[DOWNLOAD: mobileYouth Research Memo #3] Facebook, Google & Apple - The race to win …
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[mobileYouth Research Memo #3] Facebook, Google & Apple - The race to win young creators

[mobileYouth Research Memo #3] Facebook, Google & Apple - The race to win young creators

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    [DOWNLOAD: mobileYouth Research Memo #3] Facebook, Google & Apple - The race to win … [DOWNLOAD: mobileYouth Research Memo #3] Facebook, Google & Apple - The race to win … Document Transcript

    • ! mobileYouth Research Memo Facebook, Google & Apple: Race to win young creators Contact for research queries www.mobileyouth.org 1!
    • !IntroductionWe’re shifting from a consumer economy to a creator economy. Young coders outside ofcorporate tech jobs are the largest creator segment. Future innovation in Facebook, Googleand Apple depends on winning the young creators market.This week, Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey joined forces to support a newinitiative, Code.org, that encourages young people to code.In this document I outline how Facebook can tap youth driven innovationin the creator economy.Youth drive the new creator economyYouth are the most prolific creators online: 80% of youth aged 15-21 create original contentonline compared to only 34% of people aged 30 and above.Youth innovators, traditionally represented by college students, are getting younger eachyear. "We would get emails after the developer conference from students, 16, 15, 14 yearsold, saying I already have X number of apps in the app store. Im a developer. Can I takepart in this too?" said Apples marketing chief, Phil SchillerUnderstand why youth innovateInnovation happens in the homes, hangouts and hideouts (3H) of young people.SMS evolved within the youth market outside of telecoms industry initiatives. Where adultssaw only form factor limitations, youth saw a platform to communicate through a sharedlanguage (i.e. txtspk) that defined their peer group identity and tightened their tribe.It’s not just the hackers lauded by the press that tech companies need to focus on. In thenew creation economy, innovation is happening wherever youth get together to share theirproblems and collaborate to find solutions. There are a million mini-hackathons going onduring sleepovers, barbeques and sports practice.Apps and services created by youth won’t necessarily be the next big thing. Youth won’tcreate an out of box solution for the mass market. They will create small hacks that solvetheir personal problems. The culmination of small hacks from a community of innovatorswill result in a better experience for people everywhere.Research needs to step inside the young creator’s natural habitat not only to find out whatthey are creating but also to understand why they are creating. Answering the why questionwill identify these personal problems which in turn will help Facebook build solutions toeveryday pain points and need gaps. www.mobileyouth.org 2!