed to fix the problem. The remote assistant can also transfer any files required to fix the problem. Do not confuse Remote Assistance with Remote Desktop. Remote Desktop allows one to connect to, and control, a computer remotely. It does not allow the user at the computer being controlled to see what is happening on the screen. We will present more information on Remote Desktop in Chapter 10. IMPORTANT Microsoft Incident Submission and Management The Microsoft Incident Submission and Management feature allows a user to submit electronic support incidents to Microsoft, collaborate with support engineers, and manage submitted incidents. Pick a Task This area of Help and Support contains links to Windows Updates, links for locating compatible hardware and recovering from system problems with System Restore, and a menu of system support tools. Windows Update Microsoft maintains a collection of patches and updates for each recent Windows operating system on the Windows Update Web site. This option connects the user to this site to scan for available updates. Compatible Hardware and Software The Compatible Hardware and Software feature provides up-to-date, comprehensive, user-friendly hardware and software compatibility information to aid users in upgrading equipment, making purchasing decisions, and troubleshooting problems. For example, if you purchase an application that requires a 3-D accelerator card, you might not know which cards are compatible with your computer. You can use Help and Support to run a comprehensive query and find compatible 3-D accelerator cards. You can run queries based on manufacturer, product type, software, or hardware. The Microsoft compatibility teams use data from user interactions, independent hardware vendors (IHVs), and ISVs to improve their products.
  39. 39. CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCING WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL My Computer Information My Computer Information provides an easily understood, highly accessible view of personalized software and hardware information about your computer or another computer for which you have administrative permissions. You can view information in five categories, as described in the following sections. View General System Information About This Computer The My Computer Information – General category allows you to view information about your computer such as the computer manufacturer, model, basic input/output system (BIOS) version, processor version and speed, operating system, amount of memory, and amount of available disk space. View The Status Of My System Hardware And Software The My Computer Information – Status category allows you to examine diagnostic information about your computer, including the following: ■ Obsolete applications and device drivers ■ System software ■ Hardware: video card, network card, sound card, and universal serial bus (USB) controller ■ Hard disks ■ Random access memory (RAM) Find Information About The Hardware Installed On This Computer The Computer Information – Hardware category allows you to examine descriptive information about your computer’s hardware, including the local disk, display, video card, modem, sound card, USB controller, network cards, CD-ROM drives, floppy drives, memory, and printers. View A List Of Microsoft Software Installed On This Computer The Software category allows you to view a list of Microsoft products that are installed and registered by product identification (PID) number on your computer, including products that run automatically from Startup. It also shows you the Windows Dr. Watson Crash Information about any software that crashed while running on your computer. View Advanced System Information Advanced System Information allows you to choose from the following options: 11
  40. 40. 12 INSTALLING, CONFIGURING, AND ADMINISTERING MICROSOFT WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL ■ FT01HT10.bmp View Detailed System Information (MSINFO32.exe) This option allows you to view detailed information about hardware resources, components (multimedia, input, network, ports, and storage), software environment, and Internet settings, as shown in Figure 1-10. Figure 1-10 The System Information window ■ View Running Services This option lets you view the system service processes running on your computer. ■ View Group Policy Settings Applied This option lets you view which settings on your computer are the result of Group Policy control. ■ View The Error Log View errors and messages from the operating system, its services, and installed applications. ■ View Information For Another Computer If you have administrative permissions on a remote computer, you can view My Computer Information on that remote computer. If you click View Computer Information For Another Computer, the Web Page dialog box appears, prompting you to enter the name of the remote computer you want to view. Enter the remote computer name, and then click Open to view the remote computer information.
  41. 41. CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCING WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL Searching and Printing Options Help and Support also supports a full-text search function and gives users the ability to print applicable sections for offline reference. Full-Text Search The Windows Help system uses Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) to format and display information. If you have an Internet connection, you can search for every occurrence of a word or phrase across all Windows-compiled HTML Help files. Because the Windows Help System is also extensible, multiple search engines can plug into the Help and Support Center application using a set of standard interfaces. Users can search for content across multiple remote and online providers. For example, you can search for information resident on your computer or located remotely in the Microsoft Knowledge Base or in a participating OEM’s knowledge base. The Microsoft Knowledge Base is a comprehensive database containing detailed articles with technical information about Microsoft products, fix lists, documentation errors, and answers to commonly asked technical support questions. To access the Knowledge Base directly, instead of using the Help And Support application, go to http:// search.support.microsoft.com/kb/c.asp. NOTE Printing The Help and Support Center application allows you to print an entire chapter of Help content with one print command—that is, it can iteratively print all available topics in a specified node. If some topics are not available because of network connection problems, Windows XP Professional prints only the available content. After you have located the information you want to print, click Print. WINDOWS XP SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES Windows XP supports many technologies for securing communications and data. Among these are the Windows Firewall, Security Center, Attachment Manager, Encrypting File System, and policy-based security management. Windows Firewall Known prior to Windows XP Service Pack 2 (SP2) as the Internet Connection Firewall, Windows XP SP2 provides the improved Internet firewall known as the Windows Firewall. SP2 enables the Windows Firewall by default to protect 13
  42. 42. 14 INSTALLING, CONFIGURING, AND ADMINISTERING MICROSOFT WINDOWS XP PROFESSIONAL Internet-connected computers from malicious access from the Internet. The Windows XP Firewall blocks nearly all incoming TCP/IP traffic by default. It automatically responds to requests by Windows applications for Internet data by opening a port to allow return traffic only from the remote host. When the connection is dropped, the port is closed again to outside traffic. Unless a user chooses to configure service definitions, the Windows Firewall does not respond to any outside connection attempt. This prevents any access from an outside system that is not specifically invited, thus thwarting attempts to hack the system from the Internet. Security Center Released with SP2, the Security Center (Figure 1-11) is a centralized, Internet security monitoring center. It has links to maintenance and configuration activities for Internet Firewall, Virus Protection, and Automatic Updates. Figure 1-11 Windows XP Security Center FT01HT11.BMP NOTE The Security Center will be discussed in more depth in Chapter 14. Attachment Manager The Attachment Manager, also released in SP2, provides security by controlling which e-mail attachments can be opened from within installed e-mail clients.

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