Privacy drives the next wave of Social Media Apps (Graham Brown mobileYouth) << DOWNLOAD PDF
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Privacy drives the next wave of Social Media Apps (Graham Brown mobileYouth) << DOWNLOAD PDF

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Not a day goes by when some app asks you to link your profile to Google Plus or upload or photo.

Back in the day, it was fun.

Now it’s becoming annoying.

Not only is it annoying, it’s scaring away the most valuable users.

Facebook and co are pushing towards increasing transparency and auditability. Not of their processes but of your profile. Facebook implemented technology that prevented users uploading phoney pictures for their profiles in 2013. Similarly, every time you use Youtube now, Google coerces you into providing your real name.

Their goal is to link your profiles across multiple services to build a picture of your behavior, interests and emotions which they can then sell to advertisers – so called HIGH PROFILE APPS

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Privacy drives the next wave of Social Media Apps (Graham Brown mobileYouth) << DOWNLOAD PDF Privacy drives the next wave of Social Media Apps (Graham Brown mobileYouth) << DOWNLOAD PDF Document Transcript

  • mobileYouth® - youth marketing and mobile culture analysis of the latest research, insights and trends by Graham D Brown http://www.mobileyouth.org Privacy drives the next wave of Social Media Apps THE RISE AND FALL OF HIGH PROFILE APPS 1 / 8
  • mobileYouth® - youth marketing and mobile culture analysis of the latest research, insights and trends by Graham D Brown http://www.mobileyouth.org Not a day goes by when some app asks you to link your profile to Google Plus or upload or photo. Back in the day, it was fun. Now it’s becoming annoying. Not only is it annoying, it’s scaring away the most valuable users. WHEN DEVELOPERS CREATE APPS Let’s create an app. Let’s get users to fill in their bio, upload a picture. Let’s get users to share their profile. No, wait a minute. People already have enough profiles. And people are learning that profiles can work against them. In particular young people. YOUTH FLIGHT FROM HIGH PROFILE APPS 2 / 8
  • mobileYouth® - youth marketing and mobile culture analysis of the latest research, insights and trends by Graham D Brown http://www.mobileyouth.org 72% of 18-24 year olds want the option to use nicknames given by friends instead of their real names. Young people want to use nicknames but the media doesn’t. Young people today see profiles increasingly as a cost in their interaction but the media sees it as another way of “engaging” customers. More From Graham Brown's Series on How to Sell Technology Privacy drives the next wave of Social Media Apps The 90-10 Rule: Focus on the 10% that influences the 90% The Paradox of Quality: Why Better Technology Fails Change Your Metaphors: How great leaders sell technology These 2 Social Experiments Show How Stories Sell Technology Facebook and co are pushing towards increasing transparency and auditability. Not of their processes but of your profile. Facebook implemented technology that prevented users uploading phoney pictures for their profiles in 2013. Similarly, every time you use Youtube now, Google coerces you into providing your real name. Their goal is to link your profiles across multiple services to build a picture of your behavior, interests and emotions which they can then sell to advertisers - so called HIGH PROFILE APPS 3 / 8
  • mobileYouth® - youth marketing and mobile culture analysis of the latest research, insights and trends by Graham D Brown http://www.mobileyouth.org facebook (Photo credit: Sean MacEntee) For youth, there are few benefits in high profile apps. The cost far outweighs the novelty factor. Whereas adults have less social mobility and are supposedly more experienced, young people are still out there exploring their worlds and making mistakes. The difference with this generation and those that came before them, is that drunken pictures at keg parties or smoking dope in the park will no longer be lost to history. HIGH vs LOW PROFILE APPS Higher Profile Low Profile Examples Facebook, Linkedin, Google Plus Whatsapp, Instagram, Kik, Viber, Snapchat, Whisper Attributes Encourages users to create extensive public profiles. Links profiles across related apps. Profile attempts to reflect real world, real name etc. Can be used with limited (or no) profile. Profile can be avatar, representative or nickname. 4 / 8
  • mobileYouth® - youth marketing and mobile culture analysis of the latest research, insights and trends by Graham D Brown http://www.mobileyouth.org Driver Advertising. Tracking & Auditing of user behavior. Building comprehensive demographic and behvioral profiles to sell to potential advertising Privacy. Users want Social Space where they can interact freely and express themselves without fear of public excoriation or reprisal Outlook HPAs will suffer gradual erosion of customer base, particularly in the sensitive youth market. Effect will eventually feed-through until apps become old or irrelevant. LPAs will rise to prominence and eventually be acquired by larger players. Their continued significance will rest on the acquirer's capacity to allow the app to stay largely unconnected to the HPA. WHAT YOUTH DO WITH HIGH PROFILE APPS If we promote a transparent world that demands customer data, we’ll also promote a world where youth take their meaningful interactions elsewhere. We'll end up with a world sterilized to suit our corporate needs. Sure, youth will keep using their Facebook accounts but they will whitewall them, offering only a blank sanitized version of their life that means nothing and offends no-one. By contrast, the privacy of these low profile apps allows them to explore their lives and do what teens do naturally in the process of learning i.e make mistakes. If we pursue an open auditable social landscape where privacy is non-existent, marketers will reduce engagement: * Users will whitewall their accounts * Users will feel less loyal to the brand, treating the relationships as a game which they need to cheat in order to get what they want * Information will become less meaningful, creating false-positive echo chambers Rather than complain about loss of privacy, people simply leave and the challenge for brands is that this exodus is often invisible. The loss is not marked by quantity 5 / 8
  • mobileYouth® - youth marketing and mobile culture analysis of the latest research, insights and trends by Graham D Brown http://www.mobileyouth.org but quality: the subscriber numbers remain the same but engagement falls. The danger in the big data - transparency - advertising cycle is the false positive of an increased volume of metrics compounded by a decreased accuracy in the data. This cycle leads to irrelevance - the opposite of engagement. ADVERTISING IS AT ODDS WITH THE NEED FOR LOW PROFILE APPS Advertising drives the supply of High Profile Apps. Advertisers don’t like nicknames. Advertisers can’t trace nicknames back to users. They have to know everything about you. Advertisers don’t like privacy. But privacy is a means not an end. The end is the relationship that privacy allows to grow. Relationships require vulnerability and vulnerability needs privacy. Privacy gives youth space to experiment, take risks and make mistakes - all key elements of the development process. Social Space needs privacy to grow. But privacy isn’t all about surrendering the 6 / 8
  • mobileYouth® - youth marketing and mobile culture analysis of the latest research, insights and trends by Graham D Brown http://www.mobileyouth.org marketing effort to the selfish needs of customers. FACEBOOK’S DECLINE As was Facebook in the days before advertising but advertising in its current model cannot exist with privacy. We need to know the customer, know all their behavior, their likes and interactions. The technologist’s dream of a single, converged platform for all social activity will never happen. Facebook and co will lose out to a gradual creep towards Low Profile Apps - apps that require only the minimum of profile information, don’t link accounts or don’t have profiles at all (apps like Whatsapp, Viber, Kik, Instagram, Snapchat, Whisper 7 / 8
  • mobileYouth® - youth marketing and mobile culture analysis of the latest research, insights and trends by Graham D Brown http://www.mobileyouth.org etc). Either Facebook will buy out these competitors or lose its customer base one teenager at a time. LOW PROFILE APPS CAN PROVIDE THE DEEPEST INSIGHT The information brands really need to build a relationship - insight into the hopes, passions and fears of their customers - can only be found where there is privacy. The world of transparency will result in a big loss for brands as they will lose their only contact with what matters i.e. The Interest Economy. If we give young people privacy, they’ll return honesty. Privacy drives trust and trust impacts the bottom line: * Increased word of mouth recommendation, decreased customer acquisition costs * Increased loyalty * Increased likelihood of response to marketing call to action We need to focus on solutions that give customers the space to do what they do naturally and leverage that interaction without segmenting and interrupting it with advertising. That means creating an event, community or cause (a Permission Asset) for your customers to connect with each other without fear of being tracked or audited by the master brand. Powered by TCPDF (www.tcpdf.org) 8 / 8