• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Future Architecture, Technology and Application Enablers Roadmap- 02
 

Future Architecture, Technology and Application Enablers Roadmap- 02

on

  • 715 views

Future Architecture, Technology and Application Enablers Roadmap- 02 vijay perumbeti

Future Architecture, Technology and Application Enablers Roadmap- 02 vijay perumbeti

Statistics

Views

Total Views
715
Views on SlideShare
714
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://www.slashdocs.com 1

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Future Architecture, Technology and Application Enablers Roadmap- 02 Future Architecture, Technology and Application Enablers Roadmap- 02 Presentation Transcript

    • © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein aretrademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of theirowners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.
    • Embracing IPv6This presentation is part of the Joint GSMA/NGMN Conference Stream“Technology Evolution”Mobile World Congress 2011, BarcelonaHall 5, Auditorium 2Thursday, 17 February, 2011Vijay PerumbetiExecutive Director, Strategic StandardsAT&T © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of their owners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.
    • Outline 1. IP Address demand 2. IPv6 Drivers, Scope, and Readiness 3. Transition and Co-existence considerations and mechanisms h i 4. Roaming and Interoperability Aspects – GSMA Activity 5. The Mi Th Migration P ti Process 6. Key Takeaways IANA ran out of IPv4 Addresses: February 2011 February, © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of their3 owners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.
    • IP Address Demand © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of their4 owners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.
    • Drivers for migrating to IPv6 • Primary Driver: The Internet is running out of IPv4 addresses – Need to ensure business continuity and growth • Derived Drivers – National/Governmental Strategies, Mandates • EU, US DoD, China NGI – Demand from new and evolving infrastructures • Machine to machine, Smart Grid, LTE, “Internet of Things” – Take advantage of new IPv6 Content Applications Content, • IPv6 has functional improvements: Streamlined header format, native mobile IP support, native IPSEC support, Auto configuration, etc. – But these are not driving the migration to IPv6 – These functional improvements will be harnessed in due course IPv6 migration affects …. Every E part of the network and IT infrastructure t f th t k d i f t t Every customer-facing application and device Every application the company uses internally Every business function © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of their5 owners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.
    • IPv6 Migration Scope What does IPv6 Touch? VoIP Data D t Center IPTV Security ..... Messaging M i Network Servic (DNS, DHC AAA, NTP, etc.) IT In nfrastructure (BSS, OSS, M Secur IP Network CP, ngIP Addressin rity Infrastruct IP Network ces Access/Aggregation Mgmt Tools, et ture Infrastructure Remote Access DSL Ethernet ... WiFi Cellular Network tc) Devices Residential Business Mobility Customer Customer Devices Devices Devices © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are Page 6 trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of their6 owners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.
    • IPv6 Readiness • What is IPv6 Readiness? – Have the ability to sell, provision, install and maintain new services with IPv6 – Handle current and forecasted volumes – Provide interoperability between IPv4 and IPv6 sites, content and networks – Provide a seamless transition for customers, network and operations • AT&T has an active program to be “IPv6 ready” IPv6 ready – Multi-year program in place – Over a 100 funded projects – Recent milestones include IPv6 support for AT&T’s services to enterprise customers -- Internet Access, VPN and Peering services © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of their7 owners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.
    • IPv6-IPv4 Co-existence v4 dominant v4 address exhaustion V6 dominant (Current) (~2011/2012) (TBD) IPV4-only IPV4/IPv6 dual stack IPv6-only IPv4 and IPv6 will co-exist for a long time. We need to address how different types of nodes (v4-only, v6-only, v4/v6 d l stack) will ( 4 l 6 l 4/ 6 dual t k) ill communicate with one another © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of their8 owners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.
    • IPv6-IPv4 Co-existence A Mobility perspective v4 NAT/Proxy IPv4 Internet v4/v6 Dual Stack IP network NAT64 IPv6 Internet v6 NAT Network Address Translator IPv4 <-> IPv4 traffic IPv6 < > IPv6 traffic <-> © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of their9 owners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.
    • IPv6-IPv4 Co-existence A Wireline perspective p p Public v4 addr v4 LAN CPE v6 over v4 NAT/Proxy IPv4 Internet TS Public 4 P bli v4 & v6 addr 6 dd v4/v6 Dual Stack LAN CPE IP network Public v6 addr NAT64 IPv6 Internet LAN CPE v6 v4 over v6 TS NAT Network Address Translator TS Tunnel Server IPv4 <-> IPv4 traffic IPv6 < > IPv6 traffic <-> Tunnel Traffic © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of their10 owners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.
    • IPv4-to-IPv6 Transition Mechanisms and Co-existence Proposals • IETF has defined mechanisms for transitions and co-existence: – Dual-stack ll D l t k allows IP 4 and IPv6 to co-exist in th same devices and networks IPv4 d IP 6 t i t i the d i d t k – Tunneling allows IPv6 packets to be transmitted over an IPv4 infrastructure or vice versa -- when IPv6 becomes the more prevalent network – Translation allows IPv6-only devices to communicate with IPv4-only devices (work y y ( in progress) • IPv6/IPv4 Co-existence Proposals – NAT 444 (draft-shirasaki-nat444) • Extends life of IPv4 addresses • Translates private v4’ to private v4 and then to public v4 – 6rd (RFC 5969) • Supports IPv6 Transition • IPv6 over IPv4 tunneling – Dual Stack Lite (draft-ietf-softwire-dual-stack-lite) • Supports IPv6 Transition • Allows IPv6 network to continue access IPv4 resources via NAT44 and Tunneling – IPv6-IPv4 Translation (draft-ietf-behave-v6v4-framework) • Supports IPv6 Transition • Provides IPv6-only client with IPv4 access – Gateway Initiated Dual Stack Lite (draft-ietf-softwire-gateway-init-ds-lite) • Extends life of IPv4 addresses © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of their11 owners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.
    • Roaming and Interoperability GSMA Activity to Facilitate MNO Migration to IPv6 • Task force launched in 3Q2010 to address: – “Roaming and Interoperability Impacts of IPv6 Transition” – Task force had active contributions from IPv6 experts from 18 MNOs • Release 1 of white paper just completed: – Focus on the user plane and HPLMN services, where the IPv4 address and/or the IPv6 prefix is assigned by Home PLMN – Describes 27 use cases for inter-operability and roaming – Describes high level guidelines to facilitate uninterrupted roaming across PLMNs for IMS and non-IMS services – Identify minimum requirements to ensure inter-operability and roaming in a mixed environment • Release 2 will address Local Breakout scenarios and transport plane issues as they relate to local breakout • The white paper provides guidance to GSMA Work Groups to update or create new PRDs • For further information contact: Jose Aranda, Project Manager – Jaranda@gsm.org Jaranda@gsm org © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of their12 owners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.
    • Roaming and Interoperability Variables affecting roaming and interoperability • PLMN user level can be IPv4, IPv6 or Dual stack IPv4&6 • Different components of a PLMN may evolve at different time frames (e.g. Packet Core, Applications, IMS Core, etc.) • Three RAN/CORE environments: – EPS Release 8.0 and beyond – UMTS/GSM Release 9.0 (A Bearer can carry both IPv4 and IPv6 packets) – UMTS/GSM Release 8.0 and before (There are two Bearers: one for IPv4 and another for IPv6) • Interfaces for data roaming – Roaming using Gp interface – Roaming using S8 interface via EPC • Private IPv4 or Public IPv4 addresses will be assigned • Terminal to network and terminal to terminal based services • Roaming with or with out local breakout • User Equipment with IPv4, IPv6 and Dual Stack IPv4v6 capabilities • Internet websites and applications can be IPv4, IPv6 or Dual Stack IPv4v6 • Networks might control whether inbound unsolicited packets are permitted to reach a particular IPv6 address or addresses • Supported IP version(s) of the GRX and IPX user plane for IMS interworking © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of their13 owners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.
    • The Migration Process The 4 Pillars of IPv6 Migration • Program Management – Execute on an end to end integrated work plan • Financial Management g – Vigilant capital tracking; Ensure investments are properly timed with requirements and ROIC criteria met • Risk Management Ri k M t – Have a detailed association of revenue and infrastructure elements to cross check that planned projects account for all elements of v6 readiness • Communication – Employees, Customers, Suppliers, Employees Customers Suppliers industry participants – Awareness, training, progress © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of their14 owners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.
    • The Migration Process The Planning Process for IPv6 Migration Program Governance Infrastructure Readiness Strategy and Architecture and Communication • Quantify infrastructure readiness • Research IPv6 technologies •C Create IP 6 transition IPv6 ii and understand transition utilized for transition (tunnels, timelines, sequencing and impacts translation mechanisms) interdependencies • Categorize Components for • Develop IP Addressing Plan • Identify governance team Readiness • Develop a thorough transition to oversee plan strategy • Develop review and program Design and Engineering Testing and Piloting management aspects of overall plan, timelines and • Develop detailed design and • Create IPv6 test labs assigned transition teams equipment configurations configurations, • Develop test plans and • Execute plan including: production piloting – IP addressing • Conduct dual stack testing – DNS • Tunneling • Identify and assign transition sequencing and engineering tasks © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of their15 owners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.
    • Key Takeaways • Must operate on the premise that IPv4 exhaust is imminent and IPv6 is inevitable – IPv4 exhaust is no longer a distant problem • There are architecture and design choices to made; • Some affect only operators’ own networks operators • Others affect interworking and roaming • In order to be IPv6 ready, we not only need to implement IPv6 but also consider how IPv6 will co-exist with IPv4 • IPv6 Migration is complex, requires careful planning, and needs considerable resources – Introduction and migration of IPv6 can start now and can be incremental – Complete IPv6 migration will be a multi-year program – New services should be targeted to support IPv6 from Day 1 to avoid transition costs later In an interconnected world, IPv6 migration planning has to be a collaborative industry effort Embrace it! © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of their16 owners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.
    • Thank you vijay.perumbeti@att.com © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of their17 owners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.
    • © 2011 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, AT&T logo and all other AT&T marks contained herein aretrademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other trademarks are the property of theirowners. This document is not an offer, commitment, representation or warranty by AT&T and is subject to change.