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(mobileYouth) Mobile Messaging Trends Research for Operators
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(mobileYouth) Mobile Messaging Trends Research for Operators

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The future of mobile will be determined by who wins the mobile messaging market today and that battle will play out in the youth market. ...

The future of mobile will be determined by who wins the mobile messaging market today and that battle will play out in the youth market.

1) It’s all about messaging, everything else is a sideshow

2) Move from being a creator to curator: the messaging landscape has shifted

3) Driving the upsell: The landgrab for free customer touchpoints

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(mobileYouth) Mobile Messaging Trends Research for Operators (mobileYouth) Mobile Messaging Trends Research for Operators Document Transcript

  • Mobile Messaging Trends Research forOperatorsThe future of mobile will be determined by who wins the mobile messagingmarket today and that battle will play out in the youth market.We previously analyzed the 15 brands that will define the mobile market in2013. Now, we’ll look at how some of those key players will shape mobilethrough their messaging agendas.1) It’s all about messaging,everything else is a sideshowAfter messaging everything else is a sideshow.Facebook has bet its turnaround on the strength of its Home messagingplatform for android. Google is in rumored talks to acquire popular messagingservice WhatsApp for $1bn. The high prices paid today for messaging mayappear excessive but this isn’t just about another technology, this is aboutcontrol. Securing messaging tomorrow guarantees the mobile marketFind more insights on youth, messaging and the mobile industry:http://www.mobileyouth.org
  • tomorrow. Facebook, Google and Apple are all actively developing their ownmessaging solutions to enable a place at the top table of the mobile industry.A brief overview of messaging:* The most popular mobile app* The default mobile interaction* The universal common denominator in mobile* The preferred mode of communication for young people* Revenues driven by teen mobile owners(source Youth and Mobile Messaging Report)2) Move from being a creator to curator: the messaging landscape has shiftedThe messaging landscape is fragmented. No longer is SMS the onlymessaging app. From 2011 to 2016, SMS is predicted to grow by 37%, whileIP-based messaging will grow 686% (source Smith’s Points Analytics).Growth comes from multiple non-SMS apps with negligible startup costs forthe user. Rather than operate a single messaging app, users are apt todownload and try multiple apps.The move by mobile operators to produce their own solutions may provefatal. Not only are they competing with well financed entrants like Google,Apple and Facebook, they are also competing with the complete cognitivesurplus of the world’s creativity. Any teenager in his background can producea messaging app and there are as many potential producers as there areusers.The competitive landscape of mobile value added services has shifted. Nowthe focus needs to be on curation rather than creation. If providers can’tcompete with the resources of Google and Facebook they need to becurating what’s available by providing a better platform or data tariff to enablethese messaging apps to grow.3) Driving the upsell: The landgrab for free customer touchpointsFind more insights on youth, messaging and the mobile industry:http://www.mobileyouth.org
  • The revenue streams of the old business model have become commodities(i.e. voice & data) sold in bundles, at flat rates or near zero pricing. Newmarket entrants bring new models and new growth in the form of the serviceupsell. By providing the key services free (i.e. messaging), new entrantscreate a touchpoint to upsell new products (e.g. established services likeadvertising, apps and payments or the ‘long tail’ of mobile apps popular withyouth) while at the same time undercutting incumbents.New entrants like Facebook and Google have a history of monetizing free -e.g. social media and mail, so represent the biggest possible disruption to theexisting mobile landscape.Facebook and Google’s strength lies in the quality and quantity of theirrelationships with the youth market. The key relationship has moved frombilling to touchpoint. The company that owns the mobile phone screen is theone that has the invitation to upsell. Google has focused on building itspresence in the youth market through education and co-creation. Facebookhas built on the successes of acquisitions like Instagram (see Teens:Instagram’s growing vocal minority).Not only do youth drive adoption of new technologies and smartphones (seethe Role of Smartphones in the Lives of Teenagers) but they are also themost open to the upsell (e.g. mobile advertising etc). Facebook or Google arethe default for this generation, ingrained in the social constant andrepresenting verbs in their daily vernacular.Messaging in 2015 will be a fragmented landscape controlled by a fewdominant players who have a history of strength in the youth market,monetization of free and the economies of both scale and scope to makethings happen. Operators need to evolve from being competitive creators tosupportive curators who can facilitate these new entrants on a b2b basis.Find articles like this by signing up to our newsletter onhttp://www.mobileYouth.orgFind more insights on youth, messaging and the mobile industry:http://www.mobileyouth.org