(Graham Brown mobileYouth) American Youth Mobile Culture: 5 Key Drivers for 2011
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(Graham Brown mobileYouth) American Youth Mobile Culture: 5 Key Drivers for 2011

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The American Marketing Association asked us to share our latest findings with its members. We identified 5 key trends relevant to North American Youth Mobile Culture and share those with you here today. We’ve put together some great research from our two US partners and we’d like to share with you five key findings on youth mobile culture in America. We hope this will help to frame the discussion on how brands can engage the American youth.

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(Graham Brown mobileYouth) American Youth Mobile Culture: 5 Key Drivers for 2011 (Graham Brown mobileYouth) American Youth Mobile Culture: 5 Key Drivers for 2011 Document Transcript

  • American Youth Mobile Culture: 5 Key Drivers for 2011 - 03-02-2011by andrewladan - mobileYouth® - http://www.mobileyouth.orgAmerican Youth Mobile Culture: 5 Key Drivers for 2011by andrewladan - Wednesday, March 02, 2011http://www.mobileyouth.org/post/american-youth-mobile-culture-5-key-drivers-for-2011/by mobileYouth®The American Marketing Association asked us to share our latest findings with its members. We identified 5 keytrends relevant to North American Youth Mobile Culture and share those with you here today. Click for moreinformation on mobileYouth in North AmericaWe’ve put together some great research from our two US partners and we’d like to share with you five keyfindings on youth mobile culture in America. We hope this will help to frame the discussion on how brands canengage the American youth.Positive Deviance - the key to youth mobile behaviorBefore that, we’d like to introduce the concept of positive deviance. This has something to do with how a youngperson relates to technology. Specifically, the emotional relationship a young person can have with their mobilephone. Give an adult a phone and tell her to make calls with it. She’ll make the call. Now give a young person aphone and tell her this is for making calls. She’ll find a way to make it work better, cheaper, and in a way that givesher control of the medium. Looking deeper into this phenomenon, we see that young people derive social currencyfrom their mobile phone, and this will have implications for how brands can actually work with the youth.1. All Youth Are Not The SameBasically, we can split the market into the 10-19 category and the 20-29 category. You will find that different agebrackets have different emotional attachments. We went out and asked teenagers what they thought about keybrands. Travis, 15, thinks “Nokia = meh.” On the other hand, Jennifer, 25, says “My first cell phone was a Nokia -so I’m a little fond of them.” Customers in Jennifer’s age group remember early Nokia phones, they rememberSnake, and they have a nostalgia, an emotional attachment to the brand that younger generations do not share.Link: More data on the North American youth mobile market2. Growth Lies In Less Wasteful MarketingRevenues from American youth have reached their natural ceiling. We forecast spending to plateau in 2011 at$70bn a year. The growth story then, doesn’t lie in broadening the already-saturated base, but in deepening it.Brands should begin looking at new business models to increase the Average Revenue Per User (ARPU) says aWireless Federation report.3. Earned Media Reaches Tipping PointFor the last decade the tried and tested formula of celebrity endorsement has been reliable. However, according todata from McKinsey, more recently new product sales are driven almost equally by recommendation andadvertising. By next year, influence will come mostly from earned media, or word of mouth, rather than paid media.What the youth are saying is far more important than what marketers are saying. The opportunity, and thechallenge, lies in finding ways to become involved in their conversations.4. We Have The TechnologyFortunately, we now have the technology to track earned media. The Online Promoter Score is one such EarnedMedia Index. We ask youth on the Internet, would you recommend this product? The numbers show that actual page 1 / 2
  • American Youth Mobile Culture: 5 Key Drivers for 2011 - 03-02-2011by andrewladan - mobileYouth® - http://www.mobileyouth.orgmarket share closely tracks online promoter score. A 2008 AdAge report talks about how OPS has helped brandsdiscover the connection between online buzz and sales.5. Liked Vs LovedIf your young customers like you, be afraid - be very afraid. Young customers talk about brands that they love, notabout brands they like. Being liked today is as good as being invisible. Just because they “Like” your brand onFacebook doesn’t mean that they love it, or that they’ll talk to their friends about it.Considering these trends and the need for continued growth, how do brands get from just liked to loved? This iswhere we go back to positive deviance, cultural hacks, and social capital. The insight is that young people need thebrand as much as you need them. Brands need to start dialogues that can facilitate the next youth discovery. Thequestion is no longer, how do we engage young people? The question is, how do we make it easier for the toengage with us?* Well share regular trends and case study updates over at our new mobileYouth America website* For a complete look at all the 50 trends covered in this study, download the 5 part series: The Youth Mobile Age.View the original presentation:Click here to listen to the original webcast with audio page 2 / 2