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[mobileYouth] The top 3 reasons why youth buy Samsung (and why these are not enough to beat Apple)
[mobileYouth] The top 3 reasons why youth buy Samsung (and why these are not enough to beat Apple)
[mobileYouth] The top 3 reasons why youth buy Samsung (and why these are not enough to beat Apple)
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[mobileYouth] The top 3 reasons why youth buy Samsung (and why these are not enough to beat Apple)

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Find articles like the one above by signing up to the newsletter on http://www.mobileyouth.org

Find articles like the one above by signing up to the newsletter on http://www.mobileyouth.org

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  • 1. The Top 3 Reasons Why Youth Buy Samsung(and why these are not enough to beat Apple)It’s a question I think about a lot because handset brands keep asking me.My answer to Samsung lies in measuring the emotional attachment betweenyouth and the Samsung brand. Do youth like or love Samsung? (answer inMobile Youth Report). Take a look at these insights from young people talkingabout Samsung and Apple:“Why did you buy Samsung not Apple?”“It’s lighter, slimmer and has a better camera”“Why did you buy Apple not Samsung?”“I don’t know, I just like it”If it was traditional focus group or survey research the last answer would bedismissed but my experience tells me it is the most revealing. That’s why inmy newsletter and report, I focus on brand reality as told by the youth market,not brand makeovers pushed by creative agencies. Find the most relevant insights on youth mobile marketing: http://www.mobileYouth.org
  • 2. What do youth think of Samsung?I’m presenting at Samsung in Europe this week and one of the questionsposed by the research team beforehand was “what do youth think ofSamsung?”To answer this, we need to understand difference between emotion and logicin smartphone sales. You see, youth don’t buy Samsung because they thinkit’s the better phone, they buy Samsung if they feel it’s the better phone. Notethe difference. What youth think and what youth feel about Samsung could be2 very different questions.Research from the Mobile Youth Report highlights 3 characteristics of howthe Samsung brand is perceived by youth:1) Youth say Samsung is reliable and affordable2) Youth say Samsung has better features than other brands3) Youth would buy Samsung for themselves but not recommend the brand tofriends(source: Youth and Handset Brands Report)Brand perceptions: logic vs emotionOur data highlights an interesting divergence in youth brand perception thatmost traditional brand research or ad agencies fail to pinpoint: the logical andemotional appeal of Samsung are very different. The 3 reasons why youthbuy Samsung are not enough to sustain long term engagement.Brand dissonance is easy to hide. Nokia was once here. Here was a brandviewed as reliable and affordable, it was the mass market brand liked bymany but loved by few. We even found examples of grandmothers buyingNokia handsets for their grandchildren (because it was seen as “safe” and Find the most relevant insights on youth mobile marketing: http://www.mobileYouth.org
  • 3. “reliable”) but the kids taking out the SIM cards to use in other brand phones.The rest, as they say, is history.Samsung’s strength in market share and brand visibility can also be itsbiggest weakness. Market share does not translate to profitability long term(62% of the market produces less than 7% of its profit). By comparison,Apple’s iPhone has less than 20% of the market share but produces 70% ofindustry profits (source: How can mobile handset brands win hearts andminds of customers?).What matters is connecting at the emotional level. Campaigns may createinterest but youth market attention isn’t sustainable long term. Samsunggenerated less consumer buzz compared to Apple during its Next Big ThingCampaign despite several ad campaigns including a Super Bowl Ad (source:How can Samsung beat Apple?). If Samsung aspires to be the “LifeCompanion” touted by the CEO, it needs to look at the social context ofsmartphone usage (a subject we’ve studied in depth) and identify the socialbenefits not features of appeal.If Samsung is to compete with Apple at the level of emotion and wean itself ofits resource hungry high visibility marketing, it needs to connect at theemotional level of appeal. Competing with Apple doesn’t mean “slimmer”,“more affordable” or “better camera” but those less measurable answers like“I just liked it.” When we start to see these results come up in our research,we know that Samsung has arrived. Find articles like this by signing up to our newsletter on http://www.mobileYouth.org Find the most relevant insights on youth mobile marketing: http://www.mobileYouth.org

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